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SPRING 2018 COURSES
 
WGS 71600 – Research Methods in Women’s and Gender Studies
GC:   W, 11:45PM-1:45PM, 3 credits, Prof. Dána-Ain Davis [38565]
Cross-listed with Anthropology.
 
WGS 71601 – Topics in Women's and Gender Studies: Sexuality
GC:   M, 4:15PM-6:15PM, 3 credits, Prof. Juan Battle [38566]
Cross-listed with Sociology.

WGS 71601 – Topics in Women's and Gender Studies: Introduction to Lesbian & Gay/Queer Studies
GC:   TH, 4:15PM-6:15PM, 3 credits, Prof. Matt Brim [38733]

WGS 71601 – Topics in Women's and Gender Studies: Migrant and Immigrant NYC
GC:   T, 2:00PM-4:00PM, 3 credits, Prof. Margaret Chin [38574]
Cross-listed with Sociology.

WSCP 81601 – Topics in Women's and Gender Studies: Sexuality
GC:   M, 4:15PM-6:15PM, 3 credits, Prof. Juan Battle [38583]
Cross-listed with Sociology.
 
WSCP 81000 – Sociology of Disability
GC:   T, 6:30PM-8:30PM, 3 credits, Prof. Barbara Katz Rothman [38567]
Cross-listed with Sociology.
 
WSCP 81000 – Philosophy of Feminism: Gender and the Body
GC:   M, 2:00PM-4:00PM, 3 credits, Prof. Linda Alcoff [38568]
Cross-listed with Philosophy.
 
WSCP 81000 – History of Literary Criticism
GC:   T, 200PM-4:00PM, 3 credits, Prof. Charity Scribner [38569]
Cross-listed with Comparative Literature.
 
WSCP 81000 – Social Reproduction
GC:   T, 4:15PM-6:15PM, 3 credits, Prof. Cindi Katz [38570]
Cross-listed with Earth and Environmental Science.
 
WSCP 81000 – Postmodern Memoir: Mostly Women, Also Graphic
GC:   TH, 4:15PM-6:15PM, 2 or 4 credits, Prof. Nancy Miller [38571]
Cross-listed with English.
 
WSCP 81000 – The Black Radical Tradition
GC:   M, 2:00PM-4:00PM, 3 credits, Prof. Robyn Spencer [38572]
Cross-listed with History.
 
WSCP 81000 – Migrant and Immigrant NYC
GC:   T, 2:00PM-4:00PM, 3 credits, Prof. Margaret Chin [38573]
Cross-listed with Sociology.
 
WSCP 81000 – Affect, Race, and Gender
GC:   F, 2:00PM-4:00PM, 3 credits, Prof. Bianca Williams [38574]
Cross-listed with Anthropology.
 
WSCP 81000 – Teaching Political Science
GC:   TH, 2:00PM-4:00PM, 3 credits, Prof. Alyson Cole [38575]
Cross-listed with Political Science.
 
WSCP 81000 – Black Listed: African American Writers and the Cold War Politics of Integration, Surveillance, Censorship, and Publication
GC:  T, 6:30PM-8:30PM, 2 or 4 credits, Profs. Cathy Davidson, Shelly Eversley, and Allison Guess [38576]
Cross-listed with English.
 
WSCP 8100 – Early Modern Trans History and Theory
GC:   T, 11:45AM-1:45PM, 2 or 4 credits, Prof. Will Fisher [38577]
Cross-listed with English.
 
WSCP 81000 – Edith Wharton: Texts and Contexts

GC:   M, 2:00PM-4:00PM, 2 or 4 credits, Prof. Hildegard Hoeller [38578]
Cross-listed with English.
 
WSCP 81000 – Somatic Austen
GC:   M, 11:45AM-1:45PM, 2 or 4 credits, Prof. Talia Schaffer [38579]
Cross-listed with English.
 
WSCP 81000 – The Hidden Curriculum of Gender and Sexuality in Schools: A Critical Race Theory Perspective
GC:   T, 6:30PM-8:30PM, 3 credits, Prof. Sherry Deckman [38580]
Cross-listed with Urban Education.
 
WSCP 81000 – Food, Culture, and Society
GC:   W; 6:30-8:30PM, 3 credits, Prof. Barbara Katz Rothman [38581]
Cross-listed with Sociology.
 
WSCP 81000 – Critical Perspectives on Childhood and Pedagogy
GC:   W, 4:15PM-6:15PM, 3 credits, Prof. Wendy Luttrell and Amita Gupta [38582]
Cross-listed with Urban Education.

WSCP 81000 – Introduction to Lesbian & Gay/Queer Studies
GC:   TH, 4:15PM-6:15PM, 3 credits, Prof. Matt Brim [38700]
Cross-listed with IDS.

WSCP 81000 – Taking Back the Land:  Black Social Movements in the Americas and the Caribbean
GC: Monday, 11:45-1:45PM, Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Professor Mamyrah Prosper [38724]
Cross-listed with Anthropology.

WSCP 81000 – Problems in French Literary History: The Novel
GC: Room 4202.11, Tuesday, 4:15-6:15PM, Professor Domna Stanton [38725]
Course taught in French
Open to students outside of French, 2-4 credits. 
Cross-listed with French.

SPRING 2018 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
 
WGS 71600 – Research Methods in Women’s and Gender Studies
GC:   W, 11:45PM-1:45PM, 3 credits, Prof. Dána-Ain Davis [38565]
Cross-listed with Anthropology.

 
WGS 71601 – Topics in Women's and Gender Studies: Sexuality
GC:   M, 4:15PM-6:15PM, 3 credits, Prof. Juan Battle [38566]
Cross-listed with Sociology.
Missing! Marginal! Misrepresented!  This course draws on various bodies of scholarship – across the humanities and social sciences – to interrogate the complex subject of sexuality. Because students will be exposed to (and contribute from) a wide variety of perspectives on the subject, this course is appropriate for students in the traditional social sciences (e.g. sociology, anthropology, psychology, urban education, and history) as well as more contemporary ones (e.g. women’s studies, race studies, American studies, cultural studies, lesbian and gay studies).

WGS 71601 – Topics in Women's and Gender Studies: Introduction to Lesbian & Gay/Queer Studies
GC:   TH, 4:15PM-6:15PM, 3 credits, Prof. Matt Brim [38733]
Cross-listed with IDS.

The special topic for the spring IDS 71001 course will be “Queer Studies Pedagogy and the CUNY Mission.” The course will be project-based, with students designing syllabi for queer studies classes they want to teach to students on CUNY campuses. There will be an emphasis on using Open Educational Resources (OER) for course texts, and part of the work of the course will be theorizing the act of “freeing” queer texts for working-class and working-poor students. In that vein, we will also focus on making the most of the queer labor that is already produced and undertaken within the CUNY system. Students will present on canonical and cutting-edge queer scholarship in order to survey the field, but always with an eye toward democratizing access to that work. For more information, please email Matt Brim at matt.brim@csi.cuny.edu.

WGS 71601 – Topics in Women's and Gender Studies: Migrant and Immigrant NYC
GC:   T, 2:00PM-4:00PM, 3 credits, Prof. Margaret Chin [38574]
Cross-listed with Sociology.

Over the course of the twentieth century, New York City has witnessed two major waves of immigration: from the Irish, Italian and Jewish immigrants who arrived at the turn of the twentieth century to the Chinese, Jamaican and Mexican immigrants who now constitute the majority of the city’s immigrant population. New York City has also been on the receiving end of the great migration of African Americans. Together, these successive waves of newcomers and their children have changed the socioeconomic, political and cultural landscape of the city. We will examine migration across a diverse spectrum; distinguishing between forced and voluntary migration, “classic” issues of immigration, immigrant adaptation - assimilation and incorporation/integration; social mobility- the labor market, race and ethnic relations, gender and the family, transnationalism and the second generation. Throughout the course, we will use NYC experiences to highlight how these immigration and migration streams have transformed the city in the past and the present.


WSCP 81601 – Topics in Women's and Gender Studies: Sexuality
GC:   M, 4:15PM-6:15PM, 3 credits, Prof. Juan Battle [38583]
Cross-listed with Sociology.
Missing! Marginal! Misrepresented!  This course draws on various bodies of scholarship – across the humanities and social sciences – to interrogate the complex subject of sexuality. Because students will be exposed to (and contribute from) a wide variety of perspectives on the subject, this course is appropriate for students in the traditional social sciences (e.g. sociology, anthropology, psychology, urban education, and history) as well as more contemporary ones (e.g. women’s studies, race studies, American studies, cultural studies, lesbian and gay studies).

WSCP 81000 – Sociology of Disability
GC:   T, 6:30PM-8:30PM, 3 credits, Prof. Barbara Katz Rothman [38567]
Cross-listed with Sociology.
This course offers an introduction to the field of Disability Studies, through a sociological lens.  As more and more of our lives are drawn into biomedical discourse, the construction of disability grows broader; and as Disability activism develops as a social movement, the discussion becomes more politically complex. From the initial conceptualization of the field by Irving Kenneth Zola, to contemporary analyses of ‘queer, crip,’ race and gender intersectionality, the Sociology of Disability offers us a lens for understanding medical sociology, the body, social movements, gender and more.  The class will begin with an introduction to the theoretical and framing work; and expand into topics to be chosen in consultation with seminar members.
 
WSCP 81000 – Philosophy of Feminism: Gender and the Body
GC:   M, 2:00PM-4:00PM, 3 credits, Prof. Linda Alcoff [38568]
Cross-listed with Philosophy.
The question of the relation of gender identity to embodiment has been central in feminist theory and received sustained analysis since Simone de Beauvoir. Bodies are not all the same, and their differences have been accorded various cultural meanings with political effects. Today there is a lot of focus on the plasticity of bodies and the need to reduce the importance of bodily difference, even while the “delusions of gender,” as Cordelia Fine call them, continues to play a strong role in the sciences. Phenomenological approaches to embodiment offer a corrective to some the extreme views today, so this course will focus on these readings. What role do (or should) bodies play in identity, social roles, or laws? Are female bodies inherently limiting, with increased dependence? How should we understand the role of embodiment in regard to sexual violence? What is the role of reproduction in the formation of gender identity? This course will primarily focus on gender but consider also embodiment issues in relation to race, sexuality, disability, intersex, and trans identities. We will also consider the relation of women and of feminism to the practice and discipline of philosophy.

WSCP 81000 – History of Literary Criticism
GC:   T, 200PM-4:00PM, 3 credits, Prof. Charity Scribner [38569]
Cross-listed with Comparative Literature.
This course is a study of the thought about literature as it has developed from the late eighteenth to the mid-twentieth century. Readings range from Kant to Horkheimer and Adorno. This course will examine the evolution of modern aesthetics as well as current critical methodology. Conducted in English. Students may choose to read assigned texts in their original languages or in translation.

WSCP 81000 – Social Reproduction
GC:   T, 4:15PM-6:15PM, 3 credits, Prof. Cindi Katz [38570]
Cross-listed with Earth and Environmental Science.
 
WSCP 81000 – Postmodern Memoir: Mostly Women, Also Graphic
GC:   TH, 4:15PM-6:15PM, 2 or 4 credits, Prof. Nancy Miller [38571]
Cross-listed with English.
“I do not know how far I differ from other people,” Virginia Woolf remarks in Moments of Being, neatly summarizing the memoirist’s dilemma. In this course we will explore strategies of self-representation in the works of twentieth and twenty-first century writers and artists, mainly women, for whom questions of identity have led to experiments in form.  
Writers include: Lynda Barry, Roland Barthes, Alison Bechdel, Julie Delporte, Roxane Gay, Zora Neale Hurston, Maxine Hong Kingston, Maggie Nelson, Gertrude Stein, Virginia Woolf, Yi Yun Li.
Work for the course: in class presentations and a final paper, which may be a creative exercise.
 
WSCP 81000 – The Black Radical Tradition
GC:   M, 2:00PM-4:00PM, 3 credits, Prof. Robyn Spencer [38572]
Cross-listed with History.
This course will trace the contours of the Black Radical Tradition in the twentieth century. It will focus on the dialectic between Black intellectual thought and social movement organizing on the ground to consider how Black radicalism impacted movements for change. Students will interrogate the works of some of the major historians defining the field of Black radicalism such as Robin Kelley, Dayo Gore, Russell Rickford, Minkah Makalani, Carole Boyce Davies and learn about organizations ranging from the African Blood Brotherhood to the Third World Women’s Alliance. Race, class, gender and sexuality will be used as intersectional analytical categories to guide our exploration.

WSCP 81000 – Migrant and Immigrant NYC
GC:   T, 2:00PM-4:00PM, 3 credits, Prof. Margaret Chin [38573]
Cross-listed with Sociology.
Over the course of the twentieth century, New York City has witnessed two major waves of immigration: from the Irish, Italian and Jewish immigrants who arrived at the turn of the twentieth century to the Chinese, Jamaican and Mexican immigrants who now constitute the majority of the city’s immigrant population. New York City has also been on the receiving end of the great migration of African Americans. Together, these successive waves of newcomers and their children have changed the socioeconomic, political and cultural landscape of the city. We will examine migration across a diverse spectrum; distinguishing between forced and voluntary migration, “classic” issues of immigration, immigrant adaptation - assimilation and incorporation/integration; social mobility- the labor market, race and ethnic relations, gender and the family, transnationalism and the second generation. Throughout the course, we will use NYC experiences to highlight how these immigration and migration streams have transformed the city in the past and the present.

WSCP 81000 – Affect, Race, and Gender
GC:   F, 2:00PM-4:00PM, 3 credits, Prof. Bianca Williams [38574]
Cross-listed with Anthropology.
 
This course takes an in-depth look at how race and gender influence the pursuit of happiness in the United States, particularly for Black women. By putting theorizations and representations of Blackness, womanhood, and happiness into conversation with one another, students will be able to investigate whether, and to what extent, historical processes of racism and sexism continue to leave their imprints on an individual’s ability to attain happiness and success. Throughout the course, we will examine representations of race, gender, and happiness present in self-help books, music, films, magazines, blogs, and other forms of media. Using analytic lenses from Black studies, Anthropology, Psychology, Cultural Studies, and Women and Gender Studies, this course provides students with an intense interrogation of Black feminist thought, race theories, and gender studies. Therefore, the following questions are of interest for this course:
(1)    How do race and gender affect an individual’s ability to pursue happiness?
(2)    What are the emotional and economic “costs” of happiness? In other words, how do Black women negotiate work/life balance, including professional success, educational pursuits, family development, intimate relationships, friendships, and health and wellness while pursuing happiness?
(3)    What do Black women’s experiences of pursuing happiness in the U.S. tell us about the broader American concept of “the pursuit of happiness?”

WSCP 81000 – Teaching Political Science
GC:   TH, 2:00PM-4:00PM, 3 credits, Prof. Alyson Cole [38575]
Cross-listed with Political Science.
 
WSCP 81000 – Black Listed: African American Writers and the Cold War Politics of Integration, Surveillance, Censorship, and Publication
GC:  T, 6:30PM-8:30PM, 2 or 4 credits, Profs. Cathy Davidson, Shelly Eversley, and Allison Guess [38576]
Cross-listed with English.
Content: This course examines the inter-relationship between the Cold War, the early Civil Rights movement, and the writing and censorship of African American writers, especially during the McCarthy Era. By looking at a range of literary and theoretical texts, we will work to understand the relationship between a range of legal, political, and social conditions and the forms of Black protest and expression at that time. We will be looking at writers who were deeply involved in many forms of activism, including the organizing of domestic workers and other less well-known aspects of the  Civil Rights movement (such Claudia Jones and Alice Childress), writers who wrote against and around censorship especially of same-sex sexual and affective relationships (such as Chester Himes and James Baldwin), writers who had to leave America to write about it (including Ralph Ellison, Richard Wright and others), and writers, especially Black women writers, who did not have the freedom to leave the U.S. and who, for the most part, disappeared within America and to literary history (including Alice Childress and Ann Petry).
 
Method: We will be using student-centered, activist, engaged pedagogy in this class. For graduate students who are also teaching, we will encourage you to try these methods in your own courses. These methods are rooted in traditions of progressive pedagogies that extend from Montessori and Dewey to Freire and bell hooks to Gardner and Dweck, All are designed to help students not only to learn the content but to be able to apply ideas beyond the classroom, to live and society.  Students will take charge of choosing, collaborating, and organizing units; will work together on ways to have equitable, shared roles across collaborations (methods again applicable to their own present and future teaching); and to design their own active learning pedagogies for our class to try.  

Requirements: Texts and topics for this course were designed for those especially interested in original research. Every student will leave this course contributing something “public” and published (online, in print, or in a conference paper), enhanced pedagogical tools for their teaching, and (where appropriate) contributions for their required departmental portfolios.

Website and digital components:  Much of the activity of the course will be made public on a course website and in a “group” made for our course as part of the hastac.org network. Students will be expected to learn minimal digital literacy skills as part of the contribution to public knowledge that is at aim in the course.
Spring Symposium, Wed March 28: As a Futures Initiative course, our class will need to be represented in a panel, poster session, workshop, or other contribution on Wednesday, March 28th, 9:00am-5:00pm (Skylight Room). All class members will be included in the preparation or presentation at the Symposium (the equivalent of a midterm paper).
 
Syllabus
Some possible texts:
These texts were chosen because they are rich, multi-layered, and offer many opportunities for graduate students to do extensive theorizing, historical, and other kinds of research (including archival).  They are grouped under topics, all of which students leading our discussions may wish to revise, remix, recombine, refocus.
 
Possible Topics for Students to Choose From:  
 
The Sojourners: Women, Activism, Communism, Immigration, Deportation
Claudia Jones, “We Seek Full Equality for Women” (1949)
 
Black Nationalism, Marxism, Identity
Ralph Ellison,  Invisible Man (1952)
 
Sexuality, Sex and Normalization of Surveillance
Ann Petry, The Narrows (1953)
 
Print culture (magazines, Black newspapers: how ideas are transmitted)
Langston Hughes,  Simple Speaks His Mind (1950) or Simple Stakes a Claim (1957)
Alice Childress, Like One of the Family  (1956)
Stories published in Afro American and Defender and Pittsburgh Courier
 
Editing, Censorship, Rebellion, and Incarceration
Chester Himes, Yesterday Will Make You Cry (formerly Cast the First Stone (1952)
 
Global Blackness in Exile: Debates and Controversy  
Richard Wright, White Man, Listen!  (1957) (“Tradition and Industrialization”)
James Baldwin, “Princes and Powers”  (1957)
Franz Fanon, On Violence  (1960)
 
Activism, Communism, Deportation, Women
Claudia Jones, “We Seek Full Equality for Women” (1949)
 
WSCP 8100 – Early Modern Trans History and Theory
GC:   T, 11:45AM-1:45PM, 2 or 4 credits, Prof. Will Fisher [38577]
Cross-listed with English.
This class will offer a broad survey of possible sites of inquiry for transgender (trans) scholarship on early modern English texts, and explore the intersections between the fields of early modern studies and trans studies. It will address questions like: How might gender-variant characters and historical figures speak to contemporary trans inquiries? What are the major premodern trans texts? How do recent developments in trans studies impact the way we read early modern texts, and vice versa? What are the methodological issues involved in understanding gender variability before the introduction of terms like trans, genderqueer, nonbinary, genderfluid, pangender, agender, and cisgender? How does early modern thinking about sex/gender and the body compare with contemporary thinking about these topics as articulated in trans studies?
 
READINGS:
Literary texts will include canonical works like Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night, Middleton and Dekker’s The Roaring Girl, John Lyly’s Gallathea (along with other early modern iterations of the Iphis and Ianthe story), and Ben Jonson’s Epicoene, as well as lesser-known works like Francis Beaumont’s Salmacis and Hermaphroditus and seventeenth-century broadside ballads about gender-variant individuals.
 
In addition, we will be examining a range of non-literary sources, including the court cases of individuals like Eleanor/John Rykener and the “female husbands” of the late-seventeenth century like Amy Howard/James Howard. We will also study early modern medical writing about gender and the body, including the accounts of spontaneous gender transformation from the period and the discussions of intersexed individuals, in order to consider whether – or how – this material might help contest assumptions about the historical dominance of binary models of gender identity.
 
Finally, trans theorists like Susan Stryker, Jack Halberstam, Joanne Meyerowitz, Cheryl Chase, and Dean Spade will be read alongside the work of early modern scholars like Simone Chess, Colby Gordon, M.W. Bychowski, and Leah DeVun.
  
WSCP 81000 – Edith Wharton: Texts and Contexts
GC:   M, 2:00PM-4:00PM, 2 or 4 credits, Prof. Hildegard Hoeller [38578]
Cross-listed with English.
Edith Wharton was a great American writer, a great woman writer, and a great New York writer. Her work is extraordinary versatile—spanning from short stories to fiction, from books on interior decoration, gardening and architecture to unique female war reporting and writing about World War I.  Her fiction responds to several major literary traditions: sentimental fiction, realism, naturalism, and modernism. Her writing tackles most of the cultural and social concerns of her time, including issues of gender, race, nation, and class. On all of these issues, she held complicated views. Unlike most American writers, she managed simultaneously to become canonized and sell her work successfully as a professional writer. Many Wharton papers are available in reasonable vicinity from us, such as in the Beinecke Library at Yale or the Firestone Library at Princeton University. Some of her previously unpublished writings, such as a newly discovered play, have been recently published. This seminar will explore Edith Wharton’s wide-ranging work, from her juvenile novella to her last unfinished novel, from her letters to her fiction, from her writing on interior decorating to her World War I writings. It will encourage critical projects that link Wharton to a wide variety of contexts, materials, and critical approaches. This course is extremely well suited to develop publishable articles and conference papers as well as to fulfill one of the portfolio requirements. 
 
WSCP 81000 – Somatic Austen
GC:   M, 11:45AM-1:45PM, 2 or 4 credits, Prof. Talia Schaffer [38579]
Cross-listed with English.
This course interrogates Austen’s crucial contributions to the history of the novel, with particular attention to the function of bodies in her oeuvre. We will interrogate disability, debility, and sickness as modes of signaling female virtue and instituting social relationality, and we will ask how important erotic desire really is for Austenian marriage. Austen developed the kind of realist fiction that would dominate the nineteenth century novel, centered on the marriage plot – but how might Austen’s work itself hearken back to older models of seduction,  courtship, or rational esteem, and how might it depict marriage in ways that modern readers do not recognize? In terms of bodily impairments and marriageable bodies, then, Austen may have somatic values that are interestingly different from our norms. The course will therefore work to recast the role of the body, while also introducing students to the major critics and debates about Austen’s work, including work on political, narrative, and historical directions in Austen.

WSCP 81000 – The Hidden Curriculum of Gender and Sexuality in Schools: A Critical Race Theory Perspective
GC:   T, 6:30PM-8:30PM, 3 credits, Prof. Sherry Deckman [38580]
Cross-listed with Urban Education.
This course explores the role of gender, sexuality, and race, and the intersection of these facets of identity, in contributing to young people’s schooling experiences, opportunities, and outcomes, and to the social context of schools more broadly.  In many ways, the course is about the “hidden curriculum” of racialized heteronormativity, or the subtle practices in schools that privilege particular heterosexual, gendered, and raced identities and ways of being.  In the course, we will engage with a variety of texts including theoretical works, qualitative and quantitative, empirical research, and applied, practical texts in analyzing how social differences are fundamentally entangled, and enmeshed with the making of identities. We will also engage the concept of the hidden curriculum and the lens of critical race theory as analytic tools for studying, understanding, and responding to how gender, sexuality, and race intersect with other social constructs with regard to schooling, and how these intersections contribute to shaping students’ identities. In particular, we will examine how these identities shape—and are shaped by—marginalized students’ experiences with inequity in schools. Lastly, we will apply our theoretical understandings to inquiry projects that will provide opportunities to ground the theoretical understandings that will be cultivated.         
 
WSCP 81000 – Food, Culture, and Society
GC:   W; 6:30-8:30PM, 3 credits, Prof. Barbara Katz Rothman [38581]
Cross-listed with Sociology.
This course explores major issues in foodways—food habits from production through consumption—through readings and discussions as well as through primary research in food and society.  The scholarly study of food invokes issues of gender, class, labor, and cultural identities and demands an interdisciplinary approach.  Theoretical frameworks include the food voice (Hauck-Lawson), cultural studies, political economy, and symbolic interactionism.
The key focus in the course is going to be the application of theory and methods from the disciplines represented by students, faculty and invited guests in the course, to Food Studies.
Rather than a standard paper, each student will, in consultation with the professor and the other students, develop a project that best fits in with her/his own work –for example,  a food-focused dissertation chapter, an internship, a series of published book reviews, or a paper presentation at a professional conference in the student’s home discipline.

WSCP 81000 – Critical Perspectives on Childhood and Pedagogy
GC:   W, 4:15PM-6:15PM, 3 credits, Prof. Wendy Luttrell and Amita Gupta [38582]
Cross-listed with Urban Education.
This course marries two fields of study: critical childhood studies and critical educational theory and practice.  Using early childhood education discourse as the focal point, students consider and re-imagine processes of socialization and child development.   Rather than characterizing children as “incomplete” en route to becoming adults and as objects rather than subjects of adult socialization, the course features children as active agents who contribute to and are shaped by social institutions.  The course explores childhood in relationship to broader processes of neoliberalism, globalization, institutionalization, consumerism, technology, and children/youth activism.  Historically and socio-culturally constructed images of children and childhood permeate visual culture and students will examine how these changing images influence day-to-day relationships between adults and children.  Images of children, notions of childhood, childrearing, and educational practices constructed within non-western cultural communities that appear very different from the Euro-American images are explored. The course is particularly concerned with how global forces create postcolonial hybrid third spaces in classrooms within which hybrid pedagogies may emerge.  Students explore these practices in light of current ideologies about child-centeredness and demands for culturally relevant pedagogies in the context of the realities of classrooms, images of teachers and children in culturally diverse contexts.  The class, as a learning community, will be taught primarily through discussion and dialogue and students are encouraged to raise questions, share stories and learn collaboratively.

WSCP 81000 – Introduction to Lesbian & Gay/Queer Studies
GC:   TH, 4:15PM-6:15PM, 3 credits, Prof. Matt Brim [38700]
The special topic for the spring IDS 71001 course will be “Queer Studies Pedagogy and the CUNY Mission.” The course will be project-based, with students designing syllabi for queer studies classes they want to teach to students on CUNY campuses. There will be an emphasis on using Open Educational Resources (OER) for course texts, and part of the work of the course will be theorizing the act of “freeing” queer texts for working-class and working-poor students. In that vein, we will also focus on making the most of the queer labor that is already produced and undertaken within the CUNY system. Students will present on canonical and cutting-edge queer scholarship in order to survey the field, but always with an eye toward democratizing access to that work. For more information, please email Matt Brim at matt.brim@csi.cuny.edu.
 
WSCP 81000 – Taking Back the Land:  Black Social Movements in the Americas and the Caribbean
GC: Monday, 11:45-1:45PM, Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Professor Mamyrah Prosper [38724]
This course examines black social movements for freedom, justice, equality, and self-determination in varying national contexts in the Americas and the Caribbean. Beginning with the movements to end slavery and bring about full citizenship, we will examine the role of resistance, institution building, and social thought in the collective action of African-descended people and their allies from the 19th through the 21st century. This research seminar engages major theories that attempt to explain the origins and development of these movements struggling for land rights, labor rights, racial and ethnic rights, as well as gender and sexuality rights.
 
WSCP 81000 – Problems in French Literary History: The Novel
GC: Room 4202.11, Tuesday, 4:15-6:15PM, Professor Domna Stanton [38725]
Course taught in French
Open to students outside of French, 2-4 credits. 
This course on the history and theory of the novel will begin with a set of readings (Scholes, Bakhtin, Brooks, Genette, Barthes, Sedgwick) on aspects of narrative and narratology. We will then read closely six novels beginning with La Princesse de Clèves (Folio Classique, 2000) and Les liaisons dangereuses (Petits Larousse Classiques, 2007), followed by Mme de Duras' Ourika (Folio Classique 2007) and Madame Bovary (Folio Classique 2001) and ending with Du côté de chez Swann (Folio Classique, 1988) and Djebar's Ombre sultane (Livre de Poche, 2006) . [These editions will be on reserve in the GC Library, but if you purchase your own texts, please make sure to buy the same editions so we are all on the same page.] Our discussions will be informed by critical readings for each text, listed in the syllabus, and available on Blackboard.

Goals of this course include: gaining an understanding of the sweep of the French novel; reading novels intensively for their narratological, thematic, stylistic, ideological/political and gender scripts; writing analytical papers on literary texts; doing literary research; reading critical theory critically; and improving spoken and written literary/critical French (or English).

Work for the course, over and above class preparation and engaged participation, involves for those taking the course for 4 credits: two short papers 5-7 pp), one of these a class presentation of a critical text,  a final 15-page paper (topic developed in consultation with the instructor ), and a final exam; for those taking the course for 2 credits: there will be the class presentation of a critical text (written up into 5-7 pp); and the final exam, in addition to class preparation and participation.

The course will be conducted in French; written work will be in French for students in French; students from other departments may write their papers in English.

For further information and all questions, please contact Domna Stanton (dstanton112@yahoo.com).