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Jonathan W. Gray
Position: Associate Professor, John Jay College, English
Campus Affiliation: John Jay College of Criminal Justice
Room Number: 4402
Office Hours: Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 & by appointment
Degrees/Diplomas: Ph.D., The CUNY Graduate Center
Research Interests: African American Literature and Culture, post-WWII American Literature and Culture, Comic Books and Graphic Novels, Contemporary Media--especially popular music, Narratives of Contemporary (post 1970s) Art
Specialization: African American Literature and Literary Theory|Cultural Studies|Literature after 1945|Popular Culture|Twenty-first-Century and Contemporary Literature|Visual Culture
Publications:
Books:
Forthcoming: Illustrating the Race: Representing Blackness in American Comics. Columbia University Press.
 
Civil Rights in the White Literary Imagination: Innocence By Association. The University Press of Mississippi. 2013. 
 
Editorial Work:
Journal of Comics and Culture. Vol. 1.1 Pace University Press. Spring 2016. 
 
with Chris Foss and Zach Whalen, Disability in Comic Books and Graphic Novels. Palgrave MacMillan, February, 2016.
 
Editor, “Trayvon Martin in Popular Culture: A Roundtable.” MLS (45.1) Summer, 2015. 
 
Recent book chapters and articles:
“7.1 Bayou.” Black One Shot. Michael B. Gillespie and Lisa Uddin, eds. ASAP/J August 27, 2018. http://asapjournal.com/b-o-s-7-1-bayou-jonathan-gray/

“Black Panther and Cold War Colonialisms in the Marvel Universe.” Black Perspectives Blog, African American Intellectual History Society, University of Pittsburgh. March 17, 2018. https://www.aaihs.org/the-black-panther-and-cold-war-colonialism-in-the-marvel-universe/

“‘Why Couldn’t You Let Me Die?’: Cyborg, Social Death, and Narratives of Disability” Disability in Comic Books and Graphic Novels. Palgrave MacMillan, February, 2016.
 
“‘Commence the Great Work’: The Historical Archive and Unspeakable Violence in Kyle Baker’s Nat Turner.” Afterimages of Slavery: Essays on Appearances in Recent American Films, Literature, Television and Other Media. Marlene D. Allen and Seretha D. Williams eds.  McFarland and Co, 2012. 183-200.
 
“Harlem Modernisms.” The Oxford Handbook of Modernisms.  Peter Brooker, Andrzej Gasiorek, Deborah Parsons and Andrew Thacker, eds.  Oxford University Press, 2010. 235-248.
 
““I’ll Be Forever Mackin’”:  The Social Construction of Black Masculine Identity in Hip Hop’s Platinum Age.” Black Sexualities: Probing Powers, Passions, Practices and Policies. Sandra L. Barnes and Juan Battle, eds. Rutgers University Press, 2009. 401-422.