Show The Graduate Center Menu
 
 

Spring 2019

PH.D. PROGRAM IN LATIN AMERICAN, IBERIAN, AND LATINO CULTURES
SPRING 2019 – COURSE LISTINGS
THREE-CREDITS
 
SPAN 70100 – Spanish as a Historical Problem
GC: Tuesday, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Prof. José del Valle, []
 
SPAN 82000 – The Humanistic Comedy in Renaissance and Baroque Spain
GC: Thursday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Prof. Lía Schwartz, []
 
SPAN 87100 – When Narrative and Image Interact: Intermedial Spaces in Latin American Writing and Photography
GC: Tuesday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Prof. Magdalena Perkowska, []
 
SPAN 87100 – Havana in Contemporary Cuban Literature
GC: Thursday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Prof. Carlos Riobó, []
 
SPAN 87200 – Human Rights and Literature in the Americas
GC: Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Prof. Vanessa Perez Rosario, []
 
SPAN 87200 – The Cinema of Pedro Almodóvar y Guillermo del Toro
GC: Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Prof. Paul Julian Smith, []
 
 
ONE-CREDIT MINI-SEMINARS
 
SPAN 80100 – Language Attitudes
GC: Monday, 3/25/2019 through Friday, 3/29/2019, Prof. Loureiro-Rodríguez, []
(Galician Chair)
 
SPAN 87200 – Condición póstuma y emancipación. Una mirada desde el sur de Europa
GC: Monday, 2/25/2019 through Friday, 3/1/2019, Prof. Garcés, []
(Rodoreda Chair)
 
SPAN - Pensar el futuro: narrativas distópicas en el siglo XXI
GC: Thursday, 5/9/2019 through Saturday 5/11/2019, Prof. Antonio Orejudo []
(Delibes Chair)
 
 
SEE ALSO
 
SPAN 88800 – Dissertation Seminar
GC: Tuesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Prof. José del Valle, []
 
 
SPRING 2019 – COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
 
SPAN 70100 – Spanish as a Historical Problem
GC: Tuesday, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Prof. José del Valle, []
 
Este curso propone un recorrido por varias articulaciones de la lengua española y la historia; una mirada acaso irónica sobre las estrategias de constitución del objeto bajo condiciones disciplinarias y políticas diversas. Nos detendremos en la “Gramática Histórica”, en la “Historia de la Lengua”, en la “Historia Social” y en la “Historia Política de la Lengua”, que, aunque vislumbran objetos lingüísticos sólo parcialmente coincidentes, los encuadran sin embargo en una misma cronografía que va desde los tiempos en que el latín fue introducido en la Península Ibérica hasta el momento actual, cuando aún el valor de la unidad y el significado simbólico del español en el mundo reciben atención privilegiada dentro y fuera de las disciplinas que se ocupan del estudio del lenguaje. Por lo tanto, este curso no se plantea reproducir la descripción de la historia de la lengua como un proceso de evolución lineal de unidades y sistemas fónicos, morfológicos y sintácticos; no se propone tampoco señalar los hitos culturales y políticos que puntúan el proceso de la cristalización de la lengua. La perspectiva aquí adoptada invita a aproximarse de manera reflexiva y crítica a las articulaciones de lenguaje e historia, a las disciplinas mismas que configuran como objetos de estudio la emergencia histórica del español como “lengua”, su evolución orgánica y las circunstancias pasadas y presentes de su propagación por la Península Ibérica y por el continente americano. Pero nuestro objeto además abarcará representaciones del idioma producidas afuera de las fronteras del campo académico y en abierta confrontación con una variedad de discursos y procesos históricos.​ 
 
SPAN 82000 – The Humanistic Comedy in Renaissance and Baroque Spain
GC: Thursday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Prof. Lía Schwartz, []
 
TBA
 
SPAN 87100 – When Narrative and Image Interact: Intermedial Spaces in Latin American Writing and Photography
GC: Tuesday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Prof. Magdalena Perkowska, []
 
Since the discovery of photography in 1839, and despite its long association with the mechanical reproduction of reality, the photographic image has increasingly assumed the role of participating in or indeed embodying literary projects. This course explores different modalities of interaction between photography and literary texts in contemporary Latin American writing, and between photography and narrativity in mixed works: fictional questioning of photographic practice, meaning, and ethics (Rodolfo Walsh, Julio Cortázar, Roberto Bolaño, Norah Lange), fiction with photographs (Eduardo Belgrano Rawson, Mario Bellatín), the photographic essay (Diamela Eltit, Eduardo Lalo), the photo-book and the photographic narrative (Susan Meiselas, Juan Manuel Echavarría), a photograph as (a source of) narrative (Marcelo Brodsky). We will examine these intermedial spaces in conjunction with theoretical readings on photography and literature in relation to affect, memory, ethics, and politics (Walter Benjamin, Roland Barthes, Susan Sontag, W.J.T. Mitchell, Jacques Rancière, Marianne Hirsch, Ariella Azoulay). The crossing of medial boundaries produces an imagetext  (Mitchell) or sentence-image (Rancière), a site of tension, slippage, transformation, displacement or interference, which impugns the notion of a single, fixed meaning; challenges representation, revealing its inescapable heterogeneity; reorganizes textual-visual visibilities and hierarchies;  and  posits questions about ethics of reader- and spectatorship.
 
SPAN 87100 – Havana in Contemporary Cuban Literature
GC: Thursday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Prof. Carlos Riobó, []
 
As Cuba prepares to celebrate the 500th anniversary of the founding of Havana, we will examine the origins of the capital city and its discursive formations, from an urban planning perspective, in literature and cartography. We will consider Havana as archive as we analyze 20th and 21st-century Cuban fiction in which the cityscape, its inhabitants, its lingo, and its history feature prominently. We will first study notions of the archive and the counter archive and then examine works by Reinaldo Arenas (Viaje a La Habana), Guillermo Cabrera Infante (La Habana para un infante difunto), Alejo Carpentier (La ciudad de las columnas), Leonardo Padura (Adiós, Hemingway), Ena Lucía Portela (Cien botellas en una pared), Severo Sarduy (De donde son los cantantes), and Karla Suárez (Habana año cero). This course will be taught in Spanish.
 
SPAN 87200 – Human Rights and Literature in the Americas
GC: Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Prof. Vanessa Perez Rosario, []
Human Rights carry one set of popular meanings, that their protections will safeguard the human person from abuse, torture, pain, suffering, and other corporeal deprivation. Despite their immense promise, human rights discourses and norms remain fraught with paradox. Virtually since their inception, critics have decried the many contradictions that trouble human rights and the mechanisms of their internationalization and application. Although some of these paradoxes ensue from legal and other practical challenges of rights enforcement, the philosophical architecture of human rights norms and the definition of the human that organizes them are also composed of structural tensions and inconsistencies. Over the course of the semester, we will explore the convergence of human rights and theories of the human, violence, feminicide, dissent, censorship, vulnerability and precarity, and migration and mobility in theoretical and literary texts. We will think about the politics of reading, literature’s relationship to social justice, and the relationship between aesthetics and politics. Some theoretical readings will include works by Hannah Arendt, Homi Bhabha, Judith Butler, Edward Said, Elaine Scarry, Achille Mbembe, Lauren Berlant, and Giorgio Agamben, among others. We will read literary texts by Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx authors such as Los rendidos (2015) by José Carlos Agüeros, “Las orquídeas negras de Mariana Callejas”(1998) by Pedro Lemebel, Tell Me How it Ends (2017) by Valeria Luiselli, Fuera del juego (1968) and La mala memoria (1989) by Heberto Padilla, The Water Museum (2018) by Luis Alberto Urrea, and Under the Feet of Jesus (1995) by Helena Viramontes, among others.

SPAN 87200 – The Cinema of Pedro Almodóvar y Guillermo del Toro
GC: Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Prof. Paul Julian Smith, []
 
This course examines the works of contemporary Spain and Mexico's most successful filmmakers, critically and commercially. The aims of the course are industrial, critical, and theoretical. First, Almodóvar is placed in the context of audiovisual production in Spain, while del Toro (as director and producer) is contextualized within the 'golden triangle' of Mexico, Europe, and the US. Second, both cineastes are interrogated for signs of auteurship (a consistent aesthetic and media image), sharing as they do a self-fashioning that takes place, unusually, within the confines of genre cinema (comedy/melodrama and fantasy/horror, respectively). Finally, the course explores how English-language critics have assimilated these two Spanish-speaking directors to debates in Anglo-American film studies that draw on psychoanalysis, feminism, queer theory, and the transnational.
Grading is by written exam (25%), student oral participation and presentation (25%) and final paper (50%).
This course is taught in English.
 
 
ONE-CREDIT MINI-SEMINARS
 
SPAN – Language Attitudes
GC: Monday, 3/25/2019 through Friday, 3/29/2019, Prof. Loureiro-Rodríguez, []
(Galician Chair)
 
The main aim of this seminar is to introduce students to key theoretical approaches and methodologies to study language attitudes. The assigned readings and class discussions are intended to encourage students to reflect on how attitudes and beliefs about non-standard (and standard) linguistic varieties emerge and develop. We will also explore the connection between accent, language use and identity in monolingual and multilingual contexts.
 
SPAN – Condición póstuma y emancipación. Una mirada desde el sur de Europa
GC: Monday, 2/25/2019 through Friday, 3/1/2019, Prof. Garcés, []
(Rodoreda Chair)

TBA