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Courses

EES students are always allowed to register for any EES course, provided they meet the course prerequisites. However, faculty and students have selected which courses are most relevant to students in each program track. These lists will typically be created at the beginning of registration based on the schedule for the following semester, but may not be current if there have been late changes. If there is any question as to whether and when a course is being offered, please consult the dynamic course schedule.

 

SPRING 2021 COURSES

Ph.D Program in Earth and Environmental Sciences Fall 2020 Course Schedule

EES REQUIRED COURSES 


EES 71700 – [61186] Earth Systems II
At the GC:         W, 9:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m., Rm., TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Black and Booth, Course open to EES Students only

Course Description and Objectives:
This seminar-style course is divided into two parts: (1) Dynamics and composition of Earth’s Interior, led by Prof. Black; and (2) Atmosphere and climate dynamics, led by Prof. Booth.
Each week, the group will be required to read 2–4 scientific journal articles on pre-determined topics (see tentative list on last page). In class, subgroups will discuss given questions related to the articles, and a designated group member(s) will then summarize the subgroup findings to the entire class and lead the subsequent open discussion. A central objective of this course is the production of a term paper on a topic of the group members’ choice, hopefully related to their PhD research. In addition to learning about the geosphere and atmosphere, by the end of this course you will also have improved your skills at:
• Reading, understanding, synthesizing and evaluating scientific literature
• Oral presentation and discussion of scientific results
• Writing scientific papers
• Collaborating with your peers

Student Learning Outcomes
By the end of this course, you will be able to:
·      Describe the primary evidence that led to scientific consensus on the Plate Tectonics Theory;
·      Discuss mechanisms of core–mantle differentiation in the early Earth and the workings of the geodynamo;
·      Explain the mechanisms of continental crust formation in Earth history;
·      Discuss the evidence for whole vs. layered mantle convection and debate the existence of mantle plumes;
·      Describe key processes within the Subduction Factory;
·      Explain the mechanisms by which volcanic eruptions affect global climate;
·      Explain the links between global energy imbalances and large-scale atmospheric wind circulation patterns and storms;
·      Use first principles of physics to explain differences between the atmosphere and the ocean coupling and atmosphere and land surface coupling;
·      Describe the leading mode of response of the northern hemisphere atmosphere to large-scale forcing: the Northern Annular Mode;
·      Explain the advantages and limitations of General Circulation Models;
·      Explain the difference between natural and forced climate variability;
·      Synthesize and apply theory of the various natural and anthropogenic climate change mechanisms to explain the context of global warming.

Reading summaries (20 %)
You will be expected to have completed the assigned readings; the success of the course relies on this. In teamwork (2 students), you will write 1 reading summary (2 pages each, no more, no less) per week, on the article of your choice, using a standard format to be provided and discussed in class. The summaries will be due before each meeting for upload on Blackboard. A single grade per team will be assigned and will be returned promptly with comments.

Participation and leading discussions (15 %)
This course requires your contributions to discussions in subgroups and to discussion summaries in the full group. Subgroup members should alternate responsibilities to present discussion findings to the whole group and lead the subsequent open discussion. Visual support, i.e. a PDF of the articles, will be available to refer to figures when necessary. Participation will be evaluated throughout the semester.

Term paper (5+20 %)
In no less than 2000 and no more than 3000 words (i.e. ~8–12 double-spaced pages in Times New Roman 12-point font), you will write a term paper on the topic of your choice. Note that the word count excludes the abstract, figure captions and references. Include as many figures as relevant. The abstract should be no more than 250 words written in the third person. Ideally, you will use this opportunity to produce a thorough but concise literature review on your PhD research topic (or closely related). We ask that, in this process, you compile relevant published data and analyze them in a new way. The paper will be done in two steps: (1) A first version worth 5% of the final grade will be due on April 3rd. This first version should contain all the key components of the paper (i.e., title, abstract, introduction, discussion, conclusion, references cited), including references and supporting figures. We will read, provide detailed comments and suggest improvements on this version within 2 weeks. (2) You will submit a final version of your improved paper at the end of the semester (exact date to be announced). The final version of the paper will be worth 20% of the final grade.

Mid-term exam (20 %)
A mid-term exam will take place on March 20th. This will cover topics seen in the first part of the course (Earth’s interior) only.

Final exam (20 %)
A final exam will take place in the final exam period (exact date to be announced). This will cover topics seen in the second part of the course (atmosphere and climate) only.

Notes
Readings, attendance and participation in class: It is expected that group members will arrive to meetings on time and be active participants in all discussion sessions. Attendance to all meetings is expected unless justification for absence is provided prior to the time of meeting.
Blackboard: Blackboard will be routinely used to make announcements, distribute reading materials, and collect writing assignments, so make sure that you regularly check for updates.
Academic integrity: This course is subject to the academic integrity policy at CUNY. Therefore all group members must understand the meaning and consequences of cheating, plagiarism and other academic offences.

EES 79901 – [61187] Current Issues in EES
At the GC:         R, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 4102/6495, 1 credit, Prof. Katz Course open to EES Students only


EES ELECTIVES


EES 79903 – [63263] Rethinking Place and Space
At the GC:     R, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Kabachnik, Course open to EES Students only

Place and space are key concepts not only in geography and social theory, but in our everyday lives. The meanings of these terms may seem apparent. However, upon closer examination, their use, or misuse, is a major problem in academic writing--whether by offering inconsistent definitions or simply failing to define them. Rethinking place and space strengthens the clarity of our theoretical frameworks, research designs, and pedagogy. Therefore, the course will provide a genealogy of these concepts (and related terms like choros, spatiality, topos, chronotope), focusing on the philosophical debates surrounding them. We will sift through these readings and debates to identify (ontological, methodological, and epistemological) discontinuities and patterns, and the implications of invoking one term over another.​
 
EES  79903 – [63262] Critical Remote Ethnography
At the GC:        R, 11:45-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Low, Course open to EES Students only

Drawing inspiration from video interviews with six ethnographers who have conducted research remotely, this course offers graduate students an opportunity to examine and critique remote strategies for “doing ethnography.” The seminar begins with an overview of the goals, methods and forms of analysis that make up contemporary “real life” practices and then turns to the ways that film, video, digital and other forms of virtual techniques expand and complement current methods. The seminar explores a wide range of digital and analog tools, techniques, and methods for use across the disciplines. Readings focus on past projects and the impact of remote methods on ethnographic research.  Interviews with some of the major scholars in the field are included as well as viewing pre-recorded video interviews that are already available (John Jackson, Bianca Williams, Darya Radchenko, Sarah Pink will be invited). Each student who is planning ethnographic research projects in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic is offered an opportunity to search social media for “data” and then use the course as a way to question the validity and reliability of these personal archives and resources to think through the implications of working with these data.  The course will require reading, web-based searches, and presentation of a final project that incorporates some of the virtual/digital methods covered in the course.
 
Readings include:
 
Boellstorff, T., Nardi, B., Pearce, C., & Taylor, T. L. (2013). Ethnography and Virtual World: A Handbook of Method. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. 
 
Bonilla, Y., & Rosa, J. (2015). "#Ferguson: Digital protest, hashtag ethnography, and the racial politics of social media in the United States." American Ethnologist, 42(1), 4–17. 
 
Braverman, I. (2018). Coral whisperers: Scientists on the brink. Oakland, California: University of California Press. 
 
---. (2017). "Captive: Zoometric Operations in Gaza." Public Culture, 29(1 81), 191–215. 
 
---. "Renouncing Citizenship as Protest: Reflections by a Jewish Israeli Ethnographer." Critical Inquiry, 44(2), 379–386. 
 
Hine, C. (2015). Ethnography for the Internet: Embedded, embodied and everyday.  New York: Bloomsbury Academic. 
 
Jackson, John L. “An Ethnographic Filmflam: Giving Gifts, Doing Research, and Videotaping the Native Subject/Object.” American Anthropologist 106, no. 1 (2004): 32–42. 
 
Keeling, Kara. “Passing for Human: Bamboozled and Digital Humanism.” Women & Performance: A Journal of Feminist Theory 15, no. 1 (January 1, 2005): 237–50. 
 
Pink, S., Horst, H. A., Postill, J., Hjorth, L., Lewis, T., Tacchi, J. (2016). Digital ethnography: Principles and practice. Sage. 
 
Rufas, A., & Hine, C. (2018). "Everyday connections between online and offline: Imagining others and constructing community through local online initiatives." New Media & Society, 20(10), 3879–3897. 
 
Sanjek, R., & Tratner, S. W. (Eds.). (2016). eFieldnotes: The makings of anthropology in the digital world. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press. 
Williams, Bianca, (2018). The Pursuit of Happiness.  Durham: Duke University Press.

EES 79903 –[63264] Political Ecology and Environmental Justice
At the GC:         W, 4:15 p.m.- 6:15 p.m., Rm TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Katz Course open to EES Students only
 
Political ecology and environmental justice are areas of great importance and intense contemporary debate, the former commonly associated with the global south and the latter with the north.  Yet scholars and practitioners working in these fields share similar concerns with the uneven effects of production, social reproduction, distribution, social justice, and inequalities in harms and benefits.  This seminar will critically examine contemporary theories of political ecology, environmental justice, sustainable development, and the production of nature across the disparate geographies of north and south, urban and rural, and at a number of scales.  In a series of case studies, we will engage current debates over such issues as climate change and its disparate effects, waste and pollution, environmental conservation, nature preservation, biodiversity, ecotourism, industrial agriculture, green capitalism, and the ‘green new deal.’

EES 79903 – [63265] Data Analysis and Statistics
At the GC:     M, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., R. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Fogarty, Course Open to EES Students only
 
In this course students will learn about quantitative methodology, including how to implement data analysis methods using open-source software. The concepts covered in this course brings together principles of statistics and probability, multivariate analysis, and spatial analysis methods applicable across a variety of science and engineering disciplines.
 
EES 79903 – [63260] Cities and Disaster:  Past, Present, and Future
At the GC:          W, 11:45 a.m. – 1:45 p.m.., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Caracas and Kietlinski, Course open to EES Students only
 
This team-taught, interdisciplinary course will focus on disasters faced by major urban centers across a broad span of time and place. Taught by a geographer and a historian who both specialize in the intersection of cities and crisis, the course will offer a unique perspective on critical issues that arise when cities and citizens are forced to endure a catastrophic event. The course will be divided into three thematic and chronological units: 1) PAST: The focus of this unit will be on the historic destruction and subsequent remaking of important urban centers such as Lisbon, Chicago, Chongqing, Dresden, and Tokyo as a result of earthquakes, fires, and wartime bombing; 2) PRESENT: Cities that have recently experienced destruction and reconstruction as a result of worsening climate conditions, with a sustained focus on New York City during and after Hurricane Sandy; and 3) FUTURE: An examination of cities in the Global South that are being and will continue to be impacted by environmental degradation, climate change, and diminishing resources such as water. We will interrogate differences between the concepts of “natural” versus “man-made” disasters, looking at specific case studies as we discuss how and why the line is not always a clear one.
 
EES 79902 - [61188]  – Research Proposal
At Brooklyn College:        R, 4:15 p.m. – 5:55 p.m., Rm. TBA, 2 credits, Prof. Chamberlain, , Course open to EES students only
 
Development of independent research proposal; literature searches; literature reviews; development of hypotheses and methodologies.
 
EES 79903 – [63274] Natural Resources, Management /Conservation
At Brooklyn College:        W, 6:05p.m. – 9:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Powell, Course open to EES students only
 
Principles and practices for sustainably managing natural resources (fossil fuels, alternative energy sources, base metals, strategic metals, soils, water); extraction methods; waste products and their environmental impact; approaches to remediation; approaches to
minimizing environmental impact.
 
EES  79903- [63276] Aqua and Terrestrial Environmental  System Dynamics
At Brooklyn College:        T, 6:30 P.M. – 9:15 P.M., Rm. TBA, Profs. Marra and Groffman, Course open to EES students only
 
Systems approach studies of energy flow, material exchange and ecosystem dynamics in terrestrial and aquatic environments; ecosystem feedback processes; biogeochemical cycles; human impacts and alteration of natural system functioning. Case studies of local, terrestrial and aquatic environments.
 
EES 79903 – [63275] Lab and Field Tech in GIS
At Brooklyn College:        R, 6:05 p.m. – 7:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Boger, Course open to EES Students only
 
Basics of ArcGIS, including vector and raster data models and analyses, integration of datasets, projections and datums, data editing, and map layouts; collection of geospatial data in the field using handheld GPS units with data dictionaries, total stations, and base stations; importing field data into ArcGIS to edit, analyze and merge with other data sets.
 
EES 79901- [61189] -  Earth and Environmental Seminar
At City College:        F, 12:45 p.m. – 13:45 p.m., Online, 1 credit, Prof. Tzortziou, Course open to EES students only
 
Presentations and discussions by faculty and guest speakers on current topics in the area of earth and environmental science; can be taken twice for credit. Generally offered each semester. 1 hr./wk.-+ 
 
EES 79903 – [63355]  Envrn Syst Geochem
At City College:        M/W, 12:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m., Online, 3 credits, Prof. Block, Course open to EES students only
 
A geochemistry survey course that emphasizes earth system science considerations. The survey includes application of thermodynamics, kinetics, acid-base reactions, solubility, and redox, as applied to element distribution and cycling in natural waters, soils, and the solid earth. Students will be able to test hypotheses concerning the mobility of elements in any setting and to ascertain processes important to the stability, movement, and reactivity of elements in the earth.

EES 79903 – [63277] Geophysics
At City College:        M/W, 11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m./, Online, 3 credits, Prof. Kenyon, Course open to EES students
 
Advanced work in the application of geophysics to environmental and engineering problems. Hands-on work and demonstrations of seismic, electrical, electromagnetic, and magnetic instruments and techniques. Survey design and execution. Computer analysis of survey results. in most cases a strong, 2-semester course sequence in introductory physics will serve as a prerequisite) 3 hr. lect., demonstration, or group fieldwork/wk.
 
EES 79903 – [63279] Glob Haz Envrn Res
At City College:        F, 9:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m., Online, 3 credits, Prof. Booth, Course open to EES students only
 
Study of important, naturally occurring destructive phenomena, such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, and coastal flooding. Long-term causes and remediation of these problems. Topics will focus on consequences to urban environments. Generally offered each semester.
 
EES 79903 – [63280] Hydrology
At City College:        R, 5:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m., Online, 3 credits, Prof. Zhang
 
Introduction to hydrological data, the hydrologic cycle. Precipitation, streamflow, evaporation, and runoff. Emphasis is on their interactions and processes. Prereq: Two semesters of calculus, and two semesters of general physics, or permission of the instructor. 3 lect. hr./wk.
 
EES 79903 – [63278] Env Assessment 2
At City College:        S, 10:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m., Online, 3 credits, Prof. TBA
 
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to good commercial and customary practices in the United States of America for conducting Phase II environmental site assessments (ESA). A Phase II ESA is an evaluation process for confirming and quantifying the presence of hazardous substances or petroleum products in environmental media (i.e., soil, rock, groundwater, surface water, air, soil gas, sediment) throughout a contaminated site. A Phase II ESA typically includes a determination through field screening and chemical testing of the geological, hydrogeological, hydrological, and engineered aspects of the site that influence the presence of hazardous substances or petroleum products (e.g., migration pathways, exposure points) and the existence of receptors and mechanisms of exposure.

Graduate students receive extensive training on mainstream quality review and assessment methods of completed Phase I ESAs in preparation to enter the workforce in upper level management positions in the environmental engineering consulting industry.

Students are automatically enrolled in the 40-hour OSHA HAZWOPER (Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response Standard) certification program which applies to employees who are engaged in clean-up operations that are conducted at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites. Prerequisite: EAS B3300 or permission of instructor. 3 hr./ wk.
 
EES 79903 – [63283]  Remote Sensing of Ocean Processes
At City College:        M, 3:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m., Online, 3 credits, Prof. Tzortziou
 
A comprehensive introduction to ocean remote sensing, covering aspects of both physical and biological oceanography, ocean dynamics, mesoscale phenomena, biogeochemical processes, marine ecosystem resources, human impacts, climate change, and coastal hazards. The course focuses on development of skills in underwater radiative transfer modeling and ocean remote-sensing data analysis and visualization. Prerequisite: An introductory course in Earth Science, or one semester of college biology, or one semester of introductory Remote Sensing, or permission of instructor. 3 hr./wk.
 
EES 79903 – [63285] Climate and Climate Change
At City College:        T/R, 11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m., Online, 3 credits, Prof. Booth
 
This course links processes and interactions of the atmosphere, ocean and solid earth and their impact on climate and climate change. Topics include the physical principles of climate; climates of the past and present; Ice Age theories; the Greenhouse Effect; and human impact on climate. Prereq: One semester of calculus, and one semester of physics, and one semester of introductory earth science, or permission of instructor. Generally offered each spring. 3 lect. hr./wk.
 
EES 79903 – [63286] Intro to Geography  Information Systems
At City College:        T, 5:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m., Online, 3 credits, Prof. Stephan
 
This course represents a comprehensive attempt to introduce students to major aspects of the multifaceted GIS production process, including data acquisition, editing, modeling, analysis, and cartographic output. EAS 330 is designed for students of the Earth and atmospheric sciences, as well as other disciplines. Lectures will introduce the theory and science behind Geographic Information Systems. Laboratory exercises will complement the lectures by introducing respective applications within the GIS software environment.
 
EES 79903 – [63287] Env Sensing Image Analysis
At City College:        F, 2:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m., Online, 3 credits, Prof. McDonald
 
Course Description:
This course provides students an understanding of the underlying principles and physics
of remote sensing. We will cover basics of the characteristics of electromagnetic waves and their interaction with natural media. We will cover the implementation and applications of remote sensing systems and the acquisition and interpretation data from remote sensing systems. We will consider data sources in the optical and microwave regimes of the electromagnetic spectrum. The versatility and availability of remote sensing data make of this discipline a key one in the Earth sciences. In the course you will learn the basic physics of remote sensing, become aware of the various sensors that are currently available, and learn about applications of datasets. Students will complete a project coordinated with the instructor.
 
Text (required):
“Remote Sensing and Image Interpretation, Seventh Edition” by Thomas Lillesand, Ralph W. Kiefer, Jonathan Chipman (Wiley, 2015)
ISBN: 978-1-118-34328-9
 
Recommended Texts:
“Introduction to the Physics and Techniques of Remote Sensing, Second Edition” by Charles Elachi and Jakob van Zyl (Wiley, 2006)
ISBN-13 978-0-471-47569-9; ISBN-10 0-471-47569-6
 
"Physical Principles of Remote Sensing, 3rd Edition (2013)" by W.G. Rees ISBN: 978-1-107-00473-3 (Hardcover); ISBN: 978-0-521-18116-7 (Paperback)
Additional readings may be distributed throughout the course. Make sure that you check
blackboard for reading assignments.
 
EES 79904 - [61190]  – Structural Geology
At City College:        W, 3:30 p.m. – 1710, Hybrid, 4 credits, Prof. Kidder
 
EES 79904 - [61191] – Structural Geology
At City College:        F, 2:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m., Hybrid, 4 credits, Prof. Kidder
 
Physical properties of rocks in different tectonic environments; deformation; petrofabric analysis. Geotectonics; orogenesis, earthquakes, interpretation of geologic maps and mapping techniques. Includes a two-night weekend field trip. 3 lect., 2 lab. hr./wk
 
EES 79903 – [63267] Commoning
At College of Staten Island:         F, 11:45 a.m. – 1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Dawson, Course open to EES Students only
 
From Chiapas to Occupy, from the Gezi Park uprising to disaster communism during the pandemic, acts of commoning have been central to new political imaginaries and formations over the last decades. Capitalism was born, Marx famously argued, when peasants were forcibly torn from their means of subsistence and hurled onto urban labor markets as free and “unattached” proletarians. As Marx evocatively put it, “the history of this expropriation is written in the annals of mankind in letters of blood and fire.” Recent theorists of capitalism have asserted that the process of violent dispossession not only has continued unabated for the last five centuries but has been intensifying during the neoliberal age. Indeed, for many, today’s enclosures are the leading edge of contemporary capitalism. We live in a period of violent land grabbing and resource extraction that is pushing planetary systems towards terminal breakdown.

This seminar will explore contemporary processes of – and resistance to - capitalist and neocolonialist enclosure. Our conversations will be oriented around three key theoretical and political interventions. The first is the assertion that enclosure and extraction pertain not just to material things like land and minerals but also to relatively immaterial social resources such as information, culture, and even affect. The commons is thus a social form that is constantly created and recreated. The corollary of this, and the second key theoretical hypothesis of the seminar, is the idea that the commons is not solely a thing but a social practice. The commons, in other words, is the space of social relation created in and through acts of mutual aid and solidarity. Lastly, we will explore the extent to which commoning presents political possibilities beyond the stale opposition between the vampiric free market and top-down state power.  The seminar will excavate experiences of commoning, and of capitalist extraction and decomposition, across six key sectors: land, water, cities, social reproduction, social media, and energy. We will track how these contested processes manifest in the letters of blood and fire through which today’s acts of dispossession are recorded. How does commoning affect literary fabulation, and, conversely, how does representation affect struggles over the commons? Does commoning require or catalyze new genres of expression? Is there such a thing as a common or commoning voice or mode of narration? We will read and discuss work by the following authors, activists, and theorists: Chris Abani, Sarah Brouillette, Octavia Butler, Pierre Dardot & Christian Laval, Bernadine Evaristo, Silvia Federici, Matthew Gandy, Amitav Ghosh, Guerrilla Media Collective, Jennifer Haigh, Mohsin Hamid, Garrett Hardin, Fredric Jameson, Michael Hardt & Toni Negri, Peter Linebaugh & Marcus Rediker, Justin McGuirk, Sandro Mezzadra & Brett Neilson, Timothy Mitchell, Fred Moten & Stefano Harney, José Esteban Muñoz, Elinor Ostrom, Arundhati Roy, Raja Shehadeh, Olivia Sudjic, Latife Tekin, Siva Vaidhyanathan, Alys Weinbaum, Eyal Weizman.
 
EES 79903 – [63271] Climate Change and Social Change
At the GC:     R, 4:15 – 6:15, Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Brownstein, Course open to EES Students only
 
Climate change will be among the most influential forces shaping human life in the 21st century and beyond, if not the most influential force. It is not just a technical problem, an environmental issue, a moral challenge, or a political quandary. Rather, as environmental engineer Costa Samaras put it, climate change is the landscape on which our future unfolds. While there is well-developed philosophical literature on some aspects of climate change, this course focuses on topics in need of more attention from philosophers. As such, the course presents an opportunity for graduate students to begin work in areas that likely will, and should, gain prominence over time. We will consider the cultural, political, psychological, economic, and conceptual changes needed in the face of the climate crisis. Specifically, we will discuss (1) the political psychology of climate voter behavior; (2) the history and recent growth of authoritarianism, right-wing populism, and “eco-fascism,” and the prospects for democracy in a heated world; (3) climate justice and the relationship between prejudice, inequality, and decarbonization; (4) and “individual” vs. “structural” approaches to social change. While no specialist knowledge is required, students should expect readings to draw widely from the social and behavioral sciences, and thus to become familiar with multi-disciplinary literatures and methods by means of which they can make their own work relevant to the climate crisis. Roughly speaking, every other class will have a guest speaker, and the course will conclude with a student-led workshop as well as a one-day mini-conference on individual and structural approaches to social change. Confirmed guests for the course include Nikhar Gaikwad (Political Science, Columbia), Sally Haslanger (Philosophy, MIT), Daniel Kelly (Philosophy, Purdue), Alex Madva (Philosophy, Cal Poly Pomona), Leigh Raymond (Political Science, Purdue), David Roberts (Vox Media), Samy Sekar (Analyst Institute), and Olúfémi Táíwò (Philosophy)
 
EES 79903 - [63269] Participatory Democracy and Social Movements
At the GC:     T, 11:45 am-1:45 pm, Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Su, Course open to EES Students only
 
This seminar takes a look at what ordinary citizens do to shape public policies and engage in politics— in ways other than voting. We explore the notion that popular participation can make democratic governance more legitimate, fair, and effective. We examine theories and existing evidence on the promises and challenges of participatory democracy— alternatively called bottom-up participation, maximal democracy, or direct democracy. Specifically, we will examine forms and functions of civil society from a comparative perspective by looking at specific examples of (1) participatory institutions (neighborhood councils, urban budgeting, school governance, etc.), (2) participation in non-governmental organizations and development projects, and (3) social movements around the world (potential cases include landless people’s movements, transnational networks, mothers of political dissidents who have “disappeared,” AIDS protest groups, etc.). Sometimes, these three categories blur into one another. We will try to focus on case studies in “Global South” middle-income countries like Brazil, Argentina, India, and South Africa, though we also include domestic cases as a point of reference. How much should ordinary citizens participate in policymaking, and how? Under what circumstances?
 
EES 79903 – [63272] Writing for Publication
At the GC:     T, 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Su, Course open to EEs Students only
 
This seminar aims to help students to advance research projects and dissertations for publication, by drawing out data, analysis, and arguments for a journal article submission. Because of time constraints, we cannot also tackle book reviews, turning the dissertation into a book, etc. Because the academic job market has placed increasing pressure on doctoral candidates to publish journal articles foremost, we are strategically focusing on this goal. Over the course of the seminar, we will each employ standard protocols for journal article submission, and decide on whether and how we might want to take risks in our articles. We will pay special attention to issues of audience, clarity, and impact (what do we ultimately want folks to take away from our article?) throughout. We’ll be paying attention to the craft of good writing, to the specific constraints and vagaries of academic writing (especially journal article-writing), and to life conditions (accessing resources, making time, space, and the focusing power to write, as well as managing concurrent projects and simultaneously finishing a dissertation/ going on the job market) along the way. We will work on transforming our research into publishable articles, drafting, editing, and revising our work, and reflecting upon our work through peer review. In order to successfully complete this course, enrolled students must have completed a substantial portion of their fieldwork and analysis. By the end of the semester, each of us should have a journal article manuscript that is ready to submit. Interested students should email Celina Su (csu3@gc.cuny.edu) with a brief description of your current project/ proposed paper in advance.

EES 79903 – [63273] Reading the Grundrisse
At the GC:     T, 4:15p.m. – 6:15 p.m., The People’s Forum, 3 credits, Prof. David Harvey, Course open to EES students only
 
The course entails a close reading of Marx's Grundrisse.
 
EES 79903 -  [63292] Digital Earth
At Hunter College:        W, 9:10 a.m. – 10:20 a.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Vance, Course Open to EES Students only
 
Introduction to geospatial technologies and how they are being used to capture, store, process, and display the vast amount of geospatial information about our planet. Online lab experiments using publicly available geospatial technologies. Lectures and labs online plus required field trip.
 
EES 79903 – [63293] GIS Analysis
At Hunter College:        R, 9:10 a.m. – 1:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Sun, Course Open to EES Students only
 
Advanced principles and operation of GIS, including 3-D, network and field representations and their respective analysis functions. Development of geoprocessing workflows. Geographic information science approaches to geo-spatially relevant methods, including geophysical, landscape ecological, econometric, epidemiological, and regional science.”  “Expansion of GTECH 70900 and 71000 concentrating on advanced concepts in GeoInformatics, including data models, algorithms, GIS analysis and scripting.
 
EES 79904 – [61193] Intro Geographic Information Sciences
At Hunter College:        M/W, 5:35 p.m. – 8:25 p.m., Rm. TBA, 4 credits, Prof. Albrecht, Course open to EES students only
 
Introduces the means by which geographers analyze the world to better understand geography and geographical processes. It offers an introduction to various methods for interpreting and analyzing spatial data including, cartography, GIS, remote sensing, spatial statistics and survey research. Material Fee: $15 
 
EES 79903 – [63260]​ Hydrology
At Hunter College:        M, W, 4:10 – 5:25  p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Ni-Meister, Course open to EES Students only
 
Course Description: Provides students an understanding of the hydrologic cycle - the most fundamental principle of hydrology and emphasizes an understanding of the complete hydrological cycle processes at global, regional and watershed scales.

EES 79903 – [63294] GIS Applic:  Urban
At Hunter College:        R, 5:35 p.m. – 8:25 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Gong, Course open to EES students only
 
Discussion of data, methodology, and examples of using GIS to solve urban problems in economic, social, planning, and political settings. Students are expected to conduct small research projects addressing real world issues.
 
EES 79903 – [63295] Data Analysis and Visualization
At Hunter College:        T, 2:10 p.m. – 5:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Frei, Marcotullio and Sun, Course pen to EES students only
 
This course will introduce students to the use of R programming for univariate and multivariate analysis and visualization, mapping and spatial analysis. By the end of the course students will be able to identify and describe basic computer language programming concepts including syntax, data types, variables, operators, loops, and functions; use RStudio or another IDE for R to develop, test, and execute R script; operationalize these concepts to perform basic statistical, mapping, spatial analyses and data management tasks using R; and apply basic statistics and visual analytics enabled through R to examine and analyze real world geographic issues.
 
EES 79903 – [63296] Intro:  Geographic Info System
At Hunter College:        W, 5:35 p.m. – 9:25 p.m., Rm. TBA,3 credits, Prof. Williamson, Course open to EES students only
 
Thorough introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) using multiple desktop and web-based GIS with an emphasis on spatial data handling and project management. MS GeoInformatics students are recommended to take GTECH 71000 at the same time as this course.
 
EES 79904  - [61192] – GeoComputation I
At Hunter College:        R, 5:35 p.m. – 9:25 p.m., Rm. TBA, 4 credits, Prof. Green, Course open to EES students only
 
A comprehensive course in programming that concentrates on object-oriented programming methods and algorithms specific to geographic and cartographic applications.
 
EES 79903 – [63297] Spatial Analysis of Urban Health
At Lehman College:        M, 6:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Maantay,  Course open to EES Students only
 
This course focuses on urban health issues using a geographical framework and covers topics such as the historical perspective of health, place, and society; mapping and measuring health and health impacts; the social and spatial patterning of health; the geography of health inequalities and disparities; health and social/spatial mobility; and the effects of urban segregation, overcrowding, and poverty on disease. Current research, as well as the seminal early works on the geographies of health, will be reviewed. Geographic Information Science will be used in the laboratory exercises to illustrate the theoretical concepts and to produce worked examples of health geography.
 
EES 79903 – [63298] Basic Mapping Science
At Lehman College:        T, 6:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m., Rm. TBA.,3 credits, Prof. Machado, Course open to EES Students only
 
This course provides a focus on mapping: how to use maps to obtain information about a wide variety of topics and how to create maps to display and analyze both quantitative and qualitative data. Discussions include mental maps, aerial photos, remotely sensed images, computer-assisted cartography, and Geographical Information Systems (GIS). Laboratory work includes digital map applications and GIS mapping exercises.
 
EES 79903 – [63299] Geostatistics and Spatial Analytical Concepts
At Lehman College:        W, 6:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m., Rm., TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Musa, Course open to EES Students only
 
Explores the emerging fields of geostatistics and spatial analysis. Various quantitative techniques will be studied and applied to real-world geographic problems. Exploratory spatial data analysis (ESDA) will be done within multiple GIS packages such as ArcGIS and GeoDa. Traditional statistics (e.g. incidence ratio, correlation, regression) as well as geo-statistics such as spatially-lagged regression, spatial error model, and geographically weighted regression (GWR) will be performed within various packages including SPSS, GWRIII, GeoDa, ArcGIS, [R], and Excel.
 
EES 79903 – [63300] Contaminant Hydrology
At Queens College:        M, 5:00pm – 7:50pm, Online, 3 credits, Prof. Blanford, Course open to EES Students only
 
This course provides a largely quantitative understanding of the processes controlling physical transport and biogeochemical reactions that determine contaminant concentrations in groundwater resources. The content will include the sources and different types of groundwater contaminant, the mechanisms that control contaminant behavior, and the most up-to-date technologies for groundwater remediation.
 
EES 79904 -  [61194] – Natural Hazards and Risk Analysis
At Lehman College:        R, 6:00 p.m. – 10:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 4 credits, Prof. Gorokhovich, Course open to EES Students only
 
Fundamentals of the natural hazards and disasters origin; physical and social implications; methods of quantitative and qualitative analysis; elements of geographic, geological, social and political analysis applied to risk estimation and mitigation and management measures. Use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) tools and analytical techniques in lab exercises and assignments.
 
EES 79904 - [61195] – Workshop in GISc Research
At Lehman College:        F, 6:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m., Meets once per month, Rm. TBA, 4credits, Prof. Maantay, Course open to EES Students only
 
An advanced examination of mapping and of new computer-aided technologies in the natural and social sciences, including research design and methodology and designing and conducting an independent GIS research project, conforming to generally acceptable professional geographical practices and techniques, under the supervision of faculty.

EES 79902 – [64879] Marine Conservation Biology
At Queens College:         T, 6:00 pm – 7:50 pm., Online, 2 credits, Prof. Waldman, Course open to EES Students only
 
Marine Conservation Biology is an emerging discipline that seeks to best manage the seas, from local through global levels.  It is highly synthetic, drawing from population genetics; evolutionary biology; natural history; population and community ecology; and environmental studies.  This 2-hour seminar course will introduce students to the core principles of marine conservation biology.  It also will draw on numerous case histories involving historical ecology, overfishing, climate change, acidification, dead zones, and management solutions.  Readings will be from the primary literature.  Issues will be examined within a biological framework, but also in the context of social and legal concerns, leading towards each student developing their own “sea ethic” and a prediction of the state of the seas in 2050.

EES 79903 – [63301] Environmental Microbiology
At Queens College:        T,/R, 9:15 a.m. – 10:30 a.m., Online, 3 credits, Prof. O’Mullan
 
A basic understanding and appreciation of microbial processes that may be applicable to students interested in geology, ecology, and environmental science. It covers the fundamental aspects of microbial biology and ecology with a particular emphasis on the roles of microorganisms in sustaining the web of life and earth systems. Specific areas of focus include microbial energetics and yield, enzymes and growth, cell structure and physiology, metabolic and genetic regulation, microbial/environmental interactions, and biogeochemical cycles. The study of microbial diversity and activity will be tightly coupled to the concept of Earth as a dynamic system.

EES 79903 – [63302] Emerging Topics in Hydrology
At Queens College:           T/R, 5:00 p.m. – 6:15 p.m., Online, 3 credits, Prof. Eaton, Course open to EES Students only
 
This seminar course will focus on major global groundwater issues of the 21st century, organized around weekly readings enhanced by online materials, with periodic discussions of corresponding technical journal articles as needed
 
EES 79903 – [63303] Environmental Impact Statement
At Queens College:        W, 5:00 p.m. – 8:50 p.m., Online, 3 credits, Prof. Helman, Course open to EES Students only

This course is aimed at developing an understanding of the process of environmental impact assessment [EIA] in the context of preparing environmental documents, primarily environmental impact statements [EISs], to fulfill the requirements of the various environmental laws and regulations, primarily the National Environmental Policy Act [NEPA] and the myriad of laws and regulations that fall within its purview. Students will learn the requirements of environmental documentation, how such documents are developed, and the role that EIA plays in their development by participating in the preparation of a written proposal and supporting presentation to demonstrate how they would develop an EIS for a major project in the New York metropolitan area. Students will be divided into teams and each team will prepare a proposal independently of the other teams. Teams will compete with each other to “win the job” of preparing the EIS. The course also involves in-class group exercises to develop an understanding EIA and EIS requirements, as well as individual homework assignments, and (possibly) a final exam. In addition to the written proposal, each team will give a presentation about their proposal and answer questions posed by a panel of reviewers about the proposal.
 
EES 79904 - [61195]  – Analytical Techniques in Environmental Geosciences
At Queens College:          W, 5:00 p.m. – 8:50 p.m., Science Building, D-243, 34 credits, Prof. Bracco, Course open to EES Students only
 
Course description: The objective of this course is to train students in field and laboratory techniques commonly used to characterize the chemical conditions important for contaminant transport in the environment and to characterize the interaction between organisms and their environment. Various sampling, field and laboratory chemical and biological analytical techniques appropriate for surface water, groundwater, and coastal water are practiced, including those used to assay trace contaminants and microorganisms. Instrumental analysis and molecular techniques are introduced when applicable.
 
EES INDEPENDENT STUDY/DISSERTATION SUPERVISION
 
EES 80500        Independent Study 1-6 credits, Staff, Course open to EES Students only. Permission of Executive Officer Required
 
EES 81000        Research for the Doctoral Dissertation 1-3 credits, Staff, Course open to EES Students only; Permission of Executive Officer Required
 
EES 90000        Dissertation Supervision 1 credit, Staff, Course open to EES Students only 

FALL 2020 COURSES

Ph.D Program in Earth and Environmental Sciences Fall 2020 Course Schedule


EES REQUIRED COURSES 


EES 70900 – [58040]  Geographic Thought and Theory 
At the GC:    R, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Gilmore, Course open to EES Students only

Geographic Thought and Theory examines the contemporary practice of human geography across a broad range of methodologies. The geographer’s task is to identify and explain co-constitutive interdependencies that write the world at all scales. Environment, climate, gender, race, class, territoriality, citizenship, region, scale, and capitalism are key categories of analysis for the course.

EES 71600 – [58038]  Earth Systems I 
At the GC:    M, 5:00 – 8:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Cherrier/Salmun, Course open to all GC students

Overall Goals of the Earth Systems Courses
Course, Description & Objectives
Student Learning Outcomes
Readings, Attendance & Participation in Class
Reference Books


EES 79901 – [58037]   Current Issues in EES 
At the GC:    R, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 1 credit, Prof. Katz, Course open to EES Students only

EES 79903 – [58080]    The Nature of Scientific Research 
At the GC:   T, 11:45 a.m., 1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Carmalt/Groffman, Course open to EES Students only

The purpose of this course is to examine the philosophy and practice of science, with a focus on Earth and Environmental Sciences and Geography. The course has been redesigned in recent years to focus on improving communications and collaboration between the Natural Sciences and Social Sciences, and it therefore incorporates contributions from multiple EES faculty.

This is a course that focuses on taking a step back from our immediate research in order to ask how we do what we do in terms of asking questions, formulating theories, and collecting data. Each session is framed as a discussion, and students are expected to bring their own interests, training, and curiosity in order to facilitate cross-disciplinary communication.

EES 80200 – [58048] Proposal Writing
At the GC:  R, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Price, Course open to EES students only

This course provides hands-on experience writing a research proposal for external funding. Because of the applied nature of the subject matter, this course will be run in a workshop format whereby the majority of our time will be spent writing toward a deliverable (the proposal) as opposed to listening to professor-centered lectures. Peer review will comprise much of our work together, which is appropriate given that peer review is – at all levels – the coin of our academic realm, such that becoming a solid peer reviewer is an important skill to develop. That being noted, there is a fair amount of written advisement out there on proposal writing, so we will be doing some background reading as well from around the social sciences. Roughly half of our in-class time will entail discussion of a proposal-related topic, and half will entail peer workshops of your ongoing proposal writing. Because the National Science Foundation (NSF) 1) funds so much research in the social sciences, 2) has a highly defined proposal format, and 3) has internal units that span (and solicits reviews from across) the social sciences, it is considered the gold standard of proposals. In this class you will produce a proposal suitable for submission to the NSF DDRI (Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement) program.


EES ELECTIVES
 

EES 79903 – [58091]   Carceral Geography
At the GC:   W, 4:15 p.m. – 6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Gilmore, Instructor Permission Only, Open to EES Students only

Carceral Geography explores the production of scale, space, and place through the co-constitutive interdependencies of race, gender, sexuality, disability, crisis, capitalism, and territory. The purpose of thecourse is to specify internationalist dimensions of abolition geography. Permission of instructor required.

EES 79903 – [58096]   The Rise of the New Right
At the GC:  M, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Varsanyi, Course open to all GC students 

In this class, we will seek to understand the origins and rise of the New Right in the United States as it has taken shape in the latter half of the twentieth century to the present.  We will seek to identify the origins of the New Right, what defines it, explore the varied geographies of the movement, and identify the constituents of the contemporary conservative coalition.  In addition, we will explore the actors and institutions that have played a role in the expansion of the New Right (i.e. courts, state and local governments, Tea Party, conservative think tanks, lawyers, evangelical Christians, militias), and the issues that motivate the movement (i.e. immigration, environment, white nationalism, voter suppression/integrity, neoliberal economic policies, free speech, etc.).  This is a reading-intensive, discussion-oriented seminar in which we will survey a broad sweep of the recent literature on the New Right.  While the class focuses most specifically on the US context, papers based on international/comparative case studies are welcome.  Students will be required to write brief (300 word) weekly reading memos and a 12-15-page research paper.      

Readings will include selections from the following, inter alia:

Readings


EES 79903 – [58092]   Introduction to GIS:  Methods and Applications
At the GC:   T, 6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Machado/Gorokhovich, Course open to all GC Students

Introduction to the fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) including vector and raster data formats and applicable analytical techniques. Emphasis on spatial data representation, organization, analysis, and data integration including remote sensing. Theoretical and technical concepts are reinforced through hands-on exercises illustrating GIS applications in hydrology, conservation biology, engineering, geology (topographic analysis), multicriteria-evaluation, and decision making

EES 79903 – [58094] Anticapitalist Thought and the Politics of Dispossession
At the GC:   T 4:15 p.m. – 6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Harvey/Loperena, Course open to EES Students only

The corona virus pandemic sweeping the world is revealing much about the vulnerabilities of neoliberal capitalism. This lecture and discussion-based seminar will seek to bring together critical perspectives of political economy, race and gender politics and postcolonial theory in relation to the contemporary crisis. ​​

EES 79903 – [58098]   Critical Social and Environmental Theories
At the GC:   R, 9:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Diaz Cordona, Course open to EES Students only

This course is intended to provide a broad overview of theoretical approaches to the study of space, place and culture in environmental psychology and the social sciences. The course is theoretical in nature, concerned with the capacity of concepts to help us critically understand spatial and environmental phenomena, and the role of historical contexts and underlying assumptions in shaping the lives of theories. The goal is for each participant to engage closely enough with seminal theoretical works in social, cultural, and spatial theory as to be able to effectively put them to use as they navigate other coursework and define and advance their own research interests and projects. Weekly topics include: conceptualizing the city and the urban; varieties of ecological thinking; the social production of space; functionalism, structuralism, post-structuralism; culture, meaning, performativity; practice theory and structuration theory; racialization and coloniality; globality, mobility and migration; and actor-networks and assemblages, among others.

EES  79902 – [58100] Sustainability and Democratic Processes
At the GC:    T, 4:15 p.m. – 6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Saegert, Course open to EES Students only

Complex and high-stakes global processes undermine environmental and social sustainability.  The costs and burdens fall unequally on less powerful groups at the same time these groups have less access to the decision-making processes at the global, corporate and national level.  Therefore, those whose voices and interests are not included, often turn to local activism and demands for local, direct democratic practices ranging from activist disruption through development of local deliberative democratic forums to intervene.  While less powerful groups share the experience of exclusion, within these groups interests and consequences also vary and are sometimes at odds for members of the groups.  This class will use case studies of local practices including alternative economies approaches to just sustainability.  The seminar style class will involve discussions of readings, a debate on the Green New Deal, and workshopping of student seminar papers, research ideas, and projects.  Readings and guest speakers are drawn from Anthropology, Law, Sociology, Geography, and Critical Social and Environmental Psychology.  A final seminar paper is required.  Ph.D. students considering or working on a sustainability-related research project or dissertation will find this a good setting to develop ideas, test out research design and methods approaches or interpret existing data.  For MALS students in the Social and Environmental Justice track, the course will provide a good setting for developing the MALS thesis.

EES 79903 – [58102]   Spaces of Security
At the GC:   F, 11:45 a.m. – 1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Low, Course open to EES Students only

This graduate seminar examines the efforts of anthropologists and geographers to attend to the spaces and politics of security. Today, security is one of the most prominent topics on the public’s mind midst a global pandemic and increasing concerns about the biopolitics of everyday as people search for safety and security.  The current crisis draws upon a long history of security concerns that are as diverse in their objects (terrorism, crime and criminals, immigration, war and violence) as the socio-political moments that produce them. A growing ethnographic literature explores security’s various dimensions, from studies of military action and everyday violence to specific security infrastructures (e.g. Lutz 2002; Low 2003; Masco 2006). Some anthropologists are also exploring the contemporary problematization of security by exploring assemblages and novel experiments (e.g. Lakoff and Collier 2009; Maguire 2014; Samimian-Darash and Stalcup 2016). Of course, the breath of this ethnographic literature presents a significant challenge to integrate and critique and this is the primary objective of our readings and discussion.

After a review of the foundational work of Foucault (1977-1978), Davis (1998),  Butler (2004) Brown (2010), Lowe (2015 and Haley (2016), the course explore how specific securitization processes are promoted, enhanced and reproduced by 1) infrastructures of exclusion and inclusion; 2) increased visibility through borderization, stereotyping and racial profiling; 3) spatial governance through enclosure and surveillance; and 4) discursive practices that obscure the violence and destruction potential of securitization practices.  Students are asked to offer their own ethnographic research or research proposal that considers various contexts and historical periods to build a theoretical framework that emphasizes the spatial and temporal as well as the political in the study of security.  Through our discussions we should better understand this elusive but dangerous concept that produces a reality that is changing the life chances of millions of people.

Course requirements:
Ethnographic or historical project (or proposal) for a study of some aspect of security and/or the politics, infrastructures or technologies that contribute to security claims and the creation of security spaces.  Reading and discussion in class (virtual or otherwise).  Leading a section of the class focused on their interest area.

EES 79903 – [58104] Gender and Environment/Sexuality and Space
At the GC:  W, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Katz, Course open to all GC students

This course will address questions of space, place, and nature in relation to gender and sexuality from a variety of theoretical frameworks.  A broad range of topics will be considered such as the sedimentations of gender and sexuality in built form, work environments, play environments, “discrimination by design,” the making of queer space-times, public-private space, performance and spatiality, domestic architectures, embodied geographies, global/intimate geographies, ecofeminisms and feminist approaches to nature, and the hidden and invisible geographies all around us. We will critically engage readings from the humanities, social sciences, and environmental design disciplines concerning the social construction of space, the production of nature, and the making of place in everyday life. 

EES 79903 – [58105]  Global Feminisms
At the GC:  M, 11:45 a.m. – 1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Oza, Course open to EES students only

With the rise of authoritarian regimes around the world, what insights do feminist movements and theorizing offer? What are the fault lines between different forms of feminisms? How do liberal feminist ideals and principles intertwine with an imperial agenda? What are the links and divergences between Islamophobia and racism? Who should be the arbiter of “equality,” “fairness,” and “human rights”? What ethical questions shape the practices of feminism and feminist politics both domestically and internationally? What is the relationship between modes of production, political economy, and gender politics? What are the possibilities and limits of a transnational feminist politics?  What are the material conditions/structural factors which enable and/or undermine transnational feminist solidarity? This course grapples with some of these questions in the wake of rapid world altering changes.

We will explore the gender dynamics of racial, ethnic, and economic relations of power in domestic, international, and transnational settings. We will examine feminist scholarship produced by and about American women of color, women from the global south, and other social and political actors whose experiences and thinking have shaped contemporary ideas about gender, power, and international political economies. We will explore how both self-identified feminists and people who do not consider themselves feminists write about and understand gender, justice, human rights, tolerance, agency, imperialism, and other relevant topics. We will also examine how women and self-identified feminists practice solidarity across and within national boundaries, paying attention to the possibilities and constraints that shape transnational feminist activism. We will look at both empirical and theoretical texts from a range of academic disciplines.

EES 79902 – [58041]   Presenting Research in the Earth and Environmental Sciences 
At Brooklyn College:    W, 4:15 -5:55 p.m., 2 credit, Rm. TBA, Prof. Cherrier, Course open to EES Students only

Principles and practices of presenting original scientific research at scientific meetings; concise technical writing; graphics (maps, graphs, photographs); PowerPoint presentation design; poster design.

EES 79902 – [58042]    Professional Portfolios for Earth and Environmental Scientists 
At Brooklyn College:     M, 6:30 p.m. – 9:15 p.m., 2 credit, Rm. TBA, Prof. Powell, Course open to EES Students only

Purpose of a professional portfolio; design and format; selecting material; reflection on education and career preparedness and planning.

EES 79903 – [58106] Watershed Analysis    
At Brooklyn College:      T, 6:30 p.m.  – 9:15 p.m., 3 credits, Rm. TBA Prof. Firas, Course open to EES Students only

Analysis of the hydrologic cycle from a watershed perspective using large datasets, basic computer programming, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), watershed modeling, and sensing.

EES 79903 – [58108] Seminar in Clay Minerals and Nanoparticles
At Brooklyn College:      W.,6:05 p.m. – 9:45 p.m., 3 credits, Rm. TBA Prof. Aja, Course open to EES Students only

Principles of mineral behavior; structure of layer silicates; types of layer silicates; clay minerals groups; nanomaterials and nanoparticle minerals; clays in soils and sedimentary environments; burial diagenesis of clays; clay as paleoclimate indicators; electrochemical properties of clays; thermodynamic stability of clays; environmental uses of clays; bentonites and other industrial clays; clay formation and alterations during ore mineralizations.

EES 79903 – [58109]    Geostatistics 
At Brooklyn College:      W., 6:05 p.m. – 9:45 p.m., 3 credits, Rm. TBA Prof. Cranganu, Course open to EES Students only

Description and interpretation of geological and geophysical data through statistics. Major topics include statistical description of data; collection of data; probability; hypothesis testing; variance; correlation; spatial analysis multivariate analysis, graphical display of data, common distribution models, sampling and regression. The variogram as a tool for modeling spatial correlation, variogram estimation and modeling. Introduction to spatial mapping and prediction with kriging, integration of remote sensing and other ancillary information using co-kriging.

EES 79901 – [58039]      Earth and Env Seminar 
At City College:      M/W, 12:45 – 1:45 p.m., Rm. MS-107, 1 credit, Prof. Tzortziou, Course open to EES Students only

Presentations and discussions by faculty and guest speakers on current topics in the area of earth and environmental science.

EES 79903 – [58115]     Global Env Hazards 
At City College:      M/W, 9:00 a.m., - 10:15 a.m., Rm. MS-4, 3 credits, Prof. Segni, Course Open to EES Students only

Occurrence of ground water. Basic equations and concepts of ground water flow. Flow nets. Methods of ground water investigation.

EES 79903 – [58113]    Env Assmnt 
At City College:      S, 10:00 a.m., - 12:30 p.m., Rm. MS-117, 3 credits, Prof. TBA, Course Open to EES Students only

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to good commercial and customary practices in the United States of America for conducting Phase II environmental site assessments (ESA). A Phase II ESA is an evaluation process for confirming and quantifying the presence of hazardous substances or petroleum products in environmental media (i.e., soil, rock, groundwater, surface water, air, soil gas, sediment) throughout a contaminated site. A Phase II ESA typically includes a determination through field screening and chemical testing of the geological, hydrogeological, hydrological, and engineered aspects of the site that influence the presence of hazardous substances or petroleum products (e.g., migration pathways, exposure points) and the existence of receptors and mechanisms of exposure. Students are automatically enrolled in the 40-hour OSHA HAZWOPER (Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response Standard) certification program which applies to employees who are engaged in clean-up operations that are conducted at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites.  Graduate students receive extensive training on mainstream quality review and assessment methods of completed Phase I ESAs in preparation to enter the workforce in upper level management positions in the environmental engineering consulting industry. Students are automatically enrolled in the 40-hour OSHA HAZWOPER (Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response Standard) certification program which applies to employees who are engaged in clean-up operations that are conducted at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites.

EES 79903 – [58112]    Fund Atmospheric Science 
At City College:     M, W 3:30 p.m. – 4:45 p.m., Rm. MS-1128, 3 credits, Prof. Towey, Course Open to EES students only

This course is an introductory survey to the field of Atmospheric Science, with special attention given to atmospheric thermodynamic, dynamics, and weather systems. Atmospheric science is a complex field of study that builds on physics, chemistry, and math, hence the prerequisites. This course is intended to provide a solid foundation for masters students studying earth sciences and/or environmental remote sensing.

EES 79903 – [58115]   Global Env Hazards 
At City College:     M/W 9:00 – 10:15 a.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Lampousis, Course Open to EES Students only

Study of important, naturally-occurring destructive phenomena, such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, and coastal flooding. Long-term causes and remediation of these problems. Topics will focus on consequences to urban environments.

EES 79903 – [58116]  Ground Water Hydrology    
At City College:     M 5:00 p.m-7:30 p.m., Rm. MS-044, 3 credits, Prof. Zhang, Course Open to EES Students only

Occurrence of ground water. Basic equations and concepts of ground water flow. Flow nets. Methods of ground water investigation.

EES 79903 – [58117]   Env Geophysics 
At City College:     F, 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Kenyon, Course Open to EES Students only

Advanced work in the application of geophysics to environmental and engineering problems. Hands-on   work and demonstrations of seismic, electrical, electromagnetic, and magnetic instruments and t techniques. Survey design and execution. Computer analysis of survey results.

Prerequisite:   a standard, 2-semester, calculus-based, introductory sequence of physics courses

EES 79903 – [58118]   Intro GIS 
At City College:     T, 5:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m., Rm. MS-044, 3 credits, Prof. TBA, Course Open to EES Students only

This course represents a comprehensive attempt to introduce students to major aspects of the multifaceted GIS production process, including data acquisition, editing, modeling, analysis, and cartographic output. EAS 330 is designed for students of the Earth and atmospheric sciences, as well as other disciplines. Lectures will introduce the theory and science behind Geographic Information Systems. Laboratory exercises will complement the lectures by introducing respective applications within the GIS software environment.

EES 79904 – [58119]   Sus Terres, Aqu, Atm Sys  
At City College:     R, 5:20 p.m. – 8:00 p.m., Rm. MS-044, Prof. McDonald, Course Open to EES Students only

Overview of critical Earth systems and their interrelationships with emphasis in sustainability; Lecture component places environmental issues in an ecological framework; Hands-on laboratory component introduces concepts and methods used in Earth system analysis with emphasis in sustainable management of aquatic, terrestrial and atmospheric systems. Data set analysis tasks are assigned and student presentations are given throughout this class.

Sus Terres, Aqu, Atm Sys Lab 
At City College:     W, 5:20 p.m. – 8:00 p.m., Rm. MS-044, Prof. McDonald, Course Open to EES Students only

EES 79904 – [58120]  Mineralogy
At City College:   M/W, 12:00 p.m. – 1:45 p.m. 0 credits, Rm. MS-107, 3 credits, Profs. Wang, Course Open to EES Students only

This class is designed to introduce general concept of mineralogy, including descriptive mineralogy, classification, crystallography, crystal chemistry, analytical and imaging methods and some information of the geological occurrence. This class also includes a lab component, which provides a hand-on opportunity for students to learn how to describe and identify minerals. This class prepares students for more advanced classes including Petrology, Geochemistry, Structural geology, Igneous and metamorphic petrology, Mineral physics, Economic geology, Environmental mineralogy and geology.      

Mineralogy Lab
At City College:   W, 10:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. 3 credits, Rm. T MS-107, 3 credits, Profs. Wang, Course Open to EES Students only

EES 79903 – [58269]   Energy Policy
At Hunter College:    R, 11:10 a.m. – 12:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1022, 3 credits, Prof. Marcontullio, Course open to EES Students only

Course will introduce students to current energy use policies and those proposed for low carbon in the USA at the national scale, although we will also touch on the state and local level efforts.

EES 79903 – [58270]  Sustainable Dev in Countries 
At Hunter College:    T, R, 4:10 -5:25 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Mohamed Ibrahim, Course Open to EES Students only

Analysis of factors that influence sustainable development, e.g., available resources, environment, population, food production, water supply in developing countries.

EES 79903 – [58271]  Quantitative Methods in Geography 
At Hunter College:    W, 9:10 -12:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Allan Frei, Course Open to EES Students only

Application of scientific methods to geographic research, including sampling, distribution measurement, characterizing relationships, multivariate analysis, and a strong focus on computational modeling statistical relationships using either R or Python.

EES 79903 – [58272]  Intro:  Geographic Info Systems 
At Hunter College, T, 5:35 – 9:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-2, 3 credits, Prof. Shipeng Sun, Course Open to EES Students only

Course Overview: In this course, we will cover the whole GIS production process from data modeling and acquisition to editing, analysis, and yes, cartographic output. GTECH 709 addresses students from both geography and other disciplines. Lecture examples, as well as hands-on exercises cover a range of application areas. The course itself is divided into two equally important parts: lectures, which introduce the theory of GIScience, and lab exercises, which help you to familiarize yourself with many aspects of the software. The lectures discuss concepts, data, tools, and major aspects to assignments. The laboratory sessions introduce the geospatial data and software tools needed for accomplishing the assignments. They will start at a very basic level, requiring little more than elementary experience with the Windows operating system. The course utilizes a variety of resources, including the energy and creativity of students in the class.

EES 79903 [58273] Intro:  Geographic Info Systems 
At Hunter College,   M, 5:35 – 9:25 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Shipeng Sun, Course Open to EES Students only

Course Overview: In this course, we will cover the whole GIS production process from data modeling and acquisition to editing, analysis, and yes, cartographic output. GTECH 709 addresses students from both geography and other disciplines. Lecture examples, as well as hands-on exercises cover a range of application areas. The course itself is divided into two equally important parts: lectures, which introduce the theory of GIScience, and lab exercises, which help you to familiarize yourself with many aspects of the software. The lectures discuss concepts, data, tools, and major aspects to assignments. The laboratory sessions introduce the geospatial data and software tools needed for accomplishing the assignments. They will start at a very basic level, requiring little more than elementary experience with the Windows operating system. The course utilizes a variety of resources, including the energy and creativity of students in the class.

EES 79903 – [58274]  Concepts and Theories in GeoInfo 
At Hunter College:  W, 5:35 – 8:25 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Jochen Albrecht, Course Open to EES Students only

Theoretical and conceptual foundations of GeoInformatics and Geographic Information Science. For MS GeoInformatics (MGEOi) students, GTECH 70900 is recommended to be taken at the same time as this course.

EES 79903 – [58275]  Digital Image Process & Lidar
At Hunter College:  M, 5:30 – 9:25 p.m, Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Wenge Ni-Meister, Course Open to EES Students only

Quantitative processing of digital imagery; enhancement, information extraction, classification; algorithms, registration, rectification; and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) technology and principles and applications; lab exercises.

EES 79903 – [58276]  Intro: Carto Design and Geovis 
At Hunter College:  R, 5:35 – 9:25 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Douglas Williamson, Course Open to EES Students only

This course explores fundamental design concepts and considerations in map production and presentation in the context of GIS.  Students will combine computer graphics and cartographic design principles to develop visual representations and analysis of geospatial information.

EES 79903 – [58278] Geospatial Databases 
At Hunter College:    W, 5:35 p.m. - 8:25 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Shipeng Sun, Course open to EES Students only

Methods for analyzing environmental and social spatial data sets. Topics include point pattern analysis, spatial clustering methods, spatial autocorrelation, and kriging.

EES 79903 – [58280]  Environmental Hazards 
At Hunter College:     T, 9:45 a.m. – 11:00 a.m., Rm, TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Lanz-Oca, Course Open to EES Students only

Structure and impact of environmental hazards and the societal responses to them.  Impact of hazards in urban settlements both in the developing world and developed world contexts.

EES 79904 – [58047]  GeoComputation 1 
At Hunter College:    R, 5:35 p.m. – 9:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-1, 4 credits, Prof. Douglas Williamson, Course open to EES Students only

A comprehensive course in programming that concentrates on object-oriented programming methods and algorithms specific to geographic and cartographic applications.

EES 79904 – [58044]  Remote Sensing
At Lehman College:     M, 6:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Machado, Course Open to EES Students only

Fundamentals of remote sensing: energy interactions between the sun, atmosphere, and    features on the earth surface. Structure of raster data, cell size, and both passive and active remote sensing. Spatial, spectral, radiometric and temporal resolution characteristics of different multispectral remotely sensed data using specialized image analysis software.  Students will also be exposed to a wide variety of applications in environmental mapping and monitoring, natural resources management, urban and regional planning, and global change research.

EES 79904 – [58045] Geovisualization and Analytic Cartography 
At Lehman College:     T, 6:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m., TBA, 3 Credits, Prof. Porter-Morgan, Course Open to EES Students only

Students will utilize advanced Geographic Information Science (GISc) and graphic design techniques in tandem with licensed and free software to produce maps and geovisualizations of complex spatial data with a focus on understanding cartographic conventions and principles of good cartographic design.  Maps will be studied critically in terms of their production, interpretation, and relationship to space and place.

EES 79904 – [58046] Water Resources, Hydrological Modeling     
At Lehman College:    R, 6:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 4 credits, Prof. Gorokhovich, Course Open to EES Students only

Principles of hydrology and water resources; analysis of hydrologic data using open-source and commercial Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Statistical and spatial analysis, mapping of critical hydrologic conditions, coupling GIS with hydrologic data analysis and modeling.

EES 79904 – [58043]  Environmental Modeling and Spatial Analysis     
At Lehman College:    W, 6:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m. (Hybrid online meets on six Wednesdays), Rm. TBA, 4 credits, Prof. Maantay, Course Open to EES Students only

In-depth exploration of environmental modeling and spatial analysis with GISc and a focus on current methodologies to prepare more complex analyses and simulations.  Through a series of lectures, GIS laboratory work, and the design of a GIS project, students will have the opportunity to learn more advanced GIS spatial techniques and their applications to environmental analysis and management, urban planning, risk and hazard assessment, and other arenas of public policy and decision-making.

EES 79903 – [58264]  Info Sys and Mapping  
At Queens College:     T, 5:00 p.m. – 7:50 p.m., Rm. SB-E227, 3 credits, Prof. TBA, Course Open to EES

Graduate standing in geology, environmental science, or related discipline. Introduction to the uses of Geographic Information Systems in geologic mapping and environmental fieldwork. Hands-on application of GIS techniques and digital information to prepare base maps, plan field programs, record and analyze data, and prepare professional-quality maps and poster presentations.

EES 79903 – [58265] Environmental Geochemistry  
At Queens College:     W, 5:00 p.m. – 7:50 p.m., Rm. SB-D135, 3 credits, Prof. Bracco, Course Open to EES Students only

This course explores the fundamental geochemical processes regulating the fate and transport of inorganic and organic pollutants in the environment. Both equilibrium and kinetic descriptions of the processes are applied for laboratory and field studies. The effects of these processes on pollutant bioavailability, remediation, and ecotoxicology are discussed.

EES 79903 – [58266] Atmosphere – Biosphere Interactions 
At Queens College:     M, 1:40 p.m. – 4:30 p.m., Rm. SB-D135, 3 credits, Prof. Yi, Course Open to EES Students only

This course focuses on the role of the terrestrial biosphere in climate systems, cycling processes of energy, water, and greenhouse gases. Students will learn to identify environmental problems and suggest solutions that are related to anthropogenic carbon pollution.

EES 79903 – [58267]  Environmental Risk Management 
At Queens College:     M, 5:00 p.m. – 7:50 p.m., Rm. SB-E231, 3 credits, Prof. Gold, Course Open to EES Students only

Prereq.: Background in earth science or other science and familiar with statistical concepts and probability. This course is designed to provide a practical application of earth science to the identification and management of environmental risk.  The class will focus on the tools used by environmental practitioners to address environmental risk associated with, or originating from: industrial operations and processes; business transactions; regulatory policies; natural disasters and anthropogenic events.

EES 79903 - [58268]  Urban Water System Mgt 
At Queens College:     M, 5:00 p.m. – 7:50 p.m., Rm. SB-D135, 3 credits, Prof. Balci, Course Open to EES Students only

This course focuses on integrated water management in urban systems and triple bottom line analysis including environmental, social and economic considerations. Discussion topics will include but not limited to Green Infrastructure (GI) Program implementation in NYC; GI tool box for various soil and site conditions, design parameters and construction; GI research and development; climate resiliency and flood mitigation; water demand management, decentralized systems and water reuse; energy neutrality and GHG emission reduction initiatives. Students will also learn social and economic implications of Integrated Water Management including affordability analysis.  Case studies from national and international urban cities will be provided as examples of successful implementation.
 

EES INDEPENDENT STUDY/DISSERTATION SUPERVISION
 

EES 80500        Independent Study 1-6 credits, Staff, Course open to EES Students only. Permission of Executive Officer Required

EES 81000        Research for the Doctoral Dissertation 1-3 credits, Staff, Course open to EES Students only; Permission of Executive Officer Required

EES 90000        Dissertation Supervision 1 credit, Staff, Course open to EES Students only 
  

 

PAST COURSES

Spring 2020 Courses

Ph.D Program in Earth and Environmental Sciences Spring 2020 Course Schedule

EES 71700 – Earth Systems II [62164]
GC:         W, 2:00-5:00 p.m., Rm., TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Booth and Longpre, Course open to EES Students only

Course Description and Objectives:
This seminar-style course is divided into two parts:

  1. Dynamics and composition of Earth’s Interior, led by Prof. Longpré; and
  2. Atmosphere and climate dynamics, led by Prof. Booth.

Each week, the group will be required to read 2–4 scientific journal articles on pre-determined topics (see tentative list on last page). In class, subgroups will discuss given questions related to the articles, and a designated group member(s) will then summarize the subgroup findings to the entire class and lead the subsequent open discussion. A central objective of this course is the production of a term paper on a topic of the group members’ choice, hopefully related to their Ph.D. research. In addition to learning about the geosphere and atmosphere, by the end of this course you will also have improved your skills at:

  • Reading, understanding, synthesizing and evaluating scientific literature
  • Oral presentation and discussion of scientific results
  • Writing scientific papers
  • Collaborating with your peers

Student Learning Outcomes:
By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Describe the primary evidence that led to scientific consensus on the Plate Tectonics Theory;
  • Discuss mechanisms of core–mantle differentiation in the early Earth and the workings of the geodynamo;
  • Explain the mechanisms of continental crust formation in Earth history;
  • Discuss the evidence for whole vs. layered mantle convection and debate the existence of mantle plumes;
  • Describe key processes within the Subduction Factory;
  • Explain the mechanisms by which volcanic eruptions affect global climate;
  • Explain the links between global energy imbalances and large-scale atmospheric wind circulation patterns and storms;
  • Use first principles of physics to explain differences between the atmosphere and the ocean coupling and atmosphere and land surface coupling;
  • Describe the leading mode of response of the northern hemisphere atmosphere to large-scale forcing: the Northern Annular Mode;
  • Explain the advantages and limitations of General Circulation Models;
  • Explain the difference between natural and forced climate variability;
  • Synthesize and apply theory of the various natural and anthropogenic climate change mechanisms to explain the context of global warming.

Reading summaries (20 %)
You will be expected to have completed the assigned readings; the success of the course relies on this. In teamwork (2 students), you will write 1 reading summary (2 pages each, no more, no less) per week, on the article of your choice, using a standard format to be provided and discussed in class. The summaries will be due before each meeting for upload on Blackboard. A single grade per team will be assigned and will be returned promptly with comments.
Participation and leading discussions (15 %)
This course requires your contributions to discussions in subgroups and to discussion summaries in the full group. Subgroup members should alternate responsibilities to present discussion findings to the whole group and lead the subsequent open discussion. Visual support, i.e. a PDF of the articles, will be available to refer to figures when necessary. Participation will be evaluated throughout the semester.
Term paper (5+20 %)
In no less than 2000 and no more than 3000 words (i.e. ~8–12 double-spaced pages in Times New Roman 12 point font), you will write a term paper on the topic of your choice. Note that the word count excludes the abstract, figure captions and references. Include as many figures as relevant. The abstract should be no more than 250 words written in the third person. Ideally, you will use this opportunity to produce a thorough but concise literature review on your PhD research topic (or closely related). We ask that, in this process, you compile relevant published data and analyze them in a new way. The paper will be done in two steps: (1) A first version worth 5% of the final grade will be due on April 3rd. This first version should contain all the key components of the paper (i.e., title, abstract, introduction, discussion, conclusion, references cited), including references and supporting figures. We will read, provide detailed comments and suggest improvements on this version within 2 weeks. (2) You will submit a final version of your improved paper at the end of the semester (exact date to be announced). The final version of the paper will be worth 20% of the final grade.
Mid-term exam (20 %)
A mid-term exam will take place on March 20th. This will cover topics seen in the first part of the course (Earth’s interior) only.
Final exam (20 %)
A final exam will take place in the final exam period (exact date to be announced). This will cover topics seen in the second part of the course (atmosphere and climate) only.
Notes
Readings, attendance and participation in class: It is expected that group members will arrive to meetings on time and be active participants in all discussion sessions. Attendance to all meetings is expected unless justification for absence is provided prior to the time of meeting.
Blackboard: Blackboard will be routinely used to make announcements, distribute reading materials, and collect writing assignments, so make sure that you regularly check for updates.
Academic integrity: This course is subject to the academic integrity policy at CUNY. Therefore all group members must understand the meaning and consequences of cheating, plagiarism and other academic offences. For details, see:

EES 79901 – Current Issues in EES [62163]
GC:         R, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Rm. 4102/6495, 1 credit, Prof. Varsanyi Course open to EES Students only
 
EES 79903 – Critical Geographies of Human Rights [62246]
GC:        M, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Carmalt, Course open to EES Students only
 
This course looks at how injustice, geography, and law relate to one another. It is interdisciplinary, and organized around three sets of literature: (1) critical human geography (including political ecology) literature that examines how injustices are created and sustained through spatial processes, (2) socio-legal scholarship that focuses on understanding law as a social construction, and (3) public international law scholarship that provides a doctrinal counterpart to social science explanations of injustice. We will draw on case studies ranging from race and urbanization in the United States to historical definitions of belonging for minority populations in Myanmar. Students will be expected to lead class discussions and write a paper on a relevant topic of their choosing.
 
EES 79903 – Ethnography of Space and Place [62250]
GC:        R, 11:45-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Low, Course open to EES Students only
 
Introduction:  The study of the city has undergone a transformation during the past 20 years integrating ever wider theoretical perspectives from anthropology, cultural geography, political economy, urban sociology, and regional and city planning, and expanding its attention to the city as physical, architectural and virtual form.  An emphasis on spatial relations and consumption as well as urban planning and design decision-making provides new insights into material, ideological and metaphorical aspects of the urban environment.  Reliance on ethnography of space and place allows researchers to present an experience-near account of everyday life in urban housing or local markets, while at the same time addressing macro-processes such as globalization and the new urban social order.

This course sketches some of the methodological and theoretical implications of the ethnographic study of the contemporary city using anthropological tools of participant observation, interviewing, behavioral mapping, and theories of space and place to illuminate spaces in modern/post-modern cities and their transformations.  In doing so, I wish to underscore links between the shape, vision and experience of cities and the meanings that their citizens read off screens and streets into their own lives. It begins with a discussion of spatializing culture, that is the way that culture is produced and expressed spatially, and the way that space reflects and changes culture. The subsequent weeks explore different theoretical dimensions, embodied space, the social construction of space, the social production of space, language and discursive space, and digital or ambiguous space. The course also explores a number of special topics including how urban fear is transforming the built environment and the nature of public space both in the ways that we are conceiving the re/building our cities, and in the ways that residential suburbs are being transformed into gated and walled enclaves of private privilege and public exclusion.  The privatization of public space first signaled the profound changes that American cities are undergoing in terms of their physical, social and cultural design.  Currently, however, increased fear of violence and others particularly in urban areas is producing new community and public space forms; locked neighborhoods, blank faced malls in urban areas, armed guard dogs on public plazas, and limited access housing developments are just some examples of how the cultural mood is being “written” on the landscape.      
  
Course Requirements:

  1. Weekly reading and discussion in class.  Each student will be assigned a week to present a reading review and act as the discussion facilitator.
  2. Book review of an ethnography–both oral and written presentation. Oral presentations will be integrated with the theoretical and methodological content of weekly discussions.
  3. Fieldwork project–both oral and written presentation. Students will participate in a fieldwork project related to the course using data collected and analyzed as part of the course content. The analysis will be presented at the conclusion as part of the final requirement to write a paper. Students will be asked to use theoretical materials from the course to recast or rethink their fieldwork projects for their final papers.


EES 79903 - Constructing Urban Futures [62247]
GC:         T, 11:45 am – 1:45 p.m., Rm TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Stabrowski, Course open to EES Students only
 
This seminar examines the urban development process under capitalism, paying particular attention to how visions of the future are constructed and harnessed for urban development projects, and how these visions intersect with capitalist processes of accumulation and dispossession. Grounded in urban geography, yet drawing from a wide range of disciplines, the seminar will explore how competing notions of the ideal city have shaped how urban areas are planned, built, governed, and inhabited. Each week, students will read monographs on particular urban futures such as: the military city; the green city; the creative city; the infrastructural city; and the migrant city. Case studies will draw from cities throughout the world. Participants will be expected to write a research proposal and to participate actively in reading and responding to each other’s work.

EES 79903 – Sustainable Water Management:  Case Studies and Applications [62248]
GC:          M, 6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Balchi, Course open to EES Students only
 
Water utilities and municipalities are being challenged to consider the multifaceted nature of integrated water management in their communities. Several drivers, such as water shortages and droughts, climate change, water quality, changing regulations and policies, aging infrastructure and affordability are causing utilities to manage water in more integrated and innovative ways. This course focuses on integrated water management in urban systems and triple bottom line analysis including environmental, social and economic considerations. Discussion topics will include but not limited to  Green Infrastructure Program implementation in NYC; GI tool box for various soil and site conditions; GI research and development; climate resiliency and flood mitigation; water demand management, decentralized systems and water reuse; energy neutrality and GHG emission reduction initiatives. Students will also learn social and economic implications of Integrated Water Management.  Case studies from national and international urban cities will be provided as examples of successful implementation. 

EES 79903 - Isotope Geochemistry [62249]
GC:          W, 5:15 pm – 7:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Wang, Course open to EES Students only
 
Description: Since its establishment more than a century ago, isotope geochemistry became one of the pivotal foundations of geological sciences. Every year, there are thousands of papers published involving some kinds of isotope systems, and isotope geochemistry is a very useful tool to study solid-earth geochemistry, lunar and planetary sciences, environmental sciences, atmosphere sciences, biology, ecology, and archeology. It can provide quantitative constraints on the time of geological events, tracing fluxes and processes in hydrological, rock, and biological cycles. It can be used as proxies for temperature, pH and oxygen fugacity of geological systems to reconstruct Earth’s histories. In recent years, it has also been applied to forensic sciences. As ASRC (graduate center) installed its first set of Isotope Mass-spectrometers (Mat 253 and Delta V) in 2018, it is a good time to learn some basic knowledge about this field and incorporate it to students’ research, while taking advantage of these wonderful facility in ASRC.

This class will provide an overview on fundamental principles of isotope geochemistry and their applications to specific geologic problems. The course will be for senior undergraduate students and graduate students. The course includes two parts:

  1. Stable isotope geochemistry: an introduction to the physics and chemistry of light stable isotopes, a broad overview of the principles and conceptual techniques used in light stable isotope geochemistry (C, O, S, H, N, Mg) and applications to earth science;
  2. Radiogenic isotope geochemistry: this part of the course will cover basic principles and applications of radiogenic isotope geochemistry. The goal is to familiarize students with how various isotopic systems can be applied in the earth sciences, and to illustrate the important conclusions that have been drawn from them. This course is a QR class, i.e., answers to 80% of homework, mid-term and final exams require quantitative calculation and reasoning. Class credit: 3.

Text book: Isotopes: Principles and Applications (by Gunter Faure) and Principles of stable isotope distribution (by Robert Criss)
Class policy and grades: Attendance to the class is strongly encouraged. The Final grade is based on 50% homework + 20% mid-term + 30% finals.  Mid-term exam will be a 1.5-2.0 hour closed book, closed-note exam, final is a 3-hour closed book and closed-notes exam.
The conversion from points to letter grades is done as follows:
A+          >97                         C+           77-80
A             93-97                     C             73-77
A-           90-93                     C-            70-73
B+           87-90                     D             60-70
B             83-87                     F              < 60
B-            80-83
 
EES 79003- Reading the Grundrisse [62283]
GC:           T, 6:30 p.m. – 8:30, The People’s Forum, 3 credits, Prof. Harvey, Course open to EES Students only
The course entails a close reading of Marx's Grundrisse.
 
EES 79903 Critical Statistical Methods in Psychology [62284]
GC:          R, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., Rm., TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Stoudt, Course open to EES Students only
 
Quantitative designs, methods and analyses persist as the dominant approach to research in psychology, social science and educational studies. Statistical data define knowledge and truth in our culture almost to an obsession. Like any privileged standpoint, quantification – unlike its qualitative counterpart - is largely taken for granted as essential to science and is rarely asked to justify itself as a worthwhile pursuit. While doctoral students are often trained in very technical statistical methods, they are seldom offered an opportunity to approach the subject from critical or even radical perspectives.

This seminar style course will hold intellectual space to unpack statistics as social construction and methodological choice steeped in values, assumptions and consequences. We will engage topics not typically covered in statistics or research methods courses such as the construction of race and the politics of categorization, equations informed by eugenics, the logic of p-values and its implications on knowledge production, the tension of using aggregation to understand psychological processes, big data algorithm bias, the replication crisis, decolonizing research and participatory statistics, statistical story telling as a powerful rhetoric, our trust in probability thinking, and more. This class will emphasize issues of social justice, emancipatory research, and public scholarship; exploring the traditional uses and misuses of quantitative research as well as the long history of critical statistics as a strategy for bottom up policy making, supporting environmental/climate movements, and racial justice organizing.

This course is for any student in Psychology, Social Welfare, Urban Education, Sociology, Earth and Environmental Sciences or anyone else interested in exploring the use of statistics in research and society from a critical perspective. If you are a student seasoned in statistics, this course will hopefully strengthen your future quantitative work by giving you an opportunity to unpack common practices and applications. If you are a student less invested in statistical discourse, this course will hopefully deepen your understanding of quantitative research as well as reframe its potential value for advancing your future scholarship.

Course Requirements:

  1. Have taken introductory research methods with doctoral level knowledge of quantitative design, methods and analyses.
  2. Weekly reading, writing and discussion in class.  Students will be assigned weekly to help review and facilitate discussion of the readings.
  3. A midterm and final paper with the purpose of advancing and deepening the topics we cover in class as related to your own scholarship. 

 
EES 79903 – Core Seminar in Urban Studies – New Urbanism [62286]
GC:           W, 4:15 p.m. – 6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Katz and Sholette, Course open to EES Students only
 
This interdisciplinary seminar is intended to provide a common core for urban studies across the disciplines at the Graduate School.  It will combine the close reading and analysis of key theoretical and social texts from the social sciences, arts, and humanities to think critically about how the city is produced and reproduced every day and over the longue durée.  We will draw on a range of research methods—such as historical, textual, and visual analysis; participant observation and interviews; quantitative data gathering and analysis, including mapping, Census data, administrative data, and open data sources—to look at a variety of cultural forms and material social practices taking and making place in the contested terrains of contemporary New York City.  Among other things, we will be researching such concepts as ‘the city from below,’ ‘municipalism,’ ‘insurgent public space,’ and ‘creative cities.’

EES 81000 – Research for the Doctoral Dissertation 1-3 credits, Faculty, Course open to EES Students only
 
EES 80200 – Proposal Writing [62165]
GC:         R, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Kabachnik, Course open to EES Students only 
 
This course is designed to aid graduate students in the EES program to prepare fieldwork grant applications and dissertation proposals. Topics addressed include defining researchable questions, designing an effective fieldwork plan, research proposal evaluation criteria, peer-review processes, and other theoretical and methodological topics that are relevant to the task of proposal writing. The seminar is organized as an intensive workshop. Participants are asked to embrace ground rules designed to enhance the capacity of the group as a whole to become proficient at proposal writing: all participants must be open to constructive criticism and to the possibility of rethinking parts of their research projects; and everyone must also take a rigorous yet supportive and non-competitive approach to the review of other people’s proposals.​
 
EES 80500 – Independent Study 1-6 credits, Faculty, Course open to EES Students only
 
EES 90000 – Dissertation Supervision, 1 credit, Faculty, Course open to EES Students only

EES 79901 Practicum in Earth and Environmental Science [65163]
B:            TBA, 1 credit, Prof. Cheng, Course Open to EES Students Only Practicum in Earth and Environmental Science 45 hours lab or fieldwork; 1 credit Short-term practical work in a laboratory and/or field-setting; formal report writing.

EES 79903 Lab and Field Techniques using Geospatial Technologies [62251]
B:           TBA, Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Boger, Course open to EES Students only
 
Basics of ArcGIS, including vector and raster data models and analyses, integration of datasets, projections and datums, data editing, and map layouts; collection of geospatial data in the field using handheld GPS units with data dictionaries, total stations, and base stations; importing field data into ArcGIS to edit, analyze and merge with other data sets.

EES 79903 – Geochemistry of Soils [62252]
B:           TBA, Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Cheng, Course open to EES Students only
 
An examination of the physical chemistry of soils including soil mineralogy (formation, relative stability, ion exchange properties) and surface chemistry.

EES 79903 - Groundwater Hydrogeology [62253]
B:           W, 6:05 p.m. – 9:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Cranganu, Course open to EES Students only
 
Physical, geochemical, and geologic aspects of groundwater hydrogeology; groundwater occurrence; resource management; groundwater contamination and environmental problems. Laboratory work includes field trips, computer models, and case studies.

EES 79903 – Issues in Earth and Env Sciences in NYC [62254]
B:                   T, 6:30 p.m. – 9:15 p.m., Rm., TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Groffman/Chamberlain
 
Overview of issues in earth and environmental science relevant to the historical and future development of the New York City region. Geological process that shaped the NYC area; current state of the environment and remediation initiatives; effect of climate change on NYC infrastructure; resource requirements of the city.

EES 79901 – Earth and Env Seminar [62166]
C:            F, 12:45 p.m. – 1:45 p.m. Rm. Marshak 107, 1 credit, Prof. Tzortziou, Course open to EES Students only
 
Presentations and discussions by faculty and guest speakers on current topics in the area of earth and environmental science; can be taken twice for credit. Generally offered each semester. 1 hr./wk.-+ 
 
EES 79903 – Introduction to Geog Info System [62262]
C:            T, 5:30 p.m. –8:00 p.m..., Rm. Marshak 107, 3 credits, Prof. Stephan, Course open to EES Students only
 
This course represents a comprehensive attempt to introduce students to major aspects of the multifaceted GIS production process, including data acquisition, editing, modeling, analysis, and cartographic output. EAS 330 is designed for students of the Earth and atmospheric sciences, as well as other disciplines. Lectures will introduce the theory and science behind Geographic Information Systems. Laboratory exercises will complement the lectures by introducing respective applications within the GIS software environment.

EES 79903 – Climate and Climate Change [62261]
C:            MW, 2:00-3:15 p.m., Rm. Marshak MR044, 4 credits, Prof. Luo, Course open to EES Students only
 
This course links processes and interactions of the atmosphere, ocean and solid earth and their impact on climate and climate change. Topics include the physical principles of climate; climates of the past and present; Ice Age theories; the Greenhouse Effect; and human impact on climate. Prereq: One semester of calculus, and one semester of physics, and one semester of introductory earth science, or permission of instructor. Generally offered each spring. 3 lect. hr./wk.
 
EES 79903 – Env. Assessment 2 [62256]
C:            W, 5:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m., Rm. Marshak 1128, 3 credits, Prof. Lampousis, Course open to EES Students only
 
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to good commercial and customary practices in the United States of America for conducting Phase II environmental site assessments (ESA). A Phase II ESA is an evaluation process for confirming and quantifying the presence of hazardous substances or petroleum products in environmental media (i.e., soil, rock, groundwater, surface water, air, soil gas, sediment) throughout a contaminated site. A Phase II ESA typically includes a determination through field screening and chemical testing of the geological, hydrogeological, hydrological, and engineered aspects of the site that influence the presence of hazardous substances or petroleum products (e.g., migration pathways, exposure points) and the existence of receptors and mechanisms of exposure.

Graduate students receive extensive training on mainstream quality review and assessment methods of completed Phase I ESAs in preparation to enter the workforce in upper level management positions in the environmental engineering consulting industry.

Students are automatically enrolled in the 40-hour OSHA HAZWOPER (Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response Standard) certification program which applies to employees who are engaged in clean-up operations that are conducted at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites. Prerequisite: EAS B3300 or permission of instructor. 3 hr./ wk.
 
EES 79903 – Glob Envrm Haz Res [62257]
C:            F, 9:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m., Rm. Marshak 117, 3 credits, Prof. Lampousis, Course open to EES Students only
 
Study of important, naturally occurring destructive phenomena, such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, and coastal flooding. Long-term causes and remediation of these problems. Topics will focus on consequences to urban environments. Generally offered each semester.

EES 79903 – Remote Sensing of Ocean Processes [62259]
C:            T, 12:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m., Rm. Marshak 107/105, 3 credits, Prof. Tzortziou, Course open to EES Students only
 
A comprehensive introduction to ocean remote sensing, covering aspects of both physical and biological oceanography, ocean dynamics, mesoscale phenomena, biogeochemical processes, marine ecosystem resources, human impacts, climate change, and coastal hazards. The course focuses on development of skills in underwater radiative transfer modeling and ocean remote-sensing data analysis and visualization. Prerequisite: An introductory course in Earth Science, or one semester of college biology, or one semester of introductory Remote Sensing, or permission of instructor. 3 hr./wk.
 
EES 79903 – Geophysics [62267]
C:            MW, 11:00 -12:15 p.m., Rm. Marshak MR107, 3 credits, Prof. Kenyon, Course open to EES Students only
 
Advanced work in the application of geophysics to environmental and engineering problems. Hands-on work and demonstrations of seismic, electrical, electromagnetic, and magnetic instruments and techniques. Survey design and execution. Computer analysis of survey results. in most cases a strong, 2-semester course sequence in introductory physics will serve as a prerequisite) 3 hr. lect., demonstration, or group fieldwork/wk.
 
EES 79903 – Hydrology [62258]
C:            T, 6:50 p.m. – 9:20 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Vorosmarty, Course open to EES Students only
 
Introduction to hydrological data, the hydrologic cycle. Precipitation, streamflow, evaporation, and runoff. Emphasis is on their interactions and processes. Prereq: Two semesters of calculus, and two semesters of general physics, or permission of the instructor. 3 lect. hr./wk.
 
EES 79903 –Macro-Hydrology [62255]
C:            TR, 11:00 -12:15 p.m., Rm. Marshak MR044, 3 credits, Prof. Zhang, Course open to EES Students only

EES 79903 – Env Sensing Imge Anal [62263]
C:            F, 2:00 – 4:30 p.m., Rm. Marshak MR044, 3 credits, Prof. McDonald, Course open to EES Students only

EES 79903 – Geomorphology [62265]
C:            TR, 9:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m., Marshak 1128 3 credits, Prof. Black, Course open to EES Students only
 
As the wind blows and the rain pelts and glaciers grind, the shape of the Earth’s surface gradually changes. These changes affect everything from the flow of the Hudson River to the rocks in Central Park to how long it takes you to walk to class. This course offers a quantitative examination of the processes that shape landscapes. Topics include weathering; glacial, fluvial, and aeolian erosion; mass wasting; runoff generation; and surface processes on other planets.
 
EES 79903 – Satellite Meteorology [62264]
C:            MW, 9:30 – 10:45 a.m., Rm. Marshak 44, 3 credits, Prof. Luo, Course open to EES Students only
 
EES 79903 – Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Water:  Theory, Policy, and Governance [62259]
C:            M, 5:00 -7:50p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Biles, Course open to EES Students only
 
EES 79904 – Structural Geology [62167]
C:            W, 3:30 – 5:10 p.m., Rm. Marshak 107, 4 credits, Prof. Kidder, Course open to EES Students only
 
Physical properties of rocks in different tectonic environments; deformation; petrofabric analysis. Geotectonics; orogenesis, earthquakes, interpretation of geologic maps and mapping techniques. Includes a two-night weekend field trip. 3 lect., 2 lab. hr./wk
 
EES 79904 – Structural Geology [63524]
C:            F, 2:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m., Rm. Marshak 107, 4 credits, Prof. Kidder, Course open to EES Students only
 
Physical properties of rocks in different tectonic environments; deformation; petrofabric analysis. Geotectonics; orogenesis, earthquakes, interpretation of geologic maps and mapping techniques. Includes a two-night weekend field trip. 3 lect., 2 lab. hr./wk.
 
EES 79903 – Urban Applications of GIS [62268]
H:           R, 5:35 – 8:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-2, 3 credits, Gong, Course open to EES Students only
 
Discussion of data, methodology, and examples of using GIS to solve urban problems in economic, social, planning, and political settings. Students are expected to conduct small research projects addressing real world issues.

EES 79903 – Intro to Geographic Information Systems [62269]
H:           W, 5:35-9:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-1, 3 credits, Prof. Williamson, Course open to EES Students only
 
Course Overview: In this course, we will cover the whole GIS production process from data modeling and acquisition to editing, analysis, and yes, cartographic output. GTECH 709 addresses students from both geography and other disciplines. Lecture examples, as well as hands-on exercises cover a range of application areas. The course itself is divided into two equally important parts: lectures, which introduce the theory of GIScience, and lab exercises, which help you to familiarize yourself with many aspects of the software. The lectures discuss concepts, data, tools, and major aspects to assignments. The laboratory sessions introduce the geospatial data and software tools needed for accomplishing the assignments. They will start at a very basic level, requiring little more than elementary experience with the Windows operating system. The course utilizes a variety of resources, including the energy and creativity of students in the class.
 
EES 79903 – Remote Sensing of Environment [62271]
H:           M, 5:35 – 9:15 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-2, 3 credits, Prof. Ni-Meister, Course open to EES Students only
 
Fundamental concepts of remote sensing of environment, satellite sensor systems and their applications, and basic concepts of image analysis.

EES 79903 – GeoComputation 2 [62273]
H:           R, 5:35-8:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-1, 3 credits, Prof. Green, Course open to EES Students only
 
Theory and applications of GeoComputing. Models and algorithms for advanced spatial and temporal modeling are examined and programed.  Emphasis is on an object-based computational paradigm and spatial data structures.

EES 79903 – Advanced Geoinformatics [62272]
H:           R, 9:10 a.m. – 1:00 p.m., Rm. HN-1004, 3 credits, Prof. Ahearn, Course open to EES Students only
 
Expansion of Intro to GIS and Concepts and Theories in concentrating on advanced concepts in GeoInformatics, including data models, algorithms, GIS analysis and scripting.

EES 79903 – Intro Geographic Info System [62270]
H:           T, 5:35 – 9:25p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-1, 3 credits, Prof. Albrecht, Course open to EES Students only
 
Thorough introduction to geographic information systems with an emphasis on spatial data handling and project management.

EES 79903 – Geoweb Services [62274]
H:           M, 1:10 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-2, 3 credits, Prof. Sun, Course open to EES Students only
 
This course will examine the principles of GeoWeb services in a hands-on fashion. Students will learn about the different standards that are being used in the context of the GeoWeb. They will be introduced to different commercial and open source software solutions and learn how to set up, manage, and use these services. Students will explore the different technologies introduced in class in the lab assignments. Each student will present a topic to the class based on readings provided by the instructor. In the second half of the semester, each student will work on a project that involves the setup and use of GeoWeb services. Basic programming skills in any language are a prerequisite for this course.

EES 79903 – GIS Analysis & Vis in R [62275]
H:           T, 1:10 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-2, 3 credits, Prof. Frei, Course open to EES Students only
 
Advanced principles and operation of GIS, including 3-D, network and field representations and their respective analysis functions. Development of geoprocessing workflows. Geographic information science approaches to geo-spatially relevant methods, including geophysical, landscape ecological, econometric, epidemiological, and regional science.

EES 79903 – Ecology of Global Change [62276]
H:           M, 1:10 – 4:00 p.m., Rm. HN-1028, 3 credits, Prof. Reinmann, Course open to EES Students only
 
Course Overview
Human activities have introduced a suite of planetary-scale perturbations to the Earth system that have profoundly altered the composition and functioning of ecosystems across the planet. In Ecology of Global Change, we will explore the ecological consequences of a wide range of global change phenomena including climate change, land use and land cover change, acid deposition, habitat fragmentation, urbanization, invasive species and environmental pollution. Through a combination of lectures, discussions, reading the primary literature, guest lectures from experts in the field, and an overnight field trip you will become familiar with the seminal and cutting-edge research investigating the effects of global change on ecosystems and their biota, the scientists conducting this research and the methods they use. We will run a 2-night field trip to Harvard Forest in Massachusetts to see, firsthand, several world-renowned global change field experiments that have revolutionized the field and our understanding of the ecological impacts of global change. This trip will occur during spring break. You will also become familiar with a range of instruments and techniques that are being used for studying ecological impacts of global change. Student evaluation will be based on participation in class discussions, exams/quizzes, a grant proposal/peer review, and a presentation.    
 
Expected Learning Outcomes 1. Understanding of what global change is  2. Basic understanding of ecological processes   3. Basic understanding of biogeochemical cycles  4. Understanding of how and why different aspects of global change have an effect on ecological processes and biogeochemical cycles 5. Perform data analysis and interpretation of ecological data 6. Understanding of how scientists go about studying and quantifying the impacts of global change on ecosystems 7. Developing the skills to comprehend, critique and write about scientific research
 
As this is an upper-level/graduate-level course, I expect well-written assignments. Communication is an incredibly important component of science and clear and concise articulation of science will be emphasized in this course. I encourage ALL students to take advantage of the wonderful writing resources available to you at Hunter (http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/thewritingcenterce) as this will hopefully improve your written communication skills AND your grades on assignments!
 
Required Texts There are no required textbooks for this course. Instead, readings will be derived from the peer reviewed literature. A list of readings will be posted to BlackBoard 1-2 weeks ahead of time.
 
Grades are based on two quizzes, one final exam, one consumer product presentation, one grant proposal, and participation in class discussions. Additional criteria for graduate students: 1) different exam criteria, 2) lead discussions for 1-2 of the readings during the semester, and 3) separate guidelines for the group project.   Exams 50% Quizzes  20% Final 30% Presentation 15% Group Project 20% Class Participation 15%
 
Lectures Class will meet once each week. The format will be part traditional lecture and part discussion of a particular topic and the assigned readings. Once the weather warms up, we might do mini-field trips to Central Park or other locations nearby to further discuss the ecological processes and aspects of global change covered in class. 
 
Field Trip In addition to our weekly meetings, I hope to run a 3-day field trip to Harvard Forest in Petersham, MA. This field trip will provide you with the opportunity to see different ecosystem types that occur in the northeastern U.S. as well as several world-renowned global change research experiments that we will read about in class. Further, during this field trip you will gain experience in making ecological measurements that can be used to understand how global change alters ecosystem processes. This field trip will occur over spring break (dates TBD). Any student who has concerns or questions about the field trip or is unsure they will be able to attend should meet with me before the end of the second week of class (i.e. February 8th). NOTE: The content of this field trip is a required component of this course and students who cannot come on the field trip will still be responsible for the material covered.
 
Exams The two quizzes will be mostly short answer and will test your knowledge of the material covered during that section of the course. The final exam is comprehensive and will be based on lectures, readings, discussions in class, the field trip to Harvard Forest and consumer product presentations given by each of you. Exams will begin at the start of class and if you arrive late you will have less time to complete the exam. A missed exam will be graded as a zero and make-up exams will ONLY be available in the case of a documented unavoidable circumstance that results in an excused absence. You are required to notify me if you know ahead of time that you will need to miss an exam for an excused reason.
 
Consumer Product Presentation Over the course of the semester you are expected to research the ecological impacts of a consumer product of your choice. However, you need to get prior approval from the instructor. You will present an 8-minute PowerPoint presentation to the class at the end of the semester. In addition, you will need to prepare an abstract (250-word limit) describing the content of your presentation. You will not be given credit for this presentation if the topic did not receive prior approval from the instructor. You will also be required to turn in the slides used for your presentation. Abstracts will be compiled into one document for the first day of presentations. As such, abstracts submitted late will be penalized 50%.
 
Group Project In groups of 4-5 (graduate students will be in their own group), you will research and develop an approach to solving or mitigating the ecological impacts of some aspect of global change. Each group will provide a 10-minute presentation on their research and write a 1,500 word paper in the format of a scientific manuscript
 
EES 79903 – Urban Geographic Theory [62285]
H:           M,R, 11:00 a.m. – 12:25 p.m., Rm. 1022, 3 credits, Prof. Gong, Course open to EES students only
 
Spatial analysis of contemporary and theoretical issues concerning the economic growth, transportation, land use, social segregation, and urban governance in metropolitan areas.

EES 79903 – Workshop in GISc Research – MEETS ONCE PER MONTH [64503]
L:             F, 6:00-9:30 p.m., Rm. Gillet 322, 3 credits, Prof. Maantay, Course open to EES Students only
This course provides a solid grounding in research design and methodology by designing and conducting a substantive and original GISc research project.  Students will be expected to interpret, acquire, manage, analyze, display, and synthesize geospatial data, using both quantitative and qualitative methods; design and create accurate, meaningful, and unbiased maps and cartographic products that are easily understood by the target audience; integrate spatial analysis and GISc applications in an interdisciplinary manner;  design, implement, and present a substantive research project using GISc as the organizing framework.

EES 79903 – Raster Analysis [62281]
L:             T, 6:00-9:30 p.m., Rm. Gillet 322, 3 credits, Prof. Machado, Course open to EES Students only
This course builds on intro-level "Principles of Geographic Information Science" or similar by developing the students' understanding of raster data and exposing them to additional methods of GIS analysis applied in the geospatial sciences.  We will explore the structure of raster data and various ways in which raster data can be created, modified, and analyzed using a Geographic Information System (GIS).

EES 79903 – Geostatistics & Spatial Analysis Concepts [62282]
L:             W, 6:00-9:30 p.m., Rm. Gillet 322, 3 credits, Prof. Musa, Course open to EES Students only
This course covers the emerging fields of geospatial statistics, applying quantitative techniques to real-world geographic problems.  Concepts and application of exploratory spatial data analysis (ESDA), traditional statistics and geospatial statistics within various software packages, including GeoDA, ArcGIS, [R], and Excel.

EES 79903 – Field Methods in Hydrology [64601]
Q:           W, 4:00 – 5:50 p.m., Science Building, Rm.  E231, 3 credits, Prof. Eaton, Course open to EES Students only
 
Offered at locations around New York City and Queens College campus. Prereq.: GEOL 745 or 746. Application of the latest techniques for sampling, monitoring, and evaluating groundwater and surface water systems. Emphasis on drainage basin analysis, aquifer testing, surface infiltration techniques, and hydrologic software application.

 EES 79903 – Field Methods in Hydrology [62277]
Q:           F, 3:00 – 5:50 p.m., Science Building, Rm.  E231, 3 credits, Prof. Eaton, Course open to EES Students only
 
Offered at locations around New York City and Queens College campus. Prereq.: GEOL 745 or 746. Application of the latest techniques for sampling, monitoring, and evaluating groundwater and surface water systems. Emphasis on drainage basin analysis, aquifer testing, surface infiltration techniques, and hydrologic software application.

EES 79903- Environmental Impact Assessment [62278]
Q:           T, 5:00-7:50 p.m., Rm. D135, 3 credits, Prof. Helman, Course open to EES Students only
 
This course is aimed at developing an understanding of the process of environmental impact assessment (EIA) in the context of preparing environmental documents, primarily environmental impact statements (EISs), to fulfill the requirements of the various environmental laws and regulations, primarily the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the myriad of laws and regulations that fall within its purview.
Since the enactment of NEPA over 40 years ago, EIA has come to be an important tool in the planning, development, and implementation stages of projects, an area that previously fell within the domain of economics and engineering. EIA is an all-embracing area focused on far more than physical and biological aspects of our environment. Economics, history, sociology, aesthetics, and land use planning are a few of the areas that EIA addresses in addition to wetland, hydrologic, geologic, water and air quality analyses, as well as other topics related to the natural environment. The multi-disciplinary approach of the course makes it valuable for students in a variety of fields.

EES 79903 – Advanced Meteorology [62279]
Q:           M, 5:00 – 7:50 p.m., Rm., TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Yi, Course open to EES Students only
 
This is research-based course to learn: (1) what are the essentials of meteorology; (2) how to describe a climate issue; (3) how to link the climate data to the climate issue; (4) how to do a simple statistical analysis on the scientific problem; (5) how to professionally communicate your results at a conference; and (6) how to write a regular manuscript ready submitted to a journal. Research objectives are in three categories: (1) for undergraduates; (2) for master students; and (3) for PhD students.

PhD research topics: Why global wind speeds slowing since 1960? Several lines of evidence indicates that as the average global wind speed close to the surface of the land decreases. And while it is not affecting the whole earth evenly, the average terrestrial wind speed has decreased by 0.5 kilometers per hour (0.3 miles per hour) every decade, according to data starting in the 1960s. This research can be completed by either way: (1) using climate data to explore why warming climate slows down world’s wind speeds? Or (2) to write synthetic paper review about implications of world wind slowing down.

EES 79903 – Estuarine and Coastal Management [62280]
Q:           M, 1:40 – 4:30 p.m., Rm., D135, 3 credits, Prof. Greenfield, Course open to EES Students only
 
Objective: In this interdisciplinary course, students will learn about a wide range of coastal environments.  This course covers the biological, chemical, physical, and geological factors that influence coastal ecosystem processes and their implications for management.  Students will learn material through lectures, discussions of primary literature, and a term paper.

Fall 2019 Courses

Ph.D Program in Earth and Environmental Sciences Fall 2019 Course Schedule

EES 70400 – 67672    The Nature of Scientific Research
GC:   W, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Carmalt, Course open to EES Students only.
EES 70900 – 59979    Sem:  Geographic Thought/Theory
GC:    R, 2:00 p.m. – 1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Gilmore, Course open to EES Students only.
EES 71600 - 59980     Earth Systems I
GC:    W, 5:00 – 8:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Lindo Atichati/Salmun, Course open to EES Students only.
EES 79901 - 59985    Current Issues in EES
GC:    R, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 1 credit, Prof. Katz, Course open to EES Students.
EES 79903 – 59982    (Im)migration, the State and Justice
GC:   T, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., Prof. Varsanyi, Course open to all Ph.D. Students.
EES 79903 – 59987    Reading the Grundisse
GC:   M, 4:15 p.m. – 6:15 p.m., Prof. Harvey, Course open to EES Students only.
EES 79902 - 60008   Presenting Research in Earth and Env Sciences
B:    W, 4:15 -6:15 p.m., 2 credit, Rm. Ingersoll 3108, Prof. Cherrier, Course open to EES Students only.
EES 79902 - 60009    Professional Portfolios for Earth and Environmental Scientists
B:     M, 6:30 p.m. – 9:15 p.m., 2 credit, Rm. Ingersoll 4215, Prof. Powell, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79902 – 60010     Presenting Earth and Environmental Sciences Seminar
B:     M, 4:15p.m. -5:55 p.m., 2 credit, Rm. Ingersoll 1127, Prof. Cherrier, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – 60047    Advanced GIS and Remote Sensing   
B:      R, 6:05 p.m.  – 9:45 p.m., 3 credits, Rm. TBA Prof. Boger, Course open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60049     Biogeochemistry
B:      T., 6:30 p.m. – 9:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Groffman, Course open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60051     Isotope Geology
B:      W, 6:05 p.m. – 8:35 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Seidemann, Course open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60052     Geostatistics
B:      W., 6:05 p.m. – 9:45 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Smith, Course open to EES Students only.
EES 79901 - 60000     Earth and Env Seminar
C:      F, 12:45 – 1:45 p.m., Rm. MS-107, 1 credit, Prof. Tzortziou, Course open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60055     Global Env Hazards
C:      T, R, 9:00 a.m. – 10:15 a.m. Rm. MS-044, 3 credits, Prof. Segni, Course Open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – 60004     Sus Terres, Aqu, Atm Sys
C:     R, 5:20 p.m. – 8:00 p.m., Rm. MR-1128, 3 credits, Prof. McDonald, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60053    Fund Atmospheric Science
C:     M, W 12:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m., Rm. MS-1128, 3 credits, Prof. Booth, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60054    Env Assessment
C:     M, 9:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m., Rm. Ms-1128, 3 credits, Prof. Lampousis, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60055   Global Env Hazards
C:     T, R, 9:00 – 10:15 a.m., Rm. MS-044, 3 credits, Prof. Lampousis, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60056 Ground Water Hydrology   
C:     T, R, 11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m., Rm. MS-044, 3 credits, Prof. Zhang, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60023 Env Geophysics
C:     M, 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m., Rm. MS-107, 3 credits, Prof. Kenyon, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60024 Intro GIS
C:     T, 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m., Rm. Ms-044, 3 credits, Prof. TBA, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60057 Earth Mat:  Intro Lg Meta Petrol
C:     M, W, 2:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m..., Rm. MS-1128, 3 credits, Profs. Black, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 - 60025 Isotype Geochemistry
C:     T, R, 9:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m., Rm. MS-1128, 3 credits, Prof. Wang, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60027  Coast/Ocean Proc
C:     W, 9:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m., Rm. MS-107, 3 credits, Prof. Tzortziou, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60058   Geologic Field Mapping
C:     F, 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m., Rm. MS-107, 3 credits, Prof. Kidder, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60059 Intro to Scientific Computing
C:     M, W, 3:30 – 4:45 p.m., Rm. NAC 1/302, 3 credits, Prof. Booth, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60029  Energy Policy
H:    M, R, 11:10 a.m. – 12:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1022, 3 credits, Prof. Marcotullio, Course open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 –60031  Geog Sustainable Dev
H:    T, R, 4:10 -5:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1022, 3 credits, Prof. Ibrahim, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903- 60015 Intro:  Geographic Info Systems
H      T, 5:35 – 9:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-2, 3 credits, Prof. Williamson, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903- 60016 Intro:  Geographic Info Systems
H      M, 5:35 – 9:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-1, 3 credits, Prof. Gong, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 - 60017 Concepts and Theories in GeoInfo
H:      W, 5:35 – 8:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1022, 3 credits, Prof. Ahearn, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60036 5 Intro: Carto Design and Geovis
H:     R, 5:35 – 9:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-2, 3 credits, Prof. Williamson, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60032 Quantitative Methods in Geography
H:     W, 9:10 a.m. – 12:00 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-2, 3 credits, Prof. Frei, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60039 Geospatial Databases
H:    W, 5:35 p.m. - 8:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-2, 3 credits, Prof. Sun, Course open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60018 Advanced Geoinformatics
H:     M, 5:35 p.m. – 9:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-2, 3 credits, Prof. Albrecht, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60042 Global Climate Change
H:     M, R, 51:10 p.m., - 2:25 p.m., Rm, HN-1090B-1, 3 credits, Prof. Rutberg, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60040 Seeing Space:  Art, Geography, and the Right to the City
H:     W, 4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m., Rm, TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Gilmore/Rodriguez, Course Open to Graduate Center Students only.  Instructor Permission only.
EES 79903 – 60034 Digital Image Process & LIDAR
H:     T, 5:35 p.m. – 9:25 p.m., Rm, HN-1090B-1, 3 credits, Prof. Ni-Meister,  Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 - 64261 Field Ecology of NYC
H:     M, 1:10 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Reinmann, Course Open to EES Students only,
EES 79904 –60003 GeoComputation 1
H:    R, 5:35 p.m. – 9:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-1, 4 credits, Prof. Green, Course open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 - 60066 Data Acquisition and Integrative Methods for GIS Analysis
L:     R, 6:00 p.m. – 10:10 p.m., Rm. Gillet 322, 3 credits, Prof. Gorokhovich, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 - 67004 Macro-Hydrology
L:     T, 6:50 p.m. – 9:20 p.m., TBA, 3 Credits, Prof. Vorosmarty, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79904 – 60006 Special Topics in Geographic Information Systems:    
L:    T, 6:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m., Rm. Gillet 322, 4 credits, Prof. Maantay, Course Open to EES Students only
EES 79904 - 60007 Principles and Applications in Remote Sensing:    
L:    R, 6:00 p.m. – 10:10 p.m., Rm. Gillet 322, 4 credits, Prof. Machado, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60043 Coastal Estuarine Geology (Lecture)
Q:     M, 9:40 a.m. – 11:30 a.m., Rm. SB D237, 3 credits, Prof. McHugh, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60044 Coastal Estuarine Geology (Lab)
Q:     W, 9:20 a.m. – 112:10 p.m., Rm. SB D237, 3 credits, Prof. McHugh, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60020 Hydrology
Q:     M, W, 5:00 p.m. – 6:15 p.m., Rm.SB E231, 3 credits, Prof. Eaton, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60045 Volcanoes and Climate
Q:     T, 5:30 p.m. – 8:20 p.m., Rm.SB D135, 3 credits, Prof. Longpre, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 79903 – 60046 Bioremediation
Q:     R, 5:00 p.m. – 7:50 p.m., Rm.SB D135, 3 credits, Prof. Blanford, Course Open to EES Students only.
EES 80500        Independent Study
B, C, H, Q, L        1-6 credits, Staff, Course open to EES Students only.
EES 81000        Research for the Doctoral Dissertation
B, C, H, Q, L        1-3 credits, Staff, Course open to EES Students only.
EES 90000        Dissertation Supervision
B, C, H, Q, L        1 credit, Staff, Course open to EES Students only.
 
Cross-Listed Courses:

CHEM  75000 – 60361 Organic Chemistry/Physical Organic Chemistry
GC:    T, R,  9:30 – 10:50 a.m., Rm. GC 6429, 3 credits, Profs. Braunschweig/Vorosmarty/Tessler

P SC 83502 60146 Urban studies Core Seminar II
GC:    W, 4:15 p.m. – 6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Gutman/Mollenkopf

PSYC 7910360483 Environmental Social Science III Social/Cultural Theory
GC:    M, 4:15 p.m. – 6:15 p.m., Rm. 3308, 3 credits, Prof. Checker

WGS 71701 – Global Feminism
GC:   M, 11:45 a.m. – 1:45 p.m., Prof. Oza

IDS 81630 – 60288 The Discursive Framing of Climate Change:  From Scientific Discourse to the Public Sphere
GC:   T, 11:45 a.m. – 1:45 p.m., 3 credits, Profs. Lindo Atichati/del Valle

IDS 81620 - 60286 Voices of the City: accessibility, reciprocity, and self-representation in place-based community research
GC:   R,  2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. 3 credits, Profs Hum/Kanakamedala

Spring 2019 Courses

Ph.D Program in Earth and Environmental Sciences Spring 2019 Course Schedule
 
EES 79903 – The Nature of Scientific Research [66539]
GC:         R, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm., TBA, 3 credits, Professor Carmalt, Course open to EES Students only
EES 71700 – Earth Systems II [57855]
GC:         W, 2:00-5:00 p.m., Rm., TBA, 3 credits, Profs Booth and Longpre, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79901 – Current Issues in EES [57842]
GC:         R, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Rm. 4102/C415A, 1 credit, Prof. Weisberg, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79901 – Participant Observations and Field Notes [57851]
GC:        R, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m., 1/31. 2/7, 2/14, 2/21. 2/28, Rm. TBA, 1 credit, Professor Low
EES 79901 – Interviewing (Structured and Unstructured) [57852]
GC:        R, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m., 3/14. 3/21, 3/28. 4/4, Rm. TBA, 1 credit, Professor Low
EES 79901- Qualitative Analysis (Coding and Memos) [57853]
GC:        R, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m., 4/11. 4/18, 5/2, 5/9, 5/16, Rm. TBA, 1 credit, Professor Low
EES 79903 - Anthropology of the City:  Engaged Urbanism [57980]
GC:        F, 12:00 – 2:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Professor Low
EES 79903 – Racial Capitalism [57983]
GC:        T, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Professor Gilmore, Instructor Permission Required
EES 81000 – Research for the Doctoral Dissertation 1-3 credits, Faculty
EES 80200 – Proposal Writing [57979]
GC:         R, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Professor Kabachnik, Course open to EES Students only 
EES 80500 – Independent Study 1-3 credits, Faculty
EES 90000 – Dissertation Supervision, 1 credit, Faculty
EES 79902 - Research Proposal [61758]
B:          W, 4:15 p.m. – 5:55 p.m., Rm. TBA, 2 credits, Professor Chamberlain, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 - Global Tectonics [61744]
B:            T, 6:05 p.m. – 8:50 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Professors Flores/Kennet, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 - Lab and Field Techniques using Geospatial Technologies [61747]
B:           W, 6:30 p.m. – 10:10 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Professor Boger, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 - Seminar:  Case Studies in Applied Sustainable Urban Infrastructure Systems [61750]
GC:         M, 6:05 p.m. – 8:50 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Professors Balchi/Cherrier, Course open to EES Students only
EES -   79903 – Earth’s Oceans [61755]
 B:           W, 6:05 p.m. – 8:50 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Professor Marra, Course Open to EES Students only
EES -   79903 – Environmental Geochemistry [58009]
C:            MW, 12:30 – 1:45 p.m., Rm. Marshak MR404, 3 credits, Professor Block, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79904 – Structural Geology [58039]
C:            MW, 3:30 – 4:20 p.m., Rm. Marshak 107, 4 credits, Prof. Kidder, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79904 – Structural Geology [61728]
C:            F, 2:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m., Rm. Marshak 107, 4 credits, Prof. Kidder, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Introduction to GIS [61742]
C             R, 5:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.., Rm. Marshak 107, 3 credits, Prof. Winslow, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79904 – Climate and Climate Change [61903]
C:            MW, 2:00-3:15 p.m., Rm. Marshak MR044, 4 credits, Prof. Luo, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79901 – Earth and Env Seminar [57848]
C:            F, 12:45 p.m. – 1:45 p.m. Rm. Marshak 107, 1 credit, Prof. McDonald, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Phase II Environmental Site Assessment As [58022]
C:            SA 9:00 a.m. – 10:15 A.M., Rm. Marshak 107, 3 credits, Prof. Lampousis, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Remote Sensing of Ocean Processes [58024]
C:            T, 12:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m., Rm. Marshak MR044, 3 credits, Prof. Tzortziou, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Geophysics [58011]
C:            MW, 11:00 -12:15 p.m., Rm. Marshak MR107, 3 credits, Prof. Kenyon, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Hydrology [58023]
C:            TR, 11:00 -12:15 p.m., Rm. Marshak MR044, 3 credits, Prof. Zhang, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Env Sensing Imge Anal [58029]
C:            F, 2:00 – 4:30 p.m., Rm. Marshak MR044, 3 credits, Prof. McDonald, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Geomorphology [58030]
C:            TBA, TBA. Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. TBA, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Satellite Meteorology
C:            MW, 9:30 – 10:45 a.m., Rm. Marshak MR044, 3 credits, Prof. Luo, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – The Right to the City:  Origins, Theory, Debates
CLUS:     T, 6:15 – 8:45 p.m., 25 W 43 St, 19th Floor, 3 credits, Prof. Attoh, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – African Environment & Development [57986]
H:            MR, 1:10 – 2:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1022, 3 credits, Prof. Ibrahim, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Intro to Geographic Information Systems [57991]
H:            W, 5:35-9:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-1, 3 credits, Prof. Williamson, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Remote Sensing of Environment [57994]
H:            W, 5:35 – 9:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-2, 3 credits, Prof. Ni-Meister, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Advanced GIS [57995]
H:            R, 5:35-8:15 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-1, 3 credits, Prof. Sun, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Concepts and Theories in GeoInfo [57992]
H:            T, 5:35-8:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1004-, 3 credits, Prof. Sun, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – GeoComputation 2 [57996]
H:            R, 5:35-8:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1090B-2, 3 credits, Prof. Green, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Seminar in Geoinformatics [57849]
H:            W, 1:00 – 2:50 p.m., Rm. HN-1004, 3 credits, Prof. Ahearn, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Geog NYC Metro Area [57988]
H:            T, 5:35 – 8:25p.m., Rm. HN-1022, 3 credits, Prof. Miyares, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – International Pollution Issues [57990]
H:            TF, 11:10 a.m. – 12:25 p.m., Rm. HN-1022, 3 credits, Prof. Lanz Oca, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Ecology of Global Change [57997]
H:            M, 1:10 – 4:00 p.m., Rm. HN-1022, 3 credits, Prof. Reinmann, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Workshop in GISc Research – MEETS ONCE PER MONTH [58034]
L:             F, 6:00-9:30 p.m., Rm. Gillet 322, 3 credits, Prof. Machado, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Natural Hazards and Risk Assessment with GISc [58037]
L:             R, 6:00-9:30 p.m., Rm. Gillet 322, 3 credits, Prof. Gorokovich, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Spatial Database Management [58005]
L:             T, 6:00 – 9:00 p.m., Rm. Gillet 322, 3 credits, Prof. Donnelly, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Geostatistics & Spatial Analysis Concepts [58004]
L:             W, 6:00-9:00 p.m., Rm. Gillet 322, 3 credits, Prof. Musa, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Biosphere-Atmosphere Interactions [57984]
Q:           W, 5:00 – 7:00 p.m., Science Building, Rm.  D-135, 3 credits, Prof. Yi, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903- Analytical Techniques in Environmental Geosciences [58007]
Q:           M, 5:00-8:50 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Bracco, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Shallow Subsurface Geophysics [58008]
Q:           W, 4:30 – 6:20 p.m., Rm., TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Eaton, Course open to EES Students only
EES 79903 – Shallow Subsurface Geophysics [58008]
Q:           F, 3:00 – 5:50 p.m., Rm., TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Eaton, Course open to EES Students only
 
Cross-Listed Courses:
 
PSYCH 80103 Writing for Publication
GC:         R, 11:45 a.m. – 1:45 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Su
 
DCP 803 Spatial Demography
Baruch:  W, 4:15 – 6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Balk
 
P SC 83501 Core Seminar in Urban Studies
GC:       M, 4:15 – 6:15 p.m., Profs. Gutman and Mollenkopf

U ED 71100 Critical University Studies with a Special Emphasis on CUNY 
GC:    
  W, 4:15 – 6:15 p.m., Prof. Brier
 
LABR 669 Economic Democracy and System Change
New School:   M, 6:15 – 8:45 p.m., 3 credits, Profs. Menser and Caspar-Futterman

IDS 81620 Voices of the City: accessibility, reciprocity, and self-representation in place-based community research

GC:     R, 2:00 - 4:00 p.m., 3 credits, Profs. Hum and Kanakamedala