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Fall 2018 – Course Descriptions 


Français 87200 : Entre Rire et Châtiment : La Formation de la Satire moderne à la Renaissance
Prof. B. Renner
Thursday, 6:30-8:30
2 or 4 Credits
 
La satire est une des formes d’expression littéraire les plus complexes. Elle se place à la fois dans un contexte strictement littéraire (p. ex. parodie de genres tels l’épopée où de conventions telles l’amour courtois) et dans un cadre politique, religieux ou social. Son objectif principal est d’habitude de nature morale : elle vise à guérir les maux de la société à travers une multitude d’approches critiques et esthétiques. La Renaissance offre un champ d’étude particulièrement fertile pour la satire. De nombreuses traditions satiriques différentes se mélangent à cette époque pour aboutir au concept moderne de la forme : le modèle classique de la satire en vers (Lucilius, Horace, Perse, Juvénal), L’épigramme (Martial), la variante ménippéenne (Lucien de Samosate), le drame satyrique grec et la variante populaire en vernaculaire (farce et sottie). Quasiment tous les auteurs, canoniques ou non, souscrivent à cette écriture militante riche et complexe qui combine de manière exemplaire un éventail représentatif d’aspects littéraires et extralittéraires. L’étude de la satire renaissante nous permettra donc de mieux comprendre l’évolution de la littérature française (et européenne) en vernaculaire dont les débuts étaient dominés par les soucis de l’imitatio et de l’anoblissement des lettres nationales.
 
Liste préliminaire des textes étudiés :
 
--La Farce de Maître Pathelin.
--François Rabelais, Pantagruel. Paris : Seuil, 1996.
--Clément Marot, « L’Enfer ».
--Bonaventure Des Périers, Le Cymbalum mundi.
--Barthélemy Aneau, Lyon marchant. Satire françoyse.
--Le Paradoxe contre les Lettres.
--Joachim Du Bellay, Les Regrets ; Divers Jeux rustiques.
--Pierre de Ronsard, Discours des Misères de ce Temps.
--Agrippa d’Aubigné, Les Tragiques.
--La Satyre Menippee.

French 87500: Independent Study - Surrealism I : Prose, Poetry, and Visual Art of Surrealism from 1924- 1944.
Prof. Mary Ann Caws
First five Wednesdays of Fall 2018
4:15pm-6:00pm
French Thesis Room
 
Description: Beginnings and “heroic “ period, including works by Aragon, Artaud, Bellmer, Brauner, Bunuel, Breton, Cahun, Carrington, Cesaire,  Desnos, Freddie, Lamba, Magritte, Malkine, Masson, Matta, Nouge, Oppenheim,  Peret, Picasso, Sage, Tanguy, Philippe Soupault, and Remedios Varo.
 
 
French 87200: REFUGEE CRISES: HISTORY AND LAW, NARRATIVE, POETRY AND FILM.
Distinguished Prof. Domna Stanton
Tuesdays 4:15-6:15
2 or 4 credits

Why are we in the midst of an unparalleled refugee crisis that involves 65 million people? Such dislocations and displacements have occurred since the late 17th century, when the term was first coined; and they have proliferated over the past century, notably since 1915. Who is a refugee? Who qualifies for asylum, why and why not? What about unaccompanied minors; victims of forced migrations? What is the status of economic migrants; of internally displaced persons? How should we classify those fleeing climate catastrophes? Are these others viewed as human?
This course in critical refugee studies will begin with history (and histories), then focus on the development, successes –and failures--of the human rights regime, humanitarian law and regional instruments, such as those of the European Union. We will examine transnational North-South disparities as drivers of migration, and lastly, the current ideological and nationalist trends that have led to securitization, the closing of borders, and authoritarianism in the post 9/11 world.
We will consider particular cases: the Armenian genocide; the Holocaust; the aftermath of the Vietnam war; the intractable Palestinian problem; persecutions in Darfur and South Sudan; the flight from dictatorships, gangs and failing economies in the Americas (including Haiti); the European Union’s integrity. We will end with the present crisis catalyzed by the Syrian war.
Our approach will be interdisciplinary: critical studies in history, theory and law will combine with close readings of novels, including graphic texts, poetry, memoirs/testimonials, and documentaries that represent/construct figures of refugees as well as themes of longing, remembering and return in refugee art.
Authors/film makers include Abdelrazaq, Agamben, Ai Wei Wei, Arendt, Balibar, Bauman, Butler, Dandicat, Darwish, Derrida, Dummett, Eggers, Erpenbeck, Hisham, Lanzmann, Said, Viet Than Nguyen
Work for the course will involve, beyond close readings of assignments, a class presentation (and write-up) of a case study with other members of a team; a 20 page paper on a topic developed in consultation with the instructor; and a final exam. Course materials will be uploaded to Blackboard cAugust 15, 2018.
Please direct all questions about the course to Domna Stanton (dstanton112@yahoo.com).
 
French 87500: Independent Study - Surrealism I : Prose, Poetry, and Visual Art of Surrealism from 1919- 1937.
Distinguished Prof. Mary Ann Caws
First five Wednesdays of Fall 2018
4:15pm-6:00pm
French Thesis Room
 
Description: Beginnings and “heroic “ period, including works by Aragon, Artaud, Bellmer, Brauner, Bunuel, Breton, Cahun, Carrington, Cesaire,  Desnos, Freddie, Lamba, Magritte, Malkine, Masson, Matta, Nouge, Oppenheim,  Peret, Picasso, Sage, Tanguy, Philippe Soupault, and Remedios Varo.
 
French 77010: Techniques of Literary research
Prof. Francesca Sautman
Thursdays 1:30pm – 3:30pm
French Thesis Room
Course required for all first year students.

FREN 87400 - GLOBALIZING THE ENLIGHTENMENT
Professor Helena Rosenblatt
Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15
2 or 4 credits
#68712
 
Course Description:
 
The Eighteenth Century European Enlightenment is widely seen as a transformative moment in Western culture, one which gave birth to many of our most cherished ideals. We are often told, for example, that it is to the Enlightenment that we owe our modern notions of human rights, representative government, and liberal democracy. However, the recent “global turn” in scholarship has led historians to ask some new and often unsettling questions. How, for example, did eighteenth-century European thinkers perceive the world beyond their own borders? How did they get their information and to what purposes was that information put?  Did regions outside of Europe experience an Enlightenment too? With the help of both primary and secondary sources, we will ask how adopting a “global” perspective on the Enlightenment might change our view of it. Is it even correct to call the Enlightenment European?