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Spring 2018

PH.D. PROGRAM IN LATIN AMERICAN, IBERIAN AND LATINO CULTURES
 
SPRING 2018 – COURSE LISTINGS
THREE-CREDITS
 
SPAN 80000 – Todo nuevo bajo el sol: Re-shaping Spanish Identity at the End of 20th Century
GC: Thursday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Prof. Alvaro Fernandez, [38050]
 
SPAN 80100 – Analyzing Discourse Data
GC: Monday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Prof. Cecelia Cutler, [38048]
 
SPAN 82200 – The Invention of Love in Early Modern Spanish Poetry
GC: Thursday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Prof. Lía Schwartz, [38053]
 
SPAN 87000 – Archival Subversions in Cuban Literature (XX-XXI Centuries)
GC: Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Prof. Carlos Riobó, [38054]
 
SPAN 87000 – Ugly Feelings: Post-Utopic Fiction and Film from Central America
GC: Tuesday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Prof. Perkowska, [38055]
 
SPAN 87100 – To Love & To Sin: Sexual Practices in Colonial Latin American
GC: Tuesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Prof. Mariana Zinni, [38051]
 
SPAN 87300 – Language and Politics
GC: Thursday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Prof. Juan Rodríguez, [38049]
 
 
 ONE-CREDIT MINI-SEMINARS
 
SPAN 87500- Elegies Without Consolation: Territory, Language and Conflict in Contemporary Galician Culture
GC: Monday, 3/5/2018 through Friday, 3/9/2018, Time: TBA, Prof. Helena Miguélez-Carballeira, [38747]
(Xunta de Galicia Chair)
 
SPAN 87200– Palabra e historia. La poesía de Jaime Gil de Biedma
GC: Dates: May 3 (10:00- 1:30 pm), May 4 (10:00- 1:30 pm), May 5 (10:00 am -1:00 pm) 2018, Prof. Luis García Montero, [38748]
(Miguel Delibes Chair)
 
SPAN 87200-  Nuevas visiones del parentesco y de la comunidad desde la literatura y el cine
GC: Dates: April 9-13, 2018, Time: 11:00 - 1:00 pm. Prof. Marta Segarra [38919]
(Cátedra Rodoreda)

 
SEE ALSO
 
SPAN 88800 – Dissertation Seminar
GC: Wednesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Prof. Oswaldo Zavala, [38052]
 
 
 
 SPRING 2018 – COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
 
THREE-CREDITS
 
SPAN 80000 – Todo nuevo bajo el sol: Re-shaping Spanish Identity at the End of 20th Century
GC: Thursday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Prof. Fernandez, [38050]
Following the fall of Francisco Franco's dictatorship, Spain underwent a process of cultural re-imagining, supported both by the political class and the cultural industry. The Francoist image of an authoritarian, conservative society, bearing the marks of 40 years of ultra-catholic fascist dictatorship was actively re-shaped by the political and cultural élite in order to demonstrate that Spain succeeded in conquering its past and turned into a model society of 'modernity'. For the last four decades of the 20th century, the country went through a period of Transition, a process which amounted to the intellectual erasure of the memory of the previous regime. Spain became part of the European Union, which stands for a cosmopolitan, open society, and invested heavily in developing and concentrating its cultural industry. It actively engaged in the economic reconquest of Latin America, and at the end of the century faced the re-emergence of political discussions in the form of historical memory debates. This course will consist of reading, watching and analyzing cultural products that were created along this transitional socio-political process. It will provide an opportunity to the students to examine and critically evaluate the social, political and cultural aspects of the Transition period and to examine the intersection of culture and politics in reshaping Spanish national identity.
Among other readings, the course will analyze: Aub’s La gallina ciega, Patino’s Nueva cartas a Berta, Espinosa’ La fea burguesía, Rosa’s El vano ayer, and a selection of Latin American literature affected by the Spanish publishing companies’ dominance​.

SPAN 80100 – Analyzing Discourse Data
GC: Monday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Prof. Cutler, [38048]
 
Discourse Analysis: Studying discourse is more than examining language use; it entails studying the use of language as a form of social practice, and a way of reflecting and shaping society. This course explores socially informed and critical approaches to analyzing language at the level of discourse (beyond the level of the sentence), including an overview of current theories and methods (e.g. Pragmatics, Interactional Sociolinguistics, Conversation analysis, Critical Discourse Analysis, and Computer-Mediated Discourse Analysis). With this set of tools, students will gain experience analyzing different forms of spoken and written texts such as conversations, service encounters, computer-mediated interaction, print/online news and other forms of public discourse. Students will develop their own projects and present their research at the end of the semester focusing on (but not limited to) examinations of micro structural patterns across texts, coherence, turn-taking, lexical choices, and translanguaging, or macro level phenomena such as speaker intentions, and socio-cultural meanings in relation to ideology, identity, power, and gender.
 
SPAN 82200 – The Invention of Love in Early Modern Spanish Poetry
GC: Thursday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Prof. Schwartz, [38053]
 
The development of Humanism led to the rediscovery of Italian poetry in the Renaissance, which became a main model for different conceptions of love at the time, and of Greek and Roman poetry. The example of Petrarch’s Canzoniere and his Italian followers in the sixteenth-century, Bembo among others, combined with the enthusiastic reception of Neo-Platonism after the translations of Plato and the philosophical writings of Marsilio Ficino, promoted a vision of love that was going to be recreated by Spanish Renaissance and Baroque poets for two long centuries. The purpose of this course will be to examine the relations between literary and philosophical theories and their recontextualization in poetic texts, focusing on the constitution of the voices of the lover and on the portraits of the beloved, as they appear in individual poems, and in the collections built as “cancioneros” after the example of Petrarch. Garcilaso de la Vega’s and Fernando de Herrera’s works, historical precedents of Góngora’s and Quevedo’s poetry, will be studied in conjunction with readings of Neo-Platonic theory, Marsilio Ficino’s treatises and those composed by his most important mediator in Spain, León Hebreo in the famous translation of Inca Garcilaso de la Vega, with references to other important texts in the transmission of Neo-Platonic ideas.
 
SPAN 87000 – Archival Subversions in Cuban Literature (XX-XXI Centuries)
GC: Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Prof. Riobó, [38054]
This course will examine notions of subversive archives and XX and XXI-century Cuban writers who incorporate them in their narratives. We will analyze works by Reinaldo Arenas, Alejo Carpentier, Pedro Juan Gutiérrez, Achy Obejas, Leonardo Padura, Antonio José Ponte, Ena Lucía Portela, and Severo Sarduy. This course will be taught in Spanish.

SPAN 87000 – Ugly Feelings: Post-Utopic Fiction and Film from Central America
GC: Tuesday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Prof. Perkowska, [38055]
 
Ugly feelings, as defined by Sianne Ngy in her eponymous study, are “minor and generally unprestigious” emotions of a strong, diagnostic nature because they have the capacity to shed light on “a real social experience and a certain kind of historical truth.” Central American cultural texts (novels, short stories and films) produced during the last two decades are full of such feelings: disenchantment, bitterness, anguish, anxiety, fear, disdain, frustration, sorrow, pain, melancholia, loss, and confusion are signifiers of disappointment with past utopias and present neoliberal restoration or reaffirmation of market capitalism. This course explores a selection of Central American fictions and films which will be read in conjunction with theoretical approaches to affect and emotions (Phillip Fischer, Sianne Ngy, Sara Ahmed, Ruth Leys, Martha Nussbaum, among others), neoliberalism (David Harvey, Wendy Brown), and politics and aesthetics (Jacques Rancière).  We will examine unresolved tensions articulated through affects and emotions, and will fathom what commitments, if any, are encoded in these ‘feeling texts.’  
 
SPAN 87100 – To Love & To Sin:  Sexual Practices in Colonial Latin American
GC: Tuesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Prof. Zinni, [38051]
 
In this class we will examine different sexualities, love relationships and sexual practices in Colonial Latin America. We will focus our attention in three major topics: cohabitation, marriage and homosexuality regarding the Spanish Law and mores. All these three fields point out distinct problems and outcomes that we will explore through the reading of Spanish chronicles, Confesionarios de Indios, satirical poems by Juan del Valle y Caviedes, sections of Juan Rodríguez Freyle’s El Carnero, the autobiography of the Monja-Alferez, inquisitorial testimonies, and archival materials.
The course will be taught in Spanish.

SPAN 87300 – Language and Politics
GC: Thursday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Prof. Rodríguez, [38049]
 
This course addresses the study of political language in linguistic anthropology. The course surveys classic anthropological works on political oratory, political discourse, rhetoric, as well as ethnographic cases that explore how linguistic phenomena are intrinsic to political systems. This is a writing intensive course in which the students will be required to develop a final project of their interest.  
 
ONE-CREDIT MINI-SEMINARS
 
SPAN – Elegies Without Consolation: Territory, Language and Conflict in Contemporary Galician Culture
GC: Monday, 3/5/2018 through Friday, 3/9/2018, Time: TBA, Prof. Helena Miguélez-Carballeira, [38747]
 
Galician culture and politics are marked today by discourses of loss and collapse, which are often related to the idea that Galician identity is on an irreversible course towards disappearance. The historical split of the Galician nationalist party in 2012 and the appearance of new political parties have given way to new discourses about national construction in the region. Galician language planning continues to reap meagre results in terms of language revitalization, with a 2014 study showing that first-language Galician speakers have now dropped below 50% for the first time in history. Current criticism of heritage policies is often linked to the idea that the Galician natural and built landscape has suffered a decades of social and institutional neglect. How is Galician culture registering these trends? And what consolation does it bring about, if any? This course will try to answer these questions and others through an engagement with contemporary Galician poetry, fiction, essay and film.   
 
SPAN – Palabra e historia. La poesía de Jaime Gil de Biedma
GC: Dates: TBA, Time: TBA, Prof. Luis García Montero, [38748]
 
Jaime Gil de Biedma (1929-1990) es uno de los poetas más importantes de la literatura española en la segunda mitad del siglo XX. Su figura se proyectó en la generación de los años 80 con la misma fuerza que Juan Ramón Jiménez dejó su magisterio en la generación del 27. Este tipo de herencias tienen su razón de ser no sólo en la calidad estética, sino en la configuración de una personalidad capaz de reunir buena parte de los debates más serios en el horizonte lírico de su tiempo. Heredero de Jorge Guillén, el mundo poético de Gil de Biedma se concibió a sí mismo como una superación del simbolismo y como acercamiento al realismo crítico y a la poesía meditativa. Para este tránsito buscó un diálogo fecundo con la tradición anglosajona (Eliot y Auden, sobre todo).
 
Los poemas de Jaime Gil de Biedma son una indagación en la historia literaria, en la historia social de España y en su propia identidad homosexual. Su estudio se abre por ello a cuestiones como la intertextualidad, la ironía, el compromiso político y el carácter histórico de la intimidad. El silencio prematuro de Gil de Biedma, analizado por él mismo, supone uno de los síntomas literarios más lúcidos de lo que significó para la escritura el proceso culturas y social de la Transición española.
 
SPAN 87200-  Nuevas visiones del parentesco y de la comunidad desde la literatura y el cine
GC: Dates: April 9-13, 2018, Time: 11:00 - 1:00 pm. Prof. Marta Segarra [38919]
(Cátedra Rodoreda)


Durante el último medio siglo, los conceptos tanto de “comunidad” como de “parentesco” han sufrido profundos cambios en las sociedades occidentales. Desde los estudios de género y sexualidad se abogó por una extensión de la “familia” a grupos de personas unidas por lazos distintos a los de sangre. Paralelamente, diversas líneas de pensamiento han problematizado la noción de “comunidad” y de “lo común”. Analizaremos en este seminario diversas formas que toman estas nuevas visiones del parentesco y de la comunidad en textos literarios y cinematográficos, pertenecientes a la cultura catalana y europea.