Show The Graduate Center Menu
 
 

Fall 2018

FALL 2018 – COURSE LISTINGS
THREE-CREDITS
 
SPAN 70200 – Hispanic Critical & Cultural Theory
GC: Monday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Prof. Oswaldo Zavala
Room 3305

 
SPAN 80000 – Language, Identity and Political Economy
GC: Tuesday, 11:45-1:45 p.m., Prof. José del Valle, 
Room 3305

 
SPAN 80200 – Teaching Spanish as a Heritage Language
GC: Thursday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Prof. Beatriz Lado, 
Room 3308

 
SPAN 85000 – The City in Contemporary Spanish Literature, Cinema, and Visual Arts
GC: Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Prof. Paul Julian Smith, 
Room 4422

 
SPAN 86300 – Theatre and Society: Contemporary Latin American Theatre and Performance (1960-present)
GC: Wednesday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Prof. Jean Graham-Jones, 
Room 5382

 
SPAN 87000 – In-Between Worlds & Traditions: Rereading the “Crónicas de Indias”
GC: Wednesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Prof. Raquel Chang-Rodríguez, 
Room 3310A

 
SPAN 87100 – Del espacio de aca: Photographic Discourses & Practices in/about Latin America
GC: Thursday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Prof. Angeles Donoso Macaya, 
Room 4433

 
SPAN 87100 – Cuerpos letrados: Intelectuales, política y performance
GC: Tuesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Prof. Fernando Degiovanni, 
Room 8202

 
SPAN 88800 – Dissertation Seminar GC: Wednesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Prof. José del Valle,
Room 4116.18

ONE-CREDIT MINI-SEMINARS

 
SPAN 87200 – Escuela e ideologías lingüísticas en España y Cataluña, en particular. Siglos XIX y XX
GC: Monday, 9/24/18 through Friday, 9/28/18, 11:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m., Prof. Jenny Brumme, []
(Rodoreda Chair)
 
SPAN 87200 – ‘La batalla del relato’ y el conflicto de identidades nacionales en España
GC: Tuesday, 10/9/18 through Friday, 10/12/2018, 10:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m., Prof. Gorka Mercero Altzugarai, []
(Atxaga Chair)


FALL 2018 – COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
 
THREE-CREDITS
 
SPAN 70200 – Hispanic Critical & Cultural Theory
GC: Monday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Prof. Oswaldo Zavala
 
SPAN 80000 – Language, Identity and Political Economy
GC: Tuesday, 11:45-1:45 p.m., Prof. José del Valle
 
In this seminar, we will examine language´s involvement in the contemporary construction and mobilization of ethnic and national identities as well as in the development of late capitalist forms of economic organization. The sociolinguistic objects and specific case-studies examined throughout the seminar will include, but not be limited to, language revitalization processes in Latin America, the politics of language and ethnic and national identity in the United States, the promotion of Spanish in global linguistic markets, and normalization policies and discourses on behalf of minority languages in Europe -mainly in Spain-.
 
The seminar´s narrative and theoretical footing -anchored in critical sociolinguistics and glotopolítica- will be established through Monica Heller and Alexandre Duchêne’s proposal to analyze the deployment of linguistic ideologies around the 'pride' and 'profit' tropes (Language in Late capitalism, 2012). The studies and the interpretive frameworks put forth in this book will be placed in dialectic relation with each other and with other sociological and political views of language´s interface with capital and labour, identity and citizenship, and politics and power. Various approaches to language and identity will be introduced through John E. Joseph´s Language and Identity (2004); critical approaches to language and political economy will be discussed through Marnie Holborow´s Language and Neoliberalism (2015) and Monica Heller and Bonnie McElnihhy´s Language, Capitalism, Colonialism (2017); and the articulation of language and politics will be studied through John Joseph´s Language and Politics (2009) and Bentivegna, del Valle, Niro and Villa´s Anuario de Glotopolítica 1 (2017).
 
As the seminar proceeds, discussion of each topic will be informed by the following readings among others: José del Valle, La lengua, ¿patria común? (2007); Norma Mendoza-Denton, Homegirls: Language and Cultural Practices among Latina Youth Gangs (2008); Jan Blommaert, The Sociolinguistics of Globalization (2010); Robert Phillipson, Linguistic Imperialism Continued (2010); H. Sami Alim and Geneva Smitherman, Articulate While Black: Barack Obama, Language, and Race in the U.S. (2012); Angela Reyes, Language, Identity, and Stereotype among Southeast Asian American Youth (2012); Jacqueline Urla, Reclaiming Basque: Language, Nation, and Cultural Activism (2012); Elvira Arnoux and Susana Nothstein´s Temas de glotopolítica: Integración regional sudamericana y panhispanismo (2014); Serafín Coronel-Molina, Language Ideology, Policy and Planning in Peru (2015); Kathryn A. Woolard, Singular and Plural: Ideologies of Linguistic Authority in 21st Century Catalonia (2016); Jonathan Rosa, Looking like a Language, Sounding like a Race: Raciolinguistic Ideologies and the Learning of Latinidad (2018). [The seminar will be conducted in various forms of Spanish and English; so, receptive knowledge of both languages is required; class participation and papers may be in any language or languages I think I can understand.]
 
SPAN 80200 – Teaching Spanish as a Heritage Language
GC: Thursday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Prof. Beatriz Lado
 
This course is an introduction to the field of heritage language education, with an emphasis on the teaching of Spanish to bilingual Spanish-English learners in the US. We will explore different areas that are relevant for the field, such as the definition of a heritage speaker/language; heritage language acquisition, development, and maintenance; historical, socio-cultural, political, and ideological dimensions of heritage language learning and teaching; and current pedagogical approaches to teaching Spanish as a heritage language (e.g., critical, multiliteracies). An important part of the course will be devoted to curriculum development and assessment. The course will be conducted in Spanish with readings in both English and Spanish.
 
SPAN 85000 – The City in Contemporary Spanish Literature, Cinema, and Visual Arts
GC: Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Prof. Paul Julian Smith
 
This course, which is taught in Spanish, examines the modern Spanish city in the media of novel (Martín Santos, Laforet, Goytisolo), film and TV (Almodóvar, Alex de la Iglesia, TVE’s Fortunata y Jacinta and La Regenta), and visual art (painter Antonio López, web artist Marisa González). Each class examines an urban theorist (eg Henri Lefebvre, Michel de Certeau, Manuel Castells), a work of criticism by a scholar of Spanish urbanism, and one or more creative works.
 
SPAN 87000 – In-Between Worlds & Traditions: Rereading the “Crónicas de Indias”
GC: Wednesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Prof. Raquel Chang-Rodríguez
 
This course will study a diverse group of testimonies from the early contact period and beyond.  Generally grouped under the label “crónicas de Indias,” they will include letters, histories, relaciones, and chronicles written by men and women of diverse backgrounds and ethnicity. These works will be situated in their historical and literary contexts in order to analyze the objectives of their authors and understand their meaning in the shared culture and history of Europe and the Americas. Among the issues to be discussed are: 1) how these texts became “literature;” 2) alphabetic culture vis-à-vis native traditions; 3) the polemics about the indigenous population; 4) the eye-witness and the construction of history; 5) the indigenous perception of the conquest; 6) gender issues; 7) Sor Juana’s view of the conquest.  Class discussions will be illustrated with images and communication facilitated through Blackboard. There will be ample time for discussion and pursuing individual projects
Readings will include: selections from letters by Colón, Isabel de Guevara, 2da carta de relación, Cortés* [Castalia or Porrúa]; Bartolomé de las Casas, Brevísima relación de la destrucción de las Indias * (Cátedra), Inca Garcilaso de la Vega, Comentarios reales (Biblioteca Ayacucho, on-line), Felipe Guaman Poma de Ayala, Primer nueva corónica y buen gobierno (selection; Royal Library Copenhagen, on-line), La monja alférez, Catalina de Erauso (Cátedra)*. Other material will be electronically distributed. *Purchase text.
Among the general requirements are: team work, exam, research essay (MLA Style, latest edition; written in English or Spanish), active class participation in English or Spanish reflecting reading of assigned material.
The specific bibliography will be distributed in class.

SPAN 87100 – Del espacio de aca: Photographic Discourses & Practices in/about Latin America
GC: Thursday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Prof. Angeles Donoso Macaya
 
Traditional histories of photography return again and again to France, England and the United States to investigate the origins of the photographic apparatus, explain the birth of the documentary genre, elucidate the links between control, surveillance and the advent of photographic archives, or explore issues related to the circulation of photographs. Although images produced in Latin America & the Caribbean played a central role in these processes (Poole 1998), regional photographic practices have been persistently ignored (or rendered invisible) in traditional histories of photography. This postcolonial erasure is even more startling if one considers that the birth of photography was the product of a relentless sequence of displacements and disseminations (Azoulay 2008, Cadava 2013). If photography is both an entangling and de-territorializing civil practice (due to its capacity for circulation and movement), it is necessary to critically examine the histories of photography and elucidate the (ignored, silenced, invisible) place of Latin American photographic practices within these same discourses.
The title of this course refers to Ronald Kay’s essay Del espacio de acá: señales para una mirada americana (1980). Kay’s ideas and recent contributions by visual studies and postcolonial and decolonial criticism will serve us to elucidate the notion of colonial visuality (in opposition to that of modern visuality) and to examine the voids and silences of the histories of photography vis-à-vis the photographic practices from the 19th century. We will also review theories about the documentary and the document, the archive, and forensic aesthetics in order to explore and reconsider the prevalent linkage made by photography criticism between 20th-century Latin American documentary photography and humanist ideologies.

SPAN 87100 – Cuerpos letrados: Intelectuales, política y performance
GC: Tuesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Prof. Fernando Degiovanni
 
Este curso se propone explorar la noción de intelectual más allá de su producción escrita. Trabajando aspectos usualmente marginalizados en el abordaje de su figura, como sus intervenciones en espacios públicos y masivos, nos planteamos la posibilidad de pensar la actividad del escritor como una práctica corporizada, dependiente de la voz y el gesto y formulada para un público que ve y oye. Esta historia del cuerpo letrado se puede rastrear en salones y cafés, tours de conferencias, discursos en asambleas masivas, entre otros espacios, y plantea interrogantes distintos a los que presupone su análisis como productor de textos destinados a ser leídos. Nociones tales como espectacularización, populismo y género serán claves en este curso. Entre los eventos que trabajaremos se encuentran la campaña presidencial de Macedonio Fernández, el tour latinoamericano de Manuel Ugarte, los banquetes de Norah Lange, y las performances de Ramón Gómez de la Serna y Omar Viñole. El seminario supone el abordaje de estos cuerpos letrados desde la teoría contemporánea como desde la investigación misma de los archivos en los cuales se documentaron sus prácticas. El curso dedicará especial atención a las intervenciones de Omar Viñole, figura sobre la cual convergen algunos nombres citados más arriba. Entendido como un seminario dentro del seminario, el estudio de la producción de Viñole (quien a mediados de la década de 1930 realizó numerosas intervenciones escandalosas en Buenos Aires y Montevideo acompañado por una vaca) permitirá explorar los desafíos específicos que plantea el análisis de la performance en circunstancias históricas y culturales atravesadas por la política de masas, la institucionalización letrada y la emergencia de nuevos debates sobre el cuerpo y la sexualidad.


SPAN 86300 – Theatre and Society: Contemporary Latin American Theatre and Performance (1960-present)
GC: Wednesday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Prof. Jean Graham-Jones

ONE-CREDIT MINI-SEMINARS
 
SPAN 87200 – Escuela e ideologías lingüísticas en España y Cataluña, en particular. Siglos XIX y XX
GC: Monday, 9/24/18 through Friday, 9/28/18, 11:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m., Prof. Jenny Brumme, []
(Rodoreda Chair)
 
El curso pretende ofrecer una aproximación histórica al llamado hecho diferencial catalán partiendo de las ideas que las distintas fuerzas políticas propagaron a lo largo de los siglos xix y xx sobre las lenguas de España y el papel del catalán en la escuela. A partir de ejemplos concretos que marcaron los altibajos en la recuperación del catalán como lengua culta y escrita, se observará la inseparable relación entre las ideologías adoptadas y ciertos modelos escolares. Cabe destacar que las conclusiones que se sacarán del estudio de los documentos aportados (discursos, apologías, prefacios, etc.) serán extrapolables a situaciones lingüísticas que presentan cierto paralelismo con el caso catalán. Se fomentará el acercamiento crítico a las diversas realidades e ideas lingüísticas que existen en el mundo hispánico.
 
SPAN 87200 – ‘La batalla del relato’ y el conflicto de identidades nacionales en España
GC: Tuesday, 10/9/18 through Friday, 10/12/2018, 10:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m., Prof. Gorka Mercero Altzugarai, []
(Atxaga Chair)
 
En el debate político actual en España, la expresión la batalla del relato se refiere a la necesidad de que el grupo armado ETA – disuelto definitivamente en mayo de 2018 tras 60 años de existencia – se recuerde exclusivamente como una muestra más de la deplorable capacidad humana para el daño y la destrucción. Pero esta visión deja peligrosamente de lado el hecho de que para muchos ETA fue la consecuencia directa de un conflicto político. Diversas obras literarias han ofrecido su visión sobre este asunto, algunas tan conocidas como El hijo del acordeonista (2003) de Bernardo Atxaga o Patria (2016) de Fernando Aramburu. El curso pondrá dichas obras en su contexto, analizará su posición respecto a la batalla del relato y evaluará su contribución a la prolongación o resolución de un conflicto negado por unos, señalado por otros, y que entre todos debemos intentar resolver.