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Fall 2016

COURSE LISTINGS
THREE-CREDITS
 
SPAN 70200 – Hispanic Critical & Cultural Theory
GC: Monday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Dapía, [32229], room 3310A
 
SPAN 80000 – Language & The Politics of Pride & Profit
GC: Wednesday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. del Valle, [32234], room 3305
 
SPAN 80100 – The Sociolinguistics of Computer-Mediated Communication
GC: Tuesday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Cutler, [32231], room 7395
(cross-listed with LING 79500 and ANTH 78100)
 
SPAN 82100 – Cervantes Don Quixote
GC: Thursday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Schwartz, [32236], room 3209
(cross-listed with COMP LIT 80900)
 
SPAN 86200 – Moving the Muses: Poetic Praxis & Colonial Criollismo
GC: Wednesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Chang-Rodríguez, [32235], room 3310A
 
SPAN 87100 – When Narrative & Image Interact: Intermedial Spaces in Latin American Writing & Photography
GC: Tuesday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Perkowska, [32232], room 8202
 
SPAN 87100 – Cuerpos letrados: intelectuales, política y performance en América Latina
GC: Tuesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Degiovanni, [32233], room 3310B
 
SPAN 87100 – Counter Archives Within Modern Latin American Narrative
GC: Thursday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Riobó, [32237], room 3306
 
ONE-CREDIT MINI-SEMINARS
 
SPAN 80100 – Language ideology and Political Practice in Basque Language Revival
GC: Oct. 5 (10:30-2pm) Oct. 6 (10:30-2pm) Oct. 7 (11-2pm), 1 credit, Jacqueline Urla and Estíbaliz Amorrortu Gómez, [32238]
(Atxaga Chair)
 
SPAN 87000 – Ideologies of Linguistic Authority in 21st Century Catalonia
GC: Sept. 13-17 (11:30- 2:00 pm), 1 credit, Kathryn Woolard, [32239]
(Rodoreda Chair)
 
SEE ALSO
 
SPAN 88800 – Dissertation Seminar
GC: Monday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 0 credit, Prof. Degiovanni, [32230]
 
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
THREE-CREDITS
 
SPAN 70200 – Hispanic Critical & Cultural Theory
GC: Monday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Dapía, []
 
"Why did theory come about?  What qualifies as theory under different historical conditions? What difference could it make to our reading of literature? What is “affect,” “post-hegemony,”  "infrapolitics," “post-sovereignty” and why did these notions appear? The aim of this course is to give a map of the main concepts and currents of contemporary theory while providing historical and philosophical understanding of those theories and concepts.  Included on our map will be post-Lacanian psychoanalysis (Slavoj Žižek), post-Marxism (Ernesto Laclau, Chantal Mouffe, Jacques Rancière), biopolitics (Roberto Esposito) and affect theory (Lauren Berlant, Antonio Negri, Sianne Ngai).  We will place these theories in their historical and institutional contexts and explore the way in which fundamental assumptions are at stake. The goal is to understand them in their place, time, and traditions, but also to see what is of “use” for literature in their thought. Other thinkers who may be included are Benjamin Arditi, Gabriela Basterra, Oscar Cabezas, Jon Beasley-Murray, Alberto Moreiras, Bruno Bosteels, Pilar Calveiro, Eduardo Subirats, and León Rozitchner."
 
SPAN 80000 – Language & The Politics of Pride & Profit
GC: Wednesday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. del Valle, []        
 
In this seminar we will examine the linguistic ideologies of high modernity by using Monica Heller and Alexandre Duchêne’s proposal as a point of departure. The explanatory power as well as the limitations of the pride and profit framework developed by these authors will be examined, first, by placing it in dialectic relation with alternative sociological and political views of language (e.g. Blommaert, Crystal or Phillipson) and, second, by putting it into play in the analysis of specific sociolinguistic spaces. These will include, but not be limited to, normalization policies on behalf of minority languages in Europe, language revitalization processes in Latin America, and the politics of language and ethnic and national identity in the United States. The readings will include: Monica Heller and Alexandre Duchêne, Language in Late capitalism (2013); Jan Blommaert, The Sociolinguistics of Globalization (2010); Robert Phillipson, Linguistic Imperialism Continued (2010); David Crystal, English as a Global language (2003); Jacqueline Urla, Reclaiming Basque: Language, Nation, and Cultural Activism (2012); Serafín Coronel-Molina, Language Ideology, Policy and Planning in Peru (2015); Norma Mendoza-Denton, Homegirls: Language and Cultural Practices among Latina Youth Gangs (2008). [The seminar will be conducted in various types of English; papers may be submitted in any language or languages I can read]
 
SPAN 80100 – The Sociolinguistics of Computer-Mediated Communication
GC: Tuesday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Cutler, []
(cross-listed with LING 79500 and ANTH 78100)
 
This course examines recent quantitative and qualitative research on language use, attitudes, ideologies, and practices in computer mediated communication (CMC) with a special focus on Spanish language data. It explores research on subcultures and fan communities, political activism and radicalization, diasporic communities, multilingual practices, creative orthography, language play, expressions of gender and transgender identities, and other topics of interest to students across various CMC platforms including Twitter, Facebook, online fora, microblogs, YouTube, blogs, and SMS/texting What’s App, and Instagram.
 
SPAN 82100 – Cervantes Don Quixote
GC: Thursday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Schwartz, []
(cross-listed with COMP LIT 80900)
 
 SPAN 86200 – Moving the Muses: Poetic Praxis & Colonial Criollismo
GC: Wednesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Chang-Rodríguez, []
 
The aim of this course is to explore how New World poets in the Spanish Indies assimilated and began to subvert metropolitan poetic tradition. The discussions will include the manner in which Spanish themes and models were appropriated to produce a singular vision of America and its subjects. The analyses will underscore how New World poets, when expressing their concerns and interests, contributed to developing a "conciencia criolla." Authors to be discussed include: the anonymous women poets from Peru (Clarinda and Amarilis), Bernardo de Balbuena, Juan del Valle y Caviedes, Esteban de Terralla y Landa. Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz will receive special attention in order to highlight the concerns of women and other marginalized subjects. Among the objectives of the course are:  to situate the poets in a historical and literary grid, to study their work as attempts to imitate and differ from models;  and to pay special attention to understudied authors through individual research projects. Discussions  will be illustrated with images and communication facilitated through the use of Blackboard. The specific bibliography will be distributed in class.  The course will be conducted in Spanish; team work, class participation and written work in Spanish, English or Portuguese.
Texts to be purchased
1. “Aquí, ninfas del sur, venid ligeras.” Voces poéticas virreinales. Ed. R. Chang-Rodríguez. Madrid/Fráncfort: Iberoamericana/Vervuert, 2008;
2. Bernardo de Balbuena, Grandeza mexicana (any ed.).
Additional texts will be distributed in PDF format or place “in reserve” at the library.

SPAN 87100 – When Narrative & Image Interact: Intermedial Spaces in Latin American Writing & Photography
GC: Tuesday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Perkowska, []
 
Since the discovery of photography in 1839, and despite its long association with the mechanical reproduction of reality, the photographic image has increasingly assumed the role of participating in or indeed embodying literary projects. This course explores different modalities of interaction between photography and literary texts in contemporary Latin American writing and between photography and narrativity.  It will cover fictional questioning of photographic ethics (Julio Cortázar, Roberto Bolaño), fiction with photographs (Eduardo Belgrano Rawson, Mario Bellatín), the photographic essay (Diamela Eltit, Eduardo Lalo), the photographic narrative (Susan Meiselas, Juan Manuel Echavarría), and the photograph as (a source of) narrative (Marcelo Brodsky). We will examine these intermedial spaces in conjunction with theoretical readings on photography and literature in relation to affect, memory, ethics, and politics (Walter Benjamin, Roland Barthes, Susan Sontag, W.J.T. Mitchell, Jacques Rancière, Marianne Hirsch, Ariella Azoulay, Margaret Olin). The crossing of medial boundaries produces an imagetext  (Mitchell) or sentence-image (Rancière), a site of tension, slippage, transformation, displacement or interference, which impugns the notion of a single, fixed meaning; challenges representation by revealing its inescapable heterogeneity; reorganizes textual-visual visibilities and hierarchies;  and  posits questions about ethics of reader- and spectatorship.
 
SPAN 87100 – Cuerpos letrados: intelectuales, política y performance en América Latina
GC: Tuesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Degiovanni, []
 
Este curso se propone como una exploración de la noción de intelectual más allá de su producción escrita. Trabajando aspectos usualmente marginalizados en el abordaje de su figura, como sus intervenciones en espacios públicos y masivos, nos planteamos la posibilidad de pensar la actividad intelectual como una práctica corporizada, dependiente de la voz y el gesto y formulada para un público que ve y oye. Esta historia del cuerpo intelectual se puede rastrear en salones literarios, tours de conferencias, discursos en asambleas políticas, entre muchos otros espacios, y plantea interrogantes distintos a los que presupone el abordaje del intelectual como productor de textos destinados a ser leídos. Nociones tales como espectacularización, populismo y género serán claves en este curso. La nómina tentativa de autores que trabajaremos se centra en el paso del siglo XIX al siglo XX e incluye a José María Ramos Mejía, José Martí, Rubén Darío, Manuel Ugarte, Rufino Blanco-Fombona y Porfirio Barba-Jacob. Algunos ensayos de Diana Taylor, María Moreno, Sylvia Molloy e Irina Garbartzky servirán como antecedentes para la discusión de este tema en el campo latinoamericano; se incluirán también materiales teóricos claves sobre cuerpo y performance.
SPAN 87100 – Counter Archives Within Modern Latin American Narrative
GC: Thursday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Riobó, []
 
This course will begin by surveying the field of archival studies in order to understand why it plays such an important role in 20th and 21st-century Latin American narrative. After studying the origins of archives in Habsburg Spain and its colonies and continuing with general theories of archives by Foucault, Derrida, Guillory, and González Echevarría, we will move on to consider counter archives that have always existed either parallel or in direct opposition to official archives. We will question the official archive’s role in surveillance and epistemic control by analyzing counter spaces and collections that reveal: gaps in the historical and cultural records, meaning in detritus, and fetishistic inventions that ultimately lead to a trail of traces, but never to the always-illusive “real.” We will also focus on works relating to digital media by Žižek, Lanier, Featherstone, and Badiou; museology by Bal and Bennett; library science by Chartier; and women’s studies by Chaudhuri, Katz, and Perry. We will then study eclectic notions of the counter archive in our main corpus of texts: Juan Rodríguez Freyle’s El carnero, Alfonso Kijadurías’s “De hijos suyos podernos llamar” (Otras historias famosas), Augusto Roa Bastos’s “Borrador de un informe,” Carlos Fuentes’s Aura, Rosario Ferré’s “La muñeca menor,” Manuel Puig’s Boquitas pintadas, Severo Sarduy’s De donde son los cantantes and Maitreya, and Roberto Bolaño’s Nocturno de Chile. Course requirements include: a book review, an MLA-style talk, and an 18-22-page paper. This course will be taught in Spanish, but many of the critical/theoretical readings will be in English.
 
 
ONE-CREDIT MINI-SEMINARS
 
SPAN 80100 – Language ideology and Political Practice in Basque Language Revival
GC: Oct. 5 (10:30-2pm) Oct. 6 (10:30-2pm) Oct. 7 (11-2pm), 1 credit, Jacqueline Urla and Estíbaliz Amorrortu Gómez, []
(Atxaga Chair)
 
This seminar will bring together sociolinguistic, linguistic and anthro-political perspectives on Basque language revival strategies. Standardization and the acquisition of new speakers have been two key strategies in the social movement to guarantee the future of the Basque language.  The seminar will look critically at ideological frameworks, values and sociolinguistic conditions that have shaped these strategic foci.  We will look critically at how and why legitimacy and authority are such key forms of symbolic capital for linguistic minorities.  We will also consider the kinds of unintended consequences and specific dilemmas that minority language advocacy engenders.  The final section will explore some of the latest efforts in Basque civil society to reconfigure the goals and methods of language advocacy for the 21st century.
 
SPAN 87000 – Ideologies of Linguistic Authority in 21st Century Catalonia
GC: Sept. 13-17 (11:30- 2:00 pm), 1 credit, Kathryn Woolard, []
(Rodoreda Chair)