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Michael Raphael
Institution: The Graduate Center, CUNY
Program: Sociology
Dissertation: The Politics of Expertise in Professional Education: Cognitive Style and Metaphor in the Problem-Based Learning of Decision-Making

Degrees/Diplomas: B.S. Sociology, Northeastern University; M.S.C.J. Criminal Justice, Northeastern University

Dissertation Title: The Politics of Expertise in Professional Education: Cognitive Style and Metaphor in the Problem-Based Learning of Decision-Making

Research Interests: medical sociology, sociology of law, social control (policing and deviance), culture and cognition/cognitive sociology, soical, political and legal theory

Michael W. Raphael is in the sociology department at CUNY Graduate Center, specializing in cognitive sociology. He is interested in the politics of bounded rationality and its relationship to tacit knowledge in the development of competence and expertise. Michael explores these socio-cognitive aspects in a wide range of empirical contexts, ranging from everyday life to specific manifestations in professional work – in areas such as chess, policing, law, and medicine. Holding a master’s degree in Criminal Justice from Northeastern University, his thesis began this research program by analyzing factors constraining the development of interpersonal expertise for the implementation of community policing. His dissertation, “The Politics of Expertise in Professional Education: Cognitive Style and Metaphor in the Problem-Based Learning of Decision-Making” investigates the politics of culture & cognition in the relationship between the development of legal expertise and the demands of the legal profession.

This multi-method research program has earned grants and publications. His 231-volume Kindle series, “ReViewing Chess” (2010-2011), was an experiment in the development of expertise. “Phenomenological Theories of Crime” (Oxford Bibliographies, 2012), co-authored with Peter K. Manning, demonstrated how cognitive sociology challenges traditional criminological explanations. Raphael’s “Cognitive Sociology” (Oxford Bibliographies, 2017) demonstrated five ideal types of how social theory understands cognition. He teaches courses in sociology and criminology.