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Program Events

Channeling Relations in Medieval England and France 
Friday May 4th, 2018.

 
This event is hosted by Pearl Kibre Medieval Study and the Doctoral Students’ Council
at the The Graduate Center, CUNY.
Generous contributions were made by The Henri Peyre French Institute, the Medieval Studies Certificate Program, the Ph.D. Program in Art History, the Ph.D. Program in English, and the Ph.D. Program in History.
Organizers: Stephanie Grace-Petinos (University of Wisconsin-Madison); Deborah McGrady (University of Virginia); Elizabeth Robertson (University of Glasgow); Sara Rychtarik (Graduate Center, CUNY)


Jacques Viau Renaud Book Tour
Friday April 20th at 5:30 pm, Room 4202
Hosted by the Ph.D. Program in French this Friday April 20th at 5:30 pm Room 4202
Conversation with Sophie Marinez, Daniel Huttinot, Amaury Rodriguez & Raj Chetty Conversation will take place around the publication of J’essaie de vous parler de ma patrie (Mémoire d’encrier, 2018), the French translation of poems by Jacques Viau Renaud (1941-1965), a Haitian-Dominican poet who died in the struggle for Dominican sovereignty during the North-American occupation. Presented by the Center for the Study of Women & society Co-Sponsored by the Henri Peyre French Institute Join us at Jacques Viau Renaud’s book tour’s first stop in New York City


L’ile Maurice: Carrefour De l’Ocean Indien et du monde
Friday April 13th, 2018



Contemporary research in literature of the Indian Ocean
Emmanuel Bruno Jean-Francois, Penn State University
Kumari Issur, University of Mauritius , "Fill the silences of history by writing"
Shenaz Patel, journalist and writer
Presentations followed by a round table and a discussion
Seminar taking place in room 9204 from 5pm – 7pm
Co-Sponsored by the Henri Peyre French Institute

 
Renaissance Workshop & Public Lecture by Distinguished Scholar Mireille Huchon
Two day event: March 26 and 27




The Henri Peyre French Institute is delighted to announce;
 Professor Mireille Huchon, Senior Member of the Institut Universitaire de France, and Vice-President of the Société d’Histoire Littéraire de la France, Director of the series Etudes et Essais sur la Renaissance, Textes de la Renaissance, Les Mondes de Rabelais and co-director of the collection Bibliothèque de la Renaissance aux éditions Classiques Garnier, will speak on:

"RABELAIS EN GRAND ARCHITECTE"
On Tuesday March 27th, room 9207, 6 PM

WORKSHOP
There will also be a workshop on early modern work in progress
with doctoral students in dialogue with Professor Huchon, 
March 26th.
Place: French thesis room lounge
 2pm-5pm



Haunted History in France and America: When the Ghosts of Slavery Resurface
Student Conference 2018 March 23, 2018, 9:30am – 6:30pm



Keynote, Crystal Fleming, Professor of Sociology and Africana Studies, SUNY Stony Brook
Room C201 & C202

As seen in Charleston, South Carolina and more recently in Charlottesville, Virginia, monuments that celebrate slave-owning heritage such as confederate flags and memorials honoring anti-abolitionists have become contentious subjects, leading to outrage and violence. For some, these controversial symbols represent racial oppression; for others, their heritage, turning historic landscapes into a stage for the ongoing conversation about race and inequality in America. Unlike France, the United States has yet to officially acknowledge slavery as a crime against humanity or to erect slave memorials that pay homage to the victims.

2018 will mark the 170th anniversary of the abolition of slavery in France’s former colonies. Since the 150th anniversary of the Abolition of Slavery in 1998 and the Taubira law of 2001, the French State has sponsored a number of memorials across continental France and its overseas departments. These include memorials along the slave ports of arrivals in Western France, the impressive ACTe memorial in Guadeloupe, François Hollande’s commitment to build a state-of-the-art slave memorial museum in Paris, and the declaration of May 10th as the national day for commemorating slavery. Nevertheless, the current will to equate remembrance with reparation seems at odds with the reality in France where institutionalized racism along with socioeconomic disparity between Whites and Blacks continue to intensify racial division. On both sides of the Atlantic, people call for the creation of slave memorials to break the cycle of the past. Creating monuments alone is not sufficient. The conversation about race must take place as well. And as Professor Jennifer Allen says in a recent conversation with NPR, “the discussions about monuments and the Confederacy…are an opportunity for the U.S. to reimagine its relationship to the past” (2017). She further suggests that the moment the younger generation becomes involved in the debate, “you start to see a sort of qualitative re-evaluation of the kind of forms memory and commemoration might take” (2017). The same can be applied to France. The symbolic act of remembering must be followed by real actions that will bring meaningful changes not only in the lives of slaves’ descendants but also in racial equality. We are particularly interested in interdisciplinary studies and welcome a diversity of methodological approaches. Our goal is to have a stimulating conversation on this heated debate from both sides of the Atlantic.

Contributions may address one or more of the following:
Memory politics
Trauma theory and slavery
Critical race theory
The reconstruction of slavery in literature
Absence of slave autobiographies and narratives in French literature
The unsung heroes of slavery abolition
Social history Sources and archives on slavery
Public space as historic landscape
Architecture and the politics of memorialization
Reconstruction of memory
The significance of selective versus collective memory
Disguising and displacing slavery in France
Cinema and memory
Commemoration, museums, and monuments Museums as sites of contestation
Myths and silence in the discourses of abolition
Schoelcherism and politics of assimilation Slavery and the struggle for freedom as imaginary narratives
The role of Saint-Domingue in the first emancipation Haiti as the first black nation and antebellum America
 

A Surrealist Moment
October 19th 5.30 pm -7.30pm


In Honor of Distinguished Professor Mary Ann Caws
An Evening of Surrealist Performances.
The Martin Segal Theater
Doors OPEN at 5.00pm. Refreshments will be served after the show.
Sponsored by The Henri Peyre French Institute

 
Adventures in Criticism Friday,
April 21, 2017


  A Day-Long Symposium on Nineteenth-Century French Studies in Honor of Professor Julia Przybos
10:00AM - 8:00 PM The Graduate Center CUNY, Rooms 9205 & 4202 Students, alumni and faculty of the Graduate Center, CUNY along with guest speakers Claudie Bernard (NYU), Rachel Corkle (BMCC), Rachel Mesch (Yeshiva), Raisa Rexer (Vanderbilt), Wilson Decembre (Hunter College) and Chapman Wing (College of Staten Island).

Special thanks to: The Henri Peyre Institute, Prof. Julia Przybos, Prof. Francesca Sautman, Prof. Sara McDougall, Patricia Winter, Marguerite Van Cook, Christopher Campbell and Sabeel Kazi
Full Program here




 llegitimacy in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe
 Thursday May 17th 2:00-4:00 PM, Room 9205



Sara McDougall (French, John Jay and The Graduate Center): “Bastards and Bastard Priests in Medieval Europe”

Glenn Burger (English, Queens and The Graduate Center): “Bedroom Conduct: Legitimizing Late Medieval/Early Modern Marital Relations”