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Specializations

Specializations Within The Educational Psychology PhD Program

Educational Psychology students will complete a program of study including a minimum of 60 credits in Educational Psychology and related fields.

Click on the corresponding link below for details about each specialization.

Learning, Development, and Instruction

Learning Goals of the LDI Specialization:

1. Provide students with an understanding of the learning processes and development of children and adolescents, including the development of cognition, language, and socio-emotional functioning.

2. Provide students with an understanding of how learning and development:

  • are affected by individual factors, such as affect and motivation
  • are affected by instruction and technology
  • are affected by additional socio-cultural factors, such as the learning environment, including both formal learning environments (pre-k-college) and informal learning environments (e.g., games, family), and student socio-economic level and cultural status
  • occur in diverse student populations, including atypically developing children and, given the program’s urban location, with particular attention to urban student populations, including English Language Learners, ethnic-racial minority children, and those from low socio-economic environments.

3. Provide students with the capacity to conduct research on learning, development, and instruction, including facility with experimental and quasi-experimental designs, secondary data analyses, data mining, and other qualitative and quantitative methods.

4. Provide students with the capacity to develop, implement, and assess interventions related to fostering learning, development, and/or best instructional and educational practices.

Program Of Study

The Graduate Center has three levels of doctoral studies that correspond to both credits accumulated and exam levels (with exams that can be of very different formats to reflect the learning goals of individual programs). The LDI program of study includes a minimum of 60 credits of coursework that provides students with a great breadth of knowledge in Educational Psychology and related fields.

A First Level Examination (essay in format) assesses student knowledge in some foundational course areas (see information on “First Level Exam” below). Students who have completed fewer than 45 credits of graduate work (including approved transfer credit) and/or have yet to pass their First Level Exam are defined as Level 1 students.

Students are at Level II in the semester following their completion of 45 credits and passing of the First Exam and until they are advanced to candidacy. Graduate Center students take a Second Level Examination in this Level II period. The LDI program emphasizes research preparation for its students. Hence, in the LDI area, the Second Level Exam is in the form of a pilot research study that corresponds to our major course in “Supervised Research.” Once this Second Level Exam, consisting of a research pilot, including its write-up and presentation, has been successfully completed, and students have completed all required course work with an overall grade average of at least “B,” students are advanced to candidacy and are defined as Level III students. The dissertation work comprises Level III and is termed the Third Exam Level.

Curriculum

Coursework:

Students are required to take at least 60 credits of coursework required distributed across course categories. Students may take courses through the program, other programs at the GC or through the “Inter University Doctoral Consortium”. The following universities are members of the consortium: Columbia University (including Teachers College), Fordham University, The New School, New York University (including Steinhardt School of Education), Princeton University, Rutgers–New Brunswick (State University of New Jersey), and Stony Brook (State University of New York).

The following course list includes a snapshot of the courses that students complete throughout their time in the program. Some courses are required while others are examples of the courses that students may take:

4 Required Core Courses (3 credits each, total of 12 credits)
70200 Educational Psychology: Foundations and Contemporary Issues 70500 Statistics and Computer Programming I 70600 Statistics and Computer Programming II
70700 Research Methods in Educational Psychology
4 Required Area Foundational Courses (3 credits each, total of 12 credits)
71100 Cognitive Development and Learning
71300 Social Emotional and Cultural Factors in Development and Education
71400 Instructional Issues: Individual and Cultural Factors
71700 Language Development
2 Quantitative Methods Courses (3 credits each, total of 6 credits)
Possibilities include:
Program Courses:
73000 An Introduction to Psychometrics
73100 Evaluation Research
83300 The General Linear Model
83400 Path Analysis, Factor Analysis, and Structural Equation Models
83500 Categorical Data Analysis
84200 Hierarchical Linear Models
Courses in Other Programs:
SOC 81100 Survey Methodology
SOC 81200 Ethnography and Methods
SOC 81900 Topics in Multivariate Methods
SOC 81900 Data Mining
SOC 81900 Methods of Demographic Analysis
SOC 82201 Computer Mapping for LA, NY, and other Global Cities: GIS with Mapinfo: Basic and Advanced Techniques
6 Major Courses (3 credits each, total of 18 credits)
Possible Major Area courses include the courses below.
Please note that 89000-Supervised Research is required, leaving students to choose five other courses.
71500 Educational Problems in Inner City Schools
71900 Theory and Application of Behavioral Techniques in Educational Settings
75200 Theories and Instructional Issues in Learning Disabilities
75300 Theories and Issues in Reading
80800 Metacognitive and Cognitive Processes in Learning and Instruction
80900 Health Education and Behavior Change
81100 Self-Regulation of Academic Learning and Motivation
81300 Cultural Differences in Social Cognitive Processes and Academic Achievement
85000 Technology, Learning, and Development
85100 Advanced Seminar on Technology, Learning and Development
85800 Communication in Cognitive Development
86000 Research on Theories and Issues in Comprehension and Composition: Part I
86100 Research on Theories and Issues in Comprehension and Composition: Part II
86200 Theory and Research in Early Literacy: The Pre-School and Early Elementary Years
86300 Theory and Research on Literacy in School Settings: Grades 3 through 12
86400 Theory and Research on Literacy: Adults
86500 Theory and Research on Reading Disabilities
87000 Cognitive Structures and Processes and the Development of Understanding in Mathematics in Educational Settings
87100 Research on Learning and Instruction in Mathematics
87200 Applied Research Seminar in Problem Solving in Mathematics
87300 Research on the Teaching of School Subjects
88000 Seminar in Special Topics
88000 Key Challenges for K-College Education: Addressing through Policy, Pedagogy, and the Learning Process
89000 Supervised research (required of all students)
Sample Courses in other GC Programs
PSYCHOLOGY
PSYC 79900 Seminar and Practicum on the Teaching of Psychology
PSYC 82005 Narrative Inquiry
PSYC 80103 The Politics and Psychology of Belonging in the U.S.
4 Courses Consisting in Electives and/or Additional Major Area Courses (3 credits each, total of 12 credits)
The remaining credits can be satisfied by taking additional major area courses and/or elective courses related to the LDI area. Some possibilities are listed below. These credits may also be met through course credits transferred from previous graduate level coursework.
Sample Courses that can fulfill Elective and/or Additional Major Area Course Requirements
PSYC 80103 Childhood and Youth Studies: Approaches and Methods
SOC 84503 Sociology of Education
SOC 85700 Race, Schools, and Policy
SOC 74400 Change and Crisis in Universities: Research, Education, and Equity in Uncertain Times
SOC 84503 Rethinking Higher Education for the Knowledge Economy
SOC 84700 Public and Social Policy Development, Analysis, and Evaluation
ECON 87400 Economics of Health
Additional Quantitative Courses (see sample listing above)
Courses in Certificate Program in Interactive Technology and Pedagogy*
ITCP 70010 Interactive Media: History, Theory, and Practice
ITCP 70020 Interactive Technology and the University: Theory, Design, And Practice

*LDI students can also acquire this certificate, if interested, by taking these two core ITCP courses and meeting the other certificate course requirements through electives or advisor approval of these as Major Area courses.

Requirements

Three Additional Program Requirements:

  1. First Level Exams: Essay format that assesses knowledge from some foundational program courses
  2. Second Level Exam: Pilot Research Study that is linked to the LDI Major Course “Supervised Research” (EPSY 89000)
  3. Third Level Exam: Dissertation Research
1. First Level Exams

The purpose of the first level doctoral examinations is to assess whether a student has reached competency in certain core areas of Educational Psychology. Students are required to successfully complete their first-level exams to continue their study in the program. There are two pairs of first-level exams.

In the first of these pairs, typically taken in the summer after one’s first year of study, student knowledge in the following two areas is assessed:

  1. Statistics Exam
  2. Research Methods Exam

In an additional pair of first-level exams, typically taken either midway through one’s second year of study or in the summer after completing the second year, four foundational areas of Learning, Development, and Instruction are assessed. However, each student is assessed only on any two of these four exam areas of their choosing:

  1. Cognition and Learning Exam
  2. Socio-Emotional & Cultural Factors in Development and Education Exam
  3. Instructional Issues Exam
  4. Language Development Exam
2. Second Level Exam: Pilot Research Study linked to “Supervised Research” Major Course (EPSY 89000)

After completion of 45 credits and passage of the First Level Exams, LDI students enroll in the course “Supervised Research” (EPSY 89000), with a member of the LDI faculty to design and conduct a pilot study. The student receives 3 credits for the course upon completion of the pilot study.

The purpose of the pilot study is to gain experience in the conduct of research, with a study designed to be potentially publishable or presentable at a scholarly conference. The pilot is an empirical study that can entail any of the following: data collection, meta-analysis, or secondary analyses of a significant data set. The pilot study should be characterized by clear research aims, hypotheses stemming from a critical review of the relevant literature, an appropriate research design, data collection or analysis sufficient to the task, use of appropriate statistics, appropriate interpretation and discussion of results in light of the research aims and hypotheses.

The pilot study is evaluated on its quality, not on the significance of its results. A two-person faculty committee assesses the write-up (report) of the study. When the report is accepted, the student moves to a short oral presentation of the pilot study for the same faculty committee. The committee makes the determination on fulfillment of the Pilot Study Requirement.

3. Third Level Exam: Dissertation

Upon successful completion of the Second Level Exam and all required coursework with an overall grade average of at least a “B,” students are advanced to candidacy and become Level III students. The dissertation is conducted in this level of study. The dissertation study differs from the pilot in that the dissertation typically includes a more complete review of the literature, more participants, additional measures, modified procedures to address problems uncovered in the pilot study, and so forth. This dissertation can represent an advance of the pilot study research or research in a new and different area from the pilot.

Sample Path To Degree

Outlined below is a sample path toward the PhD in Educational Psychology with a specialization in Learning, Development, and Instruction.

Year 1

Courses
  • Statistics and Computer Programming I
  • Statistics and Computer Programming II
  • Research Methods
  • Ed Psych: Foundations and Contemporary Issues
  • 2 required area foundational courses (e.g., Cognitive Development)
Research
  • Begin exploring research topics
  • Get involved in a research project with a faculty member, postdoc or senior student
Examinations
  • Research methods and statistics exams after completing year 1 (level 1 exams)
Begin thinking about… Professional/Career Development
  • Attend a teaching workshop
  • Attend a local conference
Year 2

Courses
  • 2 required area foundational courses (e.g., Language Development)
  • 2 quantitative methods courses
  • 2 major LDI courses
  • 2 elective or additional major LDI courses
Research
  • Continue conducting research with a faculty member, postdoc or senior student that can lead to publishing
  • Start thinking about the Pilot Study for the level 2 exam
Examinations
  • 2 foundational area exams midyear and/or after completion of year 2 (level 1 exams)
Continue to think about… Professional/Career Development
  • Generate a submission for a major research conference
  • Attend a major research conference (e.g., AERA, SRCD)
Begin thinking about… Funding/Fellowships
  • Seek internal GC funding (e.g., Doctoral Student Research Grant)
Year 3

Courses
  • 4 major LDI courses
  • 2 elective or additional major LDI courses
Research/Examination
  • Begin the L2 exam Pilot Study to be completed by the end of the year or beginning of year 4 (level 2 exam)
  • Continue conducting research with a faculty member, postdoc or senior student that can lead to publishing
Continue to think about… Professional/Career Development
  • Attend and present (e.g., poster) at a major research conference
  • Work on publications
Continue to think about… Funding/Fellowships
  • Seek both internal and external funding (e.g., NSF, NIH, APA)

Year 4
 
Courses
  • Complete coursework and any additional electives relevant to your dissertation or future career goals
Research/Examination
  • Complete the Pilot Study (level 2 exam) by end of Fall semester
  • Begin developing your dissertation proposal to propose by the end of the year or beginning of year 5
Continue to think about…Professional/Career Development
  • Continue attending major research conferences
  • Work on publications
  • Complete a summer internship at an organization
Contine to think about…Funding/Fellowships
  • Continue writing applications for internal and external funding
 
Years 5 and 6
 
Courses
  • Audit any courses relevant to your dissertation
Dissertation Research (level 3 exam)
  • Conduct and defend your dissertation research by the end of year 5 or beginning of year 6
Professional/Career Development
  • Update your CV
  • Continue attending major research conferences
  • Work on publications
  • Look for postdoctoral research fellowships
  • Apply for academic positions

 

 

Faculty

Alpana Bhattacharya

Alpana Bhattacharya

Literacy, language development, reading and spelling acquisition, strategy instruction, learning disabilities.

 

Patricia Brooks

Patricia Brooks

Language development from a life-span perspective; Individual differences in language learning and processing; Cognitive development in technology-mediated contexts; Pedagogy.

 

Peggy Chen

Peggy Chen

Academic self-regulation, math self-efficacy beliefs, and assessment and evaluation.

 

Colette Daiute

Colette Daiute

Formal and information education to mediate growing up in adversity (such as in situations of conflict, migration, economic inequality). Within education contexts, my research focuses on design and implementation of digital tools, oral narrative, and written communication.

 

Bruce Homer

Bruce Homer

Literacy, language and cognition, cognitive development, theory of mind, and computer-based multimedia learning.

 

Helen Johnson

Helen Johnson

Language development and emergent literacy; language and literacy development in dual language learners; school-based prevention; home-school partnerships and parent education.

 

Anastasiya Lipnevich

Anastasiya Lipnevich

Instructional feedback, attitudes toward mathematics, emotions and affect, alternative ways of cognitive and non-cognitive assessment, and the role of non-cognitive characteristics in individuals’ academic and life achievement.

 

Joan Lucariello

Joan Lucariello

Cognitive development, evidence-based instructional (teaching) practices, learning processes and development, cultural psychology.

 

Students

See Current Student Profiles for information on current LDI students

Quantitative Methods in Educational and Psychological Research: Statistics, Measurement, Evaluation, and Policy Analysis

The area of Quantitative Methods in Educational and Psychological Research trains students in the area of quantitative research methodology, emphasizing quantitative approaches to solving research problems in educational psychology and in the behavioral sciences generally. Courses encompass research design, statistics, measurement, evaluation, and policy analysis.

Program Of Study

The program of study includes a minimum of 60 credits in Educational Psychology and related fields.

Curriculum & Requirements

 

Required Core Courses

The following 3-credit core courses are required of all students in the Ph.D. Program in Educational Psychology:

  • 70200 Educational Psychology: History and Current Systems
  • 70500 Statistics and Computer Programming I
  • 70600 Statistics and Computer Programming II
  • 70700 Research Methods in Educational Psychology

Total Credits: 12

Area Courses (3 credits each)

Students majoring in Quantitative Methods must take three of the following four courses from the Learning, Development and Instruction area:

  • 71100 Cognitive Development and Learning Processes in Education
  • 71300 Social and Motivational Development in Education
  • 71400 Instructional Issues: Individual Differences, Group Processes and School Context
  • 71700 Language and Communicative Development: Research and Education

Total Credits: 9

Required Quantitative Courses (3 credits each)
  • 73000 An Introduction to Psychometrics
  • 83300 The General Linear Model
  • 83400 Path Analysis, Factor Analysis, and Structural Equation Models
  • 83500 Categorical Data Analysis
  • 84200 Hierarchical Linear Models
  • 89000 Supervised Research (taken at end of coursework)

Total Credits: 18

Major Courses (3 credits each)

In addition to the required quantitative courses listed above, students must choose a minimum of 4 courses (12 credits) from the following list:

  • 73100 Evaluation Research
  • 73200 Introduction to Policy Research
  • 83200 Statistical Theories of Mental Testing (IRT)
  • 83600 Bayesian Data Analysis
  • 83800 Advanced Seminar in Education Policy Research
  • 84100 Statistical Analysis with Missing Data

Total Credits: 12 or more

Courses from other programs or schools (both within CUNY and at other universities in the Consortium) may be substituted for some of these with the approval of the area head.

Elective and Additional Major Area Courses

Any remaining credits can be satisfied by taking additional major area courses and/or elective courses related to the area (e.g., computer science, sociology, psychology, econometrics).

Other Area Requirements

It is highly recommended that students register for 84000 (Statistical and Research Design Consulting Seminar) for at least one semester. This course provides students with the opportunity to serve as statistical consultants on real life projects.

All students with a Statistics specialization are expected to be proficient in both differential and integral calculus. Normally, a one-year undergraduate calculus sequence will satisfy this requirement. This preparation is necessary for the recommended courses in probability and statistical theory, which are available at Baruch and Hunter Colleges:

  • Statistics 9715 Probability Foundations of Statistics and Operations Research (Baruch)
  • Statistics 9719 Foundations of Modern Statistical Theory (Baruch)
  • STAT 311 Probability Theory (Hunter)
  • STAT 313 Introduction to Mathematical Statistics (Hunter)
Faculty

Sophia Catsambis, Ph.D., New York University

Keith Markus, Ph.D., The Graduate Center, CUNY

David Rindskopf, Ph.D., (Area Head) Iowa State University

Charles Scherbaum, Ph.D., Ohio University

Jay Verkuilen, Ph.D., University of Illinois

Faculty

Keith Markus

Keith Markus

Test validity, causation and causal inference, SEM model interpretation, program evaluation.

 

David Rindskop

David Rindskopf

Latent variable models, categorical data, Bayesian statistics, multilevel models.

 

Jay Verkuilen

Jay Verkuilen

Psychometrics

 

Students

See Current Student Profiles for information on current Quant students

School Psychology

 

The specialization in School Psychology has been accredited by the American Psychological Association since 2000. The specialization is currently in "ACCREDITED, INACTIVE" status and is NO LONGER ACCEPTING NEW APPLICANTS.

 

The objective of this specialization is to develop professional psychologists who are capable of research and practice in preschools, elementary and secondary schools, mental health facilities, community agencies, and higher education. The School Psychology specialization offers an integrated Graduate Center–Queens College program that leads to the Ph.D. in Educational Psychology—Area: School Psychology. Graduates of the program receive New York State Certification in School Psychology and are eligible to sit for the New York State licensing exam in Psychology. The School Psychology specialization is accredited by the American Psychological Association and the Department of Education of the State of New York.

Students can enter the Graduate Center-Queens College School Psychology Specialization either with or without a prior certificate in school psychology. Bachelor or MA/MS-level graduates (who do not hold a certificate in school psychology and who wish to pursue a course of full-time doctoral study in the area of school psychology) will graduate with a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology - Area: School Psychology and a Certificate in School Psychology.

Individuals who have previously obtained certification as a School Psychologist and wish to pursue a course of full-time doctoral study in the area of school psychology will be given advanced standing (which recognizes students’ previous coursework in their school psychology certification program). Students admitted with advanced standing will graduate with a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology - Area: School Psychology.

All graduates of the Specialization are eligible to take the New York State licensing exam in Psychology. The School Psychology Specialization is fully accredited by the American Psychological Association and the State of New York.

Program of Study

Course work is designed to broaden the perspective of school psychologists and to provide an applied research orientation that stimulates evaluative research in educational settings. The knowledge base of the program stresses the development of assessment, intervention and consultation skills as well as a broader understanding of special populations. Expertise is acquired through course work in the areas of applied behavior analysis, psychometrics, school, family, and community relations, individual differences, multicultural concerns, instructional theory, learning theory and human development. Students complete a one-year, full-time internship in a school setting.