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Joseph Straus
Position: Distinguished Professor, The Graduate Center
Degrees/Diplomas: B.A. Harvard; PhD, Yale
Research Interests: Music since 1900, musical modernism, post-tonal theory, disability studies

Joseph Straus is a music theorist specializing in music since 1900. He has written technical music-theoretical article, analytical studies of music by a variety of modernist composers, and, most recently, a series of article and books that engage disability as a cultural practice. He has written textbooks that have become standard references. Many of his books and articles have received publication awards from the Society for Music Theory (SMT), of which he was President from 1997–99.
 

REPRESENTATIVE PUBLICATIONS:
 
Books
 
Monographs
 
Broken Beauty: Musical Modernism and the Representation of Disability (Oxford University Press, 2018).

Extraordinary Measures: Music and Disability (Oxford University Press, 2011). 

Twelve-tone Music in America (Cambridge University Press, 2009). 

Stravinsky's Late Music (Cambridge University Press, 2001). 

The Music of Ruth Crawford Seeger (Cambridge University Press, 1995). 
Remaking the Past: Musical Modernism and the Influence of the Tonal Tradition (Harvard University Press, 1990).  **Received the Outstanding Publication Award of the Society for Music Theory in 1991** 
 
Textbooks

A Concise Introduction to Tonal Harmony, co-written with Poundie Burstein (Norton, 2016).

Elements of Music (Prentice-Hall, 2002; revised 2nd ed., 2007; revised 3rd ed., 2011). 

Introduction to Post‑Tonal Theory (Prentice‑Hall, 1990; revised 2nd ed., 2000; revised 3rd ed., 2005; revised 4th ed., Norton, 2016). 
 
Editorial

The Art of Tonal Analysis, by Carl Schachter (Oxford University Press, 2016). **Received a Citation of Special Merit from the Society for Music Theory in 2017**

The Oxford Handbook of Music and Disability Studies, co-edited with Blake Howe, Stephanie Jensen-Moulton, and Neil Lerner (Oxford University Press, 2016).

Sounding Off: Theorizing Disability in Music, co-edited with Neil Lerner (Routledge, 2006).  

Collected Writings of Milton Babbitt, co-edited with Stephen Dembski, Andrew Mead, and Stephen Peles (Princeton University Press, 2003).  **Received a Citation of Special Merit from the Society for Music Theory in 2006**

Unfoldings: Essays in Schenkerian Theory and Analysis, by Carl Schachter (New York: Oxford University Press, 1998).  

Milton Babbitt: Words About Music, co‑edited with Stephen Dembski (University of Wisconsin Press, 1987).  Edited transcripts of lectures by the distinguished composer and theorist, with an editor's preface.
 
Essays

Modernist Music and the Representation of Disability. Journal of the American Musicological Society 69/2 (2016): 530–536.

Autism and Postwar Serialism as Neurodiverse Forms of Cultural Modernism, in The Oxford Handbook of Music and Disability Studies (Oxford UP 2016).

Representing the Extraordinary Body: Musical Modernism’s Aesthetics of Disability, in the Oxford Handbook of Music and Disability Studies (Oxford UP 2016).

“Twelve-Tone in My Own Way”: An Analytical Study of Ursula Mamlok’s Panta Rhei (1981), Third Movement, with Some Reflections on Twelve-Tone Music in America.  Essays on Music by Women, ed. Laurel Parsons and Brenda Ravenscroft (Oxford University Press, 2015).  **Volume received award for Best Edited Collection from the Society for Music Theory in 2017**

Total Voice Leading. Music Theory Online 20/2 (2014).

Harmony and Voice Leading in the Music of Stravinsky. Music Theory Spectrum 36/1 (2014): 1-33. **Received the Outstanding Publication Award of the Society for Music Theory (2015)**

Idiots Savants, Retarded Savants, Talented Aments, Mono-savants, Autistic Savants, Just Plain Savants, People with Savant Syndrome, and Autistic People who are Good at Things: A View from Disability Studies. Disability Studies Quarterly 34/3 (2014).

Three Stravinsky Analyses. Music Theory Online 18/4 (2012).

Contextual-Inversion Spaces. Journal of Music Theory 55/1 (2011): 43-88.

Autism as Culture. In The Disability Studies Reader, 3rd ed. (Routledge, 2010): 535-62.  Reprinted in the 4th edition (Routledge, 2015).

The String Quartets of Bela Bartok. In Intimate Voices: Aspects of Construction and Character in the Twentieth-Century String Quartet, ed. Evan Jones (University of Rochester Press, (2009).  **Volume received a Citation of Special Merit from the Society for Music Theory (2010)**

Disability and Late Style in Music. Journal of Musicology 25/1 (2008): 3-45.

Motivic Chains in Bartók’s Third String Quartet. Twentieth-Century Music 5/1 (2008): 1-20.

Voice Leading in Set-Class Space. Journal of Music Theory 49/1 (2005): 45-108.  **Received the Outstanding Publication Award of the Society for Music Theory (2011)** 

Two Post-Tonal Analyses.  In Engaging Music: Essays in Music Analysis, ed. Deborah Stein (Oxford University Press, 2005): 215-25.  **Volume received a Citation of Special Merit from the Society for Music Theory (2007)**