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Faculty

Faculty 
Katherine Behar
Cathy Davidson
Kevin Ferguson
Matthew K. Gold
Michael Mandiberg
Lev Manovich
Lisa Rhody


Graduate Advising Fellow
Andi Çupallari 
 



Katherine Behar

Faculty B
Position:
Associate Professor of New Media Arts
Campus Affiliation: Baruch College and Graduate Center
Phone: 646-312-4072
Email: katherine.behar@baruch.cuny.edu
Degrees/Diplomas: MFA, Hunter College, CUNY
Website
Areas of expertise: Feminist critical theory; contemporary art practices; materialist digital media studies; embodiment and representation in data; automation and labor politics; interface ethics
 
Katherine Behar is an interdisciplinary artist and critical theorist of new media and is Associate Professor of New Media Arts at Baruch College. Prof. Behar’s work explores digital culture through feminism and materialism. Her artwork spans interactive installation, performance art, public art, photography and video art to explore contemporary digital culture. Her projects mix low and high technologies, creating hybrid forms that are by turns humorous and sensuous.
 
Prof. Behar’s work has been exhibited nationally and internationally and is held in private collections. Her survey exhibition and catalog, Katherine Behar: Data's Entry | Veri Girişi, was presented in 2016 at the Pera Museum in Istanbul, Turkey, documenting eight years’ of her work. Behar's survey exhibition and catalog, Katherine Behar: Data's Entry | Veri Girişi, was presented in 2016 at the Pera Museum in Istanbul, Turkey, documenting eight years' of her work. Robert Morris University presented her solo exhibition Katherine Behar: Anonymous Autonomous in 2018. A previous solo exhibition, Katherine Behar: E-Waste, premiered with catalog at University of Kentucky in 2014, and traveled to Boston Cyberarts Gallery in 2015. Additional recent venues include Judson Memorial Church in New York, SPRING/BREAK Art Show in New York, Leubsdorf Gallery in New York, Wassaic Project in New York, Lesley Heller Workspace in New York, the Chicago Cultural Center in Chicago, Sector 2337 in Chicago, The Alice in Seattle, Moscow Biennial Special Projects in Moscow, Russia; De Balie Centre for Culture and Politics in Amsterdam, Netherlands; CamouFlash in Dresden, Germany; the Digital Live Art Festival in Leeds, England; PostsovkhoZ 6 in Mooste, Estonia; Galata Perform in Istanbul, Turkey; the National Museum of Art in Cluj-Napoca, Romania; and numerous others.
 
Prof. Behar writes and lectures widely on object-oriented feminism, technologized labor, cyborgian ethics, feminist media critique, and decelerationist aesthetics. She coined the term “object-oriented feminism” (OOF) in 2010. She is the editor of Object-Oriented Feminism (University of Minnesota Press), the coeditor with Emmy Mikelson of And Another Thing: Nonanthropocentrism and Art (punctum books), and the author of Bigger than You: Big Data and Obesity (punctum books). Her exhibition catalogues include Katherine Behar: Data’s Entry | Veri Girişi (Pera Museum, 2016) and Katherine Behar: E-Waste (Tuska Center for Contemporary Art, 2014). Additional writing has been published in books including After the “Speculative Turn”: Realism, Philosophy, and Feminism, Why Look at Plants? The Botanical Emergence in Contemporary Art, and Imperceptibly and Slowly Opening; in journals including Chiasma, Lateral, Media-N, Parsons Journal for Information Mapping, Visual Communication Quarterly, EXTENSIONS: The Online Journal for Embodied Technology; and in conference proceedings for Digital Arts and Culture, SPIE, and Cyberworlds.
 
Prof. Behar’s ongoing project, Disorientalism, is a decade-long multimedia performance art collaboration with Arizona-based artist Marianne M. Kim. Disorientalism studies the disorienting effects of technologized labor, junk culture, and consumerism. Using live performance, video, and photographic projects, Disorientalism explores how these forces mediate race, gender, and bodies. Disorientalism has presented numerous solo exhibitions and performances at venues including Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami, Artspace West at Arizona State University, Rapid Pulse Festival, TECHNE at University at Buffalo, and Feldman Gallery + Project Space at Pacific Northwest College of Art, among others. Notable group exhibitions include: de la Cruz Collection, Poznan Biennial, Wassaic Project, Katherine Nash Gallery, Radiator Arts, and video_dumbo. Disorientalism attended residencies at The MacDowell Colony, Wassaic Project, and Cannonball.
 
Behar is the recipient of fellowships from Nida Art Colony (2018), The MacDowell Colony (2017, 2013), Pioneer Works Tech Lab (2017), Art Journal (2010-2013), and the Rubin Museum of Art (2011). Her artwork has been supported by grants and awards from the U.S. Consulate General in Leipzig, the Franklin Furnace Fund, the Illinois Arts Council, and the Cleveland Performance Art Festival. Additionally, she has received research funding and academic grants from PSC-CUNY, Arizona State University, Baruch College, New York University, and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, as well as a sub-award from the National Science Foundation.
 
At Baruch College, Prof. Behar runs the New Media Arts undergraduate minor and teaches studio courses in video art and exhibition practices. She manages and curates at the New Media Artspace at Baruch College, a teaching exhibition space located in the Newman Library.
 


Cathy Davidson


Position: Distinguished Professor; Director, The Futures Initiative; Co-Founder, Humanities, Arts, Science and Technology Alliance and Collaboratory (hastac.org)
Campus Affiliation: Graduate Center
Phone: 212-817-7247
Email: cdavidson@gc.cuny.edu
Website
Additional Website
Degrees/Diplomas: Ph.D. SUNY at Binghamton
Research Interests: History of technology, history of the book in the U.S., history and future of higher education, digital media and learning, digital humanities, critical university studies, the role of technology in culture, cognition, and learning, industrial and postindustrial society, American cultural and literary studies.
Specialization: Digital Humanities, Textual, and Media Scholarship|Early American Literature|Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist/Queer Theory|Postcolonial, Transnational, and Global Literature and Theory|Twenty-first-Century and Contemporary Literature

Selected Publications:

  • The New Education:  How To Revolutionize the University To Prepare Students for a World in Flux (Basic Books, 2017) 
  • Now You See It:  How the Brain Science of Attention Will Transform the Way We Live, Work, and Learn.  New York:  Viking Press, 2011.   Paperback re-issue (with a new subtitle): Now You See It:  How Technology and Brain Science Will Transform Schools and Business for the 21st Century (Viking Penguin, 2012).
  • The Future of Thinking:  Learning Institutions in a Digital Age, with David Theo Goldberg. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2010.
  • Revolution and the Word: The Rise of the Novel in America.  Expanded Edition.  New York: Oxford University Press, 2004.  
  • Closing:  The Life and Death of an American Factory. With photographs by Bill Bamberger. New York:  W. W. Norton, 1998; paperback, 1999.
  

Kevin Ferguson
Faculty F
Position: Associate Professor of English
Campus Affiliation: Queens College and Graduate Center
Phone: (718) 997-4707
Email: kferguson@qc.cuny.edu
Degrees/Diplomas: Ph.D. CUNY Graduate Center
Research Interests: cinema and media studies, digital humanities, contemporary American literature, literary theory, college writing

Kevin L. Ferguson is associate professor of English at Queens College, City University of New York, where he directs Writing at Queens and teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on digital humanities, film adaptation, college writing, and contemporary American literature. His first book, Eighties People: New Lives in the American Imagination (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016), examined cultural strategies for fashioning self-knowledge in the American 1980s, focusing on objects of knowledge such as the yuppie, crack baby, brat pack, surrogate mother, and the person with AIDS. His digital and media studies writing has appeared in Bright Lights Film Journal, Camera Obscura, Jump Cut, Scope, The Journal of Medical Humanities, Criticism, [in]Transition: Journal of Videographic Film and Moving Image Studies, The Journal of Dracula Studies, Digital Humanities Quarterly, and Cinema Journal. He also has chapters on the 1980s and 1990s in American Literature in Transition: 1980-1990 (Cambridge University Press, 2017), 25 Sitcoms that Changed Television: Turning Points in American Culture (Greenwood/ABC-CLIO, 2017), and Satanic Panic: Pop-Cultural Paranoia in the 1980s (Spectacular Optical, 2015).

Publications:

Pop Goes the Decade: The Nineties. Santa Barbara: Greenwood, forthcoming 2019.

Eighties People: New Lives in the American Imagination. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016.

Journal Articles:

“Where You End and I Begin,” Screenworks 8.1 (2018), 9 minutes.

“Lizard Train,” after Catherine Grant’s “Carnal Locomotive,” [in]Transition: Journal of Videographic Film and Moving Image Studies 4.4 (2018), 6 minutes.

“The Variety of Kathy Acker: on the Avant-garde between Pornography and Narrative,” Cinema Journal 56.4 (2017). 12,000 words.

“Digital Surrealism: Visualizing Walt Disney Animation Studios,” Digital Humanities Quarterly 11.1 (2017). 10,000 words.

“Quantum Haunting,” [in]Transition: Journal of Videographic Film and Moving Image Studies 3.2 (Summer 2016), 11 minutes.

“Aviation Cinema,” Criticism 57.2, Spring 2015: 8,000 words.

“Teaching Subtitles as Historiographic Research,” Cinema Journal Teaching Dossier: Digital Humanities and Media Studies Crossovers. 1,600 words.

“The Machine at the Mad Monster Party,” The Journal of Dracula Studies, Spring 2015: 3,000 words.

“Volumetric Cinema,” [in]Transition: Journal of Videographic Film and Moving Image Studies 2.1 (March 2015), 20 minutes.

“Panting in the Dark: The Ambivalence of Air in Cinema,” Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies 77 (2011): 32-63.

“Home Movies: Historical Space and the Mother’s Memory,” Scope: An Online Journal of Film and TV Studies 18 (October 2010): 14 pp.

“The Cinema of Control: On Diabetic Excess and Illness in Film,” Journal of Medical Humanities 31.3 (2010): 183-204.

“Timely Films Past Their Time: On The Singing Fool,” Bright Lights Film Journal 65 (August 2009): 4,000 words.

“The Yuppie Devil: Villainy in Kathryn Bigelow’s Blue Steel,” Jump Cut: A Review of Contemporary Media 50 (Spring 2008): 25 pp.

“Covering the Cinema: On Wallpaper in Some Films,” Bright Lights Film Journal 58 (November 2007): 5,200 words.

Book Chapters:

“Youth Culture on the Skids: Generation X and Brat Pack Fiction,” American Literature in Transition: 1980-1990. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017. 6,000 words.

“No Hugging, No Learning: Seinfeld between the Yuppies and Slackers,” 25 Sitcoms that Changed Television: Turning Points in American Culture. Santa Barbara, CA: Greenwood/ABC-CLIO, 2017. 5,000 words.

“Slices of Cinema: Digital Transformation as Research Strategy,” The Arclight Guide to Media History and the

Digital Humanities, eds. Charles R. Acland and Eric Hoyt. Falmer: REFRAME/Project Arclight, 2016. 4,000 words.

“Devil on the Line: Technology and the Satanic Film,” Satanic Panic: Pop-Cultural Paranoia in the 1980s, eds. Kier-La Janisse and Paul Corupe. Toronto: Spectacular Optical, 2015. 9,000 words.

“Pets in Memoir,” Representing the Modern Animal in Culture, eds. Jeanne Dubino, Ziba Rashidian, and Andrew Smyth. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014. 7,800 words.

Creative and Other Work:

“What Does the Western Look Like?,” The Best American Infographics 2016, ed. Gareth Cook (New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2016). Film visualizations.

“To Cite or to Steal? When a Scholarly Project Turns Up in a Gallery,” Hyperallergic, June 30, 2016.

“The Color of Time,” Photo Viz: Visualizing Information Through Photography (Berlin: Gestalten, 2016). Photography.

“from Three Thousand Films,” Hotel Amerika 10.1 (2011): 70–73.

“Index Card Poetry” (from Three Thousand Films), Michigan Quarterly Review, August 2010.

Typecast, an ongoing typewritten blog about the intersection of film and writing, particularly the question “how can film speak of writing?”

Typewriters in Films, the world’s largest collection of screenshots of typewriters in films.
 
Matthew K. Gold


Position: Associate Professor of English and Digital Humanities
Campus Affiliation: Graduate Center
Phone: (212) 817-7256
Email: mgold@gc.cuny.edu
Website
Degrees/Diplomas: PhD Graduate Center, CUNY
Research Interests: Digital Humanities, scholarly communication, networked rhetoric, open-access pedagogy, nineteenth-century American literature and culture
Other GC Affiliations: Ph.D. Program in English; M.A. Program in Digital Humanities; M.S. Program in Data Analysis and Visualization; Interactive Technology and Pedagogy Doctoral Certificate Program; American Studies Doctoral Certificate Program 

Matthew K. Gold is Associate Professor of English and Digital Humanities at the Graduate Center, where he holds teaching appointments in the Ph.D. Program in English, the M.A. Program in Liberal Studies (MALS), and the doctoral certificate programs in Interactive Technology and Pedagogy and American Studies. He serves as Advisor to the Provost for Digital Initiatives, Director of the CUNY Academic Commons, Co-Director of the CUNY Digital Humanities Initiative, Director of the GC Digital Scholarship Lab, and Director of the GC Digital Fellows Program. In all of these roles, he works to integrate digital tools and methods into the core research and teaching missions of the Graduate Center.
 
He is series editor (with Lauren F. Klein) of Debates in the Digital Humanities, which is now published on an annual basis by the University of Minnesota Press, tracking new developments in the field. His work has appeared in The Journal of Modern Literature, Kairos, and On the Horizon, as well as in the edited collections The Johns Hopkins Guide to Digital Media, Digital Humanities Pedagogy: Practices, Principles and Politics, From A to <A>: Keywords of Markup, and Learning Through Digital Media: Experiments in Technology and Pedagogy. His collaborative digital humanities projects, including Looking for Whitman, Commons In A Box, Social Paper, DH Box, and Manifold Scholarship have been supported by grants from the NEH Office of Digital Humanities, the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Education, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and the Ford Foundation. He serves on the Executive Council of the Association for Computers and the Humanities, the Steering Committee of HASTAC, the editorial board of Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, and Pedagogy, the editorial collective of the Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy, and the Steering Committee of NYCDH.

Publications:

Buurma, Rachel Sagner and Matthew K. Gold. "Contemporary Proposals about Reading in the Digital Age." Blackwell Companion to Literary Theory, ed. David H. Richter. New York: Wiley, 2018. 

Gold, Matthew K. and Klein, Lauren F., Ed., Debates in the Digital Humanities 2016. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2016. Interactive open-access edition: http://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu

With Jessie Daniels and the InQ13 Collective. “The InQ13 POOC: A Participatory Experiment in Open, Collaborative Teaching and Learning.”Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy. Issue 5, Spring/Summer 2014.

“The Digital Humanities.” The Johns Hopkins Guide to Digital Media, ed. Lori Emerson, Benjamin Robertson, and Marie-Laure Ryan. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014.

"Against Learning Management Systems." Hacking the Academy, ed. Dan Cohen and Tom Scheinfeldt. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2013.“Looking for Whitman: A Multi-Campus Experiment in Digital Pedagogy.” Digital Humanities Pedagogy: Practices, Principles, and Politics, ed. Brett D. Hirsch.Cambridge: Open Book Publishers, 2012.

Gold, Matthew K., Ed. Debates in the Digital Humanities. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2012. http://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu

“The Digital Humanities Moment.” Debates in the Digital Humanities, ed. Matthew K. Gold. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2012.

With Jim Groom. “Looking for Whitman: A Grand, Aggregated Experiment.” In Debates in the Digital Humanities, ed. Matthew K. Gold. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2012.

Beyond Friending: BuddyPress and the Social, Networked, Open-Source Classroom.” Learning Through Digital Media: Experiments in Technology and Pedagogy, ed. Trebor Scholz. New York: Institute for Distributed Creativity, 2011.

With George Otte, “The CUNY Academic Commons: Fostering Faculty Use of the Social Web.” Online Social Networking as a Site for Learning. Spec. issue of On the Horizon. 19.1 (2011).

Becoming Book-Like: Bob Stein and The Future of the Book.” Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, and Pedagogy. 15.2 (Spring 2011).

“Breaking All the Rules: <HR> and the Aesthetics of Online Space.” From A to <A>: Keywords of Markup, Eds. Bradley Dilger and Jeff Rice. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2010.

Forthcoming:

Gold, Matthew K. and Klein, Lauren F., Ed., Debates in the Digital Humanities 2019. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2019. 

DH: A Short Guide to the Digital Humanities, Johns Hopkins University Press. 
 
Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: Concepts, Models, and Experiments, Co-General Editor, with Rebecca Frost Davis, Katherine D. Harris, and Jentery Sayers, Modern Language Association.

Michael Mandiberg


Position: Associate Professor 
Campus Affiliation: College of Staten Island and Graduate Center
Phone: 718.982.2555
Email: Michael.Mandiberg@csi.cuny.edu
Degrees/Diplomas: MFA, California Institute of the Arts
Website

Michael Mandiberg is an artist, programmer, designer and educator. Mandiberg’s work varies from web applications about environmental impact to conceptual performances about subjectivity, to laser cut lampshades for Compact Flourescent Lightbulbs.

Mandiberg’s work includes:
-HowMuchItCosts.us, a car direction site that incorporates the financial and carbon cost of driving;
-Digital Foundations: an Intro to Media Design, a textbook that teaches formal principles through design software;
-The Real Costs, a browser plug-in that inserts carbon footprints into airplane travel & car directions websites;
-Oil Standard, a browser plug-in that converts prices on any web page into their value in barrels of oil;
-Year long performance and e-commerce website Shop Mandiberg, which sold all of his possessions;
-AfterSherrieLevine.com, where he made hi-resolution scans of the Walker Evans images rephotographed by Sherrie Levine available, complete with certificates of authenticity to be signed by the user themselves;
-The Essential Guide to Performing Michael Mandiberg, an extensive DIY guide prepared for a life art.

He is a founding member of Eyebeam's Sustainability Research Group which developed the Eco-Vis Design Challenge and the Feedback exhibition. Working with fellow group member Steve Lambert, he has created the Bright Idea Shade, a Creative Commons licensed lampshade for bare CFL lightbulbs.

Scholarship / Publications

Michael is currently an OpenLab Research Fellow at Eyebeam.

Michael’s work has been exhibited at such venues as the New Museum for Contemporary Art in New York City, Ars Electronica Center in Linz, ZKM in Karlsruhe, Germany, and Transmediale Festival, Berlin. His work has been featured in such books as Tribe and Jana’s New Media Art, Blais and Ippolito’s At the Edge of Art, and Greene’s Internet Art. He is a recipient of grants and residencies from Eyebeam, Rhizome.org, and Turbulence.org/Jerome Foundation. The Essential Guide to Performing Michael Mandiberg, was selected by the Electronic Literature Organization as one of the foundational works of electronic literature to be included in the Library of Congress.
 
Michael Mandiberg is an interdisciplinary artist whose work crosses multiple forms and disciplines in order to trace the lines of political and symbolic power as it takes shape online. Building on the conceptual tradition, Mandiberg orders and reorders information, remixing the forms in which it manifests or solidifies. While technically sophisticated, Mandiberg's work eschews the novelty of new technology in favor of an exploration of appropriation, the digital vernacular, the ways in which these new technologies impact our lives, and the politics and poetics of technological subjectivities.

Mandiberg received an MFA from California Institute of the Arts and a BA from Brown University. Mandiberg’s projects have been presented at The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), The New Museum, Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, Denny Gallery, Art-in-Buildings Financial District Project Space, Arizona State UniversityMuseum & Library, and Transmediale amongst others. Mandiberg's work has been written about widely, including Artforum, Art in America, ARTnews, The New York Times, The New Yorker, and The Wall Street Journal.

Mandiberg is the recipient of a LACMA Art+Technology Lab grant, three Eyebeam fellowships, a Mellon fellowship at the CUNY Graduate Center, several Wikimedia Foundation grants, and commissions from Rhizome, Turbulence.org, and Link Art Center/Abandon Normal Devices. Mandiberg has participated in residencies at the Banff Centre, Eyebeam, the MacDowell Colony, and 18th Street Arts Center.

Mandiberg is a Professor of Media Culture at the College of Staten Island/CUNY and is on the Doctoral Faculty at the CUNY Graduate Center. Founder of the New York Arts Practicum, and co-founder of the Art+Feminism Wikipedia, Mandiberg lives in, and bicycles around, Brooklyn. Mandiberg's work lives at Mandiberg.com.
Michael Mandiberg is an interdisciplinary artist whose work crosses multiple forms and disciplines in order to trace the lines of political and symbolic power as it takes shape online. Building on the conceptual tradition, Mandiberg orders and reorders information, remixing the forms in which it manifests or solidifies. While technically sophisticated, Mandiberg's work eschews the novelty of new technology in favor of an exploration of appropriation, the digital vernacular, the ways in which these new technologies impact our lives, and the politics and poetics of technological subjectivities.

Mandiberg’s projects have been presented at The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), The New Museum, Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, Denny Gallery, Art-in-Buildings Financial District Project Space, Arizona State UniversityMuseum & Library, and Transmediale amongst others. Mandiberg's work has been written about widely, including ArtforumArt in AmericaARTnewsThe New York TimesThe New Yorker, and The Wall Street Journal.

Mandiberg is the recipient of a LACMA Art+Technology Lab grant, three Eyebeam fellowships, a Mellon fellowship at the CUNY Graduate Center, several Wikimedia Foundation grants, and commissions from Rhizome, Turbulence.org, and Link Art Center/Abandon Normal Devices. Mandiberg has participated in residencies at the Banff Centre, Eyebeam, the MacDowell Colony, and 18th Street Arts Center.

Mandiberg is a Professor of Media Culture at the College of Staten Island/CUNY and is on the Doctoral Faculty at the CUNY Graduate Center. Founder of the New York Arts Practicum, and co-founder of theArt+Feminism Wikipedia, Mandiberg lives in, and bicycles around, Brooklyn. Mandiberg's work lives at Mandiberg.com.

 
Lev Manovich


Position: Professor
Program: Computer Science
Campus Affiliation: Graduate Center
Phone: 212-817-8190
Email: lmanovich@gc.cuny.edu
Website
Research Interests: Social and cultural computing, data visualization, computers and society
Lev Manovich, a world-renowned innovator in digital humanities and theorist of digital culture and media art, joined the Graduate Center’s doctoral faculty in January 2013 to lead digital humanities research. Manovich’s global reputation in digital humanities stems from the tremendous impact of his 2001 book, The Language of New Media, which has been translated into eight languages. One reviewer, William Warner of University of California–Santa Barbara, called the book “the most suggestive and broad ranging media history since Marshall McLuhan.” His next book, Software Takes Command, is forthcoming with Bloomsbury Publishing (July 2013).
 
Manovich’s innovative leadership in digital humanities is also playing a key role in the development of a new field of software studies—the study of how software shapes contemporary societies. In 2007, he founded the Software Studies Initiative (SSI) at UC–San Diego’s California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2). Manovich’s research, which is housed at the Graduate Center, focuses on cultural analytics using computational and visualization techniques to analyze massive cultural data sets and flows. The techniques developed in his lab can be used in digital humanities, art history, cinema studies, game studies, media studies, ethnography, exhibition design, and other fields.
 
Manovich holds a Ph.D. in visual and cultural studies from the University of Rochester. His awards include a Guggenheim Fellowship; a Digital Cultures Fellowship from UC–Santa Barbara; a fellowship from the Zentrum für Literaturforschung, Berlin; and a Mellon Fellowship from California Institute for the Arts.
 
Lisa Rhody


Campus Affiliation: Graduate Center
Email: lrhody@gc.cuny.edu
Phone: 
212-817-8490
Degrees/Diplomas: PhD University of Maryland
Research Interests: 20th-century American literature, digital humanities, poetry, text and image studies, scholarly communication, topic modeling, data visualization
Other GC Affiliations: Deputy Director of Digital Initiatives, Director of Digital Fellowship Programs

Publications:

“Beyond Darwinian Distance: Situating Distant Reading with a Feminist Ut Pictura Poesis Tradition.” PMLA, Volume 132, Number 3, May 2017, pp. 659–667 (9). https://doi.org/10.1632/pmla.2017.132.3.659

“Why I Dig: Feminist Approaches to Text Analysis.” Debates in the Digital Humanities 2016. Eds. Matthew K. Gold and Lauren Klein. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, 2016. http://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu/debates/text/97

“Working the Digital Humanities: Uncovering Shadows between the Dark and the Light.” with Wendy Hui Kyong Chun. differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies. Edited by Elizabeth Weed and Ellen Rooney. 25.1 April 2014 DOI: 10.1215/10407391-2419985

"Topic Modeling and Figurative Language." Journal of Digital Humanities. 2.1 April 2013. http://journalofdigitalhumanities.org/2-1/
 


Agustín Indaco


Email: aindaco@gmail.com
Office hours: Monday 5:30-6:30 PM
http://aindaco.com/
@agustindaco

Agustín Indaco is a Ph.D. candidate in Economics at CUNY, The Graduate Center. His research interests lie in the intersection of applied microeconomics and big data. He is particularly interested in exploring ways in which we can study economic behavior and measuring economic outcomes in societies through data collected from social media. Agustín is a research fellow for Lev Manovich at the Software Studies Initiative and serves as Visiting Faculty at Strelka Institute for The New Normal postgraduate program. Prior to his graduate studies, he was a Junior Professional Associate at The World Bank in Washington DC.