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Environmental and Geological Sciences Specialization
Geography Specialization

 

 
 

Courses

EES students are always allowed to register for any EES course, provided they meet the course prerequisites. However, faculty and students have selected which courses are most relevant to students in each program track. These lists will typically be created at the beginning of registration based on the schedule for the following semester, but may not be current if there have been late changes. If there is any question as to whether and when a course is being offered, please consult Banner.
 



SPRING 2020 Courses

Ph.D Program in Earth and Environmental Sciences Spring 2020 Course Schedule

EES 71700 – Earth Systems II [62164]
GC:         W, 2:00-5:00 p.m., Rm., TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Booth and Longpre, Course open to EES Students only
Course Description and Objectives:
This seminar-style course is divided into two parts: (1) Dynamics and composition of Earth’s Interior, led by Prof. Longpré; and (2) Atmosphere and climate dynamics, led by Prof. Booth.
Each week, the group will be required to read 2–4 scientific journal articles on pre-determined topics (see tentative list on last page). In class, subgroups will discuss given questions related to the articles, and a designated group member(s) will then summarize the subgroup findings to the entire class and lead the subsequent open discussion. A central objective of this course is the production of a term paper on a topic of the group members’ choice, hopefully related to their PhD research. In addition to learning about the geosphere and atmosphere, by the end of this course you will also have improved your skills at:
• Reading, understanding, synthesizing and evaluating scientific literature
• Oral presentation and discussion of scientific results
• Writing scientific papers
• Collaborating with your peers

Student Learning Outcomes
By the end of this course, you will be able to:
·      Describe the primary evidence that led to scientific consensus on the Plate Tectonics Theory;
·      Discuss mechanisms of core–mantle differentiation in the early Earth and the workings of the geodynamo;
·      Explain the mechanisms of continental crust formation in Earth history;
·      Discuss the evidence for whole vs. layered mantle convection and debate the existence of mantle plumes;
·      Describe key processes within the Subduction Factory;
·      Explain the mechanisms by which volcanic eruptions affect global climate;
·      Explain the links between global energy imbalances and large-scale atmospheric wind circulation patterns and storms;
·      Use first principles of physics to explain differences between the atmosphere and the ocean coupling and atmosphere and land surface coupling;
·      Describe the leading mode of response of the northern hemisphere atmosphere to large-scale forcing: the Northern Annular Mode;
·      Explain the advantages and limitations of General Circulation Models;
·      Explain the difference between natural and forced climate variability;
·      Synthesize and apply theory of the various natural and anthropogenic climate change mechanisms to explain the context of global warming.
Reading summaries (20 %)
You will be expected to have completed the assigned readings; the success of the course relies on this. In teamwork (2 students), you will write 1 reading summary (2 pages each, no more, no less) per week, on the article of your choice, using a standard format to be provided and discussed in class. The summaries will be due before each meeting for upload on Blackboard. A single grade per team will be assigned and will be returned promptly with comments.
Participation and leading discussions (15 %)
This course requires your contributions to discussions in subgroups and to discussion summaries in the full group. Subgroup members should alternate responsibilities to present discussion findings to the whole group and lead the subsequent open discussion. Visual support, i.e. a PDF of the articles, will be available to refer to figures when necessary. Participation will be evaluated throughout the semester.
Term paper (5+20 %)
In no less than 2000 and no more than 3000 words (i.e. ~8–12 double-spaced pages in Times New Roman 12 point font), you will write a term paper on the topic of your choice. Note that the word count excludes the abstract, figure captions and references. Include as many figures as relevant. The abstract should be no more than 250 words written in the third person. Ideally, you will use this opportunity to produce a thorough but concise literature review on your PhD research topic (or closely related). We ask that, in this process, you compile relevant published data and analyze them in a new way. The paper will be done in two steps: (1) A first version worth 5% of the final grade will be due on April 3rd. This first version should contain all the key components of the paper (i.e., title, abstract, introduction, discussion, conclusion, references cited), including references and supporting figures. We will read, provide detailed comments and suggest improvements on this version within 2 weeks. (2) You will submit a final version of your improved paper at the end of the semester (exact date to be announced). The final version of the paper will be worth 20% of the final grade.
Mid-term exam (20 %)
A mid-term exam will take place on March 20th. This will cover topics seen in the first part of the course (Earth’s interior) only.
Final exam (20 %)
A final exam will take place in the final exam period (exact date to be announced). This will cover topics seen in the second part of the course (atmosphere and climate) only.
Notes
Readings, attendance and participation in class: It is expected that group members will arrive to meetings on time and be active participants in all discussion sessions. Attendance to all meetings is expected unless justification for absence is provided prior to the time of meeting.
Blackboard: Blackboard will be routinely used to make announcements, distribute reading materials, and collect writing assignments, so make sure that you regularly check for updates.
Academic integrity: This course is subject to the academic integrity policy at CUNY. Therefore all group members must understand the meaning and consequences of cheating, plagiarism and other academic offences. For details, see:
EES 79901 – Current Issues in EES [62163]
GC:         R, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Rm. 4102/6495, 1 credit, Prof. Varsanyi Course open to EES Students only
 
EES 79903 – Critical Geographies of Human Rights [62246]
GC:        M, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Carmalt, Course open to EES Students only
 
This course looks at how injustice, geography, and law relate to one another. It is interdisciplinary, and organized around three sets of literature: (1) critical human geography (including political ecology) literature that examines how injustices are created and sustained through spatial processes, (2) socio-legal scholarship that focuses on understanding law as a social construction, and (3) public international law scholarship that provides a doctrinal counterpart to social science explanations of injustice. We will draw on case studies ranging from race and urbanization in the United States to historical definitions of belonging for minority populations in Myanmar. Students will be expected to lead class discussions and write a paper on a relevant topic of their choosing.
 
EES 79903 – Ethnography of Space and Place [62250]
GC:        R, 11:45-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Low, Course open to EES Students only
 
Introduction:  The study of the city has undergone a transformation during the past 20 years integrating ever wider theoretical perspectives from anthropology, cultural geography, political economy, urban sociology, and regional and city planning, and expanding its attention to the city as physical, architectural and virtual form.  An emphasis on spatial relations and consumption as well as urban planning and design decision-making provides new insights into material, ideological and metaphorical aspects of the urban environment.  Reliance on ethnography of space and place allows researchers to present an experience-near account of everyday life in urban housing or local markets, while at the same time addressing macro-processes such as globalization and the new urban social order.

This course sketches some of the methodological and theoretical implications of the ethnographic study of the contemporary city using anthropological tools of participant observation, interviewing, behavioral mapping, and theories of space and place to illuminate spaces in modern/post-modern cities and their transformations.  In doing so, I wish to underscore links between the shape, vision and experience of cities and the meanings that their citizens read off screens and streets into their own lives. It begins with a discussion of spatializing culture, that is the way that culture is produced and expressed spatially, and the way that space reflects and changes culture. The subsequent weeks explore different theoretical dimensions, embodied space, the social construction of space, the social production of space, language and discursive space, and digital or ambiguous space. The course also explores a number of special topics including how urban fear is transforming the built environment and the nature of public space both in the ways that we are conceiving the re/building our cities, and in the ways that residential suburbs are being transformed into gated and walled enclaves of private privilege and public exclusion.  The privatization of public space first signaled the profound changes that American cities are undergoing in terms of their physical, social and cultural design.  Currently, however, increased fear of violence and others particularly in urban areas is producing new community and public space forms; locked neighborhoods, blank faced malls in urban areas, armed guard dogs on public plazas, and limited access housing developments are just some examples of how the cultural mood is being “written” on the landscape.        
Course Requirements:
1. Weekly reading and discussion in class.  Each student will be assigned a week to present a reading review and act as the discussion facilitator.
2. Book review of an ethnography–both oral and written presentation. Oral presentations will be integrated with the theoretical and methodological content of weekly discussions.
3. Fieldwork project–both oral and written presentation. Students will participate in a fieldwork project related to the course using data collected and analyzed as part of the course content. The analysis will be presented at the conclusion as part of the final requirement to write a paper. Students will be asked to use theoretical materials from the course to recast or rethink their fieldwork projects for their final papers.
 
EES 79903 - Constructing Urban Futures [62247]
GC:         T, 11:45 am – 1:45 p.m., Rm TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Stabrowski, Course open to EES Students only
 
This seminar examines the urban development process under capitalism, paying particular attention to how visions of the future are constructed and harnessed for urban development projects, and how these visions intersect with capitalist processes of accumulation and dispossession. Grounded in urban geography, yet drawing from a wide range of disciplines, the seminar will explore how competing notions of the ideal city have shaped how urban areas are planned, built, governed, and inhabited. Each week, students will read monographs on particular urban futures such as: the military city; the green city; the creative city; the infrastructural city; and the migrant city. Case studies will draw from cities throughout the world. Participants will be expected to write a research proposal and to participate actively in reading and responding to each other’s work.

EES 79903 – Sustainable Water Management:  Case Studies and Applications [62248]
GC:          M, 6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Balchi, Course open to EES Students only
 
Water utilities and municipalities are being challenged to consider the multifaceted nature of integrated water management in their communities. Several drivers, such as water shortages and droughts, climate change, water quality, changing regulations and policies, aging infrastructure and affordability are causing utilities to manage water in more integrated and innovative ways. This course focuses on integrated water management in urban systems and triple bottom line analysis including environmental, social and economic considerations. Discussion topics will include but not limited to  Green Infrastructure Program implementation in NYC; GI tool box for various soil and site conditions; GI research and development; climate resiliency and flood mitigation; water demand management, decentralized systems and water reuse; energy neutrality and GHG emission reduction initiatives. Students will also learn social and economic implications of Integrated Water Management.  Case studies from national and international urban cities will be provided as examples of successful implementation. 

EES 79903 - Isotope Geochemistry [62249]
GC:          W, 5:15 pm – 7:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Wang, Course open to EES Students only
 
Description: Since its establishment more than a century ago, isotope geochemistry became one of the pivotal foundations of geological sciences. Every year, there are thousands of papers published involving some kinds of isotope systems, and isotope geochemistry is a very useful tool to study solid-earth geochemistry, lunar and planetary sciences, environmental sciences, atmosphere sciences, biology, ecology, and archeology. It can provide quantitative constraints on the time of geological events, tracing fluxes and processes in hydrological, rock, and biological cycles. It can be used as proxies for temperature, pH and oxygen fugacity of geological systems to reconstruct Earth’s histories. In recent years, it has also been applied to forensic sciences. As ASRC (graduate center) installed its first set of Isotope Mass-spectrometers (Mat 253 and Delta V) in 2018, it is a good time to learn some basic knowledge about this field and incorporate it to students’ research, while taking advantage of these wonderful facility in ASRC.

This class will provide an overview on fundamental principles of isotope geochemistry and their applications to specific geologic problems. The course will be for senior undergraduate students and graduate students. The course includes two parts: 1) Stable isotope geochemistry: an introduction to the physics and chemistry of light stable isotopes, a broad overview of the principles and conceptual techniques used in light stable isotope geochemistry (C, O, S, H, N, Mg) and applications to earth science; 2) Radiogenic isotope geochemistry: this part of the course will cover basic principles and applications of radiogenic isotope geochemistry. The goal is to familiarize students with how various isotopic systems can be applied in the earth sciences, and to illustrate the important conclusions that have been drawn from them. This course is a QR class, i.e., answers to 80% of homework, mid-term and final exams require quantitative calculation and reasoning. Class credit: 3.
Text book: Isotopes: Principles and Applications (by Gunter Faure) and Principles of stable isotope distribution (by Robert Criss)
Class policy and grades: Attendance to the class is strongly encouraged. The Final grade is based on 50% homework + 20% mid-term + 30% finals.  Mid-term exam will be a 1.5-2.0 hour closed book, closed-note exam, final is a 3-hour closed book and closed-notes exam.
The conversion from points to letter grades is done as follows:
A+          >97                         C+           77-80
A             93-97                     C             73-77
A-           90-93                     C-            70-73
B+           87-90                     D             60-70
B             83-87                     F              < 60
B-            80-83
 
EES 79003- Reading the Grundrisse [62283]
GC:           T, 6:30 p.m. – 8:30, The People’s Forum, 3 credits, Prof. Harvey, Course open to EES Students only
The course entails a close reading of Marx's Grundrisse.
 
EES 79903 Critical Statistical Methods in Psychology [62284]
GC:          R, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., Rm., TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Stoudt, Course open to EES Students only
 
Quantitative designs, methods and analyses persist as the dominant approach to research in psychology, social science and educational studies. Statistical data define knowledge and truth in our culture almost to an obsession. Like any privileged standpoint, quantification – unlike its qualitative counterpart - is largely taken for granted as essential to science and is rarely asked to justify itself as a worthwhile pursuit. While doctoral students are often trained in very technical statistical methods, they are seldom offered an opportunity to approach the subject from critical or even radical perspectives.

This seminar style course will hold intellectual space to unpack statistics as social construction and methodological choice steeped in values, assumptions and consequences. We will engage topics not typically covered in statistics or research methods courses such as the construction of race and the politics of categorization, equations informed by eugenics, the logic of p-values and its implications on knowledge production, the tension of using aggregation to understand psychological processes, big data algorithm bias, the replication crisis, decolonizing research and participatory statistics, statistical story telling as a powerful rhetoric, our trust in probability thinking, and more. This class will emphasize issues of social justice, emancipatory research, and public scholarship; exploring the traditional uses and misuses of quantitative research as well as the long history of critical statistics as a strategy for bottom up policy making, supporting environmental/climate movements, and racial justice organizing.

This course is for any student in Psychology, Social Welfare, Urban Education, Sociology, Earth and Environmental Sciences or anyone else interested in exploring the use of statistics in research and society from a critical perspective. If you are a student seasoned in statistics, this course will hopefully strengthen your future quantitative work by giving you an opportunity to unpack common practices and applications. If you are a student less invested in statistical discourse, this course will hopefully deepen your understanding of quantitative research as well as reframe its potential value for advancing your future scholarship.

Course Requirements:
1. Have taken introductory research methods with doctoral level knowledge of quantitative design, methods and analyses.
2. Weekly reading, writing and discussion in class.  Students will be assigned weekly to help review and facilitate discussion of the readings.
 3. A midterm and final paper with the purpose of advancing and deepening the topics we cover in class as related to your own scholarship. 
 
EES 79903 – Core Seminar in Urban Studies – New Urbanism [62286]
GC:           W, 4:15 p.m. – 6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Katz and Sholette, Course open to EES Students only
 
This interdisciplinary seminar is intended to provide a common core for urban studies across the disciplines at the Graduate School.  It will combine the close reading and analysis of key theoretical and social texts from the social sciences, arts, and humanities to think critically about how the city is produced and reproduced every day and over the longue durée.  We will draw on a range of research methods—such as historical, textual, and visual analysis; participant observation and interviews; quantitative data gathering and analysis, including mapping, Census data, administrative data, and open data sources—to look at a variety of cultural forms and material social practices taking and making place in the contested terrains of contemporary New York City.  Among other things, we will be researching such concepts as ‘the city from below,’ ‘municipalism,’ ‘insurgent public space,’ and ‘creative cities.’

EES 81000 – Research for the Doctoral Dissertation 1-3 credits, Faculty, Course open to EES Students only
 
EES 80200 – Proposal Writing [62165]
GC:         R, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Kabachnik, Course open to EES Students only 
 
This course is designed to aid graduate students in the EES program to prepare fieldwork grant applications and dissertation proposals. Topics addressed include defining researchable questions, designing an effective fieldwork plan, research proposal evaluation criteria, peer-review processes, and other theoretical and methodological topics that are relevant to the task of proposal writing. The seminar is organized as an intensive workshop. Participants are asked to embrace ground rules designed to enhance the capacity of the group as a whole to become proficient at proposal writing: all participants must be open to constructive criticism and to the possibility of rethinking parts of their research projects; and everyone must also take a rigorous yet supportive and non-competitive approach to the review of other people’s proposals.​
 
EES 80500 – Independent Study 1-6 credits, Faculty, Course open to EES Students only
 
EES 90000 – Dissertation Supervision, 1 credit, Faculty, Course open to EES Students only

EES 79901 Practicum in Earth and Environmental Science [65163]
B:            TBA, 1 credit, Prof. Cheng, Course Open to EES Students Only Practicum in Earth and Environmental Science 45 hours lab or fieldwork; 1 credit Short-term practical work in a laboratory and/or field-setting; formal report writing.

EES 79903 Lab and Field Techniques using Geospatial Technologies [62251]
B:           TBA, Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Boger, Course open to EES Students only
 
Basics of ArcGIS, including vector and raster data models and analyses, integration of datasets, projections and datums, data editing, and map layouts; collection of geospatial data in the field using handheld GPS units with data dictionaries, total stations, and base stations; importing field data into ArcGIS to edit, analyze and merge with other data sets.

EES 79903 – Geochemistry of Soils [62252]
B:           TBA, Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Cheng, Course open to EES Students only
 
An examination of the physical chemistry of soils including soil mineralogy (formation, relative stability, ion exchange properties) and surface chemistry.

EES 79903 - Groundwater Hydrogeology [62253]
B:           W, 6:05 p.m. – 9:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Cranganu, Course open to EES Students only
 
Physical, geochemical, and geologic aspects of groundwater hydrogeology; groundwater occurrence; resource management; groundwater contamination and environmental problems. Laboratory work includes field trips, computer models, and case studies.

EES 79903 – Issues in Earth and Env Sciences in NYC [62254]
B:                   T, 6:30 p.m. – 9:15 p.m., Rm., TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Groffman/Chamberlain
 
Overview of issues in earth and environmental science relevant to the historical and future development of the New York City region. Geological process that shaped the NYC area; current state of the environment and remediation initiatives; effect of climate change on NYC infrastructure; resource requirements of the city.

EES 79901 – Earth and Env Seminar [62166]
C:            F, 12:45 p.m. – 1:45 p.m. Rm. Marshak 107, 1 credit, Prof. Tzortziou, Course open to EES Students only
 
Presentations and discussions by faculty and guest speakers on current topics in the area of earth and environmental science; can be taken twice for credit. Generally offered each semester. 1 hr./wk.-+ 
 
EES 79903 – Introduction to Geog Info System [62262]
C:            T, 5:30 p.m. –8:00 p.m..., Rm. Marshak 107, 3 credits, Prof. Stephan, Course open to EES Students only
 
This course represents a comprehensive attempt to introduce students to major aspects of the multifaceted GIS production process, including data acquisition, editing, modeling, analysis, and cartographic output. EAS 330 is designed for students of the Earth and atmospheric sciences, as well as other disciplines. Lectures will introduce the theory and science behind Geographic Information Systems. Laboratory exercises will complement the lectures by introducing respective applications within the GIS software environment.
EES 79903 – Climate and Climate Change [62261]
C:            MW, 2:00-3:15 p.m., Rm. Marshak MR044, 4 credits, Prof. Luo, Course open to EES Students only
 
This course links processes and interactions of the atmosphere, ocean and solid earth and their impact on climate and climate change. Topics include the physical principles of climate; climates of the past and present; Ice Age theories; the Greenhouse Effect; and human impact on climate. Prereq: One semester of calculus, and one semester of physics, and one semester of introductory earth science, or permission of instructor. Generally offered each spring. 3 lect. hr./wk.
 
EES 79903 – Env. Assessment 2 [62256]
C:            W, 5:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m., Rm. Marshak 1128, 3 credits, Prof. Lampousis, Course open to EES Students only
 
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to good commercial and customary practices in the United States of America for conducting Phase II environmental site assessments (ESA). A Phase II ESA is an evaluation process for confirming and quantifying the presence of hazardous substances or petroleum products in environmental media (i.e., soil, rock, groundwater, surface water, air, soil gas, sediment) throughout a contaminated site. A Phase II ESA typically includes a determination through field screening and chemical testing of the geological, hydrogeological, hydrological, and engineered aspects of the site that influence the presence of hazardous substances or petroleum products (e.g., migration pathways, exposure points) and the existence of receptors and mechanisms of exposure.

Graduate students receive extensive training on mainstream quality review and assessment methods of completed Phase I ESAs in preparation to enter the workforce in upper level management positions in the environmental engineering consulting industry.

Students are automatically enrolled in the 40-hour OSHA HAZWOPER (Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response Standard) certification program which applies to employees who are engaged in clean-up operations that are conducted at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites. Prerequisite: EAS B3300 or permission of instructor. 3 hr./ wk.
 
EES 79903 – Glob Envrm Haz Res [62257]
C:            F, 9:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m., Rm. Marshak 117, 3 credits, Prof. Lampousis, Course open to EES Students only
 
Study of important, naturally occurring destructive phenomena, such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, and coastal flooding. Long-term causes and remediation of these problems. Topics will focus on consequences to urban environments. Generally offered each semester.

EES 79903 – Remote Sensing of Ocean Processes [62259]
C:            T, 12:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m., Rm. Marshak 107/105, 3 credits, Prof. Tzortziou, Course open to EES Students only
 
A comprehensive introduction to ocean remote sensing, covering aspects of both physical and biological oceanography, ocean dynamics, mesoscale phenomena, biogeochemical processes, marine ecosystem resources, human impacts, climate change, and coastal hazards. The course focuses on development of skills in underwater radiative transfer modeling and ocean remote-sensing data analysis and visualization. Prerequisite: An introductory course in Earth Science, or one semester of college biology, or one semester of introductory Remote Sensing, or permission of instructor. 3 hr./wk.
 
EES 79903 – Geophysics [62267]
C:            MW, 11:00 -12:15 p.m., Rm. Marshak MR107, 3 credits, Prof. Kenyon, Course open to EES Students only
 
Advanced work in the application of geophysics to environmental and engineering problems. Hands-on work and demonstrations of seismic, electrical, electromagnetic, and magnetic instruments and techniques. Survey design and execution. Computer analysis of survey results. in most cases a strong, 2-semester course sequence in introductory physics will serve as a prerequisite) 3 hr. lect., demonstration, or group fieldwork/wk.
 
EES 79903 – Hydrology [62258]
C:            T, 6:50 p.m. – 9:20 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Vorosmarty, Course open to EES Students only
 
Introduction to hydrological data, the hydrologic cycle. Precipitation, streamflow, evaporation, and runoff. Emphasis is on their interactions and processes. Prereq: Two semesters of calculus, and two semesters of general physics, or permission of the instructor. 3 lect. hr./wk.
 
EES 79903 –Macro-Hydrology [62255]
C:            TR, 11:00 -12:15 p.m., Rm. Marshak MR044, 3 credits, Prof. Zhang, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Env Sensing Imge Anal [62263]
C:            F, 2:00 – 4:30 p.m., Rm. Marshak MR044, 3 credits, Prof. McDonald, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Geomorphology [62265]
C:            TR, 9:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m., Marshak 1128 3 credits, Prof. Black, Course open to EES Students only
 
As the wind blows and the rain pelts and glaciers grind, the shape of the Earth’s surface gradually changes. These changes affect everything from the flow of the Hudson River to the rocks in Central Park to how long it takes you to walk to class. This course offers a quantitative examination of the processes that shape landscapes. Topics include weathering; glacial, fluvial, and aeolian erosion; mass wasting; runoff generation; and surface processes on other planets.
 
EES 79903 – Satellite Meteorology [62264]
C:            MW, 9:30 – 10:45 a.m., Rm. Marshak 44, 3 credits, Prof. Luo, Course open to EES Students only
 
EES 79903 – Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Water:  Theory, Policy, and Governance [62259]
C:            M, 5:00 -7:50p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Biles, Course open to EES Students only
 
EES 79904 – Structural Geology [62167]
C:            W, 3:30 – 5:10 p.m., Rm. Marshak 107, 4 credits, Prof. Kidder, Course open to EES Students only
 
Physical properties of rocks in different tectonic environments; deformation; petrofabric analysis. Geotectonics; orogenesis, earthquakes, interpretation of geologic maps and mapping techniques. Includes a two-night weekend field trip. 3 lect., 2 lab. hr./wk
 
EES 79904 – Structural Geology [63524]
C:            F, 2:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m., Rm. Marshak 107, 4 credits, Prof. Kidder, Course open to EES Students only
 
Physical properties of rocks in different tectonic environments; deformation; petrofabric analysis. Geotectonics; orogenesis, earthquakes, interpretation of geologic maps and mapping techniques. Includes a two-night weekend field trip. 3 lect., 2 lab. hr./wk.
 
EES 79903 – Urban Applications of GIS [62268]
H:           R, 5:35 – 8:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-2, 3 credits, Gong, Course open to EES Students only
 
Discussion of data, methodology, and examples of using GIS to solve urban problems in economic, social, planning, and political settings. Students are expected to conduct small research projects addressing real world issues.

EES 79903 – Intro to Geographic Information Systems [62269]
H:           W, 5:35-9:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-1, 3 credits, Prof. Williamson, Course open to EES Students only
 
Course Overview: In this course, we will cover the whole GIS production process from data modeling and acquisition to editing, analysis, and yes, cartographic output. GTECH 709 addresses students from both geography and other disciplines. Lecture examples, as well as hands-on exercises cover a range of application areas. The course itself is divided into two equally important parts: lectures, which introduce the theory of GIScience, and lab exercises, which help you to familiarize yourself with many aspects of the software. The lectures discuss concepts, data, tools, and major aspects to assignments. The laboratory sessions introduce the geospatial data and software tools needed for accomplishing the assignments. They will start at a very basic level, requiring little more than elementary experience with the Windows operating system. The course utilizes a variety of resources, including the energy and creativity of students in the class.
 
EES 79903 – Remote Sensing of Environment [62271]
H:           M, 5:35 – 9:15 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-2, 3 credits, Prof. Ni-Meister, Course open to EES Students only
 
Fundamental concepts of remote sensing of environment, satellite sensor systems and their applications, and basic concepts of image analysis.

EES 79903 – GeoComputation 2 [62273]
H:           R, 5:35-8:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-1, 3 credits, Prof. Green, Course open to EES Students only
 
Theory and applications of GeoComputing. Models and algorithms for advanced spatial and temporal modeling are examined and programed.  Emphasis is on an object-based computational paradigm and spatial data structures.

EES 79903 – Advanced Geoinformatics [62272]
H:           R, 9:10 a.m. – 1:00 p.m., Rm. HN-1004, 3 credits, Prof. Ahearn, Course open to EES Students only
 
Expansion of Intro to GIS and Concepts and Theories in concentrating on advanced concepts in GeoInformatics, including data models, algorithms, GIS analysis and scripting.

EES 79903 – Intro Geographic Info System [62270]
H:           T, 5:35 – 9:25p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-1, 3 credits, Prof. Albrecht, Course open to EES Students only
 
Thorough introduction to geographic information systems with an emphasis on spatial data handling and project management.

EES 79903 – Geoweb Services [62274]
H:           M, 1:10 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-2, 3 credits, Prof. Sun, Course open to EES Students only
 
This course will examine the principles of GeoWeb services in a hands-on fashion. Students will learn about the different standards that are being used in the context of the GeoWeb. They will be introduced to different commercial and open source software solutions and learn how to set up, manage, and use these services. Students will explore the different technologies introduced in class in the lab assignments. Each student will present a topic to the class based on readings provided by the instructor. In the second half of the semester, each student will work on a project that involves the setup and use of GeoWeb services. Basic programming skills in any language are a prerequisite for this course.

EES 79903 – GIS Analysis & Vis in R [62275]
H:           T, 1:10 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-2, 3 credits, Prof. Frei, Course open to EES Students only
 
Advanced principles and operation of GIS, including 3-D, network and field representations and their respective analysis functions. Development of geoprocessing workflows. Geographic information science approaches to geo-spatially relevant methods, including geophysical, landscape ecological, econometric, epidemiological, and regional science.

EES 79903 – Ecology of Global Change [62276]
H:           M, 1:10 – 4:00 p.m., Rm. HN-1028, 3 credits, Prof. Reinmann, Course open to EES Students only
 
Course Overview
Human activities have introduced a suite of planetary-scale perturbations to the Earth system that have profoundly altered the composition and functioning of ecosystems across the planet. In Ecology of Global Change, we will explore the ecological consequences of a wide range of global change phenomena including climate change, land use and land cover change, acid deposition, habitat fragmentation, urbanization, invasive species and environmental pollution. Through a combination of lectures, discussions, reading the primary literature, guest lectures from experts in the field, and an overnight field trip you will become familiar with the seminal and cutting-edge research investigating the effects of global change on ecosystems and their biota, the scientists conducting this research and the methods they use. We will run a 2-night field trip to Harvard Forest in Massachusetts to see, firsthand, several world-renowned global change field experiments that have revolutionized the field and our understanding of the ecological impacts of global change. This trip will occur during spring break. You will also become familiar with a range of instruments and techniques that are being used for studying ecological impacts of global change. Student evaluation will be based on participation in class discussions, exams/quizzes, a grant proposal/peer review, and a presentation.    
 
Expected Learning Outcomes 1. Understanding of what global change is  2. Basic understanding of ecological processes   3. Basic understanding of biogeochemical cycles  4. Understanding of how and why different aspects of global change have an effect on ecological processes and biogeochemical cycles 5. Perform data analysis and interpretation of ecological data 6. Understanding of how scientists go about studying and quantifying the impacts of global change on ecosystems 7. Developing the skills to comprehend, critique and write about scientific research
 
As this is an upper-level/graduate-level course, I expect well-written assignments. Communication is an incredibly important component of science and clear and concise articulation of science will be emphasized in this course. I encourage ALL students to take advantage of the wonderful writing resources available to you at Hunter (http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/thewritingcenterce) as this will hopefully improve your written communication skills AND your grades on assignments!
 
Required Texts There are no required textbooks for this course. Instead, readings will be derived from the peer reviewed literature. A list of readings will be posted to BlackBoard 1-2 weeks ahead of time.
 
Grades are based on two quizzes, one final exam, one consumer product presentation, one grant proposal, and participation in class discussions. Additional criteria for graduate students: 1) different exam criteria, 2) lead discussions for 1-2 of the readings during the semester, and 3) separate guidelines for the group project.   Exams 50% Quizzes  20% Final 30% Presentation 15% Group Project 20% Class Participation 15%
 
Lectures Class will meet once each week. The format will be part traditional lecture and part discussion of a particular topic and the assigned readings. Once the weather warms up, we might do mini-field trips to Central Park or other locations nearby to further discuss the ecological processes and aspects of global change covered in class. 
 
Field Trip In addition to our weekly meetings, I hope to run a 3-day field trip to Harvard Forest in Petersham, MA. This field trip will provide you with the opportunity to see different ecosystem types that occur in the northeastern U.S. as well as several world-renowned global change research experiments that we will read about in class. Further, during this field trip you will gain experience in making ecological measurements that can be used to understand how global change alters ecosystem processes. This field trip will occur over spring break (dates TBD). Any student who has concerns or questions about the field trip or is unsure they will be able to attend should meet with me before the end of the second week of class (i.e. February 8th). NOTE: The content of this field trip is a required component of this course and students who cannot come on the field trip will still be responsible for the material covered.
 
Exams The two quizzes will be mostly short answer and will test your knowledge of the material covered during that section of the course. The final exam is comprehensive and will be based on lectures, readings, discussions in class, the field trip to Harvard Forest and consumer product presentations given by each of you. Exams will begin at the start of class and if you arrive late you will have less time to complete the exam. A missed exam will be graded as a zero and make-up exams will ONLY be available in the case of a documented unavoidable circumstance that results in an excused absence. You are required to notify me if you know ahead of time that you will need to miss an exam for an excused reason.
 
Consumer Product Presentation Over the course of the semester you are expected to research the ecological impacts of a consumer product of your choice. However, you need to get prior approval from the instructor. You will present an 8-minute PowerPoint presentation to the class at the end of the semester. In addition, you will need to prepare an abstract (250-word limit) describing the content of your presentation. You will not be given credit for this presentation if the topic did not receive prior approval from the instructor. You will also be required to turn in the slides used for your presentation. Abstracts will be compiled into one document for the first day of presentations. As such, abstracts submitted late will be penalized 50%.
 
Group Project In groups of 4-5 (graduate students will be in their own group), you will research and develop an approach to solving or mitigating the ecological impacts of some aspect of global change. Each group will provide a 10-minute presentation on their research and write a 1,500 word paper in the format of a scientific manuscript
 
EES 79903 – Urban Geographic Theory [62285]
H:           M,R, 11:00 a.m. – 12:25 p.m., Rm. 1022, 3 credits, Prof. Gong, Course open to EES students only
 
Spatial analysis of contemporary and theoretical issues concerning the economic growth, transportation, land use, social segregation, and urban governance in metropolitan areas.

EES 79903 – Workshop in GISc Research – MEETS ONCE PER MONTH [64503]
L:             F, 6:00-9:30 p.m., Rm. Gillet 322, 3 credits, Prof. Maantay, Course open to EES Students only
This course provides a solid grounding in research design and methodology by designing and conducting a substantive and original GISc research project.  Students will be expected to interpret, acquire, manage, analyze, display, and synthesize geospatial data, using both quantitative and qualitative methods; design and create accurate, meaningful, and unbiased maps and cartographic products that are easily understood by the target audience; integrate spatial analysis and GISc applications in an interdisciplinary manner;  design, implement, and present a substantive research project using GISc as the organizing framework.

EES 79903 – Raster Analysis [62281]
L:             T, 6:00-9:30 p.m., Rm. Gillet 322, 3 credits, Prof. Machado, Course open to EES Students only
This course builds on intro-level "Principles of Geographic Information Science" or similar by developing the students' understanding of raster data and exposing them to additional methods of GIS analysis applied in the geospatial sciences.  We will explore the structure of raster data and various ways in which raster data can be created, modified, and analyzed using a Geographic Information System (GIS).

EES 79903 – Geostatistics & Spatial Analysis Concepts [62282]
L:             W, 6:00-9:30 p.m., Rm. Gillet 322, 3 credits, Prof. Musa, Course open to EES Students only
This course covers the emerging fields of geospatial statistics, applying quantitative techniques to real-world geographic problems.  Concepts and application of exploratory spatial data analysis (ESDA), traditional statistics and geospatial statistics within various software packages, including GeoDA, ArcGIS, [R], and Excel.

EES 79903 – Field Methods in Hydrology [64601]
Q:           W, 4:00 – 5:50 p.m., Science Building, Rm.  E231, 3 credits, Prof. Eaton, Course open to EES Students only
 
Offered at locations around New York City and Queens College campus. Prereq.: GEOL 745 or 746. Application of the latest techniques for sampling, monitoring, and evaluating groundwater and surface water systems. Emphasis on drainage basin analysis, aquifer testing, surface infiltration techniques, and hydrologic software application.

 EES 79903 – Field Methods in Hydrology [62277]
Q:           F, 3:00 – 5:50 p.m., Science Building, Rm.  E231, 3 credits, Prof. Eaton, Course open to EES Students only
 
Offered at locations around New York City and Queens College campus. Prereq.: GEOL 745 or 746. Application of the latest techniques for sampling, monitoring, and evaluating groundwater and surface water systems. Emphasis on drainage basin analysis, aquifer testing, surface infiltration techniques, and hydrologic software application.

EES 79903- Environmental Impact Assessment [62278]
Q:           T, 5:00-7:50 p.m., Rm. D135, 3 credits, Prof. Helman, Course open to EES Students only
 
This course is aimed at developing an understanding of the process of environmental impact assessment (EIA) in the context of preparing environmental documents, primarily environmental impact statements (EISs), to fulfill the requirements of the various environmental laws and regulations, primarily the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the myriad of laws and regulations that fall within its purview.
Since the enactment of NEPA over 40 years ago, EIA has come to be an important tool in the planning, development, and implementation stages of projects, an area that previously fell within the domain of economics and engineering. EIA is an all-embracing area focused on far more than physical and biological aspects of our environment. Economics, history, sociology, aesthetics, and land use planning are a few of the areas that EIA addresses in addition to wetland, hydrologic, geologic, water and air quality analyses, as well as other topics related to the natural environment. The multi-disciplinary approach of the course makes it valuable for students in a variety of fields.

EES 79903 – Advanced Meteorology [62279]
Q:           M, 5:00 – 7:50 p.m., Rm., TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Yi, Course open to EES Students only
 
This is research-based course to learn: (1) what are the essentials of meteorology; (2) how to describe a climate issue; (3) how to link the climate data to the climate issue; (4) how to do a simple statistical analysis on the scientific problem; (5) how to professionally communicate your results at a conference; and (6) how to write a regular manuscript ready submitted to a journal. Research objectives are in three categories: (1) for undergraduates; (2) for master students; and (3) for PhD students.

PhD research topics: Why global wind speeds slowing since 1960? Several lines of evidence indicates that as the average global wind speed close to the surface of the land decreases. And while it is not affecting the whole earth evenly, the average terrestrial wind speed has decreased by 0.5 kilometers per hour (0.3 miles per hour) every decade, according to data starting in the 1960s. This research can be completed by either way: (1) using climate data to explore why warming climate slows down world’s wind speeds? Or (2) to write synthetic paper review about implications of world wind slowing down.

EES 79903 – Estuarine and Coastal Management [62280]
Q:           M, 1:40 – 4:30 p.m., Rm., D135, 3 credits, Prof. Greenfield, Course open to EES Students only
 
Objective: In this interdisciplinary course, students will learn about a wide range of coastal environments.  This course covers the biological, chemical, physical, and geological factors that influence coastal ecosystem processes and their implications for management.  Students will learn material through lectures, discussions of primary literature, and a term paper.

Fall 2019 Courses

Ph.D Program in Earth and Environmental Sciences Fall 2019 Course Schedule

EES 70400 – 67672    The Nature of Scientific Research
GC:   W, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Carmalt, Course open to EES Students only.
EES 70900 – 59979    Sem:  Geographic Thought/Theory
GC:    R, 2:00 p.m. – 1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Gilmore, Course open to EES Students only.
EES 71600 - 59980     Earth Systems I
GC:    W, 5:00 – 8:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Lindo Atichati/Salmun, Course open to EES Students only.
EES 79901 - 59985    Current Issues in EES
GC:    R, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 1 credit, Prof. Katz, Course open to EES Students.
EES 79903 – 59982    (Im)migration, the State and Justice
GC:   T, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., Prof. Varsanyi, Course open to all Ph.D. Students.
EES 79903 – 59987    Reading the Grundisse
GC:   M, 4:15 p.m. – 6:15 p.m., Prof. Harvey, Course open to EES Students only.
EES 79902 - 60008   Presenting Research in Earth and Env Sciences
B:    W, 4:15 -6:15 p.m., 2 credit, Rm. Ingersoll 3108, Prof. Cherrier, Course open to EES Students only.
EES 79902 - 60009    Professional Portfolios for Earth and Environmental Scientists
B:     M, 6:30 p.m. – 9:15 p.m., 2 credit, Rm. Ingersoll 4215, Prof. Powell, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79902 – 60010     Presenting Earth and Environmental Sciences Seminar
B:     M, 4:15p.m. -5:55 p.m., 2 credit, Rm. Ingersoll 1127, Prof. Cherrier, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – 60047    Advanced GIS and Remote Sensing   
B:      R, 6:05 p.m.  – 9:45 p.m., 3 credits, Rm. TBA Prof. Boger, Course open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60049     Biogeochemistry
B:      T., 6:30 p.m. – 9:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Groffman, Course open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60051     Isotope Geology
B:      W, 6:05 p.m. – 8:35 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Seidemann, Course open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60052     Geostatistics
B:      W., 6:05 p.m. – 9:45 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Smith, Course open to EES Students only.
EES 79901 - 60000     Earth and Env Seminar
C:      F, 12:45 – 1:45 p.m., Rm. MS-107, 1 credit, Prof. Tzortziou, Course open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60055     Global Env Hazards
C:      T, R, 9:00 a.m. – 10:15 a.m. Rm. MS-044, 3 credits, Prof. Segni, Course Open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – 60004     Sus Terres, Aqu, Atm Sys
C:     R, 5:20 p.m. – 8:00 p.m., Rm. MR-1128, 3 credits, Prof. McDonald, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60053    Fund Atmospheric Science
C:     M, W 12:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m., Rm. MS-1128, 3 credits, Prof. Booth, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60054    Env Assessment
C:     M, 9:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m., Rm. Ms-1128, 3 credits, Prof. Lampousis, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60055   Global Env Hazards
C:     T, R, 9:00 – 10:15 a.m., Rm. MS-044, 3 credits, Prof. Lampousis, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60056 Ground Water Hydrology   
C:     T, R, 11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m., Rm. MS-044, 3 credits, Prof. Zhang, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60023 Env Geophysics
C:     M, 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m., Rm. MS-107, 3 credits, Prof. Kenyon, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60024 Intro GIS
C:     T, 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m., Rm. Ms-044, 3 credits, Prof. TBA, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60057 Earth Mat:  Intro Lg Meta Petrol
C:     M, W, 2:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m..., Rm. MS-1128, 3 credits, Profs. Black, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 - 60025 Isotype Geochemistry
C:     T, R, 9:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m., Rm. MS-1128, 3 credits, Prof. Wang, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60027  Coast/Ocean Proc
C:     W, 9:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m., Rm. MS-107, 3 credits, Prof. Tzortziou, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60058   Geologic Field Mapping
C:     F, 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m., Rm. MS-107, 3 credits, Prof. Kidder, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60059 Intro to Scientific Computing
C:     M, W, 3:30 – 4:45 p.m., Rm. NAC 1/302, 3 credits, Prof. Booth, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60029  Energy Policy
H:    M, R, 11:10 a.m. – 12:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1022, 3 credits, Prof. Marcotullio, Course open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 –60031  Geog Sustainable Dev
H:    T, R, 4:10 -5:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1022, 3 credits, Prof. Ibrahim, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903- 60015 Intro:  Geographic Info Systems
H      T, 5:35 – 9:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-2, 3 credits, Prof. Williamson, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903- 60016 Intro:  Geographic Info Systems
H      M, 5:35 – 9:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-1, 3 credits, Prof. Gong, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 - 60017 Concepts and Theories in GeoInfo
H:      W, 5:35 – 8:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1022, 3 credits, Prof. Ahearn, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60036 5 Intro: Carto Design and Geovis
H:     R, 5:35 – 9:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-2, 3 credits, Prof. Williamson, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60032 Quantitative Methods in Geography
H:     W, 9:10 a.m. – 12:00 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-2, 3 credits, Prof. Frei, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60039 Geospatial Databases
H:    W, 5:35 p.m. - 8:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-2, 3 credits, Prof. Sun, Course open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60018 Advanced Geoinformatics
H:     M, 5:35 p.m. – 9:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-2, 3 credits, Prof. Albrecht, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60042 Global Climate Change
H:     M, R, 51:10 p.m., - 2:25 p.m., Rm, HN-1090B-1, 3 credits, Prof. Rutberg, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60040 Seeing Space:  Art, Geography, and the Right to the City
H:     W, 4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m., Rm, TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Gilmore/Rodriguez, Course Open to Graduate Center Students only.  Instructor Permission only.
EES 79903 – 60034 Digital Image Process & LIDAR
H:     T, 5:35 p.m. – 9:25 p.m., Rm, HN-1090B-1, 3 credits, Prof. Ni-Meister,  Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 - 64261 Field Ecology of NYC
H:     M, 1:10 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Reinmann, Course Open to EES Students only,
EES 79904 –60003 GeoComputation 1
H:    R, 5:35 p.m. – 9:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-1, 4 credits, Prof. Green, Course open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 - 60066 Data Acquisition and Integrative Methods for GIS Analysis
L:     R, 6:00 p.m. – 10:10 p.m., Rm. Gillet 322, 3 credits, Prof. Gorokhovich, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 - 67004 Macro-Hydrology
L:     T, 6:50 p.m. – 9:20 p.m., TBA, 3 Credits, Prof. Vorosmarty, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79904 – 60006 Special Topics in Geographic Information Systems:    
L:    T, 6:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m., Rm. Gillet 322, 4 credits, Prof. Maantay, Course Open to EES Students only
EES 79904 - 60007 Principles and Applications in Remote Sensing:    
L:    R, 6:00 p.m. – 10:10 p.m., Rm. Gillet 322, 4 credits, Prof. Machado, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60043 Coastal Estuarine Geology (Lecture)
Q:     M, 9:40 a.m. – 11:30 a.m., Rm. SB D237, 3 credits, Prof. McHugh, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60044 Coastal Estuarine Geology (Lab)
Q:     W, 9:20 a.m. – 112:10 p.m., Rm. SB D237, 3 credits, Prof. McHugh, Course Open to EES Students only.

EES 79903 – 60020 Hydrology
Q:     M, W, 5:00 p.m. – 6:15 p.m., Rm.SB E231, 3 credits, Prof. Eaton, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60045 Volcanoes and Climate
Q:     T, 5:30 p.m. – 8:20 p.m., Rm.SB D135, 3 credits, Prof. Longpre, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60046 Bioremediation
Q:     R, 5:00 p.m. – 7:50 p.m., Rm.SB D135, 3 credits, Prof. Blanford, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 80500        Independent Study
B, C, H, Q, L        1-6 credits, Staff, Course open to EES Students only.
EES 81000        Research for the Doctoral Dissertation
B, C, H, Q, L        1-3 credits, Staff, Course open to EES Students only.
EES 90000        Dissertation Supervision
B, C, H, Q, L        1 credit, Staff, Course open to EES Students only.
 
Cross-Listed Courses:

CHEM  75000 – 60361 Organic Chemistry/Physical Organic Chemistry
GC:    T, R,  9:30 – 10:50 a.m., Rm. GC 6429, 3 credits, Profs. Braunschweig/Vorosmarty/Tessler

P SC 83502 60146 Urban studies Core Seminar II
GC:    W, 4:15 p.m. – 6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Gutman/Mollenkopf

PSYC 79103 60483 Environmental Social Science III Social/Cultural Theory
GC:    M, 4:15 p.m. – 6:15 p.m., Rm. 3308, 3 credits, Prof. Checker

WGS 71701 – Global Feminism
GC:   M, 11:45 a.m. – 1:45 p.m., Prof. Oza

IDS 81630 – 60288 The Discursive Framing of Climate Change:  From Scientific Discourse to the Public Sphere
GC:   T, 11:45 a.m. – 1:45 p.m., 3 credits, Profs. Lindo Atichati/del Valle

IDS 81620 - 60286 Voices of the City: accessibility, reciprocity, and self-representation in place-based community research
GC:   R,  2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. 3 credits, Profs Hum/Kanakamedala

 

Spring 2019 Courses
Ph.D Program in Earth and Environmental Sciences Spring 2019 Course Schedule
 
EES 79903 – The Nature of Scientific Research [66539]
GC:         R, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm., TBA, 3 credits, Professor Carmalt, Course open to EES Students only
EES 71700 – Earth Systems II [57855]
GC:         W, 2:00-5:00 p.m., Rm., TBA, 3 credits, Profs Booth and Longpre, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79901 – Current Issues in EES [57842]
GC:         R, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Rm. 4102/C415A, 1 credit, Prof. Weisberg, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79901 – Participant Observations and Field Notes [57851]
GC:        R, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m., 1/31. 2/7, 2/14, 2/21. 2/28, Rm. TBA, 1 credit, Professor Low
EES 79901 – Interviewing (Structured and Unstructured) [57852]
GC:        R, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m., 3/14. 3/21, 3/28. 4/4, Rm. TBA, 1 credit, Professor Low
EES 79901- Qualitative Analysis (Coding and Memos) [57853]
GC:        R, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m., 4/11. 4/18, 5/2, 5/9, 5/16, Rm. TBA, 1 credit, Professor Low
EES 79903 - Anthropology of the City:  Engaged Urbanism [57980]
GC:        F, 12:00 – 2:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Professor Low
EES 79903 – Racial Capitalism [57983]
GC:        T, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Professor Gilmore, Instructor Permission Required
EES 81000 – Research for the Doctoral Dissertation 1-3 credits, Faculty
EES 80200 – Proposal Writing [57979]
GC:         R, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Professor Kabachnik, Course open to EES Students only 
EES 80500 – Independent Study 1-3 credits, Faculty
EES 90000 – Dissertation Supervision, 1 credit, Faculty
EES 79902 - Research Proposal [61758]
B:          W, 4:15 p.m. – 5:55 p.m., Rm. TBA, 2 credits, Professor Chamberlain, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 - Global Tectonics [61744]
B:            T, 6:05 p.m. – 8:50 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Professors Flores/Kennet, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 - Lab and Field Techniques using Geospatial Technologies [61747]
B:           W, 6:30 p.m. – 10:10 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Professor Boger, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 - Seminar:  Case Studies in Applied Sustainable Urban Infrastructure Systems [61750]
GC:         M, 6:05 p.m. – 8:50 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Professors Balchi/Cherrier, Course open to EES Students only
EES -   79903 – Earth’s Oceans [61755]
 B:           W, 6:05 p.m. – 8:50 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Professor Marra, Course Open to EES Students only
EES -   79903 – Environmental Geochemistry [58009]
C:            MW, 12:30 – 1:45 p.m., Rm. Marshak MR404, 3 credits, Professor Block, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79904 – Structural Geology [58039]
C:            MW, 3:30 – 4:20 p.m., Rm. Marshak 107, 4 credits, Prof. Kidder, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79904 – Structural Geology [61728]
C:            F, 2:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m., Rm. Marshak 107, 4 credits, Prof. Kidder, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Introduction to GIS [61742]
C             R, 5:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.., Rm. Marshak 107, 3 credits, Prof. Winslow, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79904 – Climate and Climate Change [61903]
C:            MW, 2:00-3:15 p.m., Rm. Marshak MR044, 4 credits, Prof. Luo, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79901 – Earth and Env Seminar [57848]
C:            F, 12:45 p.m. – 1:45 p.m. Rm. Marshak 107, 1 credit, Prof. McDonald, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Phase II Environmental Site Assessment As [58022]
C:            SA 9:00 a.m. – 10:15 A.M., Rm. Marshak 107, 3 credits, Prof. Lampousis, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Remote Sensing of Ocean Processes [58024]
C:            T, 12:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m., Rm. Marshak MR044, 3 credits, Prof. Tzortziou, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Geophysics [58011]
C:            MW, 11:00 -12:15 p.m., Rm. Marshak MR107, 3 credits, Prof. Kenyon, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Hydrology [58023]
C:            TR, 11:00 -12:15 p.m., Rm. Marshak MR044, 3 credits, Prof. Zhang, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Env Sensing Imge Anal [58029]
C:            F, 2:00 – 4:30 p.m., Rm. Marshak MR044, 3 credits, Prof. McDonald, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Geomorphology [58030]
C:            TBA, TBA. Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. TBA, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Satellite Meteorology
C:            MW, 9:30 – 10:45 a.m., Rm. Marshak MR044, 3 credits, Prof. Luo, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – The Right to the City:  Origins, Theory, Debates
CLUS:     T, 6:15 – 8:45 p.m., 25 W 43 St, 19th Floor, 3 credits, Prof. Attoh, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – African Environment & Development [57986]
H:            MR, 1:10 – 2:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1022, 3 credits, Prof. Ibrahim, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Intro to Geographic Information Systems [57991]
H:            W, 5:35-9:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-1, 3 credits, Prof. Williamson, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Remote Sensing of Environment [57994]
H:            W, 5:35 – 9:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-2, 3 credits, Prof. Ni-Meister, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Advanced GIS [57995]
H:            R, 5:35-8:15 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-1, 3 credits, Prof. Sun, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Concepts and Theories in GeoInfo [57992]
H:            T, 5:35-8:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1004-, 3 credits, Prof. Sun, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – GeoComputation 2 [57996]
H:            R, 5:35-8:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-2, 3 credits, Prof. Green, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Seminar in Geoinformatics [57849]
H:            W, 1:00 – 2:50 p.m., Rm. HN-1004, 3 credits, Prof. Ahearn, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Geog NYC Metro Area [57988]
H:            T, 5:35 – 8:25p.m., Rm. HN-1022, 3 credits, Prof. Miyares, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – International Pollution Issues [57990]
H:            TF, 11:10 a.m. – 12:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1022, 3 credits, Prof. Lanz Oca, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Ecology of Global Change [57997]
H:            M, 1:10 – 4:00 p.m., Rm. HN-1022, 3 credits, Prof. Reinmann, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Workshop in GISc Research – MEETS ONCE PER MONTH [58034]
L:             F, 6:00-9:30 p.m., Rm. Gillet 322, 3 credits, Prof. Machado, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Natural Hazards and Risk Assessment with GISc [58037]
L:             R, 6:00-9:30 p.m., Rm. Gillet 322, 3 credits, Prof. Gorokovich, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Spatial Database Management [58005]
L:             T, 6:00 – 9:00 p.m., Rm. Gillet 322, 3 credits, Prof. Donnelly, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Geostatistics & Spatial Analysis Concepts [58004]
L:             W, 6:00-9:00 p.m., Rm. Gillet 322, 3 credits, Prof. Musa, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Biosphere-Atmosphere Interactions [57984]
Q:           W, 5:00 – 7:00 p.m., Science Building, Rm.  D-135, 3 credits, Prof. Yi, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903- Analytical Techniques in Environmental Geosciences [58007]
Q:           M, 5:00-8:50 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Bracco, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Shallow Subsurface Geophysics [58008]
Q:           W, 4:30 – 6:20 p.m., Rm., TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Eaton, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Shallow Subsurface Geophysics [58008]
Q:           F, 3:00 – 5:50 p.m., Rm., TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Eaton, Course open to EES Students only
 
Cross-Listed Courses:
 
PSYCH 80103 Writing for Publication
GC:         R, 11:45 a.m. – 1:45 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Su
 
DCP 803 Spatial Demography
Baruch:  W, 4:15 – 6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Balk
 
P SC 83501 Core Seminar in Urban Studies
GC:       M, 4:15 – 6:15 p.m., Profs. Gutman and Mollenkopf

U ED 71100 Critical University Studies with a Special Emphasis on CUNY 
GC:       W, 4:15
6:15 p.m., Prof. Brier
 
LABR 669 Economic Democracy and System Change
New School:   M, 6:15 – 8:45 p.m., 3 credits, Profs. Menser and Caspar-Futterman

IDS 81620 Voices of the City: accessibility, reciprocity, and self-representation in place-based community research

GC:     R, 2:00 - 4:00 p.m., 3 credits, Profs. Hum and Kanakamedala