Course Descriptions

Current and past History courses.

Current and past History courses.

PLEASE NOTE: All syllabi are subject to change. Please contact the professor if you are concerned. Thank you!

View our current and past semester course schedules and descriptions are below. Courses are also accessible via CUNY's Dynamic Course Schedule.

For all registration dates and deadlines, see the GC academic calendar

Level 2 students who have completed coursework register for Register on Record (ROR) and 7 Weighted Instructional Units (WIUs). Class numbers for ROR and WIUs can be found by doing a “class search” in CUNYfirst. These are also sent to all students by the Office of the Registrar.  

Level 3 students must register for Dissertation Supervision. Class numbers for Diss Sup can be found by doing a “class search” with the advisor's name in CUNYfirst.  

Courses by Semester

Required History Courses

HIST  84900-01
First-year Seminar in American History         
5 credits, Wednesdays 2 PM - 4 PM, Hybrid

Professor Thomas Kessner
This seminar is designed to train incoming graduate students in the craft of historical research and writing. Over the course of the term, each student will formulate a research topic, prepare a bibliography of relevant primary and secondary sources, write an historiographic essay, and present and defend a formal project proposal for the substantial research paper that is to be completed in the second semester seminar. Weekly meetings will discuss common readings, share and critique written work, and develop and refine the research proposals.  We will also be devoting some time to methods and issues involved in undergraduate teaching. Participants will focus primarily on framing a topic and honing a well defined, focused and reasonable research proposal for their papers. The collateral assignments are intended to advance this process forward.  Students are advised to give some thought to possible research projects before classes begin this way they can make some early efforts at sampling secondary materials and investigating the availability of sources. Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Kessner HIST 84900 FALL 2022 syllabus

HIST 84900-02 
First-year Seminar in European and non-American History
5 credits, Wednesdays 2 PM - 4 PM, Hybrid
Professor Allison Kavey

This course aims to help you define the theoretical context appropriate for your research questions, locate and make effective use of different types of sources, and draft a research paper you will continue next term. Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Kavey HIST 84900 Fall 22

HIST   80010
Historiography of American History 1

5 Credits, Thursdays 2 PM-4PM, Fully In-Person
Professor David Waldstreicher
This course introduces Ph.D. students to the historiography of the U.S. through the Civil War and is intended to prepare students for the First Written Examination. One of our primary concerns will be periodization. To what extent should the colonial period be considered a prologue to U.S. history? And on the other side of the nationhood divide, are there analyses that suggest a coherence or continuity to U.S. history beyond the peculiarities of the early republic or Civil War periods? What is the status of the  Revolution and the Civil War, and the political history that drives or used to drive the narrative of U.S. history, amid transformations that might otherwise be seen as social, cultural, economic? Are there explanations that that cut across centuries, or stories that hold up in our time?  What are the most important achievements of recent US historians, and what are the trends in the field now?
The books and articles we shall discuss include prizewinning narratives, monographs born as dissertations, and historiographical essays. An important part of what we will be doing is attempting to read these in light of each other. Be forewarned: the reading is extensive, in recognition of the five credits this course carries and its status as required preparation for qualifying examinations. Our goal is to prepare for the exam, of course, but also to prepare to teach this period at the college level and to lay a substantial foundation for future research and teaching in any period of U.S. history. Open only to PhD Program in History students.


HIST   80020
Historiography of European History 1

5 Credits, Tuesdays, 4:15 PM-6:15 PM, Hybrid
Professor Francesca Bregoli
This course offers an introduction to the literature of European history from the late Middle Ages through the eighteenth century. It explores key historiographical debates, themes, and methodologies pertinent to the study of that period. We will examine classic and recent works on cultural and political history, the economy and society, religion, states and empires, science and technology, popular culture, gender and sexuality, and more. The course prepares students for the end-of-semester comprehensive examination and for further study of European history. Open only to PhD Program in History students.
bregoli.HIST80020.fall2022.final 


HIST 80050
Historiography of Middle East History 1

5 Credits, Wednesdays, 4:15PM-6:15PM, Fully In-Person
Professor Lale Can
This course provides an introduction to the main themes and approaches in the history and historiography of the Middle East in the long 19th century, from roughly the late 1700s through the First World War. Our primary geographical focus will be regions under the rule of the Ottoman Empire and, to a lesser extent, Qajar Iran. Drawing on works of classic literature and important new scholarship, the course will cover themes such as state-building and governance; religious authority, identity, and sectarianism; economic and labor history; gender and law; histories of medicine and the environment; legal reform and modernization; migration; and the impact of imperialism and globalization. Students who complete the course will have a solid grounding in the literature of the Middle East, which will serve as a basis for preparation for oral exams as well as for future teaching and research.
This 5-credit HIST 80500 section is open only to PhD Program in History students. Advanced MA students in the MES program should register for the 3-credit MES 78000 section (with approval).
Can HIST 80500 FALL 2022 syllabus


HIST  80040
Historiography of Latin American History 2

5 Credits, Tuesdays, 11:45 AM-1:45 PM
Professor Mary Roldan
This course introduces first year graduate students to the literature of Latin American history from about the second quarter of the nineteenth century through the third quarter of the twentieth century (1820s to 1980s).  Though intended to prepare students for the First (written) examination the course is necessarily selective in terms of its thematic and country-specific content.  In addition to weekly assigned “Required Readings,” students will also receive a list of “Recommended Readings for Further Study” organized by theme and time period. “Recommended Readings” expand and deepen the course’s required readings and represent works that a graduate student of Latin American history would be expected to have read by the time of their written or oral examinations. As a longer term objective, this course is also intended to enable students to begin to think about possible dissertation or research topics, to inscribe their emerging research interests within larger paradigms of analysis and debate in Latin American history, and to expand their familiarity with methodological and comparative tools of analysis in ways that may benefit their future research and writing. Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Roldan HIST 80040 FALL 2022 syllabus

Elective History Courses

HIST 71000 
Introduction to Global Early Modern Studies: The Atlantic World
3 Credits, Mondays, 4:15 PM-6:15 PM, Fully Online
Professor Clare Carroll

Transculturation in the Atlantic world will be the focus of our study of encounters between Europeans and Africans, peoples of the Caribbean, and the Americas in texts from Portuguese, Spanish, Nahuatl, French and English authors. Topics to be discussed include political versus economic interpretations of the encounter, slavery, and colonization; the geography of empire; visual narration in Meso-American codices; the intersection of gender, class and race in the creation of mestizo cultures; monsters and cannibals in maps and ethnographic writing; the construction of race before race (the pseudo-science of the 18th and 19th centuries). All texts can be read in the original language and in English. Readings will be available on Blackboard. Readings will be from: The Asia of João de Barros; Columbus, Diario; We People Here: Nahuatl Accounts of the Conquest of Mexico; Hernán Cortés, The Second Letter; Las Casas, A Brief Account of the Destruction of the Indies; Garcilaso de la Vega, Royal Commentaries of the Incas; Sor Juana Inés de a Cruz, Response to the Very Eminent Sor Filotea de la Cruz; Montaigne, ‘On Cannibals,’ ‘On Coaches,’ Jean de Léry, History of a Voyage to the Land of Brazil; Hakluyt, Voyages and Discoveries; Shakespeare, The Tempest. Theoretical and contextual frameworks include Fernando Ortiz, Cuban Counterpoint; Herman Bennett, African Kings and Black Slaves; Nicolás Wey Gόmez, The Tropics of Empire; Diana Magaloni Kerpel, The Colors of the New World: Artists, Materials, and the Creation of the Florentine Codex; Barbara Fuchs, Mimesis and Empire; Surekha Davies, Renaissance Ethnography and the Invention of the Human; Kim Hall, Things of Darkness, Nicholas Jones, Staging Habla de Negros.  There will be guest appearance by the authors of some of the works we will read including Herman Bennett, Amanda Wunder, Surekha Davies, among others.
 Carroll HIST 71000 FALL 2022 syllabus

HIST 72100         
Understanding the Radical Right
3 Credits, Mondays, 6:30 PM- 8:30 PM, Fully In-Person
Professor Richard Wolin

Vladimir Putin in Russia, Viktor Orbán in Hungary, Marine Le Pen in France, Matteo Salvini in Italy, Jair Bolsonaro in Brazil, and so forth: the world is awash in authoritarian populism. In order to better understand the origins and efficacity of these “soft dictatorships” or “illiberal democracies” (Orbán), we will pursue a twofold approach. First, we will review the leading theories of dictatorship and the authoritarian state as outlined by luminaries such as Carl Schmitt (The Crisis of Parliamentary Democracy; 1923), Horkheimer and Adorno (Dialectic of Enlightenment; 1947), and Hannah Arendt (The Origins of Totalitarianism; 1951). Second, we will investigate the leading ideologues of fascism and the “total state,” thinkers who have recently experienced an enthusiastic revival among conservatives and reactionaries worldwide: Oswald Spengler, Carl Schmitt (again), Julius Evola, and the American paleocon Samuel Francis (1947-2005). In conclusion, we will examine the origins of “population replacement” ideology (Renaud Camus, Generation Identity, the Alt-Right) among representatives of the European “New Right”: Alain de Benoist and disciples such as Vladimir Putin-advisor and Steve Bannon-intimate, Alexander Dugin. (The course is intended for PhD students; master’s students must receive permission of the instructor – rwolin@gc.cuny.edu.)
Wolin HIST 72100 FALL 2022 syllabus
 

HIST 72110         
Globalizing the Enlightenment
3 Credits, Thursdays, 4:15 PM-6:15 PM, Hybrid
Professor Helena Rosenblatt

The Eighteenth-Century European Enlightenment is widely seen as a transformative moment in Western culture, one which gave birth to many of our most cherished ideals. We are often told, for example, that it is to the Enlightenment that we owe our modern notions of human rights, representative government, and liberal democracy. However, the recent “global turn” in scholarship has led historians to ask some new and questions. How, for example, did eighteenth-century European thinkers perceive the world beyond their own borders? How did they get their information about the outside world and to what purposes was that information put?  What were their attitudes toward race, slavery, imperialism, “primitives” and gender? Did regions outside of Europe experience Enlightenments too? If so, what was the relationship, if any, of these Enlightenments to the European one? With the help of both primary and secondary sources, we will ask how adopting a “global” perspective on the Enlightenment might enrich or even change our view of it. Is it even correct to call the Enlightenment European?
Rosenblatt HIST 72110 FALL 2022 syllabus

HIST 72200         
Race, Gender, & the Art of Memoir
3 Credits, Tuesdays, 6:30 PM-8:30 PM, Hybrid
Professor Tanisha Ford

In recent years, there has been resurgent interest in the genre of memoir. Many of these contemporary texts are written by young(er), people of color. In this course we will read classic memoirs in conversation with more recent publications to explore the intersections of gender and race and the unique ways that writers of creative non-fiction use the genre to explore identity politics, trauma, pleasure, the (recent) past, and worldmaking. Learning how to write in this style is a useful skill for all students—regardless of field, discipline or career path. To that end, students will write and revise several autobiographical essays, with attention to developing voice and tone, pacing, and social/cultural/political texture.
Registration open only to M.A. Program in Biography and Memoir and PhD Program in History students.

HIST 72300 
Quantitative Method for Social Scientists and Humanists: Data Analysis and Mapping Data
3 Credits, Thursdays, 4:15 PM-6:15 PM, Fully Online
Professor Laird Bergad

This course is designed to develop introductory skills needed for the analysis of large-scale data bases such as those provided by the U.S. Census Bureau, other government agencies such as the National Institute of Health, the Bureau of Labor Statistics, or census data bases provided by other countries throughout the world. After you conclude this course you should be able to use the skills you have learned to analyze any kind of data base, large or small, including those which you may develop independently in your future research. There are three broadly based skill sets you will learn in this course: 1) how to download data from specific web sites; 2) how to analyze these data to extract the specific information you want; 3) how to present these data in tables and graphic materials; and presentation of data on maps. The course will first focus on the skills needed to download data files to your computer using the IPUMS web site (Integrated Public Use Microdata Series) from the Minnesota Population Center, University of Minnesota (https://usa.ipums.org/usa/)  which maintains a repository of every census of the United States from 1790 on. There is also a number of ‘companion’ sites such as IPUMS International which maintains an ever-growing archive of census materials from around the world which you may register for and use as you develop your skills. (https://international.ipums.org/international/) . We will also learn how to download other, and similar data sets used for mapping purposes at the National Historical Geographic Information System (NHGIS) web site (https://www.nhgis.org ).
Bergad HIST 72300 FALL 2022 syllabus

HIST 72400         
Meritocracy: Education and Inequality, Past and Future
3 Credits, Tuesdays, 2 PM-4 PM, Fully In-Person
Professor John Torpey

The Supreme Court has announced that it will hear two cases bearing on affirmative action – and hence on “merit” in higher education, one emanating from Harvard and the other from the University of North Carolina.  Meanwhile, Harvard political philosopher Michael Sandel, author of a recent critique of “the tyranny of merit,” advised German Social Democratic chancellor candidate Olaf Scholz to use the campaign theme of “respect” that helped him get elected.  Controversies have arisen over the principles of admission into several selective public high schools around the country.  What is “meritocracy” and where did it come from?  Is it good or bad as a principle for organizing society?  What does its future look like?  We will explore the “merit” and “meritocracy” comparatively and historically in an effort to answer these questions.
Torpey HIST 72400 FALL 2022 reading list

HIST 72500   COURSE POSTPONED UNTIL FALL 2023
Disability: History and Theory
3 Credits, Tuesdays, 2 PM-4 PM, Fully In-Person
Professor Dagmar Herzog

 

HIST 74900
Police, Prisons, and Repression in the United Stated of America

3 credits, Wednesdays, 6:30 PM-8:30 PM, Fully In-Person
Professor Johanna Fernandez
This course examines the rise and role of jails, prisons, police and repression in the United States beginning with emergent reformulations of punishment in the early years of the republic and the proclamations on imprisonment and involuntary servitude in the Northwest Ordinance of 1787. The course covers the founding, by the Pennsylvania Quakers, of the first modern US prison in 1790 and analyzes the expansion of prisons during two turning points in American History. First in the late 19th century during the era of Reconstruction and the Second Industrial Revolution and again one hundred years later beginning in the 1970s— in the decades immediately following the civil rights and black power movements, at a time of domestic and global economic restructuring. The course tracks the origins of slave patrols —the earliest police units in the US — charged with capturing and returning escaped enslaved Africans back to southern plantations and the later expansion and professionalization of police after World War I in the context of labor unrest, left radicalization and the rise of the second KKK. We explore the link between imprisonment and political repression as seen in the Salem Witch trials, the trials and hangings of Haymarket labor activists in Chicago in the late 19th Century; the executions of Italian immigrant anarchists Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti in the 1920s and Ethel and Julius Rosenberg in the 1950s; and the failed attempts at execution in the case of Black Panther Mumia Abu-Jamal in the 1990s. The course ends with an analysis of developments in the last fifty years in the US — the rise of hyper incarceration of poor, Black American and Latinx communities in deindustrializing cities and of migrants in the US-Mexico border. We explore the meaning of police militarization and its expansion in the context of the cold war and the explosion of the carceral state as the country’s third largest employer in the 21st century.


HIST 75000
Politics of Race and Slavery in the Early Republic
3 Credits, Tuesdays, 11:45 AM-1:45 PM, Fully In-Person
Professor James Oakes
It has become clear that slavery was a contested issue in American politics for a much longer period than previous generations of scholars once suggested.  Where it was common to start the history of the sectional crisis with the Mexican War, historians now speak of a “long emancipation” that involved “eight-eight years” of conflict.  At the same time, the contours of the struggle over slavery have widened.  Where it was once reduced to a dispute over slavery in the territories, it has now become clear that the fugitive slave crisis was equally important in the developing conflict between the North and the South.  That, in turn, raised questions about the rights of free Blacks in the free states and territories.  As a result, the politics of slavery have become inseparable from the politics of race.  “Politics” itself is no longer confined to parties and elections, but embraces the active participation of Blacks and women.  Gender ideology is now understood to be a key component of antislavery thought.  Finally, where historians once contrasted the radical egalitarianism of abolitionists with the moderation of antislavery politicians, more recent scholars have highlighted interconnections between antislavery politics and radical abolitionism.
This seminar will focus on the politics of race and slavery, primarily in the northern states, between the Revolution and the Civil War.  Readings will range from classic accounts that stressed the role of racism in limiting antislavery politics, to more recent studies that have recovered an enduring anti-racist tradition that arose as the analogue to antislavery politics.  A persistent theme is the way antislavery politics repeatedly raised the question of citizenship rights for African Americans and women.
Oakes HIST 75000 FALL 2022 syllabus


HIST 75300
Topics in the History of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era
3 Credits, Wednesdays, 11:45 AM- 1:45 AM, Hybrid
Professor Thomas Kessner
This course focuses on a number of the major themes in U.S. social, political and cultural history the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, the period between. between 1877-and 1914. In these years the United States was transformed from a largely agricultural and rural nation to one that is industrial and increasingly urban. It is the era of the rise of Big Business and the Industrial Revolution, the years in which America’s post Civil War racial and immigrant absorption policies are cast. Populist, labor, and socialist reformers offer their own versions of a better way, but by and large the political lineaments for Modern America are forged from the capitalist market, modest state intervention and a regard for individual freedoms. We will also investigate economic changes, the forging of a new foreign policy and the multifaceted transformations of these years. Readings will include a sample of classic works along with a selection of more recent monographs and interpretive studies.
Kessner HIST 75300 FALL 2022 syllabus  

HIST 75500
Public History and Memory
3 Credits, Mondays, 2 PM-4 PM, Fully In-Person
Professor Anne Valk

This course investigates approaches to studying and producing public history and collective memory. Through our readings, class discussions, and assignments, we will examine the activities of public historians and the complex issues they face when preserving, researching, interpreting and presenting history and collective memory. Reading a series of case studies that span over time and place, we will discuss how theory plays out in practice and in various arenas in which historians and publics encounter historical events, sites, objects, and traces.
Valk HIST 75500  FALL 2022 reading list


HIST 75700
Labor and Race in the 20th Century U.S.

3 Credits, Mondays, 4:15 PM-6:15 PM, Fully In-Person
Professor Ruth Milkman
The rich history of labor activism among Blacks and other workers of color is well documented.  It is also beyond dispute that many white trade unionists embraced racist ideologies and/or excluded workers of color from their labor organizations, especially before 1935.  Even in that period, however, some unions did manage to build working-class unity across racial lines.  Although such cases were exceptional in the early 20th century, they began to multiply in the 1930s as the Congress of Industrial Organizations took shape.  By the end of World War II, union exclusion of workers of color was largely eliminated, although racism persisted in other forms within the labor movement.  The rise of public-sector unionism in the 1960s and 1970s introduced new dynamics thanks to the influence of the civil rights movement. 
This course will explore the complex interplay of race and class in the 20th century U.S. labor movement through a series of exemplary historical case studies and selected theoretical texts.  The goal is to address the question:  under what conditions has class solidarity prevailed over white supremacy in the U.S. labor movement?   
Milkman Fall 2022 Race and Labor Syllabus corrected


HIST 75900
Twentieth Century African-American History
3 Credits, Tuesdays, 4:15 PM-6:15 PM, Hybrid
Professor Tanisha Ford
This is a readings course designed to introduce students to major themes, questions, and historiographical debates in African American history. Typical weekly readings consist of a book monograph and 1-2 articles. Students will be expected to actively engage with one another about the books’ core arguments, interventions, contributions to the field, use of source material, periodization, and so forth. Spirited, collegial debate is encouraged. Assignments will include weekly response papers, oral presentations, and a 15-17pp historiographical essay or a review essay. The course is organized chronologically as well as thematically and will explore topics such as racial capitalism, criminalization and the rise of the carceral state, social movements, religion, gender and sexuality, and artistic production. Some of the authors whose work we read will join us virtually to share insights about their research methods and interventions. The course will provide a foundation for students who are preparing for exams or who plan to write a thesis or dissertation on United States, African American, or African diaspora history. Attendance at each class session is mandatory. All students will be expected to participate fully and thoughtfully in class discussions.


HIST 76000
The African Diaspora
3 Credits, Thursdays 6:30PM-8:30PM, Fully In-Person
Professor Herman Bennett
On a practical professional level, the course serves as a graduate-level introduction to the African diaspora.  Scholarship on this subject along with its development over time and in distinct settings (the United States, Latin America and the Caribbean, Sub-Saharan Africa, England and Continental Europe) introduces us to disciplinary formations and the history of knowledge production.  For this reason, we will devote considerable time focusing and discussing how writers, theorists, and subsequently scholars have approached their engagement with the African diaspora.  Since the African diaspora as a field of study constitutes a relatively novel interdisciplinary endeavor, most of the readings draw on a range of disciplines (Anthropology, English, History, Religion, and Sociology).  While this conveys a sense of where this interdisciplinary field is presently at, it also serves to delineate how the African diaspora draws and builds on earlier forms of inquiry (the history of colonial expansion, the history of slavery and freedom, the history of racial formation, etc.).
Over the semester we will constantly ask what defines an inquiry, an approach or a perspective as diasporic in scope.  As scholars, we might begin by asking whether diaspora complicates our understanding of disciplinary formations—including the normative assumptions that inform the study of society and culture.  How does diaspora, for instance, enhance our perspectives on imperial, colonial, national and post-colonial formations and the ways in which they have been historically represented?  In utilizing the prism of diaspora, we confront the politics of representation through which scholars render meaning out of the past and present.  For this reason, diaspora like other categories of analysis engages the vexed terrain of representation whereby scholars frame the subject of their inquiries.
Conceived primarily as a reading course, this means there will be a significant amount of reading each week.  Reading up to or the equivalent of two books a week is standard practice but also one of the numerous skills that students need to master if they intend to succeed in graduate school and beyond.
Bennett Hist 72700 The African Diaspora Fall 2022

HIST 78110 - 01
History of The Modern Middle East
3 credits, Mondays 6:30-8:30, Fully In-Person 
Professor Dina Le Gall

This course introduces students to major dynamics and issues in the history of the Middle East in the past two centuries and seeks to nurture critical historical thinking about the region. We examine a wide range of topics, from different modes of colonial intervention, to modernizing reforms and reforming elites, the move from empire to a new state order, the politics and culture of nationalism, post-colonial states and authoritarian regimes, Islamist mobilization, and recent neo-liberal politics. Proceeding in a roughly chronological order, we weave thematic discussions of women and gender, environmental history, urban history, history of consumption, etc. into that framework. A central over-arching theme of the course is modernity: what shape it has taken at different times and places, how it has been perceived and experienced, what challenges and tensions it has engendered, who have been the beneficiaries and losers.

Class discussions will be guided by reading questions handed out in advance, one of which students will answer in writing before class. For example: To what extent was Ottoman reform founded upon emulation of the West? How was WWI a watershed in ME political culture? How were women and gender deployed in nationalist and modernizing projects of the inter-war period? What best explains the resilience of ME post-colonial authoritarian regimes? What has given Islamist movements (of different kinds) their purchase? Has globalization been primarily destabilizing in the ME and why? The course’s final assignment is a 6-8 pages argument-based analytical essay.
Le Gall HIST 78110 syllabus

HIST 78110 - 02 
Israeli and Palestinian Identities: Religion and the Formation of National Identity
3 credits, Tuesdays 6:30-8:30, Fully In-Person
Professor Erik Freas

The course will examine the Israeli-Palestinian conflict largely from an ideological perspective, as reflective of two competing, and to some extent constructed, nationalist narratives. In particular, the role of religion (Islam and Judaism, respectively) as a basis of corresponding proto-nationalist identities will be considered; likewise, the extent to which religion has informed both Zionist/Israeli and Palestinian nationalisms, for instance by way of legitimizing respective claims to what is a contested territory. Notably, both nationalisms are considered as case studies of the role of religion vis-à-vis nationalism in a phenomenological sense. Related to this, other nationalisms will be considered, particularly those where religion has come to constitute a defining aspect of respective national identities (such as has been evident, for instance, with many of the various populist movements that have emerged worldwide over the last few decades).
Freas Syllabus-HIST 78110-02

HIST 78400
Science and Society
3 Credits, Mondays, 6:30-8:30 PM, Fully In-Person
Professor Timothy Alborn
This course surveys the rise of modern science in Western Europe and the United States from the late-eighteenth century to the present by focusing on a set of major themes that have captured the interest of historians and sociologists, including the intersections of science with empire, warfare, the environment, race, religion, and the state.
Alborn HIST 78400 FALL 2022 syllabus
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SEE ALSO

RECOMMENDED COURSES FROM OTHER PROGRAMS

MSCP 80500 – Special Topics in the Archaeology of the Classical, Late Antique, and Islamic Worlds: Jerusalem - Monuments and Memory from Constantine the Great to Suleiman the Magnificent
Wednesday, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Warren Woodfin (Warren.Woodfin@qc.cuny.edu)
Mode of Instruction: In-Person

Placed by many medieval maps at the center of the word, Jerusalem is a city triply sacred: to Jews as the capital of the kingdom of Judah and the location of the Temple until its destruction in 70 CE; to Christians as the city in which Jesus instituted the Eucharist, suffered, and was buried; and to Muslims as the site of the “farthest place of prayer,” al masjid al aqsa, visited by Mohammed on his night journey. Throughout the holy city and its environs, sites were marked with monuments to their spiritual significance that were in turn remodeled and re-interpreted over the centuries. The figural arts—painting, sculpture, textiles, metalwork, and the arts of the book—similarly played a role in configuring and reconfiguring this landscape of holiness. Jerusalem presents a remarkable series of case studies on the integration and diffusion of artistic and architectural models, the changing discourses around key monuments, the role of pilgrimage and relics, and interreligious competition through artistic patronage. Covering the period from the reign of Constantine (312–337) to the city’s conquest by the Ottomans (1516), the course will consider both the artistic production of Jerusalem itself and arts intended to reproduce the holiness of Jerusalem elsewhere.

MES 78500: MIDDLE EASTERN EXPLORERS: TIME, SPACE AND TRAVEL LITERATURE
Thursdays, 2:00-4:00 (in-person), 3 credits, Professor Anna Akasoy

​​​​​​​Since the early days of Islamic history, Muslims traveled for a number of reasons, including trade, education and the pilgrimage. Some traveled on diplomatic missions. While most remained within territories under Muslim rule, others such as Ibn Fadlan or Ibn Battuta ventured well beyond these boundaries into the African, European and Asian continents. Like a small number of other medieval and early modern travelers of the Middle East, they left behind accounts of their journeys which provide important insights into the ways these authors experienced the world and their underlying geographical and ethnographic taxonomies. In some cases, these travel accounts have become critical sources for the regions the authors described (e.g., Ibn Fadlan for human sacrifice among the Vikings, or Ibn Battuta for the early history of Islam in the Maldives).

 

Fall Courses at The Writing Center

Would you benefit from a weekly support and skill-building group? The Writing Center manages a range of semester-long, zero-credit classes that can help you stay on track! 

If you are a multilingual student who wants support for your academic writing, consider enrolling in a section of "Effective Academic Writing for Multilingual Students." Alternatively, if you'd like to get help with your spoken English, "Advanced Spoken English: Teaching and Presentation Skills" could be the perfect course for you. We also have courses in "Effective Academic Writing for Native Speakers of English," "Teaching Strategies," and "Writing the Dissertation." 

These courses involve very little work outside of weekly class sessions. They are a low-pressure space in which you can benefit from knowledgable faculty and a community of fellow students. If you've been thinking about taking one of these courses, the time to enroll is now! 

Students register for these courses as they do their academic classes: log into CUNYFirst; go to Student Center and select “Search,” which takes you to the “Search for Classes” page. Select the institution (Graduate Center), the term, and enter the course number (listed below).
**Note: Because these courses are zero-credit, Level 3 students are eligible to enroll.**

 

Effective Academic Writing for Multilingual Students (PDEV 79403)
This course is a workshop that aims to help non-native English-speaking students take control of their writing process as they move forward in their graduate studies. We look at the conventions that shape academic writing, keeping in mind that these conventions vary from discipline to discipline and from genre to genre. We focus on the writing process by looking at various steps we can take in order to create “effective academic writing,” with emphasis on discussing writing in progress. Students work on improving writing projects connected to their coursework. We deal with grammar and other writing convention issues as needed.
First Section
Professor: Sharon Utakis
Time: Tuesdays, 11:45 AM-1:45 PM (online)
Second Section
Professor: Maria Jerskey
Time: Thursdays, 2:00-4:00 PM (in-person)


Advanced Spoken English: Teaching and Presentation Skills (PDEV 79400)
This course, for both novice and experienced teachers, focuses on teaching and presenting in university classrooms. Students will improve their spoken English through increased interactional awareness and focused feedback on pronunciation and delivery. This course will prepare students to make informed choices about leading and facilitating classroom interaction, including consideration of the role of technology in teaching and presenting.
Professor: Christine Jacknick
Time: Tuesdays, 2:00-4:00 PM (online)

 

Effective Academic Writing for Native English Speakers (PDEV 79403)
This course grounds students in the fundamental elements that inform all argument-based academic writing in order to help them better understand and navigate the sometimes bewildering array of genres in which they are expected to write, from seminar papers and conference presentations to grant applications and dissertation proposals to theses, dissertations, job letters, abstracts, and journal articles. At once a seminar and a workshop, this course combines opportunities for peer review with instruction in the genres of academic writing, revision techniques, advanced outlining, the art of the paragraph, methods for overcoming writer’s block, and other skills. The syllabus will be developed in coordination with students’ stated interests and needs.
Professor: David Hershinow
Time: Mondays, 11:45 AM-1:45 PM (online)


Teaching Strategies (PDEV 79401)
This course provides Graduate Center students from all disciplines with community and structure to help them prepare for and reflect upon their development as teachers. Our work will proceed from an understanding of the social contexts of teaching, as well as the positionalities of graduate student instructors and adjuncts. Short theoretical readings will help guide participants’ exploration and development of their teaching philosophies and materials. The course curriculum and structure will be responsive to the group’s needs, and the moments when we teach. In Fall 2022, the course will address the challenges of the ongoing public health and social crises, and of the ongoing transition back to face-to-face or hybrid teaching in the 2022-2023 academic year.
Foundational topics explored in the course will include classroom community, student-centered and active learning approaches, accessibility, course design and policies, lesson planning, assignment design, assessment, educational technology, cultivating student writing, affective responses in classroom settings, and culturally-responsive pedagogy. For questions about the course, please reach out to Dr. Waltzer lwaltzer@gc.cuny.edu.
Professor: Luke Waltzer
Time: Fridays, 9:30 AM-11:30 AM (online)

 

Writing the Dissertation (PDEV 79407)
Writing the Dissertation is a course that supports you through the writing process as you work toward completing the dissertation. Designed to help you with everything from writing schedules to chapter drafts, the course aims to demystify what makes a great dissertation happen. You will be writing and sharing your work in the form of outlines, chapter abstracts, and of course completed chapter drafts; you will also prepare timetables for a sane schedule of work and write an “elevator speech” summary of your project for interviews and your CV. You will get a chance to critique completed dissertations in your disciplines and will also have time to review the common practices of academic discourse and rhetoric. We will also discuss how all students, especially historically underrepresented graduate students, can use mentoring, writing groups, and other strategies to achieve their academic writing goals.
Professor: Elizabeth Dill
Time: Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 PM (in-person) 

 

*Note: "Writing the Dissertation" is already full. However, if you would have wanted to enroll, please email David Hershinow (dhershinow@gc.cuny.edu) to let them know. This information will help us understand whether the current level of demand would justify running two sections of this course in the Spring.

HIST 80010- Literature Survey in American History
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 5 credits, Prof. KC Johnson  
Room 6493

This course fulfills the second half of the literature requirement. It will move chronologically and thematically from Reconstruction through the present day, addressing such themes as: the aftermath and legacy of slavery, the emergence of the United States as a global power, the rise and consolidation of the American state, backlashes to the liberal ideal, and the struggle for national inclusion: race, rights, and citizenship. We will also discuss issues of periodization and highlight recent developments in methodology related to our period. The workload is heavy: on average, two books each week.
Attendance is required for each class session.  Participation is expected. 
Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Johnson-Lit-syllabus-S2021 

HIST 80020- Literature Survey in European History
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 5 credits, Prof. Elissa Bemporad

Room 5114.01
This course provides students with an introduction to the major themes and historiographical debates in the field of modern European history from the Enlightenment to the present. We will explore a range of literature from works of classic historiography to innovative recent studies; themes will include nation-state building, imperialism, war and genocide, culture, and sexuality. After completing the course students should have a solid grounding in the literature of modern Europe, which will serve as a basis for preparation for first year written exams and oral exams, as well as for later teaching and research work.  
Open only to PhD Program in History students.
SyllabusModernEuropeGC

HIST 84900- First year Seminar in History
Thursdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 5 credits, Prof. Sarah Covington  

Room 6494
This course will continue the Seminar in Non-American History, sharpening and deepening students’ research projects and shaping them into a significant contribution to the students’ respective fields. Emphasis will be placed on students’ ability to describe their projects with clarity and precision; to work through and provide analysis of primary and secondary source material; to interpret and think imaginatively of those sources; to finesse a convincing historical argument and be able to defend it before others; and to hone one’s writing skills through the workshopping process. Equally important will be the expectation that students provide helpful feedback and learn to critique each others’ work and accept those critiques in turn. The research paper may or may not result in an article, though it should be of publishable quality and provide an essential scholarly reference point and learning tool as students move ahead to their dissertations. 
Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Covington-Research-Seminar
 
HIST 89900- Dissertation Seminar
Fridays, 11:45 am - 1:45 pm, 0 credits,  Prof. David Waldstreicher

Room 5114.01
This course is entirely devoted to students at the dissertation writing stage who would benefit from sharing some of their work with fellow students. We will spend the semester workshopping your dissertations-in-progress.  Each of you will present sections of your thesis to the group and comment on each other’s work. The goal is to create an atmosphere of friendly, constructive criticism that will benefit all students as they work to organize their material and develop their interpretations.
 Open only to Level 3 PhD Program in History students who have successfully defended their dissertation prospectus.
 
HIST 71600 - Modern Germany and the World
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Steven Remy

Room 3310A     
This course offers an intensive introduction to the history and current historiography of modern Germany. We will focus on how historians are now assessing the continuities, breaks, catastrophes, influence, and innovations in Germany from the late 19th Century to the present.
     The course is designed for students intending to specialize in this field and for those who wish to round out their engagement with modern European histories.  Adding “and the world” to the course title is more than window dressing. While much of the class will be devoted to nation-centered historiography, we will also pay close attention to recent scholarship on Germany in broader contexts. So we will consider – among other topics - Imperial Germany and globalization, the imperial presence in Africa and its legacies, Weimar as history and legend, the German Jewish diaspora, the global dimensions of Nazi ideology, warmaking, and empire building, the Holocaust in comparative perspective and an important recent challenge to the concept of genocide, and the post-World War II radical left and right in global contexts. There will be a strong emphasis on informed, regular in-class engagement with the reading assignments. As for a final paper, I will be flexible based on student needs: written and/or oral exam preparation or the substantial development of a research paper, journal article, or a thesis proposal are all options.
Modern-Germany-and-the-world-syllabus
 
HIST 72300 - Anti-Racism in Comparative-Historical Perspective
Tuesdays, 2:00-4:00 pm,  3 credits, Prof. John Torpey
Room 6114
This course addresses the changing meaning of “antiracism” from the founding of the United States to the present day.  We will explore the varying meanings of the idea of antiracism in the context of the times in which they were set.  Readings will range from commentary on the American Constitution to the arguments of today’s “neo-universalists” and may include the writings of Nikole Hannah-Jones, Frederick Douglass, W. E. B. Dubois, Ida Wells, James Baldwin, Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, the Report of the Kerner Commission, Bob Blauner, George Fredrickson, Kimberle’ Crenshaw, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Ibram X. Kendi, Robin DiAngelo, Adolph Reed, Toure’ Reed, Randall Kennedy, Rogers Brubaker, John McWhorter, Ian Haney-Lopez, Wesley Yang, Ruy Teixeira, and John Halpin.  Class discussion will be the heart of the course; students will be expected to do all the readings and be prepared to discuss them.
Syllabus-Anti-Racism-in-Historical-Perspective-(provisional)


HIST 72800- Twentieth Century American Foundations
Mondays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Kathleen McCarthy
Room 6494
This course is designed to teach students interested in Public History to do historically-based program reviews for institutional decision making, with a focus on grantmaking foundations. It will include scholarly and archival readings keyed to the students’ topics, discussions about their research, and presentations by foundation practioners to provide insights into how the big foundations work and the rationales behind their programs. The course requirement is a 10-15 page paper based on original research in the foundation collections at the Rockefeller Archive Center [RAC] in Pocantico, Hills, NY, which houses the historical records of the Rockefeller, Ford, Russell Sage, Henry Luce, William and Flora Hewlett, Near East and Markle Foundations, and the Commonwealth and Rockefeller Brothers Funds (among many other materials).  These materials cover a broad swath of U.S. and global history, from women’s, minority, and other social justice campaigns, to the colonial devolution; scientific, agricultural, and social science research; and public health, the arts and humanities in the United States and around the world.  Many of these collections have not previously been used, offering an important opportunity for original research. Information about the Archive Center’s holdings, including finding aids available at https://rockarch.org/Prospective students are strongly advised to consult the Archive Center’s online finding aids and to contact reference staff to ensure that the available manuscript collections are sufficiently rich for the topic they plan to study. They will also have an opportunity to apply for a limited number of grants to work with RAC staff  to disseminate their research findings to the general public through digital publishing and/or other RAC projects. Their papers may also be suitable for scholarly publications and presentations afterwards. Instructor permission is required to enroll in this course. 
Foundation-Syllabus-22-Final
 
HIST 74300 - Gendered Justice in Europe and the Americas c.1350- 1750
Wednesdays, 2:00-4:00 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Sara McDougall

Room 9205
The course will explore the role of gender in the prosecution and punishment of crime in social and cultural context in Europe and the Americas c.1350-1750. We will examine gender and justice as it intersected with race, religion, and status, as found in the Atlantic World, and particularly the French and Iberian metropoles and colonies. Our main body of evidence will be trial records, including litigation, witness testimony, confessions, and sentences. In addition we will engage with a range of other source materials such as law codes, prison records and the writings of incarcerated persons, newspaper reports, true crime narratives, and images of alleged criminals and crime. Training in these subjects welcome but not a requirement, this will be an interdisciplinary inquiry open to graduate and professional students in the humanities and social sciences and related fields
Gender-Justice-Syllabus

HIST 75000 – Democracy: America’s Other ‘Peculiar Institution’
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Andrew Robertson

Room 3307
     Alexis de Tocqueville frequently used the term particulier to describe American democracy in the 1830s.  Translated into English, that word can mean special, unique, or peculiar.  This course describes the ways in which American democracy became a “peculiar institution.”  Like slavery, democratic beliefs and practices in the United States adapted to the political and social context of the early republic and the antebellum era.  The first part of this course will consider the culture and practice of American democracy from the American Revolution to the Civil War.  The second part of this course will focus on nineteenth-century democracy from a transnational perspective, looking at democratic practices in Latin America and in Europe.  The last part of this course will consider U.S. democracy in the recent past and present, focusing finally on the long trajectory of American democracy, in its fits and starts and in its present peril.
 Democracy-Seminar-provisional-syllabus
 
HIST 75500 –  Migration Control and Migrant Agency: Mobility in U.S. History
Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Libby Garland

Room 6494
How and why has state power been deployed to control the mobility of people across and within the borders of the United States, from the early days of the nation’s existence through recent decades? In what ways have regimes of migration control been central to the projects of empire and nation-building? How has the policing of human mobility intersected with other forms of surveillance and control—for example of race, gender, sexuality, and labor? And when and how have people on the move challenged state efforts to control their mobility? Where do those challenges overlap with other forms of political struggle and movement building? How might these histories shape our understandings of the present moment? In this course, we will engage with the work of historians who explore such questions from a range of perspectives, including legal, political, and social History; border studies; and more. Through close reading, discussion, and a longer research project, students will have the opportunity to develop their own scholarly work around these and related issues as well.
Syllabus-Hist-75500-Garland_2 

HIST 78110: Palestine under the Mandate
Tuesdays, 6:30-8:30, 3 credits, Prof. Simon Davis
Room 3310A
This course examines how British imperial policy at the time of the First World War, and subsequently, pursued control over Palestine, proceeding to consequent transformations for Palestine's peoples. How relationships evolved with Zionism and with new Arab Palestinian political and social forces will be crucial to examining successive crises culminating in 1948. Particular themes will be explored through analytical discussions of assigned historiographic materials, chiefly recent primary research-based journal literature.
GC-Palestine-Course-Syllabus
 
HIST 78400 - The Scientific Revolution: Copernicus to Newton, 1450-1700
Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Joseph Dauben
Room 5212
This course is designed to survey the rise of modern science from Copernicus to Newton, the period of intellectual ferment in the 16th and 17th centuries referred to as the Scientific Revolution. In addition to charting the advance of astronomy and physics through the works of Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, Descartes, Boyle, Newton and Leibniz, among others, the revolution in biology associated with such figures as Vesalius and Harvey will also be considered, along with related questions in the history of botany, medicine, and iatrochemistry. The emphasis in this course will be upon texts, a careful reading of the original scientific classics, along with diaries and letters where they survive, in order to evaluate as much as possible from primary sources the most important factors that motivated and inspired the creators of modern science. In assessing the social role the new science played, the disturbingly unfamiliar world in which philosophical, religious, and even political principles were called into question will also be examined. We will also consider the major factors that contributed to the Scientific Revolution in the European West as they relate to considering the Needham Question: namely why a comparable scientific revolution never happened in China, which by all accounts prior to the Scientific Revolution had achieved an equal if not superior understanding of nature through a wide range of scientific discoveries and technological innovations. Such comparative analysis will serve to highlight the crucial factors that contributed to the emergence of a new kind of scientific activity in the West, including methodological innovations, due to a variety of social, political, economic, and other factors that contributed to the success of the Scientific Revolution.

REQUIRED HISTORY COURSES

HIST   84900       First-year Seminar in History         
5 credits, Thursdays 2 PM - 4 PM, Professor Thomas Kessner
 
Hybrid
This seminar is designed to train incoming graduate students in the craft of historical research and writing. Over the course of the term, each student will formulate a research topic, prepare a bibliography of relevant primary and secondary sources, write an historiographic essay, and present and defend a formal project proposal for the substantial research paper that is to be completed in the second semester seminar. Weekly meetings will discuss common readings, share and critique written work, and develop and refine the research proposals.  We will also be devoting some time to methods and issues involved in undergraduate teaching. Students will focus primarily on framing a topic and honing a well defined, focused and reasonable research proposal for their papers. The purpose of the collateral assignments is to help push this process forward. Students are advised to give some thought to possible research projects before classes begin this way they can make some early efforts at sampling secondary materials and investigating the availability of sources.
Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus: Kessner-Seminar-Fall-Syllabus

HIST   80020       Literature of European History l
5 credits, Mondays 4:15 – 6:15 PM, Professor Helena Rosenblatt
Hybrid

This course provides an introduction to the literature of European history from the Late Middle Ages through the eighteenth century.  It explores different conceptual frameworks and methodological approaches to the period and examines an assortment of classic and recent works on a variety of topics: religion and the state; science, technology, and medicine; economy and society; gender and sexuality; and ideas and mentalities.  The course prepares students for the end-of-semester comprehensive examination and for further study of early modern Europe.
Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus: Rosenblatt-Lit-Survey-I-2021
 
HIST   80010       Literature of American History l
5 credits, , Fridays 11:45 AM - 1:45 PM, Professor David Waldstreicher
In-person

This course introduces Ph.D. students to the historiography of the U.S. through the Civil War and is intended to prepare students for the First Written Examination. One of our primary concerns will be periodization. To what extent should the colonial period be considered a prologue to U.S. history? And on the other side of the nationhood divide, are there analyses that suggest a coherence or continuity to U.S. history beyond the peculiarities of the early republic or Civil War periods? What is the status of the Revolution and the Civil War, and the political history that drives or used to drive the narrative of U.S. history, amid transformations that might otherwise be seen as social, cultural, economic? Are there explanations that that cut across centuries, or stories that hold up in our time?  What are the most important achievements of recent US historians, and what are the trends in the field now?
The books and articles we shall discuss include prizewinning narratives, monographs born as dissertations, and historiographical essays. An important part of what we will be doing is attempting to read these in light of each other. Be forewarned: the reading is extensive, in recognition of the five credits this course carries and its status as required preparation for qualifying examinations. Our goal is to prepare for the exam, of course, but also to prepare to teach this period at the college level and to lay a substantial foundation for future research and teaching in any period of U.S. history.
Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus: Hist-80010-Fall-2021-final_1

ELECTIVE HISTORY COURSES

 
HIST 70900         Mass Violence in Modern Europe
3 credits, Mondays 2 PM - 4 PM Professor Elissa Bemporad
Hybrid

This course explores instances of unprecedented mass violence in modern Europe during the twentieth century. It is based on several case studies, including events in German South-West Africa, Germany, Ukraine, the Soviet Union, and Chechnya. By analyzing some of the most recent scholarship on genocide and ethnic cleansing, the course examines the short-term and long-term causes for mass violence, assessing the extent to which, in different contexts, it resulted from political ideologies, colonialism, bureaucratic pressures, or ethnic and religious hatred. The course will also focus on the repercussions of mass violence, including acts of revenge, changes in international law and human rights, and attempts to create sites of memory in those places where atrocities were committed. Finally, this course aims at tracing how such unprecedented violence against civilians was experienced by ordinary citizens of European countries, and how it transformed and affected their everyday lives, political choices, and social attitudes during and after the events.   
Syllabus-MassViolenceGC 

 
HIST  71500        Revolution as Civil War, Revolution as War of Independence: Generations and Memory [in France] since 1789
3 credits, Wednesdays 4:15 PM - 6:15 PM Professor David Troyansky
Hybrid

Historians have long characterized the French Revolution as a civil war (revolution/counterrevolution), and historians of the Atlantic world have also employed that term; meanwhile, a famous article by Pierre Serna has made the point that “all revolutions are wars of independence.”  That idea can be applied to the French themselves but also evokes a more global context, including that of decolonization in the Caribbean.  This course will begin with those overarching ways of describing the French Revolution and examine their usefulness in regional, national, and international contexts.  It will also highlight themes of generation and memory in the transition to the post-Revolutionary era and beyond.  The first part of the course will focus on the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries and develop those themes as conceptual tools to be applied, in the middle part, to a succession of moments of fracture and revolution in the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first centuries (possibly including 1848, 1871, Vichy, Algeria, 1968, or recent debates over race and multiculturalism in France).  The final part will provide an opportunity for students to apply the conceptual tools developed in the course to their own areas of research.  Written work will include historiographical papers and a research paper.
GC-French-Revolution-Fall-2021
 
HIST 72200         LGBTQ+ Public History and Memory      
3 credits, Wednesdays 2 PM - 4 PM, Professor Anne Valk
Hybrid

This course introduces the practice of public history and its intellectual foundations, with a specific focus on representations of the LGBTQ+ past. Through our readings, class discussions, and assignments, we will examine how scholars, documentarians, activists, and other public historians have preserved, interpreted and presented LGBTQ+ history. By examining case studies and select projects, we will discuss how theory plays out in practice and in a variety of arenas in which historians engage with historical sites and subjects, material objects, and publics.  Our investigation of LGBTQ+ public history will encompass museums and historic sites; archives and oral history collections; films, podcasts, and digital displays; memorials; and history-based performances and public programs.  The class aims to immerse students in a variety of methods used to collect and memorialize LGBTQ+ history and educate the public. In addition, we will discuss many questions relevant to the larger public history endeavor including: How does society decide what’s worth remembering and saving? What is the relationship between public history and the historical discipline? Between history and memory? How do politics -- personal, professional, collective -- shape the work of public historians? What roles have activists, amateurs and those acting outside of historical institutions (and often in opposition to them) played in public history? And what is the impact of this work and how can it be assessed?  In addition to readings, book reviews, and discussions, students will complete a final research project which can take the form of a traditional paper, a collaboration with a public history organization, or a publicly-accessible digital exhibit or display.
LGBTQ-public-history-course-resources-(1)
 
HIST 74900         Topics in U.S. Legal History        
3 credits, Mondays 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM, Professor Anne Kornhauser
​Online (changed on 8/17/21)

This seminar seeks to understand the role of law in American life and the social, cultural, and political meaning of law in U.S. history. To that end, the course surveys some of the key topics in U.S. legal history, from the early republic to the present. We will dissect historiographical debates, but we will also incorporate primary sources, including legal treatises, judicial opinions, and legal lives. The aim of the primary sources is to facilitate students’ understanding of various historical methods for interpreting legal sources and to demystify and denaturalize them. Methodologically, the course will cover socio-legal approaches to legal history, critical textual analysis, and political understandings of law. Among the broad questions we will ask are: How does law affect people’s lives and how do people affect the law? How do we locate those effects? What tools have historical actors and historians used to interpret the law? Does law exist separately from other large forces that determine relations of power and possibilities for action? Specific topics include: the making of the American common law regime, slave law, law and economic development, race and the constitutional imagination, the 20th-century rights revolution, and the concept of privacy.

 
HIST 72500         Race and the Middle East/North Africa
3 credits, Thursdays 2 PM - 4 PM, Professors Beth Baron, Kristina Richardson and Mandana Limbert 
In-person
This seminar explores how notions of race (jins or `unsur and similar terms in Turkish, Persian, and other Middle Eastern languages) have been examined, experienced, and deployed in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). In particular, and in dialogue with scholarship on the United States, the Americas, and the Atlantic, the course addresses practices, policies, and beliefs of hierarchy and power, “blood,” biology, and marriage, appearance and regulation, exclusion and inclusion. Rather than presuming either the stability of the notion of “race” or its “irrelevance” (as it is often argued) for the MENA region, this seminar highlights the specific, differing, and changing ways that race has been understood, used, and reproduced in the Middle East and North Africa; among Middle Easterners and North Africans in Sub-Saharan Africa; in confrontations and conversations with Europeans; and among diaspora populations in the United States.
Syllabus-Race-in-the-Middle-East-and-North-Africa

HIST 72600          Comparing Pandemics
3 credits, Wednesdays 2 PM - 4 PM, Professor John Torpey
In-person

This course examines epidemic diseases and their social consequences across historical time and geographic space.  We will focus primarily on the Black Death of the mid-fourteenth century, smallpox and its role in the conquest of the Americas, the “Spanish” flu pandemic of 1918-1919, and the coronavirus pandemic of 2020-2021(?).  We will seek to understand how different societies were affected by these plagues, how they responded to them, and the consequences of these public health and social crises for the societies in question.
Comparing-Pademics-Syllabus
 
HIST 75200         Civil War as Social History
3 credits, Tuesdays 2 PM - 4 PM, Professor James Oakes
In-person

The American Civil War was a military and political conflict.  It has an economic history, an intellectual history, and a broader cultural history.  But some of the most important scholarship in recent years has recovered the Civil War as social history.  This seminar surveys some of that recent literature, notably the history of women but also common soldiers and poor whites.  Themes will include violence, gender, and class conflict.  Toward the end we will consider what is gained and what is lost from a focus on the Civil War as social history.
Fall-2021-The-Civil-War-as-Social-History
 
HIST 75900         The Black Freedom Movement
3 credits, Thursdays 11:45 AM - 1:45 PM, Professor Robyn Spencer
​Online

The emergence of the movement for Black Lives has moved racial justice in America to center stage and resulted in wide scale re-examination of the impact and legacy of the Black freedom movement of the post WWII period. This course will examine the major campaigns, personalities, organizations and guiding themes of the civil rights and Black Power movement.  In particular, we will analyze the major historical interpretive debates about the Civil Rights/Black Power movements and place the movements in the broader context of Cuban independence, the Cold War, the US war in Vietnam and African liberation movements. A close examination of the intersections between the Black freedom movement and the new left, women’s movement, and anti-war movement will broaden how the movement is traditionally conceptualized and foreground the movement’s anti-capitalist, anti-patriarchal and anti-imperial engagements. We will also examine the afterlives and historical memory of these movements and how they continue to animate the contemporary political landscape.
 
HIST 76000          The African Diaspora     
3 credits, Tuesdays 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM, Professor Herman Bennett
In-person

            By employing the heuristic concept of diaspora—and specifically the African diaspora—this course focuses on the analytical work generated by studying cultures of movement.  As scholars, we might begin by asking whether diaspora complicates our understanding of disciplinary formations—including the normative assumptions that inform the study of society and culture.  How does diaspora, for instance, enhance our perspectives on imperial, colonial, national and post-colonial formations and the ways in which they have been historically represented?  In utilizing the prism of diaspora we confront the politics of representation through which scholars render meaning out of the past and present.  For this reason, diaspora like other categories of analysis engages the vexed terrain of representation whereby scholars frame the subject of their inquiries.          
            Diaspora brings into relief many of the principle categories and themes informing the social and human sciences.  It de-naturalizes many of the foundational assumptions on which contemporary social theory rests.  For this reason, we will route our conversations and readings through some of the central concepts defining social theory (state, nation, society, sovereignty, difference, stratification, race, ethnicity, religion, and culture) so as to discern how diaspora might trouble existing forms of knowledge bequeathed to us by the Renaissance, Enlightenment and Modern Era. 
            On a practical professional level, the course serves as a graduate-level introduction to diasporas in general but the African diaspora in particular.  Scholarship on this subject along with its development over time and in distinct settings (the United States, Latin America and the Caribbean, Sub-Saharan Africa, England and Continental Europe) introduces us to the historical profession and professionalism.  For this reason, we will devote significant time focusing and discussing how various scholars have framed and approached their scholarly projects.  Since the African diaspora as a field of study constitutes a relatively novel endeavor, most of the readings draw on works from the last few decades.  While this conveys a sense of where the field is presently at it also serves to delineate how the African diaspora draws and builds on early forms of inquiry (polity formation and the history of empire, the history of slavery and freedom, the history of racial formation, the history of colonialism, the study of trans-nationalism, etc.)  Over the semester we will constantly need to ask what defines an inquiry, an approach or a perspective as diasporic in scope.  In doing so, we will necessarily focus on an earlier body of scholarship that was associated with different fields of inquiry (slavery, race relations, African Studies, Latin American & Caribbean history, the study of religion, English Cultural Studies, etc.).
The-African-Diaspora-Fall-2021

 
HIST 76900          The Comparative Histories of Slavery in the Americas
3 credits, Thursdays 4:15 PM - 6:15 PM, Professor Laird Bergad
​Online

This course will examine some of the main themes found in the vast historiography on Latin American and Caribbean slavery in comparative perspective with slave systems in the United States.  Comparative patterns of race relations will also be considered. Readings have been selected from some, not all, of the principal scholars who have worked on the theme of slavery; and they are reflective of topics that have been the subject of recent research and debate.
                The most exhaustive bibliographical guide to works on slavery is Joseph C. Miller, Slavery and Slaving in World History:  A Bibliography, 1900 - 1991 (Millwood, New York:  Kraus International Publications, 1993). This has been updated as Slavery and Slaving in World History: A Bibliography - Vol 2, 1992-96 (Armonk NY: M. E. Sharpe, 1999). More importantly a searchable web site has been developed by Miller and other collaborators at the following internet address: http://www2.vcdh.virginia.edu/bib/index.php. Also see Seymour Drescher and Stanley L. Engerman, eds. A Historical Guide to World Slavery (New York: Oxford University Press, 1998). There are many synthetic surveys on slavery and the slave trade to Latin America and the Caribbean that you may use for general reference. It is recommended that you read, or become familiar with, Herbert S. Klein and Ben Vinson III, African Slavery in Latin America and the Caribbean  (second edition) (New York: Oxford University Press, 2007) and Klein’s survey of the slave trade, Herbert S. Klein, The Atlantic Slave Trade  (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1999).  Robin Blackburn’s book is also recommended: The American Crucible: Slavery, Emancipation, and Human Rights (London: Verso, 2011), as well as Seymour Drescher, Abolition: A History of Slavery and Antislavery (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2009). An expansive survey which transcends slavery, and which focuses only upon the 19th and 20th centuries is George Reid Andrews, Afro-Latin America, 1800-2000 (New York: Oxford University Press, 2004).
                Latin American and Caribbean slavery is best understood in comparative perspective, which is one of the objectives of this course.  The literature on U.S. slavery is enormous.  There are several survey histories that I recommend which summarize much research. These are: Ira Berlin, Many Thousands Gone:  The First Two Centuries of Slavery in North America (Cambridge, MA.: Harvard University Press, 1998); Ira Berlin, Generations of Captivity: A History of African-American Slaves (Cambridge MA: Belknap Press, 2003); Peter Kolchin, American Slavery, 1619-1877 (New York: Hill and Wang, 2003); Robert William Fogel, Without Consent or Contract: The Rise and Fall of American Slavery (New York:  W.W. Norton, 1989); and David Brion Davis, Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and Fall of Slavery in the New World (New York: Oxford University Press, 2006).​
 

MES 73000/ HIST 78110          History of the Modern Middle East
3 credits, Thursdays 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM, Professor Dina Legall
This course introduces students to major dynamics and issues in the history of the Middle East in the past two centuries and seeks to nurture critical historical thinking about the region. We will touch on a wide range of topics, from different forms of colonial intervention, to modernizing reforms and reforming elites, the move from empire to a new state order, the politics and culture of nationalism, post-colonial states and authoritarian regimes, Islamist mobilization, and recent neo-liberal politics. Proceeding in a roughly chronological order, we will weave thematic discussions related to women and gender, environmental history, urban history, history of consumption, etc. into that framework. All along, a central arching theme of the course will be modernity: what shape it took at different times and places, how it was perceived and experienced, what challenges and tensions it engendered, who were the beneficiaries and losers.
 Class discussions will be guided by reading questions handed out in advance, one of which students will answer in writing before class. For example: To what extent was Ottoman reform founded upon emulation of the West? How was WWI a watershed in ME political culture? How were women and gender deployed in nationalist and modernizing projects of the inter-war period? What best explains the resilience of ME post-colonial authoritarian regimes? What has given Islamist movements (of different kinds) their purchase? Has globalization been primarily destabilizing in the ME and why? The final assignment for the course is a 6-8 pages argument-based analytical essay.
Syllabus - History-of-Modern-ME,-Syllabus
 
HIST 78500         Case Histories: patient and physician narratives of self and disease 
3 credits, Wednesdays 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM, Professor Allison Kavey
Online

    Disease is the great equalizer.  We will all be patients eventually.  But who are we to the physicians who encounter our pathological selves, who are we to ourselves, and who are doctors under those white coats?  This class endeavors to use disease as a common ground to discuss case histories as autobiographical and biographical tools.  We will read physician memoirs to better understand how they imagine themselves as people and professionals, and how they relate to their oddly narrative art--the act of writing is embedded in medical practice through case notes.  We will read patient memoirs and think about the nature of pain, the ways in which disease shapes us and how we resist its warping, and think about the person behind the case histories.  In short, this is a course that looks through both sides of the patient-physician mirror to try to grasp some very human truths.       
Syllabus: case-histories-fall-2021

 

SEE ALSO  

 
 
ASCP 81000: Intellectuals and Intelligence: Spies, Secrets, and Surveillance in the University, Tuesdays, 4:15pm-6:15pm, 3 credits. Professor Lucia Trimbur
Hybrid
 
While the American university is often imagined as an independent and apolitical establishment, devoid of connections to and demands from other social institutions, academia has, in fact, been a primary site of ideological struggle through collaboration with outside agencies, most notably intelligence. In the discipline of anthropology, the history of ethnographic research, colonial administration, and surveillance is well rehearsed. The same relationships in the humanities and other humanistically-grounded social sciences are less known. Intellectuals and Intelligence attempts to better understand how and when academic disciplines have been contiguous or aligned with intelligence communities.   
First, we look at the origins of American studies in the 1940s and 1950s, examining the ideological work this newly-formed area of study performed during the Cold War. Second, we use methods and theories from American studies to analyze the connections among intelligence bureaus and English, psychology, sociology, area studies, and political science. Topics include explicit engagement such as the Frankfurt School and the OSS, recruitment in the Ivy League, anti-communist propaganda and loyalty oaths, counterinsurgency during liberation movements, torture during the “War on Terror,” and the Human Terrain Program as well as sites of complicity such as cultural exchange, clandestine support for journals and conferences, and federal grant funding.   
Works likely to be addressed include Frances Stonor Saunders's The Cultural Cold War: The CIA and the World of Arts and Letters, Robin Winks's Cloak and Gown: Scholars in the Secret War 1939-1961, “The CIA Reads Foucault” by Gabriel Rockhill, The Cold War and the University: Towards an Intellectual History of the Postwar Years edited by Noam Chomsky, and Rebecca Lowen’s Creating the Cold War university: The Transformation of S
 

MSCP 70500 Intro to Medieval Studies
3 credits, Mondays 4:15 PM - 6:15 PM, Professor Nicole Lopez-Jantzen

This course provides an introduction to medieval culture and society, from the fifth to the fourteenth centuries, as well as an introduction to the discipline of Medieval Studies. The course will be interdisciplinary in nature, drawing on approaches from history, literature, art history, and gender studies to explore both scholarly analysis and also the material and textual sources of medieval Europe. We will focus on how scholars have defined the Middle Ages, both temporally and geographically, major people and events in the Middle Ages, as well as emerging fields in medieval studies, such as the study of race. Topics include the end of antiquity, conquest and colonization, and the interaction of Muslims, Christians, and Jews in the Middle Ages.


IDS 81620 Scholarly Praxis at Work in the World
3 credits, TBD, Instructor: Dr. Stacy Hartman, Director of the PublicsLab
This course is intended for students who wish to do an internship for academic credit. In addition to their internship, students will meet every other week as a group with Dr. Hartman to consider the connections between their internship experiences and their academic work, as well as how knowledge production and dissemination function outside the academy. Open to both doctoral and master's students. If interested, please write to Dr. Stacy Hartman - shartman2@gc.cuny.edu

ENGL 89000  Mining the Archives, Reinterpreting the Past. 
4 Credits, Wednesdays 2:00PM – 4:00PM, Professor David Reynolds
(Please note: History students must register for the 4 credit option)
​Online

During the past two decades, a revolution has occurred in scholarship: troves of archival materials that were once very hard to access and search have been digitized and put online. Rare books; entire runs of newspapers; obscure pamphlets; letters; manuscripts; images—these are some of the rich resources that are now universally available and instantly searchable. The implications for the study of literature, popular culture, history, and biography are immense. With the help of now-available archives, previously unnoticed dimensions of past cultures can be explored. Famous figures or writings of the past can be placed in fresh contexts, and new ones can be unearthed. And it’s not only primary research that has profited from digitalization: so has secondary research. An ever-increasing number of scholarly journals and books are online. This surfeit of online material, however, brings new challenges. How does one sort through the apparently endless digitized archives? How do we take notes without accumulating masses of mere trivia? Most importantly, what are the most effective strategies for using archival research as the basis for writing original essays or book-length monographs? How do we move from the raw material of the archive to the publishable article or book? This course addresses such issues. Students from any field or period concentration will have the opportunity to explore online archives that are especially interesting to them and relevant to their work. If Covid permits, each student will also visit at least one physical archive in order get hands-on exposure to works of interest and to seek out material that has not been digitized. Class readings include articles or book chapters about archival research. Students will periodically report to the class about their progress in the archives and will write a term paper based on their research.

Hist. 80020- Literature Survey in European History
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 5 credits, Prof. Andreas Killen

      This course provides an introduction to the major themes and historiographic debates in the field of modern European history from the 18th century to the present. We will study a range of literature, from works of classic historiography to innovative recent studies; themes will range from state building and imperialism to war and genocide to culture and sexuality. Completing the course will give students a solid grounding in the literature of modern Europe, which will serve as a basis for preparation for oral exams as well as for later teaching and research work.
Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus
 
Hist. 80010- Literature Survey in American History
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm,  5 credits, Prof. Tanisha Ford

     This is a reading-intensive course designed to introduce students to major themes, questions, and historiographical debates in U.S. history—from the end of the Civil War to the late twentieth century. One of the main course objectives is to prepare students for the departmental written exam at semester’s end. Additionally, the course will provide a foundation for students who will teach their own U.S. history courses and expose students to (sub)field-specific methods, modes of inquiry, and bibliographies that will aid in future research. A 5-credit course, Literature Survey is demanding and will require your full commitment and participation. Each week, students will read the equivalent of two book-length monographs and will be expected to actively engage with one another about the books’ core arguments, interventions, contributions to the field, use of source material, periodization, and so forth. Spirited, collegial debate is encouraged. In addition to the departmental exam, assignments will include weekly response papers, short literature reviews, and oral presentations. These assignments will serve as useful study aids as students prepare for the rigorous written exam. The course is organized chronologically as well as thematically and will explore topics/eras ranging from Reconstruction, (im)migration, and American capitalism to the interwar period, social movements, and the rise of the carceral state—by scholars of social, cultural, labor, gender, African American, and sexuality history. Attendance at each class session is mandatory. All students will be expected to participate fully and thoughtfully in class discussions.​​
Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus
 
Hist. TBD - Literature Survey in Modern Latin America History
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 5 credits, Professor Herman Bennett

In recent years, some Latin Americanists have questioned the hermeneutics defining the field of colonial Latin American History.  The colonial designation some feel posits a disjuncture (or beginning) when it could be argued that continuity characterized the historical narrative.  While students of ideas, political practice, and the cultural domain have been the strongest proponents of this intervention, scholars of indigenous cultures—especially the Nahua Studies groups—share similar sentiments despite differences in scope and method.  Consequently, scholars have been utilizing terms like ‘early’ and ‘early modern’ Latin America to distinguish their work from a colonial project and its association with the rupture that Spanish hegemony allegedly implied.  Concurrently, a self-conscious collection of scholars identified as the Latin American subaltern studies group have called into question the elitist hegemony shaping the structure and content of Latin American history.  Scholars of the Latin American subaltern along with those who take issue with the occidental reasoning informing how Latin America history is currently conceived are introducing new terminology (subaltern, postcolonial, Afro-Latin American) that allegedly re-frames the Latin American past and present.  In our semester’s work, we shall explore the meanings and implications, if any, that this and other discursive shifts have had on Latin American historiography.  Even as this seminar attends to shifts in meaning and context, we will engage the substance of the existing historiography.
            This second part of a year-long course is specifically designed as an introduction to Modern Latin American History.  It is designed to prepare History graduate students for the second major field exams in Latin American history.  Courses, despite their prominence in structuring graduate programs, merely introduce students to some of the overarching historiographic and conceptual themes defining a field.  To this end, a course identifies some areas of inquiry but in doing so obscures others. Please read the full description here. Open only to PhD Program in History students.

Hist. 84900- First year Seminar in History
Tuesdays, 11:45 am - 1:45 pm, 5 credits, Prof. Thomas Kessner

There are two essential responsibilities for the seminar: the preparation of the research paper and fully engaged participation in the discussions and critiques of work submitted by other participants. The objective of this Seminar is for students to expand and refine their skills in research and historical writing by carrying out the research project they proposed in the Fall semester. The required article length historical research paper must be a piece of original work on history, substantially based on primary sources. It should engage a clearly defined historiographical problem, be well written, effectively organized and cogently argued. In class, we will workshop in-progress drafts and discuss research methods and writing strategies.  Students will also review and critique the works in progress submitted by their colleagues. Note: Students who took either Professor Francesca Bregoli’s or Professor Andrew Roberston’s First Year Seminar in Fall 2020 should register for this course.
Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus

Hist. 84900- Advanced Research Seminar 
Tuesdays, 9:45 am -11:45 am, 5 credits, Prof. Herman Bennett

     “Research Seminars,” according to the Ph.D. Program in History’s Student Handbook “are courses in which students produce a substantial paper based on primary sources, and also demonstrate familiarity with the historiography of the field.  Every student must produce three research papers as part of their required coursework.  Two of the three research papers must be on different subjects.” (Ph.D Program in History, Student Handbook).
     The Spring 2021 Advanced Research Seminar is designed for students writing either their second or third research paper.  The second paper replicates the form, but not the content, of the first-year project; it should be research-based and engaged with the relevant historiographies.  The third, and finally paper requirement, which the Student Handbook delineates as “a preliminary investigation into the student’s dissertation” should “result in an extended dissertation proposal that is already based on some primary research.” (Ph.D Program in History, Student Handbook) 
      In short, your work in this course is write a seminar paper based on primary sources which also demonstrates an engagement with the relevant historiographies and conceptual literatures.  The focus of the participants in this course will vary.  Participants writing a second research paper will be advancing their research, analytical, and writing skills.  Individuals working on their third paper should, ideally, be advancing toward a dissertation project.  For this reason, the seminar has been structured to maximize your autonomy while offering some insight as to how individual scholars approach the writing of History, enter the archives, and think through their relationship to knowledge production and social theory.  As the course instructor, I will also structure some time for us to discuss frankly the process and craft of writing.  To that end, a few of our sessions will be curated by professional writers, editors and our colleagues.
​Open only to PhD Program in History students.
 
Hist. 89900- Dissertation Seminar
Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 0 credits,  Prof. Dagmar Herzog

This course is entirely devoted to students at the dissertation writing stage who would benefit from sharing some of their work with fellow students. The goal is to create an atmosphere of friendly, constructive criticism that will benefit all students as they work to organize their material and develop their interpretations.
Open only to Level 3 PhD Program in History students.
 
Hist. 70330 -  The Rise and Fall of a Republic: Rome and its Afterlife
Thursdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, 3 credits, Prof. Liv Yarrow

The evolution of Rome’s republican constitution and the demise of that constitution has come under intense scrutiny from the late second century BCE to the present day.  Even as the republican constitution showed signs of stress contemporary Romans speculated on what lessons could be learned from studying its foundation and growth.  Today, scholars from many disciplines and popular journalists use Rome’s struggles as a metaphor for contemporary events.  The same has happened at many earlier historical moments including the French revolution, the Haitian revolution, Cromwell’s commonwealth, and more.  This seminar provides a foundational understanding of the rise and fall of Roman republican constitution (in the broadest socio-cultural definition of that term) as reconstructed by leading ancient historians today and an exploration of the reception and historiography of the Roman republic in its own day and later historical periods.  Participants will be strongly encouraged to develop projects related to their own period(s) of interest and draw on prior academic and lived experiences.  No prior knowledge of the ancient world is required.  The instructor particularly welcomes those interested in the expression of political ideologies through visual media and the arts.
Syllabus
 
Hist. 70900- Sex and Society in Postwar Europe, 1945-1989
Wednesdays, 2-4 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Julia Sneeringer

Students will explore in detail moments in the social history of postwar Europe, East and West, using sex and gender as key categories of analysis.  We will explore how the story of Europe changes when sex and gender are the focus, re-examining such phenomena as postwar reconstruction, the Economic Miracle, building the socialist personality, consumer culture, the rise of youth culture, queer subcultures, second wave feminism, 1968, terrorism, decolonization, migration and multiculturalism, and the revolutions of 1989.
Syllabus

Hist. 72400- Nietzsche for Fun and Prophet
Mondays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Richard Wolin

In Ecce Homo, Nietzsche – never paralyzed by excessive self-modesty – exulted, “I am no man, I am dynamite.” He described his books as “assassination attempts,” rather than literary works, and he felicitously characterized his intellectual method as “philosophizing with a hammer.” Nietzsche joyfully prophesied the advent of “Great Politics,” which, in his eyes, meant “upheavals, a convulsion of earthquakes, a moving of mountains and valleys . . . as well as wars the like of which have never yet been seen on Earth.”
Nietzsche was, unaccountably, the “court philosopher” of the Third Reich as well as the intellectual progenitor of French poststructuralism (Foucault, Derrida, etc.). In interrogating Nietzsche’s legacy, our central question will be: how did it come to pass that generations of intellectuals felt obligated to define themselves and to plot their course forward through a confrontation with Nietzsche’s work?
In order to better understand Nietzsche and his titanic philosophical influence, our seminar will be divided into two parts. In the first half of the course, we will read and assess major texts by Nietzsche: The Birth of Tragedy, the Will to Power, Twilight of the idols, and the Antichrist. In the second half, we will focus on the major stages in the European and American reception of Nietzsche’s work: the political reception of Nietzsche in Germany, the deconstructionist reading of Nietzsche (Deleuze, Derrida, Foucault), the aesthetic interpretation of Nietzsche, and finally, recent Anglo-American studies reassessing Nietzsche’s attitude toward Darwinism.
Syllabus

Hist. 72600 - Policing and Police Forces in Transnational Contexts, 1750- present
Thursdays, 11:45 am - 1:45 pm,  3 credits, Prof. Mark Lewis

     This course is an introductory historiographical survey of the history of police and policing, examining both the advent of functionally and legally distinct police forces and concepts of social coercion, monitoring, and arrest/detention during the modern historical period. The course will examine the history of police on several different continents (Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe) but cannot comprehensively cover everything. Rather, the course will be structured thematically: sociological theories about policing; historical explanations about the development of policing from the 18th to 20th centuries; 19th century policing under the influence of the development of statistics and new penal theories about the nature of criminality (including racial theories); colonial policing in Africa and Asia; policing and gender (particularly concerning prostitution and abortion); policing immigration; the development of political police (both imperial and national); and the reasons why political police committed mass murder and torture.
     The history of policing has grown more transnational and comparative in recent decades, though there are many lacunae and still a tendency to view the world as “the West and the Rest.” Nevertheless, the course aims to assist students in investigations that fit their fields, or direct them to resources that may help them. Students will write weekly critical responses to readings, give presentations, and write a historiographical or research paper on a topic of their choice.
Syllabus

Hist. 74300 - 20th Century Lives on the Road to Peace and Freedom
Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Blanche Wiesen Cook

This biography/memoir seminar will explore the work of writers, visionaries, activists whose contributions we most need now.  This is a participatory class, which will emphasize student interests and enthusiasms.  Below is an introductory list, from which weekly readings and volumes for individual review may be drawn.  Students are encouraged to suggest additional and alternative readings.  Requirements:  Each student will be responsible for an introductory essay-memoir, five book reports a final research paper.
Book list here.


Hist. 72800- Twentieth Century American Foundations
Mondays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Kathleen McCarthy
Instructor permission is required to enroll in this course. Please write to KMcCarthy@gc.cuny.edu with a cc to mweber@gc.cuny.edu

This course is designed to teach students interested in Public History to do historically-based program reviews for institutional decision making, with a focus on grantmaking foundations. It will include scholarly and archival readings keyed to the students’ topics, discussions about their research, and presentations by former (and possibly current) foundation officers and program officers to provide insights into how large foundations work and the rationales behind their programs.
  The course requirement is a 25-page paper based on original research in the foundation collections at the Rockefeller Archive Center [RAC] in Pocantico, Hills, NY, which houses the historical records of the Rockefeller, Ford, Russell Sage, Henry Luce, William and Flora Hewlett, Near East and Markle Foundations, and the Commonwealth and Rockefeller Brothers Funds (among many other materials).  These materials cover a broad swath of U.S. and global history, from women’s, minority, and LGBTQ social justice campaigns, to the colonial devolution; scientific, agricultural, and social science research; and the arts and humanities in the United States and around the world.  Many of these collections have not previously been used, offering an important opportunity for original research. Information about the RAC’s holdings, including finding aids are available at https://rockarch.org.   Prospective students are strongly advised to consult the RAC’s collections to ensure that they are sufficiently rich for the topic they plan to study.
Syllabus
 
Hist. 75000 - Religions and Enlightenments in Early America
Mondays, 11:45 am - 1:45pm,  3 credits, Prof. John Dixon

                This course introduces students to newer scholarship on early American religion and the Enlightenment. It asks how recent historiography and a post-secular turn in the interdisciplinary study of religion are reshaping the meaning and relationship of what is religious and what is secular. How do historians currently define and examine religion and the Enlightenment? How did religion, the Enlightenment, evangelicalism, science, and skepticism intersect in early America? And, perhaps most fundamentally, what role should these themes play in survey histories of the United States now that grand narratives of secularization and modernization have lost their sway? 
    ​The readings for this course emphasize religious diversity, mix popular and elite culture, and span the colonial, Revolutionary, and early nation periods. In addition to raising large interpretive questions about the place of religion and secularism in early American history, the course addresses a number of more specific social, cultural, and intellectual topics, including alchemy, happiness, polygamy, death, slave conversion, electricity, and heresy. Students will write a substantial historiographical or research paper on a topic of their choice.
Syllabus

Hist. 77100 – The Latin American Cold War
Mondays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Mila Burns

This course provides an overview of the history of the Cold War in Latin America. It investigates the role of the United States and the Soviet Union in the shaping of democracies and dictatorships in the region. However, it proposes a new interpretation of the scope of such influence, focusing on local politics and regional power disputes. The military, activists, exiles, rural workers, diplomats, businesspeople, and artists are all actors of a period marked by revolutions, violence, and economic crisis. This seminar incorporates debates of gender, arts, and politics, featuring multiple methodological and geographical approaches. The course is relevant not only to students whose primary field of study is Latin America but also to those who can benefit from the comparative analysis. The final project will be a paper on a topic chosen by the student and discussed with the professor. Students are expected to lead discussions and write short comments about the readings.
Syllabus

HIST 78110 section 1 - Muslims, Tolerance, and Religious Pluralism
Monday, 6:30-8:30,  3 credits, Prof. Anna Akasoy
This course takes as its starting point and key interest the discursive function of tolerance as a fundamental value of modernity and explores a variety of ways in which debates about tolerance in western European discourse are related to Muslims. While Muslim societies, especially the Ottoman Empire, served as an example of tolerance to early modern western European observers, a prominent western European discourse now contrasts tolerance and Islam. The degree to which societies, especially Muslim-majority societies, are deemed compatible with modernity is often measured in terms of their tolerance, in particular as manifested in religious pluralism. Conversely, cases of public violence are regularly described as intolerance. In this course, we will explore the history of this discourse in conversation with select historical examples. The course will thus combine elements of Islamic and Middle Eastern history with contemporary political philosophy. We will begin with an introduction to contemporary western debates about tolerance and the history of this concept in western European thought. Throughout the class, we will be discussing classics of tolerance literature such as the works of Raimundus Lullus and Nicholas of Cusa as well as Lessing’s Nathan the Wise and Montesquieu’s Persian Letters. We will consider recent theories about premodern Islamic law as a main area in which tolerance became manifest as Muslim scholars agreed to disagree. As two historical examples we will be considering medieval Muslim Iberia and the Ottoman Empire. Finally, we will discuss examples of western European discourse about tolerance in the context of Muslim immigration in recent times. This course does not require prior knowledge of Islamic history or political philosophy.
Syllabus

HIST 78110 section 2 - Imperialism and the Shaping of the Modern Middle East
Tuesday, 6:30-8:30, 3 credits, Prof. Simon Davis
This course surveys how interaction with increasingly influential foreign interests, and responses to them, both assimilative and resistant, shaped leading currents in Middle Eastern experience from the late eighteenth century onwards. Themes include imperialism in historical interpretation, perceptions and framings of the region, forms of political, economic, cultural and social change, and in Middle Eastern intra-regional, international and global relations. Each session will feature a discussion on a theme preceded by suggested readings from course texts, related published documents, and specialized scholarly journal articles assigned for discussion. Students will each complete a research essay chosen from a number of given titles and reading lists, a number of smaller critical exercises and a final examination.
Syllabus

RECOMMENDED COURSES FROM OTHER PROGRAMS

CLAS 82600 Race, Ethnicity, and Power in the Ancient World                                                            
Prof. Jennifer Roberts, Thu 4:15 PM-6:15 PM, 3 credits
     How did the ancients conceive of race and ethnicity? What degree of difference was required, and of what nature, for Greeks and Romans to classify a group as “other”? Was “other” invariably inferior?  Were men and women separate races, of different descent? Some Greeks thought so.
     This interdisciplinary course will explore concepts of race and ethnicity in the ancient world through readings in English in both primary and secondary sources, with emphasis on the Greek, Roman, and Hellenistic worlds. No knowledge of Latin or Greek is required, although students who can read either or both of those languages may periodically wish to meet with me for close analysis of a particular text.
     Greek and Latin literature is full of references to groups that the authors felt were “not like us.” The Greeks developed the term “barbarians” (people whose incomprehensible speech sounded like bar, bar, bar) for non-Greeks; their feelings about them were mixed, but for the most part they enjoyed articulating their own superiority. In addition, the individual Greek city-states were exclusive about their citizenship, not enfranchising immigrants or the children of immigrants, and a number of them had elaborate myths designed to explain the special characteristics they possessed that set them apart from, and above, others. Matters were more complicated in the later Greek world (the Hellenistic period of 323-30BCE) when the conquests of Alexander had spawned sprawling multi-ethnic empires, and the people we call “the Romans” were a very diverse group faced with a founding legend that painted them as the descendants of criminals and slaves.  The Roman elite was increasingly multi-ethnic as time went on; the emperors Trajan and Hadrian were both from Spain, and reign of the African emperor Septimius Severus—who spoke Latin with an accent--ushered in an era in which emperors came from all over the Mediterranean world. Despite this diversity, Roman authors enjoyed lobbing ethnic slurs at other “nationalities.”
   Profiting from our own diverse backgrounds and training, we will examine the very complex picture presented by ancient notions of race and ethnicity, and students will pursue projects that grow out of their particular backgrounds and interests.
 
Readings will include:
Herodotus, The Histories (any translation)
Tacitus, Germania (any translation)
Rebecca Futo Kennedy, C. Sydnor Roy, and Max Goldman, Race and Ethnicity in the Classical World: An Anthology of Primary Sources in Translation (Indianapolis: Hackett, 2013
Denise McCoskey, Race in Antiquity and Its Legacy (London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2012)


FREN 77400 - Women’s Stories in Premodern French              
Tuesdays, 4:15pm - 6:15pm, 2/4 credits (Please note: History students must register for the 4 credit option)
Prof. Sara McDougall 
                     
In the premodern era, French language and culture spread far and wide beyond the borders of "l'hexagone". This course will explore French stories told to, for, about, and by women between 1100 and 1700. These texts document the words and deeds of both real and imagined women, famous and infamous, and also women who history has forgotten. Our sources will include romances, poetry, plays, letters, trial records, medical and legal treatises, conduct literature, and illuminated manuscripts (the premodern version of the graphic novel). We will work from translations as well as the original, according to and accommodating the skillsets and interests of each student. Knowledge of French helpful but not in the least essential. 

MSCP 80500: Jerusalem: Monuments and Memory from Constantine the Great to Suleiman the Magnificent.
Thur, 4:15PM-6:15PM. 3 credits, Warren T. Woodfin 

Placed by many medieval maps at the center of the word, Jerusalem is a city triply sacred: to Jews as the capital of the kingdom of Judah and the location of the Temple until its destruction in 70 CE; to Christians as the city in which Jesus instituted the Eucharist, suffered, and was buried; and to Muslims as the site of the “farthest place of prayer,” al masjid al aqsa, visited by Mohammed on his night journey. Throughout the holy city and its environs, sites were marked with monuments to their spiritual significance that were in turn remodeled and re-interpreted over the centuries. The figural arts—painting, sculpture, textiles, metalwork, and the arts of the book—similarly played a role in configuring and reconfiguring this landscape of holiness. Jerusalem presents a remarkable series of case studies on the integration and diffusion of artistic and architectural models, the changing discourses around key monuments, the role of pilgrimage and relics, and interreligious competition through artistic patronage. Covering the period from the reign of Constantine (312–337) to the city’s conquest by the Ottomans (1516), the course will consider both the artistic production of Jerusalem itself and arts intended to reproduce the holiness of Jerusalem elsewhere.

 
SOC 81004- Comparative Sociological Methods: Sociology Meets History
Tuesdays, 2-4pm
Prof. John Torpey
                           
This course examines the historical origins of contemporary patterns of inequality in state-building, slavery, colonialism, and capitalism.  The course will explore diverse times and places in order to understand the background to these patterns of inequality as well as efforts to overcome historical injustices.
 
 
IDS 81630 - Constructing History: Architecture and Alternative Histories of New York
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15pm
Elizabeth Macaulay (The Graduate Center, MALS)
Jason Montgomery (City Tech, Department of Architectural Technology)

Architecture and the built environment are products of their social, political, and economic circumstances. New York City, a perpetually evolving metropolis, has been shaped by successive waves of immigration, shifting economic priorities (from agriculture and manufacturing to finance and technology), and politics. Today, the impact of gentrification, the lack of affordable housing, and climate change is evident in New York City’s built environment. This is not a new story, but one that has been intrinsic to New York City since its founding. Therefore, rather than relying on the written record as the main evidence for exploring New York’s history, this course will introduce students to the built environment and use the urban fabric of New York--its buildings, streets, and places, along with primary source materials about these edifices from libraries and archives--to construct alternative histories of the city. Erected, used, and inhabited by people of all colors, creeds, socio-economic backgrounds and cultures, architecture and the built environment allows us different insights into the development of New York’s history, inviting us to develop alternative stories about the city’s past. The study of architecture and the built environment is inherently interdisciplinary. Students will be introduced to diverse research methods and will be tasked with conducting place-based research on New York City’s built environment during site visits and visits to archives and libraries. The students in the course will have an opportunity to generate new knowledge about New York City, its built environment, and people.
 
IDS 81640 - Cities and Disaster: Past, Present, and Future
Wednesdays, 11:45am-1:45pm
Cary Caracas (The Graduate Center and College of Staten Island, EES and Political Science)
Robin Kietlinski (LaGuardia Community College, History)

This team-taught, interdisciplinary course will focus on disasters faced by major urban centers across a broad span of time and place. Taught by a geographer and a historian who both specialize in the intersection of cities and crisis, the course will offer a unique perspective on critical issues that arise when cities and citizens are forced to endure a catastrophic event. The course will be divided into three thematic and chronological units: 1) PAST: The focus of this unit will be on the historic destruction and subsequent remaking of important urban centers such as Lisbon, Chicago, Chongqing, Dresden, and Tokyo as a result of earthquakes, fires, and wartime bombing; 2) PRESENT: Cities that have recently experienced destruction and reconstruction as a result of worsening climate conditions, with a sustained focus on New York City during and after Hurricane Sandy; and 3) FUTURE: An examination of cities in the Global South that are being and will continue to be impacted by environmental degradation, climate change, and diminishing resources such as water. We will interrogate differences between the concepts of “natural” versus “man-made” disasters, looking at specific case studies as we discuss how and why the line is not always a clear one.

HIST   82600  First-year Seminar in History         
5 credits, Tuesday, 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Professor Francesca Bregoli
This seminar, meant to familiarize students with the professional study of history, is conceived as an introduction to historical research and writing. Each first year PhD student in History is expected to write a research-based article-length paper by the end of the Spring semester. The goal of this course is to help students conceive this project and make continued progress towards it. Over the course of the semester, each student will identify and formulate a research topic, explore primary and secondary sources, produce a bibliography, and compose a historiographical essay. By the end of the semester, students are expected to craft a substantial research proposal, which will be presented and workshopped in class in peer review sessions. In addition to strategies and assignments to craft a cogent and successful proposal, each week we will also read a variety of approaches to historical analysis and discuss questions of methodology, historiography, and theory. The course is open to first-year, first-semester PhD students specializing in European and non-US history. Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus

HIST   84900  First-year Seminar in History         
5 credits, Tuesday, 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Professor Andrew Robertson
This seminar is the first half of a two-semester course for first-year students whose major field is the United States.  By  the end of the second semester each student will have written an article-length paper, substantially based in primary-source research that advances the scholarly literature on its topic.   Looking towards that goal, the first semester seminar focuses on the craft of history, historiography and historical methodology.  Each student in the seminar will focus on the development of a research proposal.  In the seminar and in conferences with the professor, students will identify their research topic, sharpen their questions, identify and explore archival and other primary sources and develop a bibliography of the relevant secondary literature.  Each student will write a historiographic essay.  During the semester each student will circulate drafts and engage in constructive criticism of one another’s work.  The course will include seminars focusing on library research, historians’ ethics, and recent trends in historiography and theory.  At the end of the semester, each student will defend before the seminar a formal proposal for a clearly-defined project they will complete at the end of the following semester.
Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus

HIST   80020  Literature of European History l
5 credits, Monday, 2 PM - 4 PM, Professor Helena Rosenblatt
This course provides an introduction to the literature of European history from the Late Middle Ages through the eighteenth century.  It explores different conceptual frameworks and methodological approaches to the period and examines an assortment of classic and recent works on a variety of topics: religion and the state; science, technology, and medicine; economy and society; gender and sexuality; and ideas and mentalities.  The course prepares students for the end-of-semester comprehensive examination and for further study of early modern Europe.
Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus
 
HIST   80010  Literature of American History l
5 credits, Wednesday, 2 PM - 4 PM, Professor John Dixon
This course introduces Ph.D. students to the historiography of the U.S. through the Civil War and is intended to prepare students for the First Written Examination. Covering major historiographical themes, debates, and developments, the course broadly considers how historians have organized, researched, and written pre-1865 American history. Simultaneously, it examines and compares a multitude of specific works, ranging from large narrative histories to specialized monographs and articles. Students will assess methodologies, discuss the geographical parameters of U.S. history, and confront fundamental questions of periodization and historical causation. Recent achievements and trends in the scholarship will be highlighted. The assigned workload for this reading-intensive, five-credit course is hefty. It is designed to prepare students both for the exam and to teach pre-1865 U.S. history at the college level.
Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus

HIST TBD - Literature of Colonial Latin America
5 credits, Professor Herman Bennet
t
      In recent years, some Latin Americanists have questioned the hermeneutics defining the field of colonial Latin American History.  The colonial designation some feel posits a disjuncture (or beginning) when it could be argued that continuity characterized the historical narrative.  While students of ideas, political practice, and the cultural domain have been the strongest proponents of this intervention, scholars of indigenous cultures—especially the Nahua Studies groups—share similar sentiments despite differences in scope and method.  Consequently, scholars have been utilizing terms like ‘early’ and ‘early modern’ Latin America to distinguish their work from a colonial project and its association with the rupture that Spanish hegemony allegedly implied.  Concurrently, a self-conscious collection of scholars identified as the Latin American subaltern studies group have called into question the elitist hegemony shaping the structure and content of Latin American history.  Scholars of the Latin American subaltern along with those who take issue with the occidental reasoning informing how Latin America history is currently conceived are introducing new terminology (subaltern, postcolonial, Afro-Latin American) that allegedly re-frames the Latin American past and present.  In our semester’s work, we shall explore the meanings and implications, if any, that this and other discursive shifts have had on Latin American historiography.  Even as this seminar attends to shifts in meaning and context, we will engage the substance of the existing historiography.
            This year-long course is specifically designed as an introduction to both the early modern/colonial field and modern Latin American History.  It is designed to prepare History graduate students for the two major field exams in Latin American history.  Courses, despite their prominence in structuring graduate programs, merely introduce students to some of the overarching historiographic and conceptual themes defining a field.  To this end, a course identifies some areas of inquiry but in doing so obscures others.


HIST   72600  Biography and International History                   
3 credits, Thursday, 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM, Professor Manu Bhagavan
Biography is a popular form of historical writing, often appreciated for its narrative form and accessibility.  Generally, biography follows the life of a particular individual (or of ideas, disease, or material objects) and sees the world unfold from the point of view (or in relation to) their chosen subject of study. This course explores the global history the twentieth century through a series of such narratives.  Each book we read will offer a unique perspective and set of insights onto overlapping events, focusing especially on, but not limited to, the stories of pioneering women who made contributions of international consequence. How do we remember major events of the twentieth century?  Who gets credited for their action and who does not?  Who gets left out entirely?  Why?  And how do our understandings of the past change as we look at it through new eyes?
Syllabus

HIST   72300  Psychoanalysis and Politics: History and Theory
3 credits, Tuesday, 2 PM - 4 PM, Professor Dagmar Herzog
Instructor permission is required to enroll in this course. Please write to DHerzog@gc.cuny.edu with a cc to mweber@gc.cuny.edu
This is a course in intellectual history and theory; but it is also, and above all, a course in the history of ideas about human selfhood, motivation, and behavior – and the endless mystery of the relationships between fantasy and reality. The course arcs from Freud’s and his contemporaries’ writings in the 1890s-1930s through WW2, Cold War and decolonization to the post-postmodern present. Themes explored include: trauma, aggression, anxiety, destruction, and prejudice; obsession, love, desire, pleasure, attachment, dependency; models of selfhood (conflict vs. deficit vs. chaos), compulsion, neurosis, perversion, narcissism, psychosis; therapy, including neutrality, interpretation, holding, transference, and countertransference; and the myriad relationships of psychoanalysis to politics. Most of the texts focus on Europe and the U.S., but we will explore as well examples from the Middle East, Africa, and Latin America.
Our aim is not only to acquire a deepened understanding of the interactions between individual subjectivities, social conditions, and ideological formations (and to consider how psychoanalysis-inspired commentators have theorized these interactions), but to inquire into whether and, if so, how the mechanisms of these interactions may perhaps themselves have changed over time (and this will require situating the assigned texts contextually, but also often reading them against their own grain).
Requirements include careful reading of assigned materials and active and informed participation in class discussions; one final paper on a psychoanalysis-related topic relevant to the student’s dissertation or related intellectual development. The final week is reserved for student presentations to the class; drafts will be circulated ahead of time; students are expected to provide helpful written responses to their peers.
Syllabus
 
HIST   71100  Printing Belief          
3 credits, Thursday, 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM, Professor Allison Kavey
The history of print is deeply intertwined with the history of belief in early modern Europe.  This course will look at primary and secondary literature to investigate the ways in which the print revolution contributed to the proliferation and regularization of religious practice, the popularization of emerging sects, and the emergence of competing systems for thinking about nature and natural change.  Cheap print, broadsides, pamphlets, books of secrets, and plays will provide the majority of our primary source material, but students are encouraged to bring their own interests and interesting sources to the course with them.
Syllabus
 
HIST 72800/PSC 71908  Neofascism: from the New Right to the Alt-Right           
3 credits, Monday.6:30 PM - 8:30 PM. Professor Richard Wolin
How did the far-right reestablish political legitimacy after its crushing defeat in 1945? How did it recertify the discredited ideas of race, hierarchy, anti-parliamentarism, autocracy, and patriarchy after seemingly hitting rock bottom? To what extent – and by what methods –   have its efforts to counteract the intellectual hegemony of left-wing thought by popularizing a “Gramscism of the right” been successful? To what extent have New Right ideas influenced the political self-understanding of the leading authoritarian populist parties, whose proliferation has been one of the hallmarks of twenty-first century global politics? Finally, to what extent have the depredations of “neo-liberalism” prepared the terrain for the New Right’s success?
Here, it is worth noting that the slogan, the “Great Replacement,” which was invoked by the mass murderers in Utoya, Norway, Christ Church, NZ, El Paso, and Pittsburgh, was originally a New Right slogan.
One explanation for the New Right’s success pertains to its successful rehabilitation of German conservative revolutionary thought from the 1920s: the political doctrines of Carl Schmitt, Martin Heidegger, Oswald Spengler, etc., while cleansing their work of its ties to Nazism.
Finally, at what point in time did the New Right worldview cross the Atlantic to provide ideological support for the Alt-Right? In what ways do the New Right and the Alt-Right differ from the traditional Right?  Did the Alt-Right contribute to Donald Trump’s victory in the 2016 presidential election? Is the Alt-Right still a force in contemporary American politics, or was it merely a passing political fad?
Readings:
C. Schmitt, The Crisis of Parliamentary Democracy
M. Heidegger, Nature, History, and State
A. de Benoist, View from the Right
A. Dugin, The Fourth Political Theory
T. Bar-On, Where Have All the Fascists Gone?
Y. Camus and N. Lebourg, Far-Right Politics in Europe
Woods, Germany’s New Right as Culture and as Politics
K. Belew, Bring the War Home: The White Power Movement
T. Mann, The Rise of the Alt-Right
Boggs, Fascism: Old and New
Syllabus

HIST   75900  Black Women in Slavery and Freedom                
3 credits, Wednesday, 4:15 PM - 6:15 PM, Professor Tanisha Ford
Instructor permission is required to enroll in this course. Please write to TFord1@gc.cuny.edu with a cc to mweber@gc.cuny.edu
This course will introduce students to key works, major debates, and recent developments in the field of black women’s history. Some of the first texts were published in the mid-1980s, making it a relatively nascent field that has seen exponential growth over the past few decades. Scholars have developed frameworks, theories, and methods to center black women in American histories wherein their narratives are typically omitted and/or distorted. Using “freedom” as our guiding analytical term, we will also read texts from non-historians, allowing us to explore the intersections of black women’s history, feminist studies, and queer studies—particularly “queer of color critique.” The course will devote considerable attention to black feminist practices of archiving. Students can expect to lead discussions; produce short critical book reviews; and submit a longer review essay, theoretical essay, or methodological essay as a final paper.​ 

 HIST  75200  Slavery and Capitalism                  
3 credits, Thursday, 11:45 AM - 1:45 PM. Professor James Oakes
No scholar seriously doubts that there was a strong relationship between the development of capitalism and the emergence of New World slave plantations.  Where they disagree is over the nature of that relationship.  Was slavery itself a form of capitalism, or was the master-slave relationship fundamentally different from capitalist social relations?  Did slavery give rise to capitalism, or did capitalism give rise to slavery?  This course will address these questions, beginning with a survey of the way scholars have addressed them.  Then, with a particular focus on the United States, we will address the theoretical and empirical question of whether the slave economy of the Old South was or was not capitalist.  Finally, we will shift to the very different question of the relationship between southern slavery, especially the cotton economy, and the industrialization of the North.
Syllabus
 
 
HIST   75800  Environmental History of Urban America           
3 credits, Wednesday, 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM, Professor Michael Rawson
Americans often think of cities and nature as being mutually exclusive. “As the pavement spreads,” wrote the great urbanist Lewis Mumford, “nature is pushed farther away.” But scholars in the rapidly developing field of urban environmental history challenge this view and argue instead that cities and the natural world have deep connections and shared histories. With urbanization a central theme of the American story, and over eighty percent of present-day Americans living in urban areas, we cannot fully understand the American past or even the places that most of us call home today without understanding how nature and cities have shaped each other. Over the course of the semester, students will explore such topics as early reactions to industrialization and urbanization; relationships between cities and their hinterlands; urban interactions with water; moral environmentalism and the development of parks and suburbs; concerns about pollution, public health, and environmental justice; the changing place of animals in the city; and the consequences of contemporary urban sprawl.
Reading list:
•             Michael Rawson, Eden on the Charles: The Making of Boston (2010) (e-book through library).
•             Thomas Bender, Toward an Urban Vision: Ideas and Institutions in Nineteenth-Century America (1975).
•             William Cronon, Nature’s Metropolis: Chicago and the Great West (1991).
•             Charles E. Rosenberg, The Cholera Years: The United States in 1832, 1849, and 1866 (1962) (e-book through library).
•             David Schuyler, The New Urban Landscape: The Redefinition of City Form in Nineteenth-Century America (1986).
•             Frederick L. Brown, The City is More than Human: An Animal History of Seattle (2016) (e-book through library)
•             Kate Brown, Plutopia: Nuclear Families, Atomic Cities, and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters (2013) (e-book through library)
•             Adam Rome, The Bulldozer in the Countryside: Suburban Sprawl and the Rise of American Environmentalism (2001).
•             Mike Davis, Ecology of Fear: Los Angeles and the Imagination of Disaster (1998).
•             Andrew Hurley, Environmental Inequalities: Class, Race, and Industrial Pollution in Gary, Indiana, 1945-1980 (1995) (e-book through library).
•             David Owen, Green Metropolis: Why Living Smaller, Living Closer, and Driving Less Are the Keys to Sustainability (2009).


HIST 78000/ MES 78000: Religion and Society 
3 credits, Mondays,, 4:15-6:15,  Professor Samira Haj

In this class, religion is approached as a social and historical fact with political, legal and economic attributes and ramifications. As a historical social fact, religion (in general and Islam in particular) is compelled to undergo continuous redefinitions to accommodate change in circumstance and social setting. The objective of this seminar is to explore some of these changes in light of the dramatic changes and concerns engendered by modern structures, institutions and power. These changes are drawn out through familiar oppositional yet problematic categories like the secular and the religious, state sovereignty vs. religious authority, modern law vs. divine prescriptions among others. The course is comparative and interdisciplinary; it draws on different areas of study and bodies of knowledge including anthropology, political theory, philosophy and religious studies.
Syllabus

HIST   78110  Violence in Islamic History            
3 credits, Wednesday, 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM, Professor Anna Akasoy
In this course, we will consider a wide range of examples of violence in Islamic history, primarily in premodern times. Our main focus will be on religious dimensions of violence. Throughout the class, we will be discussing a range of methodological issues such as violence as an analytical concept and violence as an ethical challenge for historians. Recent public debates and much scholarship concentrate on religiously validated public violence in Islamic contexts, especially the ‘inter-state’ violence of conquests and wars. Such violence is widely associated with the concept of jihad and sometimes described as ‘holy war’. While we will be exploring these high-profile subjects, this class will expand its perspective on violence by considering cases that unfold in the context of war, but are not part of combat. We will be discussing enslavement, especially with regard to its gendered dimension. While some enslaved men became soldiers and took on a new role in the exercise of violence, women often became concubines and were subjected to sexual violence. Furthermore, we will be discussing public violence in the context of riots, executions and public corporeal punishments such as flogging. A second set of topics is derived from what may be considered the private sphere. In this context, we will mostly be looking at Islamic law and the way legal scholars understood and approached domestic violence. Apart from violence against wives we will be considering violence against enslaved individuals in private households. To expand our discussion of Islamic law, we will be considering other examples of interpersonal violence, in particular homicide. While most of our material will be textual, a small number of visual sources will be discussed as well, especially with regard to an aestheticization of violence. Depending on student interest, other cases of violence such as violence against the self and violence against non-human animals can be taken into account as well. This course is suitable for students without prior knowledge of Islamic history.
Syllabus
 
 MALS 78500/ HIST 71000/ PSC 71902 Comparative Revolutions: From 1688 to the Arab Spring
3 credits, Monday, 4:15 PM - 6:15 PM, Professor Helena Rosenblatt
What makes a revolution a revolution? Scholarship has recently moved away from social-scientific, Marxist-inspired explanations to approaches that explore how revolutionaries themselves understood what they were doing, how they interpreted their contexts, and how their ideas shaped their actions. With such questions in mind, we will look at and compare a number of revolutions, including the so-called “Glorious Revolution” of 1688,  the American, French and Haitian Revolutions, the Russian Revolution of 1917 and the recent Arab Spring. In the eyes of their participants, what characteristics did these revolutions share? What might they have learned and borrowed from each other? Is there something we can call a revolutionary “script”?
Syllabus

HIST   75500  Public History Scholarship and Practice               
3 credits, Thursday, 2 PM - 4 PM, Professor Anne Valk
This course introduces the practice of public history and its intellectual foundations. Through our readings, class discussions, and assignments, we will examine the activities of public historians and the complex issues they face when preserving, interpreting and presenting history. Reading a series of case studies and theoretical essays, we will discuss how theory plays out in practice and in a variety of arenas in which historians engage with historical sites, objects, and publics.  The course will be organized into three parts.  In Part 1, we will address the idea of the public.  Who are the “publics” in public history? What kinds of relationships do (or should) public historians have with them?  Can authority be shared? How do public historians handle “the other” – issues of cultural appropriation or cross-cultural interactions?  Part 2 considers “history” – how does society decide what’s worth remembering and saving? What role do public historians play in shaping, sharing, and interpreting public memories?  How do we resolve the tension between memory and history? And what is the relationship between public history and the historical discipline?  Part 3 considers political activism and the politics of public history practices.  How have both conservative and radical agendas shaped the work of public history in the past, including sources of funding, methods of engagement, and institutional collecting priorities? And how do politics, personal and professional, shape the work of public historians today?  Class readings will be augmented by conversations with practioners and, if possible, visits to select public history sites.
Syllabus
 
HIST   78500  Quantitative Methods for Social Scientists and Humanists                    
3 credits, Thursday, 4:15 PM - 6:15 PM, Professor Laird Bergad
This course is designed to develop introductory skills needed for the analysis of large-scale data bases such as those provided by the U.S. Census Bureau, other government agencies such as the National Institute of Health, the Bureau of Labor Statistics, or census data bases provided by other countries throughout the world. After you conclude this course you should be able to use the skills you have learned to analyze any kind of data base, large or small, including those which you may develop independently in your future research. There are three broadly based skill sets you will learn in this course: 1) how to download data from specific web sites; 2) how to analyze these data to extract the specific information you want; 3) how to present these data in tables and graphic materials. If time permits, we may even teach you how to present data in maps. The course will first focus on the skills needed to download data files to your computer using the IPUMS web site (Integrated Public Use Microdata Series) from the Minnesota Population Center, University of Minnesota (https://usa.ipums.org/usa/) which maintains a repository of every census of the United States from 1790 on. There is also a number of ‘companion’ sites such as IPUMS International which maintains an ever-growing archive of census materials from around the world which you may register for and use as you develop your skills. - https://international.ipums.org/international.
WARNING: There is a learning curve which may lead to extraordinary frustration, irrational acts caused by despair, and other behavioral manifestations typical of neophyte data analysts! These should pass with patience and perseverance and soon you will be ‘experts’ at how to access real data on the internet. You may also wonder why all you have ever thought of in your graduate careers until this transformative moment is something called ‘culture.’ (OK, not all of you!) The course will then move to the real nuts and bolts of data analysis and teach you how ask questions of, and to extract specific data, from any data base (such as the number of males/females, their age structures, race/ethnicity, their incomes and on and on into infinity) using SPSS, the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences first developed at the University of Chicago in 1968, and now owned by IBM (since 2009) under the name IBM SPSS STATISTICS. Other programs such as SAS or STATA can perform the same statistical procedures. (See WARNING above). Finally, we will teach you how to present complex data in easy-to-understand (hopefully) tables and graphs so that mere mortals may comprehend them. Here we revert to Excel and PowerPoint which I’m certain many of you are already familiar with.
Syllabus

SEE ALSO 


BAM 70500: The Ethics of Public Biography: Historicizing ACT UP  (The AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power)
3 credits, Mondays, 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM,  Sarah Schulman
1987-1993 were the most effective years of the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT UP), New York. Perhaps the most recent American social movement to be effective, its history can be helpful to those of us working for social transformation today. Yet, the most rewarded representations have narrowed the story of ACT UP to a parody, focusing on white male individuals, instead of the diverse and extended community of which ACT UP was an organizational nexus. Using film, primary documents and relying on interviews from the ACT UP Oral History Project, www.actuporalhsitory.org , students will examine how false histories get told and contrast these dominant myths with the actual evidence.


MSCP 80500: Migrations, Displacement, and Slavery in a Global Medieval Perspective.
4 credits, Wednesdays, 4:15PM-6:15PM, Professor Francesca Sautman
What is known as the “medieval period” is largely thought of as a Western European temporality. It did not, however, exist in isolation from or without consequences for other peoples, cultures and polities located even far beyond its confines. There were vast population movements across Asia, Europe and North Africa throughout the early “medieval” period into early modern times that impacted and informed each other in many ways. These transnational or transcultural connections, as well as simultaneously occurring foundational events across regions, are what contemporary approaches to a “global history” seek to grasp and decipher, rather than narrowly defined histories based on current nation-states.
 

Hist. 82600- Seminar in Non-American History II
GC: Mondays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 5 credits, Prof. Steven Remy

This course is a continuation of Seminar in Non-American History I. Students will develop and complete the research project begun in the fall and turn their prospectuses into papers of publishable quality. Throughout the course, we will discuss the ongoing work in class, emphasizing the analysis of secondary and primary sources. Students will also circulate their works in progress amongst each other and practice giving informal and formal presentations. We will also discuss the process of working with peer-reviewed journals.
Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus

Hist. 84900- Seminar in American History II
GC: Wednesdays, 11:45 am - 1:45 pm, 5 credits, Prof. Thomas Kessner
There are two essential responsibilities for the seminar: the preparation of the research paper and fully engaged participation in the discussions and critiques of work submitted by other participants.
The objective of this Seminar is for students to expand and refine their skills in research and historical writing by carrying out the research project they proposed in the Fall semester. The required article length historical research paper must be a piece of original work on American history, substantially based on primary sources. It should engage a clearly defined historiographical problem, be well written, effectively organized and cogently argued. In class, we will workshop in-progress drafts and discuss research methods and writing strategies.  Students will also review and critique the works in progress submitted by their colleagues. 
Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus

Hist. 80010- Literature Survey in American History
GC: Mondays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 5 credits, Prof. Anne Kornhauser
This course covers significant themes and developments in U.S. history from the end of the Civil War to the late 20th century. Major themes include: the aftermath and legacy of slavery, the emergence of the United States as a global power, the rise and consolidation of the American state, and the struggle for national inclusion: race, rights, and citizenship. The broad objectives of the course include helping to prepare students for a written departmental exam, to provide a substantive foundation for students to teach their own U.S. history courses, and to expose students to modes of inquiry, subfields, and bibliographies that will aid in future research and teaching. Given these broad ambitions, this 5-credit course is necessarily demanding. In general, students will be expected to read the equivalent of two monographs a week and to be prepared to engage in rigorous yet wide-ranging discussions. The course will proceed chronologically as well as thematically and will consider questions, debates, issues, and dilemmas that arise from political, legal, cultural, economic, social, race, and gender histories of this period. In keeping with recent trends in the field, we will also consider U.S. history from a global perspective, Assignments will include weekly response papers, short literature reviews, and oral presentations. The course will culminate in a departmental final. Attendance is required for each class session, and all students will be expected to participate in class discussions
Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus

Hist. 80020- Literature Survey in European History
GC: Wednesdays, 2-4 pm, 5 credits, Prof. Eric Weitz
This course provides students with an introduction to the major themes of and historiographical debates on modern European history. Geographically we will range from the Eurasian steppe and eastern Anatolia to the Atlantic Ocean. Topically we will also range widely, from diplomatic and international to gender and social history and everything in between. We will also study Europe in its global context. By the end of the semester students should have achieved a solid grasp of the literature on European history, which will provide the basis for their qualifying exams, teaching, and dissertations. Students will write a substantial historiographical paper on a topic of their choice.
Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus
 
Hist. 89900- Dissertation Seminar
GC: Mondays, 2-4 pm, 0 credits, Prof. James Oakes
This course is entirely devoted to students at the dissertation writing stage who would benefit from sharing some of their work with fellow students. The goal is to create an atmosphere of friendly, constructive criticism that will benefit all students as they work to organize their material and develop their interpretations.
Open only to Level 3 PhD Program in History students.
 
Hist. 75500- Sojourners, Sultans, and Slaves: Slavery and Freedom in North America and the Indian Ocean
GC: Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Gunja SenGupta  
        As the 19th century dawned, global systems of capitalism and empire knit the Atlantic and Indian Ocean worlds into international networks of trade and travel, and conquest and colonization, of labor and capital, and politics and ideology. The controversies over slavery,colonialism, and freedom’s meanings that resulted from this integration, offer U.S. scholars an analytical framework for “cross-fertilizing” national histories, historiographies, and epistemologies, with the burgeoning scholarship on the Indian Ocean. This course introduces students to transnational and comparative perspectives that illuminate the interoceanic scale of the Anglophone contexts in which Americans engaged with the politics and representations of slavery, abolition and empire.
           Such engagements emerged in a moment of transition between empires in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean worlds during the 18th century. The backdrop against which they occurred, however, was shaped by developments that date as far back as what European historians would consider early modern periods in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean worlds.  So we will begin there, reflecting, as we proceed to the 19th century,  on questions like:  how exceptional was “American” slavery, and its relationship with notions of freedom? How did British colonial traditions of legal pluralism translate in the Indian Ocean world? How do we theorize “agency,” “diaspora,” and “difference,” in African diasporic history, and evaluate scholarly debates over the boundaries between law and practice, family and the market, and nation and empire within that history? In what ways did “subaltern” migrations remake identities and produce change? How did free labor experiments in British Asia influence debates over sectionalism in the U.S.? What do the struggles of American slaveholders in Indian Ocean Sultanates over land, labor, cultural politics, and international power rivalries tell us about comparative slavery histories?
We will  grapple with these questions by placing U.S. historiography in dialogue with scholarship and multinational archival materials on slavery and freedom in the Indian Ocean, comparing, for instance, the Atlantic slave trade with human trafficking on the Trans-Saharan and Arabia Sea routes; considering the ways in which tropes of difference (race, religion, class, caste, gender, sex) and ideas about dependence (especially kinship) shaped ideologies and practices of “master-slave” relationships; discussing the workings of the state, law, political economy, religious institutions, and demography, in constructing systems of bondage,  hierarchy and patronage; considering how formal institutions and informal customs influenced marginalized people’s material conditions, and regulated their access to community membership/citizenship; examining the dynamics of “subaltern” family, culture, community, and resistance; tracing the transoceanic circulation of debates over slavery and poverty, and abolition and empire; and contextualizing emancipation in the U.S, within the framework of comparative chronicles of freedom.
Syllabus
 
Hist. 74900 - Race, Gender and American Political Development
GC:  Tuesdays, 11:45 am - 1:45 pm, 3 credits, Profs. David Waldstreicher & Ruth O’Brien

This course examines to what extent, in what ways, are exceptionalist understandings of U.S. political traditions a problem or a solution? Do accounts that stress race, or gender, or the confluence of the two, provide a necessary or sufficient theory or counter-narrative of political development? Do frameworks developed in European politics, in critical theory, postcolonial thought or in domestic vernaculars comprehend the roles of race and gender, or their relationship to each other, in the political past and political time now? What kinds of analytical scholarship and storytelling have been adequate to the task?  Finally, given the recent resurgence of angry and martial rhetoric at the center of national politics, how might we understand the relationship between the revolutionary or Enlightenment dreams of justice, peace, freedom and progress on the one hand, and the recurrent dread or nightmare of decline and oppression, as shaping facts of specifically political traditions?​
Syllabus

 
Hist. 74300 - Readings in 20th Century U.S. Women’s History
GC:  Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Kathleen McCarthy
When women’s history emerged as a subfield in the 1960s, its initial goal was to write women into the historical record.  Since then, the analytical focus has shifted from an emphasis on “sisterhood” to class relations, political culture, the social construction of gender, transnationalism, and colonialism and empire.  Cultural analyses have also become increasingly important, illuminating the subtexts that shaped women’s lives in different regions and eras, while microhistories have excavated the lives of ordinary Americans in revealing ways.  This course will chart these historiographical shifts, as well as the ways in which women’s history has reshaped our understanding of American history for the period from 1900 to the late 20th century.
Within this framework a variety of topics will be explored, including (among others): 1) mainstreaming and microhistory; 2) gender and sexuality; 3) politics and political cultures; 4) transnationalism and empire; 5) race; 6) popular culture; 7) feminism and its discontents;  8) family and domesticity;  9) the women’s movement; 10) science and the politics of the body; 11) women and the welfare state; 12) power and money.
The goal of this course is threefold: 1) to help students prepare for their written and oral examinations; 2) to deepen their knowledge of the ways in which women’s history has reshaped our understanding of American history; and 3) to bolster their research, writing and analytical skills.
Students will lead one to three discussion sessions, and have a choice of doing weekly abstracts on the assigned readings for the weeks in which they are not presenting, or developing a research proposal on a women’s history topic of their choice for the period between 1900 and the 1990s.
Syllabus
 
Hist. 75900 - African Americans in Public
GC:  Tuesdays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Tanisha Ford
This course on African Americans in Public utilizes a “long twentieth century” approach to examine key historiographical debates in the field of African American History. Using “public” as a category of analysis, we will explore the ways in which scholars have used social, intellectual, cultural, labor, urban, and public history methods to ask different questions (and arrive at different conclusions) about African American life. To that end, we will consider how these different subfields approach the archive and read its gaps and silences, marshal evidence, and determine who and what gets to be worthy of historical study. The aim is to move beyond a debate about "public" vs "private" to instead focus on how African Americanists have, over time, defined and redefined what "the public" is and how people of African descent engage with/in such spaces. Students will be expected to write a 2-page critical review of each assigned monograph and produce a 10-15pp historiographical essay.
Syllabus

HIST 78400 and CHSS 695 (MPH) and CHSS 895 (Doctoral) 
Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Corporations, Health and Democracy, 1900 to the Present: Modern Capitalism and the Fate of Health    

Tuesdays, 4:00 - 5:50 pm, 3 credits
NOTE: CLASSES HELD AT The School of Public Health at 55 West 125th Street
Distinguished Professors Gerald Markowitz(History) and Nicholas Freudenberg (Public Health).

This jointly taught course with Nick Freudenberg of CUNY’s School of Public Health will explore how  21st century capitalism influences health and how its impact on health has changed since 1900?  To answer these questions, this course presents students with historical, epidemiological and sociological perspectives on the impact of corporations on population health. It reviews how changes in capitalism influenced patterns of health and diseases in the United States  and how globalization, financialization, technological changes and neoliberalism changed how capitalism and corporations shaped living conditions.   Through in-depth interdisciplinary investigations of selected industries, products and practices from the last 120 years, students will analyze the changing pathways and mechanisms by which corporate practices influence the health of consumers and workers and of the environment in the United States and globally.  It will also consider the roles of governance, democratic principles, the public health community and civil society in efforts to control harmful practices.  Among the topics to be studied are the changing roles of  food, pharmaceutical, health care ,  automobile and chemical industries on the health of  workers, consumers, communities and planetary well-being. Students will write an in-depth case study of a specific industry or product.  Masters and doctoral students will have different assignments for this class. The class is open to doctoral students in public health, history, sociology, psychology, geography, political science  and related disciplines and Masters students in public health, liberal studies, or related academic or professional programs.
Syllabus


Hist. 72600- Late Life: Histories of Old Age and Death
GC: Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. David Troyansky

The course will explore two very rich historiographies that range widely across time and space and deploy methods and approaches that emphasize religion and culture, economy and society, health, demography and public policy.  Much of the course will concern early modern and modern Europe, but we will also pay attention to notable works in ancient and medieval history, American history, and non-western (especially Asian) histories.  Our approach to the history of old age will require us to focus on gender and family, property and intergenerational relations, medical literature and institutions, pensions and social security arrangements, ageism and individual subjectivities.  Our exploration of the history of death will pay much attention to religion and secularization as well as histories of the body and its disposal, individual and mass death, and commemorative practices.  I anticipate that most students will write historiographical papers, but there will also be opportunities to do research in primary sources.
Syllabus
 
Hist. 78110- Palestine under the British Mandate: Origins, Evolutions and Implications, 1906-1949
GC: Mondays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Simon Davis
This course examines how and with what consequences British interests at the time of the First World War identified and pursued control over Palestine as an imperial objective, the subsequent forms such projections took, the crises which followed and their eventual consequences. Particular themes will be explored through analytical discussions of assigned historiographic materials, chiefly recent primary research-based journal literature.
Syllabus

Hist. 72400- The Political Thought of Hannah Arendt
GC: Mondays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Richard Wolin
In the annals of twentieth-century political thought, Hannah Arendt (1906-1975) carved out a unique and enduring niche. Today, some 40 years after her death, her political philosophy seems more relevant than ever. In 1951, she wrote the first important book on totalitarianism, perhaps the central political problem of the twentieth century. Seven years later, Arendt published her landmark contribution to European political thought, the Human Condition, in which she seeks to probe and to delineate the existential bases of human freedom. Avoiding the liberal political idiom of "rights," Arendt broaches this theme in terms of the ontological values of "plurality" and "action" – constituents of human distinctiveness that Arendt traces back to the glories of Periclean Athens. Nevertheless, she also found important modern political corollaries to "action" in the fleeting experience of direct (that is, non-representative) democracy: in the notion of "local democracy" that flourished in pre-revolutionary America and in the emergence of "workers consuls" in the course of the European revolutions of 1905, 1918, and 1956.
Our main thematic focus will concern Arendt’s central contributions to twentieth century political thought: The Origins of Totalitarianism (1951), The Human Condition (1958), and On Revolution (1962). However, as preparation for this encounter, attention to Arendt’s formative philosophical and political influences is indispensable. Therefore, in conjunction with these works, we will also selectively read a number of background texts that will assist us in clarifying the conceptual framework that Arendt develops in her mature political works. Essential in this regard are key texts by Aristotle (Nicomachean Ethics) and by Arendt’s legendary German mentor, Martin Heidegger (Being and Time). At specific junctures, Arendt’s voluminous correspondence with another celebrated mentor, Karl Jaspers, will also guide us.
Finally, the “Arendt renaissance” of recent years has been punctuated by important cinematic representations of her life and thought – a dimension of the international Hannah Arendt reception story that we will analyze and reflect upon in conclusion.
Syllabus


Hist. 72100 - Key Concepts in the Western Tradition
GC: Mondays, 4:15 – 6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Helena Rosenblatt
In recent decades there has been a new development in the academic study of political and social thought. Much attention is now being paid to “key concepts” and their historicity. The so-called “linguistic turn” has played an important role in this process.
By “key concepts” we mean the big ideas and indispensable terms without which it would be virtually impossible to engage in any meaningful political discussion. We use such concepts daily to make sense of our world and communicate with others. And yet, as scholars today are increasingly realizing, the meanings of these concepts are not static or timeless. They are constantly evolving and being contested. Key concepts can be seen as tools and weapons wielded at specific times for specific political purposes.
In this course we will examine the meaning and evolution of a number of key concepts essential to our current vocabulary, among which “democracy”, “populism” and “liberalism,” as well as “happiness,” “fear,” “genius” and “woman”. We will consider questions such as the following: What did “democracy” mean to the ancient Greeks and what does it mean to us today? How does our notion of “genius” compare to that of the Renaissance? When and why was the word “liberalism” coined and how has its meaning changed over time? Has our understanding of “woman” remained the same across the centuries?
Syllabus

Hist. 79200- Jews and the Left
GC: Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Elissa Bemporad
This course will explore the historical involvement of Jewish men and women in the political left from the French Revolution to the contemporary world, in Europe, America and Palestine/Israel. By discussing the political and ideological factors that attracted Jews to leftist political movements over time and in different geopolitical contexts, the course will study the ambivalent relationship between universalism and particularism that lied at the heart of these movements. Through a diverse selection of readings, which include memoirs, letters, fiction, press articles, and monographs, students will also be asked to disentangle facts from myth, as they ponder the reality and the limits of the Jewish alliance with the Left. This course will also explore the ways in which, at different times and in different places, the association between Jews and the Left have become a common thread in antisemitic thinking.
Syllabus

Hist. 72200 - Race, Gender, and the Art of Memoir
GC:  Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Tanisha Ford
In recent years, there has been resurgent interest in the genre of memoir. Many of these contemporary texts are written by young(er), people of color. In this course we will read classic memoirs in conversation with more recent publications to explore the intersections of gender and race and the unique ways that writers of creative non-fiction use the genre to explore identity politics, trauma, pleasure, the (recent) past, and worldmaking. Learning how to write in this style is a useful skill for all students—regardless of field, discipline or career path. To that end, students will write and revise several autobiographical essays, with attention to developing voice and tone, pacing, and social/cultural/political texture.
Syllabus

Hist. 70330- The Trajanic Moment in Roman Literature
GC: Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Joel Allen
This history course looks at the Roman Principate in its transition from the reign of Domitian to that of Trajan (roughly 80-120 CE), a momentous period that saw shifts in the nature and exercise of political power, the negotiation of empire, and attitudes toward ethnicity and identity, three themes that will form the emphases of our readings. 
            Proceeding chronologically, we’ll begin with an exploration of the intellectual climate of Domitianic Rome.  Some areas of inquiry include the use of memory of the Roman past among both poets and prose authors of the late Flavian period—Silius Italicus, Frontinus, Quintilian—as well as changes in the nature of public life in the city and the emperor’s role therein, as evident in Martial and Statius.  To the extent possible, we’ll seek to recover perspectives on and of the provinces, especially the Greek East (Josephus, perhaps), an area that will have more evidence as we move into the Trajanic empire with the texts of Dio Chrysostom, Plutarch, and Favorinus.  Tacitus will be an obvious reference point in both chronological “halves” of the course, leading into the commentaries of his later contemporaries (the letters and Panegyricus of Pliny the Younger, the biographies of Suetonius, and the satirical poems of Juvenal) on politics, ethnicity, and what it means to be “Roman”.  All texts will be read in English translation (though knowledge of Greek and Latin would of course enrich the student’s experience!).
Syllabus

 
HIST 71100/ MALS 74700/ GEMS 82100 - Reading Folklore in the Early Modern World
GC: Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Sarah Covington
Folklore has traditionally been viewed as quaint and supplementary material illustrating “hidden” voices of “the people.” This seminar will question if not overturn virtually all of the previous statement, including the use of “folklore” as a term. Folklore, or more properly, vernacular expressions and practices, emerged wherever there existed a social group, of whatever status, which expressed its shared identity by calling on past traditions. It also could enter the most elite literature, move back and forth between oral culture and text, or be invented entirely as “fakelore.” This seminar will explore this enormously fertile vernacular world, including the often overlooked discipline of folkloristics, which offers historians and literary scholars new insights and methodologies into reading pre-modern texts or interpreting often opaque stories from the deeper past. Extending across Europe and the Atlantic World (including colonial North America), from the late medieval period through the eighteenth century, we will study stories and material culture, rituals and landscape, as access points to understanding an otherwise evasive mental world and our own approaches to it.
Syllabus
 
History 76900  Labor & U.S. Empire in the Americas
GC: Thursdays 4:15 - 6:15, 3 credits, Prof. Eduardo Contreras
Guided by the transnational and hemispheric turns in labor and migration studies, this course will examine the historical experiences of working people in Central America, the Caribbean, Mexico, and the United States. Our scholarly inquiry will specifically consider how laborers in and from these regions confronted U.S. imperialism and how they, in the words of some recent scholars, "made the U.S. empire work." Topics of study will include the interconnections between labor and migration; the construction of the Panama Canal; the expansion of the banana industry; ethnoracial tensions and collaborations among working people; and the role of U.S. imperialism in prompting migration to the United States, among others. The course will be of particular interest to students training in Central American, Caribbean, U.S. labor, and/or U.S. Latina/o/x histories.
Syllabus

See Also


Sociology - Spatial Patterns of Difference and Inequality: Global, National, Regional
GC: Tuesdays, 2-4 pm, 3 credits, Prof. John Torpey
This course explores spatial patterns of difference and inequality at the global, national, and regional levels.  It seeks to make sense of the historical roots of these patterns in political, economic, ethnoracial, religious, and demographic systems.  The course will explore diverse times and places in order to understand contemporary patterns of difference and inequality in comparative and historical perspective.

English 75100 - The American Renaissance
​GC: Wednesdays, 2-4 pm, 4 credits, Prof. David S. Reynolds
Known as the American Renaissance, the decades leading up to the Civil War are generally regarded not only as the peak moment in American cultural expression but also as a watershed of themes reaching back to ancient and early-modern periods and looking forward to modernism.  The American Renaissance saw the innovations in philosophy, ecological awareness, and style on the part of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau; the metaphysical depth and cultural breadth represented by the fiction of Herman Melville and Nathaniel Hawthorne; the poetic experimentation of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson; the psychological probing and ground-breaking aesthetics of Edgar Allan Poe; and landmark portraits of race and slavery by Harriet Beecher Stowe, Harriet Jacobs, and Frederick Douglass. Urban life and class conflict were dramatized in fiction by George Lippard, and gender issues were vivified in writings by Margaret Fuller and Sara Parton. Lincoln’s speeches crystalized the nation’s enduring political themes. In addition to reading central works of American literature—among them Moby-Dick, “Bartleby,” Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, The Scarlet Letter,  Leaves of Grass, Walden, Poe’s tales, Emerson’s essays, and Dickinson’s poems--we discuss current approaches to American Studies, criticism, and cultural history.
 

Research and Writing Seminars

 
HIST 84900- Seminar in American History I
Wednesday,
4:15-6:15 pm, Room: 3310A, 5 credits, Prof. Jonathan Sassi
This is the first half of a two-semester course for first-year students whose major field is the United States.  By the end of the second semester, each student will have written an article-length paper that is substantially based in primary-source research and advances the scholarly literature on its topic; toward that goal, the first semester focuses on the craft of history and the development of a research proposal.  Students will identify topics, hone their questions, explore archival and other primary sources, develop a bibliography of the relevant secondary literature, and write a historiographic essay.  They will also circulate drafts and constructively criticize one another’s work.  The course will include related topics, such as library research, ethics, and recent trends in historiography and theory.  At the end of the course, each student will present and defend before the seminar a formal proposal for a well-defined project that they can reasonably expect to complete by the end of the following semester.
Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus

HIST 80010- Literature of American History I
Thursday, 2-4 pm, Room: 3310A, 5 credits, Prof. Benjamin Carp
This course introduces Ph.D. students to the historiography of the U.S. through the Civil War and is intended to prepare students for the First Written Examination.  
Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus


HIST 80900 - Seminar in European and non-American History I
Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 pm, Room: 3308, 5 credits, Prof. Julia Sneeringer
  This is the first semester of the year-long seminar that will culminate in the production of a substantial, research-based first-year paper, as required by the History program.  In this course we will discuss methodology and prepare a research topic.  This will include: formulation of a research topic;  preparation of a bibliography of secondary works;  writing of a historiographical essay; and preparation of a detailed research prospectus by semester’s end.  To assist you in this process, we will discuss various examples of and approaches to historical writing, as well as the past and current state of history as a discipline.  We will also visit several research libraries.  Finally, we will workshop as a group each of your research prospectuses.  The first-year paper is a key requirement of the History program - helping you craft it is a main goal of this course.    Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus

HIST 80020 - Literature of European History I
Thursday, 4:15-6:15 pm, Room: 8202, 5 credits, Prof. Sarah Covington
 This seminar will introduce students to recent and classic works of European history from the late medieval period through the early eighteenth century. In addition to focusing on schools of historiography, we will explore the ways in which various historians have practiced their craft by utilizing sources, developing different methodologies, and honing analytical and conceptual models in approaching their subjects. Intersecting with these explorations will be topics such as politics and the state; economy and class; religion and philosophy; science and medicine; technology and mentalities; and sex and gender. By the end of this reading-intensive course, students will be prepared to take the first-year qualifying exam after having laid the foundations for future teaching and research.
 Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus


Ancient ​History


HIST 70310- Thucydides, Politics, Philosophy
Monday, 6:30-8:30 pm, Room: 3306, 3 credits, Prof. Jennifer Roberts
Crosslisted with Philosophy, Political Science and Classics
 
This interdisciplinary course will be guided in part by the particular interests of the students who choose to enroll in it: historians, classicists, archaeologists, political scientists, philosophers.  Although there will be common readings, students are encouraged to pursue their own perspectives on Thucydides while at the same time coming to appreciate his relevance to other disciplines.  The text will be read in English, but I am happy to meet separately with students who would like to read selections in the original Greek.
 
A masterpiece of both narrative and analysis, Thucydides’ account of the war between the Athenian Empire and Peloponnesian League also merits study as a work of profound philosophical import.  The work of a man filled with a plangent sense of the sorrows of the human condition, Thucydides’ history offered a non-fiction counterpart to the tragic drama of his contemporaries Sophocles and Euripides. 
 
The father of political science, Thucydides has often been labeled the father of political realism.  We will explore in what ways this is and is not accurate.  Thucydides has been co-opted by one generation after another, on one continent after another, as a spokesman for its own society and identified as the one person who best understood the problems of the day.  From monarchists to republicans in Europe to 20th and 21st century American neoconservatives, his readers have proudly cited him in defense of their ideologies. Today students of international relations wring their hands over the newly dubbed menace, “the Thucydides trap,” a concept that draws parallels between the diplomatic situation that led up to the Peloponnesian War and America’s growing tensions with China.  Both Thucydides and his legacy will be the subjects of this course.
Syllabus



Latin American ​History


HIST 77300 - Rural History Of Latin America And The Caribbean
Thursday, 4:15-6:15 pm, Room: 44
33 (note new room), 3 credits, Prof. Laid Bergad
 ​"The history of Latin America has been written on and by the land." Eric Van Young
Until the middle of the 20th century the vast majority of all peoples who lived and worked in the region we refer to as Latin America and the Caribbean lived in the countryside. Their lives were defined by agricultural or pastoral production and their varied ‘relationships’ to land, whether as owners, renters, workers, and a multiplicity of other possibilities.
In large part their histories are virtually unknown as the historiography of the region has focused on urban areas, political themes, or more recently something that has been referred to as ‘cultural’ although this has not generally included agriculture.
 Overarching terminologies and labels such as ‘peasants’ ‘haciendas’ ‘plantations’ ‘estancias’ have been used as references to rural life when in most cases there is little analytical or intellectual content associated with the use of these terms from the vantage point of rural peoples themselves who have used an entirely different vocabulary to define themselves.
No auditors.
Syllabus

European ​History


HIST 72400 - The Outcome of German Classical Philosophy
Monday, 6:30-8:30 pm, Room: 6421, 3 credits, Prof. Richard Wolin
                In 1886, Friedrich Engels wrote a perfectly mediocre book, Ludwig Feuerbach and the Outcome of Classical German Philosophy, which nevertheless managed to raise a fascinating and important question that is still being debated today: how should we go about evaluating the legacy of German Idealism following the mid-nineteenth century breakdown of the Hegelian system? For Engels, the answer was relatively simple: the rightful heir of classical German philosophy was Marx’s doctrine of historical materialism. But, in truth, Engels’ response was merely one of many possible approaches. Nor would it be much of an exaggeration to claim that, in the twentieth-century, there is hardly a philosopher worth reading who has not sought to define him or herself via a confrontation with the legacy of Kant and Hegel.
                Our approach to this very rich material will combine a reading of the canonical texts of German Idealism (e.g., Kant and Hegel) with a sustained and complementary focus on major twentieth-century thinkers who have sought to establish their originality via a critical reading of Hegel and his heirs: Alexandre Kojève, Georges Bataille, Jean Hyppolite, Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, Theodor Adorno, and Jürgen Habermas. But we will also seek acknowledge the importance of the contemporary North American Hegel renaissance, as exemplified by the work of philosophers such as Charles Taylor, Robert Pippin, Michael Forster, Terry Pinkard, and Allen Wood.
                In his “Discourse on Language” Foucault warns us appositely that, “Truly to escape Hegel involves an exact appreciation of the price we have to pay to detach ourselves from him. It assumes that we are aware of the extent to which Hegel, insidiously perhaps, is close to us; it implies a knowledge that permits us to think against Hegel, of that which remains Hegelian. Thus we have to determine the extent to which our anti-Hegelianism is possibly one of his tricks directed against us, at the end of which he stands, motionless, waiting for us.” Foucault’s insightful caveat will, in many respects, function as our interpretive watchword as we seek to decode and reconstruct German Idealism and its innovative contemporary legacies.
Syllabus

HIST 71600 - Nazism and Holocaust: New Directions
Tuesday, 4:15-6:15 pm, Room: 5212, 3 credits, Prof. Dagmar Herzog
The newest scholarship on the Third Reich and the Holocaust – as well as their prehistories and aftermaths – positions these highly fraught historical topics in a variety of conceptual frameworks, both old and newly refurbished, ranging from colonialism to fascism and from eugenics to genocide. Whether antisemitism is best understood as racism or religious prejudice or cynical excuse for cruelty; whether Nazism’s ideological formations were sincerely believed or opportunistically deployed for other purposes – and if so what those purposes were; how questions of gender and sexuality were centered in Nazi policies and shaped the experiences of perpetrators, victims, bystanders, and beneficiaries; what the connections might be between the mass murder of the disabled and the Holocaust of European Jewry; how best to understand the violence of colonial encounters between Europeans and non-Europeans as either literally preparatory for the Holocaust or, together with the history of racial repression in the United States, as both inspirational for Nazi policymakers and as a comparativist resource for deeper comprehension: all of these matters have been explored in the remarkable efflorescence of brilliant historiography of the last five to ten years. Additional new “turns” in the historiography of the Holocaust in particular include the “familial” turn (especially pertinent for understanding life in hiding and in the ghettos) and the “inebriation” turn (germane above all for grasping the atmosphere and practices in the killing fields and in death factories like Belzec, Sobibor, and Treblinka).
Professor's permission required. Capped at 12 students.
Syllabus

 
HIST 72600 - Global Enlightenment
Monday, 4:15-6:15 pm, Room: 3207, 3 credits, Prof. Helena Rosenblatt
Crosslisted with MALS

The Eighteenth Century Enlightenment is widely seen as a transformative moment in Western culture, one with radical consequences for almost all aspects of Western modern thought. But recent scholarship has also exposed the sexism, racism and imperialism of Enlightenment thought. This course will explore how eighteenth century thinkers perceived of the world outside of Europe. We will consider if the very notion of an “Enlightenment” is Euro-centric and, at best, condescending idea, of little use today and that should perhaps be discarded. We will consider whether regions outside of Europe experienced an Enlightenment too—and, if so, was it different from that of Europe’s? Finally, was there a cross-fertilization between European  “enlightened” ideas and those from other countries beyond? With the help of both primary and secondary sources, we will investigate the Enlightenment from a global perspective.
Syllabus
 
HIST 73900 - Britain and the World
Wednesday, 6:30-8:30 pm, Room: 5212, 3 credits, Prof. Tim Alborn
This course explores different channels of intercourse between Great Britain and the rest of the world between 1750 and the present. It opens with surveys of Britain’s ambivalent location between America and Europe, its status an imperial power in the nineteenth century, and its changing role in the world since then. It then discusses spaces, goods, and people that have framed, moved, and settled in and among British territories and trading partners: including colonial America and the US, India, Ireland, Jamaica, and Australia. 
Syllabus

American History


  
HIST 75400- Political Economy of Slavery and Freedom
Tuesday, 2-4 pm, Room: 6421, 3 credits, Prof. James Oakes
For many years historians described the Civil War as a conflict between a free-labor capitalist society in the North and the slave labor society of the South.  More recently that framework has come into question by historians who see southern slavery itself as a brutally exploitative capitalist system, different in degree perhaps but not in kind from the economic system of the antebellum North.  This course will take up this issue through a close examination of the political economies of the North and South. Some of the questions we will ask include:  What is capitalism?  What is slavery?  If slavery and free labor were both “capitalist,” why did the North develop cities and industries at a much faster pace than the South?  If slavery and free labor were fundamentally different, why did the slaveholders behave like profit-maximizing rationalists?  To what degree was northern urban and industrial development depend on the profits of southern slavery rather than the dynamic relationship between the city and the countryside in the northern states? 
Syllabus

HIST 75300- From the Progressive Era to the New Deal: The Contours of Reform
Wednesday, 11:45 – 1:45 pm, Room: 6300, 3 credits, Prof. Thomas Kessner
This course focuses on topics in U.S. social, political and cultural history between 1900 and 1940. In this period the United States economy took on a global aspect, foreign policy turned isolationist, roles for women expanded and the U.S. was transformed from a largely agricultural and rural nation to one that was urban and metropolitan. Northern racial ghettoes formed and erupted, immigration was restricted, radicals were deported and the capitalist market surged, only to tank into depression.  The Us responded with uncertainty toward the rise of totalitarian governments in Europe and offered no haven to those seeking refuge. At the same time the succession of progressive politics, World War, prosperity and depression shaped a reform political regime that redrew the parameters of American political thought.   
 Readings will include a sample of classic works along with a selection of more recent monographs and interpretive studies.
Syllabus

HIST 75500- History of U.S. Labor and Capitalism ​
Thursday, 4:15-6:15 pm, Room: 3307 (note new room), 3 credits, Prof. Joshua Freeman
This course will consider the history of work, workers, and labor movements in the context of the changing capitalist economy, from the early 19th to the early 21st
centuries.  While the bulk of the course will be devoted to labor and labor relations, attention also will be paid to capitalist development more generally, including finance, commodity trade, the corporation, and globalization.  Topics will include artisan culture and craft unionism, factory production, cultural perceptions and representations of capitalism, the constitutive role of labor law, labor radicalism, the rise of industrial unionism, gender and race in labor markets and labor movements, capital mobility and deindustrialization, and global supply chains.  Readings will be in secondary works, including both recent and classic studies.  We will consider the historiography of labor and the significance of the emergence of the history of capitalism as an academic field.
Syllabus


HIST 75200- Warriors against Slavery: Lincoln, John Brown, and Frederick Douglass
Wednesday, 2-4 pm, Room: 3307, 3 credits, Prof. David Reynolds

 This course examines three leading antislavery figures of the Civil War era.  The three took action against the slave power’s increasing dominance of the U. S. government--Lincoln through politics, Douglass through authorship and lecturing, and Brown through violence. Douglass’s autobiographies, which span much of the nineteenth century, provide a vivid record of slavery, abolitionism, and Reconstruction.  His speeches and journalism illustrate his unceasing commitment to the cause of African Americans. Equally devoted to that cause was John Brown, of whom Douglass said, “I could live for the slave, but he could die for him.” We will trace Brown’s evolution, from his days as an Underground Railroad operative through his antislavery battles in Kansas to his doomed raid on Harpers Ferry, Virginia, which he hoped would lead to the fall of slavery but which instead resulted in his martyrdom on the gallows. Lincoln worked within the political system to end slavery. His speeches, debates, and public letters stand as timeless declarations of freedom and equality. His firm leadership of the nation during its most divided time established him as American’s greatest president. Despite their different approaches to slavery, these three antislavery leaders were connected in surprising ways. This course explores both the linkages and dissimilarities between the three. It also considers them against the background of the American Revolution, the Constitution, proslavery and antislavery thought, and cultural phenomena such as religion and popular literature. We will read key primary and secondary texts related to the three, including a definitive biography of each.
Syllabus


HIST 75000- The Age of Empires, 1492-1750
Thursday, 2-4 pm, Room: 6421, 3 credits, Prof. David Waldstreicher 
If “colonial America” is not, or not merely, the prehistory of the United States, then what is it?  In recent decades there has been a turn away from approaching North American and Caribbean colonies as a series of emergent and distinct communities or societies, and toward seeing them first as “contacts,” “contests,” or “conquests," then as an Atlantic and/or Continental world-in-formation. Most recently, these approaches seem to meld and, interestingly, return in part  to an older approach to early American history: a notion of the period as shaped fundamentally by the creation, entanglements, and  clashes of Spanish, British, Dutch, French, and Amerindian empires. Our readings will focus on attempts to use “empire” to understand both the big picture and the local lived realities of American history before the American Revolution. Among the key questions that will occupy us: does “empire” offer something analytically valuable that “atlantic,” "continental" or “global” approaches do not? Do neo-imperial histories have a bias toward certain subjects, interpretations? Do they bring Africans and Native Americans into something like the importance they actually had? Have correctives that emphasize transatlantic or imperial economies, politics, and wars come at the cost of the advances social historians made in delineating the making (and unmaking) of communities and the local experiences of natives, of settlers, of slaves? Where does “empire” leave seemingly separate but arguably central subjects like religion and gender? Has a culturalist sensibility enabled, informed, or set appropriate limits to a revised imperial approach?
Syllabus

History and Theory

 
 
HIST 72300- History and Theory II
Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 pm, Room: 3207 (note new room), 3 credits, Prof. Samira Haj
 
The question of the relationship of theory to history is laden with problems. The objective of the seminar is to explore more deeply the theoretical and analytical concerns that have haunted historians since History established itself as a discipline. The course is de facto thematically-organized as well as interdisciplinary, which by implication means that it will be drawing on different bodies of knowledge, including philosophy, political theory, anthropology, gender and legal studies with possibly some written narratives and accounts drawn from the field of history itself.
 
This course is a follow-up of the first History and Theory seminar and is a continuation rather than a repeat. While it might cover similar themes in more depth, it will not repeat the reading material covered in the first seminar.  The course is therefore open to students that have already taken the first and to all other students interested in the topic.
 
Tentatively, the reading list might possibly include:
Reinhart Koselleck, Sediments of Time: On Possible Histories (2018).
Jacques Derrida, Specters of Marx.
Michel Foucault, The Hermeneutics of the Subject.
--------------------, On the Government of the Living.
Kerwin Lee Klein, From History to Theory, 2011.
David Scott, Refashioning Futures.
Colin Koopman, Genealogy as Critique.
Paul Ricoeur, Memory, History and Forgetting
Arnold Davidson, The Emergence of Sexuality.
 R.G. Collingwood, The Idea of History.
Colin Dayan, History, Haiti, and the Gods.
Walter Benjamin, Critique of Violence.
Syllabus

Interdisciplinary


HIST 72200- Mothers in Law
Monday, 11:45am – 1:45pm, Room: C415A (note new room), 3 credits, Profs. Sara McDougall and Julie Suk
Crosslisted with MALS
This course will introduce students to central issues in the history and sociology of law, through the study of motherhood.  The lens of motherhood will open up broader themes in the study of law and society, including categories such as gender, constitutionalism, and criminal justice. Studying the socio-legal history of motherhood will enable students to learn the skills of legal reasoning, utilize methods of legal-historical research, and pursue experiential learning through field studies, panel discussions open to the public, and the authoring of publicly available teaching materials on select topics.
First, we will explore how ideas of women as mothers have been enshrined in law, from the legal definition of the mother in civil law, to the legal treatment of pregnancy.
Second, this course will study women as lawmakers, as "founding mothers" of twentieth-century constitutions, and laws more generally.  We will explore biographies of women lawyers and lawmakers.
Third, we will consider mothers as law-breakers, by engaging the history of mothers in prison, and the current legal issues arising from incarceration of mothers.  This component of the course may include field trips to engage the criminal justice system.
Syllabus
Syllabus



See Also

 

IDS 81620 - Voices of the City: accessibility, reciprocity, and self-representation in place-based community research
Thursdays, 2-4pm, Profs. Prithi Kanakamedala (Bronx Community College, History) and Tarry Hum (Queens College and The Graduate Center, Environmental Psychology)

Scholars active in place-based or participatory action research are committed to documenting community narratives and neighborhoods. It is central to our work, rooted in social justice, that these communities are not just represented, but that they have equitable stake in the project. Yet practitioners across the city struggle with core issues of accessibility, reciprocity, self-representation, and equity within the communities they work with. Who do place-based researchers represent, and does our work empower communities to tell their own stories? What histories do we contest and perpetuate with this work? And, who gets to participate? This inter-disciplinary course combines best or effective practices in Public History, Oral History, and Urban Planning to consider a number of projects in New York City that seek to document communities and narratives about the city that are not traditionally represented.

 

Research and Writing Seminars


Hist. 80010- Literature Survey in American History
GC: Mondays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 5 credits, Prof. David Nasaw
This is a reading course, a very heavy reading course.  Because it carries 5 credits, instead of the usual 3, students will be expected to read the equivalent of two monographs a week.   There will be short papers assigned periodically and a departmental final.   Our objective is to give you a short-order, preliminary, abbreviated introduction to the field, one that introduces you to critical elements, questions, issues, structures in U.S. political, economic, social, cultural, and gender histories, wherever possible and fitting, with a global perspective.  
We will steamroll our way through the past century and a half, providing you with what we hope will be the basic building blocks, the questions, areas of inquiry, and bibliography out of which you can structure your first and subsequent years of teaching and research.   Our topics are the standard ones that you will need to cover in your teaching and which we hope will serve as a foundation for future research:  Reconstruction; Industrialization and American Capitalism; Immigration; Political Movements and Campaigns from Populism to Progressivism, the New Deal, the Great Society, and the Conservative Responses to each; Feminism and Gender Politics; Racism, Civil Rights, and White Supremacy; Imperialism, World Wars, and Cold Wars; Urbanization and Suburbanization; Neoliberalism, Deindustrialization and Globalism;  Culture, Media, and Communications;  The Politics of Identity and Difference.   
            Attendance is required for each class session.  Participation is expected.  Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus

Hist. 80020- Literature Survey in European History
GC: Thursdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 5 credits, Prof. Benjamin Hett
This course is intended to provide an introduction to the major themes and historians’ debates on modern European history from the 18th century to the present. We will study a wide range of literature, from what we might call classic historiography to innovative recent work; themes will range from state building and imperialism to war and genocide to culture and sexuality. Students will be expected to take the lead in class discussions: each week one student will have the job of introducing the literature for the week, while another student brings to class questions for discussion. Over the semester students will write a substantial historiographical paper on a subject chosen in consultation with the instructor. This paper will be due on the last day of class. After completing the course students should have a solid basic grounding in the literature of modern Europe, which will serve as a basis for preparation for first year written exams, oral exams, and teaching and research work. Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus

Hist. 84900- Seminar in American History II
GC: Tuesdays, 2-4 pm, 5 credits, Prof. Thomas Kessner
There are two essential responsibilities for the seminar: the preparation of the research paper and fully engaged participation in the discussions and critiques of work submitted by other participants.
The objective of this Seminar is for students to expand and refine their skills in research and historical writing by carrying out the research project they proposed in the Fall semester. The required article length historical research paper must be a piece of original work on American history, substantially based on primary sources. It should engage a clearly defined historiographical problem, be well written, effectively organized and cogently argued. In class, we will workshop in-progress drafts and discuss research methods and writing strategies.  Students will also review and critique the works in progress submitted by their colleagues. Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus

Hist. 84900- Seminar in Non-American History II
GC: Tuesdays, 2-4 pm, 5 credits, Prof. Dagmar Herzog
This course is a continuation of History 84000 (Seminar in Non-American History I.) Students will develop and complete the research project begun in the fall and turn their prospectuses into 35-page papers of publishable quality. Course Learning Objectives: At the end of this course, students should be able to demonstrate the ability 1) to identify, analyze, and succinctly summarize the significance of appropriate primary and secondary sources; 2) to develop an effective and original historical argument; 3) to write a well-organized and compelling scholarly article; and 4) to critique in a helpful way, both in writing and verbally, the work of fellow students. No books are required for this course. Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus

Hist. 84900- Advanced Research Seminar 
GC:  Wednesdays, 4:15 am-6:15 pm, 5 credits, Profs. David Gordon and Dagmar Herzog
The aim of this seminar is for students to expand and refine their skills in historical research and writing by carrying out a research project and completing an article length historical paper of 30-40 pages. The required paper must be a piece of original work on some historical topic, largely based on primary sources and informed by current historiography. Students should come to the first session with a research topic in mind and a preliminary bibliography. The first few sessions will focus on issues of methodology, conceptualization and interpretation. By the third week of class students will submit a formal proposal (4-6 pgs) describing the topic to be researched, the methodology to be used, the sources to be employed, how the proposed work fits within the historical literature and the importance of the project. A critical bibliography of the most important secondary sources will also be required. Open only to PhD Program in History students.

Hist. 89900- Dissertation Seminar 
GC: Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 0 credits, Prof. Julia Sneeringer
ABD?  This workshop is NBD - Nothing But Dissertation.  We will spend the semester workshopping your dissertations-in-progress.  Each of you will present sections of your thesis to the group and comment on each other’s work.  I will provide guidance on structure, argumentation, and effective writing strategies.  Open only to Level 3 PhD Program in History students who have successfully defended their dissertation prospectus.

American History

 
Hist. 75000 - Era of American Revolution
GC:  Thursdays, 2-4 pm, 3 credits, Prof. David Waldstreicher
Well before the war ended, people were already arguing about what the American Revolution might mean, and the argument goes on. How important, and how revolutionary, was the American Revolution? What kind of revolution was it – political, constitutional, nationalist, localist, social, cultural or ideological, settler-colonial?  What kinds of before, during, and after stories have historians told about this event? How have trends in politics, in intellectual life, and in the writing of history changed the story? To paraphrase a famous comedy skit that invoked another chestnut of US History... was it revolutionary? was it even an era?  What were – and are - the relationships between what one influential historian of the Revolution called, more fifty years ago, "rhetoric and reality"? How much emphasis should be placed on the Revolution in understanding the late eighteenth century? The origins of the United States? Or world history?
This readings course begins with the debates among scholars as they emerged and developed during the twentieth century in part in response to the revolution’s first chroniclers and the Revolution's place in American identity; moves on to a recent efflorescence of scholarship that may or may not belie the notion of some elder practitioners about a decade ago that the field is moribund or polarized in old debates; and concludes with attention to the role that memory of the Revolution plays in U.S. politics and culture today.
Syllabus

Hist. 75200 - American Civil War
GC:  Mondays, 2-4 pm, 3 credits, Prof. James Oakes

This is a reading course emphasizing some of the most recent scholarship on the Civil War.  No single approach or interpretation will prevail.  The readings will cover the social, political, military, and economic history of the war, with attention to both the Union and the Confederacy.  The course begins and the secession crisis and ends in 1865.  For students with little or no background in the subject, it would be helpful to have read James M. McPherson, Battle Cry of Freedom, which is the best one-volume study of the Civil War.
            Every student will be required to prepare at least one review of the week’s readings and present it to the class as a stimulus to discussion.  The review should be written out and should take between ten to fifteen minutes to present.  Half of the review should be devoted to summarizing the book, the other half to analyzing the interpretation.  Final grades will be based on the review plus class participation.
Syllabus

Hist. 75800 - Twentieth Century New York City
GC:  Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Mike Wallace
How to tackle the history of Gotham – one of the most complex human constructions the species has yet come up with – as it transpired over the twentieth century?
I propose two methods. One is to read two of my efforts at grasping the whole thing in its entirety. Greater Gotham (2017), which covers the period from 1898 to1919, has been generously reviewed by the critics, but I would value seminarians’ professional assessment of its methodology and execution. That goes double for the chunk of text I’ll be handing out, drawn from the working draft of Gotham III (1920-1945), on the city during World War 2.The second method is to read new and classic accounts of the city in the twentieth century, with an emphasis on emerging interpretations and histories. The seminar will be organized in chronological order. Each session will take up (on average) four books, which are centered in that week’s period, and further delimited by some obvious topic focus(es): thus the twenties boom (consumerism, prohibition), the thirties depression (new deal, radical culture), the fifties (cold war, urban renewal), the sixties (black, women, gay, antiwar, antipoverty movements), the seventies (so-called fiscal crisis, punk culture), the eighties (immigration, gentrification, homelessness, crack), the nineties (financialization), etc etc.
Everybody will read one of the week’s books as part of a team. If we have twenty seminarians and four books, there’ll be four teams of five. Each book will be introduced to the general assemblage by two members of its team, one making the strongest positive case for the volume, the other taking the most critical position. Both of the commentators (they can prepare in concert or independently) will post a presentation (four to eight pages) that describes the book's argument, and surveys reviews. A quick oral summary of the posted analyses by the opposing presenters will be followed by a half hour of general conversation.
In addition, seminarians will be expected to read a book (or a congeries of books)  and write a substantial review essay – again drawing on commentaries already out there in the scholarly and popular literature – something on the order of a piece in the New York Review of Books or Reviews in American History, etc.
Below is a list of roughly a hundred tentative titles, from which the weekly readings – and volumes for individual review – might be drawn, but would welcome suggestions for additional books, and alternative period focuses. The goal is to collectively fashion a generally acceptable reading and writing program before the seminar begins.
Reading list
Syllabus

Hist. 75700 - Legacies of World War II: The UN and the Ongoing Global Struggle for Civil Rights, Women's Rights, Human Rights
GC:  Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Blanche Wiesen Cook
 The Legacy of WWII and the UN, will explore the ongoing struggles for civil rights, women's rights, and human rights -- promised by the creation of the UN and passage of the UNDHR on l0 December l948.  Alas, as UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres said upon opening the General Assembly in 2018: we are further away from Human Rights worldwide than we were 70 years ago! We will explore the movements, US politics from the Roosevelt era to this treacherous moment -- how did we get here? What are the current movements for hope -- peace and justice?  There are splendid and controversial new readings; student interests &involvements are key.
Syllabus

Middle East History

Hist. 78110- Slavery and Social Hierarchies in Islamic History
GC: Thursdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Anna Akasoy

In this class, we will explore social, political, economic, legal, and cultural aspects of slavery in premodern Islamic history. Starting in the late antique Mediterranean, we will consider the emergence of a variety of forms of slavery in the Islamic Middle East, including military slavery, agricultural slavery and the phenomenon of female slaves at Muslim courts. We will end with the complex relationship between Islam and transatlantic slavery. We will consider a range of sources, including legal material and popular literature.
Syllabus

Hist. 88110- Imperialism in Modern Middle East
GC: Mondays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Simon Davis  
 
This course surveys how interaction with increasingly influential foreign interests, and responses to them, both assimilative and resistant, shaped leading currents in Middle Eastern experience from the late eighteenth century onwards. Themes include imperialism in historical interpretation, perceptions and framings of the region, forms of political, economic, cultural and social change, and in Middle Eastern intra-regional, international and global relations. Each session will feature a discussion on a theme preceded by suggested readings from course texts, related published documents, and specialized scholarly journal articles assigned for discussion. Students will each complete a research essay chosen from a number of given titles and reading lists, a number of smaller critical exercises and a final examination.
Syllabus
 

European History


Hist. 71500- France and French Empire
GC: Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Clifford Rosenberg
This course will survey the historiography of France and its empire since the conquest of Algeria in 1830. Examining a mix of classic and more recent works, we will pay special attention to two central themes that have preoccupied historians of the past generation: (1) immigration, anti-Semitism, and Vichy, and (2) controversies over the French empire and its relationship to the Republican tradition.
Syllabus

Hist. 72000- Commerce and Society in Early Modern Europe
GC: Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Francesca Bregoli  
The rise of global trade and imperial ambitions during the early modern period led to great political, cultural, and material changes. This course explores early modern practices of trade as well as cultures of exchange more broadly, and their repercussions in shaping European society from the late 15th to the end of the 18th century. What processes led to the expansion of the market, the success of trading networks, and the formation of a consumer culture? How did networks of trade impact and inform cross-cultural relations? How did global trade shape European perceptions of the world, and how did the new availability of consumer goods change behaviors and habits? The course approaches these questions from the perspective and with the tools of cultural and social history. Topics will include trans-regional merchant diasporas; cross-cultural trade and communication; the early modern culture of credit and obligation; the trade of drugs; piracy and captivity; brokerage and diplomacy; patronage and the gift economy; and the rise of consumer society. Although the main focus of the course is on early modern Europe and the Mediterranean, attention will be paid to the Ottoman Levant, North Africa, and the colonial world.
Reading List
Syllabus


Latin American History

 
Hist. 76900- Afro-Latin America
GC: Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Herman Bennett
Until quite recently, few thinkers or writers have employed the term Afro-Latin America to reference peoples or populations who descended from Africans.  Though this population has been in existence since the initial arrival of Europeans in the late fifteenth-century, colonial officials, missionaries, conquerors and elites generally employed terms like esclavo/escravo (slave) to identify legal and, secondarily, racial status.  From this emerged a proliferation of terms that served to categorize, if not regulate, the various peoples of African descent.  Afro-Latin American as a term, however, did not exist prior to the 20th century and if used, it was sparingly mobilized.  For this reason, a course entitled: Afro-Latin America both represents an engagement with the present, and constitutes a provocation. Rather than normativizing this provocation, this course engages it head on by asking and exploring how, when and why the term Afro-Latin America emerged and with it the study of that field of experience.
Syllabus

Transnational History

Hist. 72400 - Adventures in Marxism
GC:  Mondays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Richard Wolin

     In his “Theses on Feuerbach” (1846) Marx, seeking to free himself from Hegel’s tutelage, famously declared that, “Heretofore, philosophers have only interpreted the world; however, the point is to change it!” At the time, little did Marx realize the immense historical influence his ideas and doctrines would have. For decades to come, Marx’s theories would inspire intellectuals and political activists in Europe, Latin America, and Asia – although, often in ways that would have undoubtedly astonished Marx himself. After all, the first “successful” communist revolution occurred not in a highly industrialized society, as Marx had prophesied, but instead in Tsarist Russia: a nation that had only recently freed its serfs and that was still largely agrarian. Although as late as 1956, Jean-Paul Sartre could still refer to Marxism optimistically as, “The unsurpassable philosophy of our time,” following World War II, with the rising tide of decolonization, the torch of World Revolution had clearly passed (in the words of Franz Fanon) to the “wretched of the earth” – to the denizens of the so-called “Third World.” To add to this litany of well-known paradoxes: in contemporary China, one of the few remaining communist nations, Marxism has paradoxically become the reigning ideology of a society that is unabashedly oriented toward exponential economic growth and conspicuous consumption. (Or, as Deng Xiaoping proclaimed during the early 1980s: “To get rich is glorious!”) Looking back from 1989 – the watershed year in which the Marxist regimes of Eastern Europe unraveled with breathtaking rapidity – intellectuals and pundits openly wondered whether the time had finally come to write Marxism’s epitaph. However, in light of the rise of neo-liberalism and the prodigious rise of social inequality, forecasts concerning Marxism’s demise would seem premature.
     Our primary focus will be the legacy of Marxist thought. As such, we will begin by examining the way in which Marx’s youthful confrontation with Hegel prepared the ground for the development of his notion of “historical materialism.” But very quickly, under the tutelage of the later Engels and the Second International, this conception congealed into a dogmatic body of received truths, precipitating what some have called the “crisis of Marxism.” At the time, one of the main responses to Marxism-in-crisis was “Leninism”: the idea that, since the European proletariat seemed increasingly lethargic, a vanguard party was required in order to focus its attention on the long-term goal of world revolution.
     Under the guise of a “return to Hegel,” and as an antidote to Soviet Marxism, the interwar period witnessed an efflorescence of philosophical Marxism. Among the highlights of this movement were Lukács’ History and Class Consciousness as well as the work of Walter Benjamin and the Frankfurt School – a renewal of Marxist thought that has been largely responsible for the postwar renaissance of “critical Marxism.” More recently, in books such as Revolution at the Gates, Slavoj Zizek has encouraged a “return to Lenin.” Similarly, the French Maoist, Alain Badiou, in part inspired by Sartre, has sought to resurrect Marx’s theory of the “subject.” Insisting that, as a critique of capitalism, Marxism has lost none of its historical relevance, Badiou claims that, by learning from its past defeats, Marxism can be resurrected.
Syllabus

See Also

French 81000: Sex and Single Mothers in Medieval France
GC: Monday 2pm – 4pm, 4 Credits, Professor Sara McDougall


It is hard to imagine anything other than terrible consequences for a woman pregnant from illicit sex living in medieval France. That said, both literary sources and documents of legal practice suggest many possible outcomes, including a less than tragic fate for the child and also for the mother. Christian doctrine condemned illicit sex, and operated with a double standard that often excused men while punishing women, but there was also an insistence on mercy and charity, and on the value of the life of an infant. Honor mattered enough to justify murder for some, but in other cases the preservation of honor by discretion and secrecy might also have led to different responses.
This course will examine ideas about and portrayals of women contending with out-of-wedlock pregnancy in a wide range of different kinds of French sources, from mystery plays and miracle stories to romance, from law codes and royal pardons to sermons and chronicles, fabliaux and farce, and prescriptive texts including hospital foundations, conduct literature, and gynecological treatises.
This course will be taught in English, with texts available in French and in translation

Soc. 85000 - Sociology of Violence
Tuesdays 2:00 – 4:00 pm, 3 credits, Prof. John Torpey jtorpey@gc.cuny.edu
 

This course explores sociological explanations for and analyses of violence in human life.  We will examine interpersonal violence as well as that inflicted by violent groups and military organizations.  Readings will include classical theories about violence as well as contemporary empirical studies and interpretations.


PDEV 79400  Advanced Spoken English: Teaching and Presentation Skills
GC:  Thursday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 5382, 0 credits, Prof. O’Shields [58693]
This course is designed to help students improve their spoken English in a variety of academic and casual settings through guided instruction of American-style conversation and direct instruction of spoken English fluency and pronunciation skills.  Additionally, students will be instructed in the standard methods and style of teaching and presenting for the American university classroom.  Students will also be discussing and learning about American culture via themes and topics that are relevant to the students’ interests.
 
PDEV 79401  Teaching Strategies
GC:  Wednesday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. 3212, 0 credits, Prof. Allen, [58694]
This course is designed to provide students with practical advice and hands-on exercises to help them design future courses and prepare for classroom teaching. It is grounded in an understanding of the social context of teaching at CUNY as well as providing some theoretical discussion of what makes for good pedagogical practice. This course will be especially valuable for graduate students who will soon be teaching undergraduate courses in the Humanities and Social Sciences.
 
PDEV 79403  Effective Academic Writing – for native English speakers
GC:  Thursday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. 5382, 0 credits, Prof. Jerskey, [58695] Section for native English speakers.
This course is designed to help students improve their academic writing.  This section is meant for native English speakers who want to address issues in their writing and overcome particular writing hurdles.
 
PDEV 79403  Effective Academic Writing – for non-native speakers
GC:  Tuesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 5382, 0 credits, Prof. Parmegiani [58696] Section for non-native English speakers.
This workshop course intends to help students improve their academic writing skills.  The section is restricted to students who speak English as a foreign language and will address common issues and problems that they may face when writing.  All students are required to share with the class a draft of their own academic writing in progress.

Research and Writing Seminars

 
Hist. 84900- Research Seminar I (listed as Seminar in American History I)
Tuesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 5 credits, Prof. Michael Pfeifer

Room 3305

The Research Seminar is a year-long course, in which students produce a substantial work of original scholarship, or a research paper of journal-article length. Research Seminar I is specifically designed to train incoming students in the practice of historical reasoning and the craft of historical research and writing. To those respective ends, in the fall semester the Seminar introduces students to the varieties of history, as well as reviews those skills and ethical practices requisite for the composition of a professional work of academic history. In Research Seminar I, students produce their research-paper proposal, in which they formulate a topic, pose a research question, identify those primary sources that will form the basis of the research paper, analyze the pertinent historical literature, propose a methodological approach, and, in light of that approach, elucidate the paper’s contribution to the historical literature. The purpose of the collateral assignments and any field trips for this course is to support the process of composing that proposal, which students workshop and defend before the class at the end of the semester. Weekly readings rather introduce students to the many schools and subfields of the discipline and their methodologies, by pairing short seminal theoretical pieces with exemplary works of history. Among the many subfields, in Fall 2018 topics will include studies of class and culture, ethnicity and race, gender and sexuality, the formation of the nation and process of globalization, human rights and world citizenship, the emotions and violence, information and communication, the environment and the anthropocene. Schedules permitting, the seminar will host guest speakers from the faculty, and other metropolitan-area institutions, to speak about their methodological approaches, thematic subfields, and careers. For PhD in History students only.
Syllabus
 
Hist. 80010- Literature of American History I
Thursday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 5 credits, Prof. David Waldstreicher
Room 3310B

 This course introduces Ph.D. students to the historiography of the U.S. through the Civil War and is intended to prepare students for the First Written Examination.
One of our primary concerns will be periodization. To what extent should the colonial period be considered a prologue to U.S. history? And on the other side of the nationhood divide, are there analyses that suggest a coherence or continuity to U.S. history beyond the peculiarities of the early republic or Civil War periods? What is the status of the Revolution and the Civil War, and the political history that drives or used to drive the narrative of U.S. history, amid transformations that might otherwise be seen as social, cultural, economic? Are there explanations that that cut across centuries, or stories that hold up in our time?  What are the most important achievements of recent US historians, and what are the trends in the field now?
The books and articles we shall discuss include prizewinning narratives, monographs born as dissertations, and historiographical essays. An important part of what we will be doing is attempting to read these in light of each other. Be forewarned: the reading is extensive, in recognition of the five credits this course carries and its status as required preparation for qualifying examinations. Our goal is to prepare for the exam, of course, but also to prepare to teach this period at the college level and to lay a substantial foundation for future research and teaching in any period of U.S. history.
Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus
 
Hist. 80900- Research Seminar I (listed as Seminar in European and non-American History I)
Tuesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 5 credits, Prof. Barbara Naddeo
Room 3310B

The Research Seminar is a year-long course, in which students produce a substantial work of original scholarship, or a research paper of journal-article length. Research Seminar I is specifically designed to train incoming students in the practice of historical reasoning and the craft of historical research and writing. To those respective ends, in the fall semester the Seminar introduces students to the varieties of history, as well as reviews those skills and ethical practices requisite for the composition of a professional work of academic history. In Research Seminar I, students produce their research-paper proposal, in which they formulate a topic, pose a research question, identify those primary sources that will form the basis of the research paper, analyze the pertinent historical literature, propose a methodological approach, and, in light of that approach, elucidate the paper’s contribution to the historical literature. The purpose of the collateral assignments and any field trips for this course is to support the process of composing that proposal, which students workshop and defend before the class at the end of the semester. Weekly readings rather introduce students to the many schools and subfields of the discipline and their methodologies, by pairing short seminal theoretical pieces with exemplary works of history. Among the many subfields, in Fall 2018 topics will include studies of class and culture, ethnicity and race, gender and sexuality, the formation of the nation and process of globalization, human rights and world citizenship, the emotions and violence, information and communication, the environment and the anthropocene. Schedules permitting, the seminar will host guest speakers from the faculty, and other metropolitan-area institutions, to speak about their methodological approaches, thematic subfields, and careers. For PhD in History students only.
Syllabus
 
Hist. 80020- Literature of European History I
Thursday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 5 credits, Prof. Allison Kavey
Room 3306

 This course provides an introduction to the literature of European history from the Late Middle Ages through the eighteenth century.  It explores different conceptual frameworks and methodological approaches to the period and examines an assortment of classic and recent works on a variety of topics: religion and the state; science, technology, and medicine; economy and society; gender and sexuality; and ideas and mentalities.  The course prepares students for the end-of-semester comprehensive examination and for further study of early modern Europe.
Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus

European ​History


Hist. 72400- Authoritarian National Populism and the Crisis of Democracy
Monday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Richard Wolin
Room 5382

With communism’s unexpected demise in 1989, optimistic forecasts concerning the worldwide triumph of democracy proliferated. During the 1980s and 1990s, authoritarian regimes unraveled not only in Europe, but also in Asia, Latin America, and South Africa, spurring hopes that a long overdue “Third Wave” of democratization was underway.
Recently, it has become painfully evident just how premature and naïve these prognoses were. Over the last ten years, instead of the triumph of liberal democracy, we have witnessed the global ascendancy of authoritarian national populism.
In part, these developments signify a defensive response to the depredations of globalization and neoliberalism. But they also represent a rejoinder to problems that, historically, have been endemic to modern democracy – problems such as: (1) how to determine who counts as part of the demos (women? those without property? religious and ethnic minorities?); and (2) which institutional mechanisms ensure that that the “will of the people” is adequately reflected by the representatives who purportedly govern in its name.
Today, the disturbing rise of political authoritarianism and ethnic nationalism reflects diminished confidence in the capacity of parliamentary democracy to remedy the acute social disequilibrium – economic, cultural, and political – intrinsic to political liberalism. Our approach to these problems will be threefold: (1) historical, (2) theoretical, and (3) political. Among the noteworthy theorists of political authoritarianism that we will discuss are: Hannah Arendt, Carl Schmitt, and leading representatives of the Frankfurt School (T. W. Adorno, Herbert Marcuse, etc.)
Syllabus

Hist. 72800- Global Perspectives on the Enlightenment
crosslisted with MALS and French

Tuesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Helena Rosenblatt
Room 3308

The Eighteenth Century Enlightenment is widely seen as a transformative moment in Western culture, one with radical consequences for almost all aspects of Western thought. But how did eighteenth century thinkers perceive the world outside of Europe? Did regions outside of Europe experience an Enlightenment too? Finally, was there a cross-fertilization of ideas between the regions and, if so, how did it happen and how did it manifest itself? With the help of both primary and secondary sources, we will investigate the Enlightenment from a global perspective.
Syllabus
 
Hist. 72500- Fashion in Early Modern Europe
Monday, 2-4 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Amanda Wunder
Room 3421

This seminar will examine the art and history of fashion in early modern Europe from the fifteenth through the eighteenth centuries. Precious few secular garments made before the eighteenth century survive, so we will be trying out a variety of sources and methods to gain a sense of the “period eye” to see and understand what clothing meant from various perspectives in the early modern period.  Seeking to understand the processes behind change and innovation in fashion, we will be looking at developments in textiles and clothing as they took place within broader historical contexts (global, political, economic, religious, and social). Students will acquire a firm grounding in the historiography of the field, which has been especially rich and dynamic in recent years. In class sessions at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and other collections we will learn from original objects such as: textiles, vestments, and accessories; printed costume books and tailoring manuals; portraiture; arms and armor. Other classes will include practical experience working with a variety of primary sources and methods, including historic reconstruction.
This interdisciplinary course is not restricted to students in Art History and History; students from other departments and programs are very welcome. Please email Prof. Wunder if you need permission to enroll. Auditors will be accepted by permission of instructor only if space allows.
* Important note: About half of the class sessions will meet away from the Graduate Center at museums in Manhattan (mostly the Metropolitan Museum of Art); please allow for travel time in your schedule. Also note that the Registrar has scheduled one class on a Thursday (Sept. 6).
 
Requirements:
Active participation and regular contributions to classroom discussions and museum visits; oral presentation on at least one week’s readings. Written assignments: Short paper based on a primary source or museum object due mid-semester; final research paper and brief oral presentation at the end of the term.
 
Preliminary Reading:
These and other course materials will be available on DropBox; email Prof. Wunder (Amanda.Wunder@Lehman.CUNY.edu) for the link after enrolling in the course.
Timothy McCall, “Materials for Renaissance Fashion,” Renaissance Quarterly 70, no. 4 (2017): 1449-64. 
Sarah-Grace Heller, “The Birth of Fashion,” chapter 2 in Fashion in Medieval France (2007); reprinted in The Fashion History Reader, ed. Giorgio Riello and Peter McNeil (2010).
Syllabus

American History


Hist. 75700- Immigration and Citizenship in US
Monday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. David Nasaw
Room 5383

 "Immigrants, refugees, and the ceaseless, sometimes futile quest for American citizenship" 
 
There is nothing new in the current debates on immigration, refugees, and paths to citizenship or the rancor, the anger, the fear that envelopes them.  Every nation on earth is defined by its immigration and citizenship policies.   Every nation on earth chooses, in one way or another, its future citizens.   In a representative democracy, these decisions are made through the political process.  
In this course we will examine how and why Americans have chosen to welcome or close this nation's mighty gates to those who sought to enter our nation and become our fellow citizens.   While attentive to European migrations from the seventeenth to the twenty-first centuries, we will focus on twentieth and twenty-first century border crossings from Mexico, immigrations from Asia and the Chinese exclusion acts, and the discordant and unintended consequences of post-World War II legislation.     
The readings will explore the separate but entwined historical literatures on “citizenship” and “immigration.”  I have designed them to be global in reach and interdisciplinary in perspective.   We will read works of history and sociology, as well as novels and memoirs written by authors who have immigrated to the United States in recent years, some with, some without their families.   
Students may be asked to write short papers in the course of the semester and a major final paper in the form of a “lecture” to undergraduates or civic groups on the themes and issues discussed in the readings. 
This is designed as a seminar, not a lecture course.
Syllabus
 
Hist. 75200- Origins of the Civil War
Tuesday, 2-4 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. James Oakes
Room 3307

What was the Civil War all about?  The answer lies largely in its origins.  This course examines various aspects of what historians call “The Crisis of the 1850s,” the crucial decade that ended in the secession of eleven slave states from the Union?  Why did they secede?  And why didn’t Lincoln let them?  The readings focus on two aspects off the crisis.  We will first review conflicting interpretations of the origins of the Civil War, after which we will focus on specific aspects of the crisis of the 1850, in particular the cascading series of events that led to war:  the War with Mexico, the “Compromise” of 1850, the fugitive slave crisis, the struggle over Kansas, the Dred Scot decision, the collapse of the Whig Party, the rise of the Republican Party, the catastrophic fissure of the Democratic party, and finally the election of Lincoln and the secession crisis.  No one methodology can adequately account for the origins of the Civil War—it requires economic, social, political, and cultural history.
Syllabus
 
Hist. 74300- 19th Century Women’s History
Monday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Kathleen McCarthy
Room 5383

When women’s history emerged as a subfield in the 1960s, its initial goal was to write women into the historical record.  Since then, the analytical focus has shifted from an emphasis on “sisterhood” to class relations, political culture, gender constructs, sex, transnationalism, and colonialism and empire.  Cultural analyses have also become increasingly important, illuminating the subtexts that shaped women’s lives in different regions and eras, while microhistories have excavated the lives of ordinary Americans in revealing ways.  This course will chart these historiographical shifts, as well as the ways in which women’s history has reshaped our understanding of American history for the period between 1790 and 1900. 
Within this framework a variety of topics will be explored, including: 1) the legacy of the Revolution; 2) microhistory, 3) crime; 4) slavery; 5) social reform; 6) religion; 7) war; 8) capitalism; 9) race; 10) transnationalism;  11) imperialism; and 12) women’s  political culture.  Particular emphasis will be placed on the ways in which historians have analyzed the changing cultural contexts that shaped women’s activities in different regions and times. 
The goal of this course is threefold: 1) to help students prepare for their written and oral examinations; 2) to deepen their knowledge of the ways in which women’s history has reshaped our understanding of American history; and 3) to bolster their research, writing and analytical skills. 
Students will lead one to three discussion sessions, and have a choice of doing weekly abstracts on the assigned readings for the weeks in which they are not presenting, or developing a research proposal on a women’s history topic of their choice for the period between 1790 and 1900.
Syllabus

Hist. 75000- Public History
Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Andrew Robertson
Room 3307

 This seminar will begin by considering the subject matter, methodology and practice of public history.  A broad definition of public history would include historical evidence presented and interpreted for a wide audience outside of the academy. Public historians employ the methods of academic history and expand them by joining traditional and non-traditional evidence, inventing new formats for public presentation and reframing historical questions in a lively and accessible context.  By employing old and new forms of evidence, broadening the intended audience for the reception of historical scholarship, rethinking strategies of presentation and redirecting historical interpretations, public historians are creating an innovative and defined practice.  Public history prepares historians to consider their research in a popular and accessible context.
This seminar will introduce students to the context, methodology and practice of Public History in the following ways:
The first few weeks of the course will examine the definitions of public history, its origins, nature and prospects.  Topics include how versions of the past are created, institutionalized and disseminated as public memory in civic festivities, memorials and monuments; in invented tradition and in popular culture, including print media, film television and social media; and in the creation of public spaces. We will also consider the relationship of public memory and collective memory in museums (e.g. presenting Native America). This seminar will consider controversial case studies over historical presentation, including the Enola Gay Exhibition and the exhibits at the new Museum of African American History at the Smithsonian.  The remainder of the course will examine other aspects of public history including community and local history, oral history and digital history. Course requirements include leading one or more class discussions and a final research paper that describes and analyzes how a particular topic or issue in history has been interpreted and presented in a variety of public history formats.
Syllabus
 
Hist. 75800- Topics in US Urban History 1840-1940
Thursday, 11:45 – 1:45 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Thomas Kessner
Room 6493

For those who would understand America’s past, the role of urban society is crucial. The influence of our cities has been considerable, pervasive and shaping. America's cities exerted broad economic, political and cultural authority, often steering the transforming forces of nineteenth and twentieth century American life.
Historians have too often studied the city as a closed system of locally limited relations, but the impact of cities and especially the major metropolises on national life has been extraordinary. If the founding elite of the early republic - Washington, Jefferson, Madison and Monroe - fastened upon the nation the ethos of the plantation and southern life, cities assumed a more important part in setting national priorities following the Civil War.
Herald of twentieth century modernity, urban America, made itself into the center of world capitalism and American diversity. Urban America’s fabled diversity provides a riveting history of relations between groups divided by class, interest, culture, ethnicity, and race. The variety of city markets and services afforded urban centers a reach in space and influence that remains unmatched and offers a fascinating perspective for examining the development of American economic, social, and political life.
A generation and more of freshly conceived city studies have dispelled local history's lingering fascination with superficial antiquarianism. Urban historians have fashioned a rigorous body of systematic work that is informed by theory and broad questions. Skilled in the tools of social science, and sensitive to calls for inclusion and complexity, city scholars have crafted a textured urban past from the lives of workers, women, ethnic and racial minorities and other strands from the common weave. Emphasizing analysis over narrative, applying new techniques to the study of social, economic and demographic patterns, and interested in subjects having to do with the material basis of existence, as well as cultural and political issues, these historians have elaborated a complex process of city history.
We will examine recent studies as well as a number of works that are recognized as classics in the field to arrive at a compelling if not entirely coherent overview of American urban life in the century, 1840-1940.
Syllabus


World ​History


Hist. 72600- Socialism and Communism: Ideas, Movements, States
Wednesday, 2-4 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Eric Weitz

Room 3307

Socialism and Communism developed into the largest international movements of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. They offered profound critiques of capitalism and the promise of freedom to men and women no matter what their nationality or race. Yet as they achieved power, socialists moderated their emancipatory drive and communists constructed oppressive dictatorships. This course, global in scope, will examine all aspects of socialism and communism in the modern world. We will begin in the very late eighteenth century with the first emergence of socialist ideas and continue through the utopian socialists and the Second and Third Internationals and the post-1945 communist states. The class will combine intellectual, social, and political history. We will read classic texts as well as historical analyses.
Syllabus

Hist. 72800- Global Perspectives on the Enlightenment
crosslisted with MALS and French

Tuesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Helena Rosenblatt
Room 3308

The Eighteenth Century Enlightenment is widely seen as a transformative moment in Western culture, one with radical consequences for almost all aspects of Western thought. But how did eighteenth century thinkers perceive the world outside of Europe? Did regions outside of Europe experience an Enlightenment too? Finally, was there a cross-fertilization of ideas between the regions and, if so, how did it happen and how did it manifest itself? With the help of both primary and secondary sources, we will investigate the Enlightenment from a global perspective.
Syllabus

History and Theory

 
Hist. 72200- The Geopoliticization of Sex: Histories and Theories
Tuesday, 2-4 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Dagmar Herzog
Instructor permission required. Please email dherzog@gc.cuny.edu.

Room 5383


In the early twenty-first century, sexual matters saturate high politics: from the giving or withholding of billions in development aid to the preoccupations of supranational human rights treaties and juridical institutions to the reasons given for nations to intervene in wars to the shapes taken by welfare states or their dismantling to transnationally organized activism and social media-fueled social movements across the ideological spectrum. We are living through an era of “the geopoliticization of sex,” involving levels of imbrication of sex with global politics to an extent that Michel Foucault could not have imagined when he was writing in the 1970s about sex as “an especially dense transfer point for relations of power.” We confront as well the double fact that, on the one hand, sexual rights of all kinds turn out to be fragile and contested, not just at state levels and within revitalized religious traditions but also popularly (as they are the focus of apparently considerable ambivalence for many people) while, on the other, the so recently hard-won ideals of sexual rights can, it turns out, be misused for other purposes entirely. Meanwhile, we encounter new questions about what exactly “sexuality” or “sex” even is, as well as recurrent skepticism about the very concepts of “rights,” “individual autonomy,” and “self-determination.”
The legacies of multiple pasts hang over all the current struggles. This is evident whether we are considering the ravages of HIV/AIDS or Zika or family planning programs or novel reproductive technologies, the persistence of sexual aggression and harm in war and peace, the instrumentalization of either support or hostility to LGBT individuals for other political agendas, the international concern with sex trafficking at the intersection of prostitution and wider migration processes, the growing affirmative visibility of individuals with disabilities concomitantly with the onslaught of neoliberal austerity projects, or the centrality of sexualized themes in the resurgence of xenophobia and right-wing populism worldwide.
This course will combine historiography and scholarship from adjacent disciplines (from military history and the history of economics to the histories of emotions and of the modern self, and from the histories of human rights law and NGOs to the sociology and anthropology of violence, of religion, and of disease and public health) with relevant theoretical readings with the pursuit of exploratory independent projects presented either as conference talks or as research papers. The theoretical readings will include texts concerned with psychoanalytic and decolonial approaches as well as epistemology, ontology, temporality, and causation. Foucault, in short, will be supplemented not only with Freud but also with Guattari, Laplanche, Koselleck, Moyn, Gessen, Stoler, Shepard, Scott, deLauretis, and Descola.
Together we will consider: What has changed even in the last five years in the questions we pose to the past? How can we make sense of recursive returns, deferred effects, and unexpected repercussions between different moments in time? And above all, a conceptual puzzle relevant to all historians: What should count as the pertinent backstories to which subsequent developments? We will thus spend significant time exploring the intersections of aspects of the history of sexuality with the histories of slavery, colonialism, Cold War conflicts, and past wars and genocides.
Syllabus
 
Hist 78400 - Sociology of Knowledge and Science
Tuesday, 2-4 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. John Torpey
Room 6114

 
This course examines the development of the sociology of knowledge and science from its nineteenth-century origins to the present day.  It seeks to convey an understanding of a) the ways in which knowledge has been grasped in sociological terms and b) the ways in which science and knowledge have affected social life in the past two centuries or so.
Reading List


Hist. 72300- Contemporary Theory and History
Tuesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Samira Haj
Room 7314

The question of the relationship of theory to history is laden with problems. While it is obvious that historians carry their research in archives, it is not obvious what analytical or theoretical frameworks historians utilize to make sense of the past, its relationship to the present and its potential relevance to the future. Obviously, the question of what is particularly historical about the discipline of history is central to the debate. The objective of this seminar is to explore some of the concerns that have haunted historians since history established itself as a modern discipline, including the notions of historical temporality, historical memory, conceptual history, periodization, historical materialism, genealogy and others that are more conceptual rather than historical per se. The course is de facto thematically-organized as well as interdisciplinary, which by implication means that it will be drawing on different bodies of knowledge, including philosophy, political theory, anthropology, religion and gender studies with some recent written narratives and accounts drawn from the history field itself.
Syllabus


Latin American History


 
Hist. 77000- Colonial Latin America
Wednesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Herman Bennett
Room 3307

         In recent years, some Latin Americanists have questioned the hermeneutics defining the field of colonial Latin American History.  The colonial designation some feel posits a disjuncture (or beginning) when it could be argued that continuity characterized the historical narrative.  While students of ideas, political practice, and the cultural domain have been the strongest proponents of this intervention, scholars of indigenous cultures—especially the Nahua Studies groups—share similar sentiments despite differences in scope and method.  Consequently, scholars have been utilizing terms like ‘early’ and ‘early modern’ Latin America to distinguish their work from a colonial project and its association with the rupture that Spanish hegemony allegedly implied.  Concurrently, a self-conscious collection of scholars identified as the Latin American subaltern studies group have called into question the elitist hegemony shaping the structure and content of Latin American history.  Scholars of the Latin American subaltern along with those who take issue with the occidental reasoning informing how Latin America history is currently conceived are introducing new terminology (subaltern, postcolonial, Afro-Latin American) that allegedly re-frames the Latin American past and present.  In our semester’s work, we shall explore the meanings and implications, if any, that this and other discursive shifts have had on Latin American historiography.  Even as this seminar attends to shifts in meaning and context, we will engage the substance of the existing historiography.
 
            This course is specifically designed as an introduction to the early modern/colonial field and is designed to prepare History graduate students for the major field exam in Latin American history.  Courses, despite their prominence in structuring graduate programs, merely introduce students to some of the overarching historiographic and conceptual themes defining a field.  To this end, a course identifies some areas of inquiry but in doing so obscures others.  At the core of this seminar are three thematic foci:
 
Firstly) Utilizing the concepts of movement, power, and difference one focus is to examine the formation of a Renaissance Atlantic in the period of 1400 to 1600 in which Iberian History and early Latin America played a central yet still overlooked role.  Framed as a question, I am asking: in what ways does recent scholarship on medieval and early modern Iberia call for a reconsideration of colonial Latin America history?  Ostensibly a historiographical question, it has epistemic implications.  In view that recent scholarship on the Iberian past has been transformative, what implications might this have on our thinking, approach, and writing of early Latin American history?  Successive turns, most notably the imperial and Atlantic ones, complicate matters by underscoring how nineteenth-century nationalist fabrications conjured up a mythic Iberia with profound consequences for the foundational representations of colonial Latin America history.
Secondly) through the prism of political economy this course will also bring into relief the genealogy of economy and government in early modern Iberia and the early modern Atlantic. In the wake of successive intellectual turns (the linguistic, feminist, cultural, the post-colonial, and archival turn), our engagement with the cultural domain has become finely honed but at the expense of our understanding of the social.  This dynamic, in many respects, reflects the working of related but distinct renderings of the political.  Arguably, for cultural historians narrating the political entails discursive formations and an awareness of how political rationalities are grafted on to cultural codes and grammars.  While we now understand how the political related to the social draws on similar discursive formations, it also embodies a materiality—signified in the relationship of the political to the economy as in ‘political economy’—that configures it as distinct.   To this end, the course will introduce students to a range of authors and texts which will develop our analytical skills as they relate to the realm of political economy.  To be clear, this aspect of the course is not intended to mean the study of economics or political science for historians.  While abstractions of the “economy” or “politics” figure prominently in the semester’s work, the course focuses on the contextualized meanings that these terms and related concepts implied for various authors and historical actors through time and space.  At the same time, it should be understood that this course does not offer a formalized discussion of ‘political economy’ framed through a historiography self-consciously stylized as such.  Instead by bringing a distinct selection of authors and texts into conversation seminar participants will hopefully refine their acumen for thinking and writing about the temporal and spatial specificity of early modern ‘political economy.’
Thirdly) this course seeks to situate the study of the African diaspora in the early modern period.  Accomplishing this task is no simple feat since the study of the black experiences in the New World and the African diaspora in general emerged as subjects of scholarly inquiry burdened by the weight of European colonial expansion and racial dominance.  In our efforts to route the study of the African diaspora through another scholarly abstraction—the early modern period—we will highlight the modern genealogies of many of our analytical concepts.  The intent here is not simply to offer a relentless critique but to foster ever more awareness for historical specificity.  By employing the heuristic concept of diaspora—and specifically the African diaspora—another thematic focus resides in the analytical work generated by studying cultures of movement.  As scholars, we might begin by asking whether diaspora complicates our understanding of disciplinary formations—including the normative assumptions that inform the study of society and culture.  How does diaspora, for instance, enhance our perspectives on imperial and colonial formations and the ways in which they have been historically represented?  In utilizing the prism of diaspora we confront the politics of representation through which scholars render meaning out of the past and present.  For this reason, diaspora like other categories of analysis engages the vexed terrain of representation whereby scholars frame the subject of their inquiries.
 
In reading and thinking about syllabi, you need to think about courses stated objectives, the instructor’s intent in relationship to those objectives, and the work a particular syllabus performs in relationship to previous and present intellectual formations.   Though designed for students in the Latin American field, the thematic and theoretical concerns informing the assigned readings and the course itself make this seminar accessible and of interest to early modern Europeanists, colonial Americanists, students of race, anthropology and cultural formations along with those interested in the current state of early modern cultural theories.
Syllabus

See Also

 

ANTH 81900 – Heterodox Marxism      
Thursday, 11:45 a.m. – 1:45 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Gary Wilder 

 Instructor permission required. Please email GWilder@gc.cuny.edu​
This course in intellectual history will focus on 20th century thinkers who sought to reconsider Marxism in relation to changing historical conditions (including transformations in capitalism, developments within the left, shifting balances of forces and political situations in particular national and regional contexts).  There will be sections on romantic Marxists (Lukacs, Bloch, Benjamin, Lefebvre), the Frankfurt School critique of state capitalism and instrumental reason (Horkheimer, Pollock, Adorno, Marcuse), Gramsci and his legacy of conjunctural analysis with regard to political strategy, cultural politics, and hegemonic projects (Gramsci, Althusser, Poulantzas, Castoriadis, Laclau), global/anti-imperial Marxism from the South (Rosa Luxemburg, José Carlos, Mariátegui, C.L.R. James, Samir Amin), and Marxism in an age of neoliberalism (Antonio Negri and David Harvey).



French 87200 - REFUGEE CRISES: HISTORY AND LAW, NARRATIVE, POETRY AND FILM.
Tuesdays 4:15-6:15; 4 credits, Domna Stanton

Why are we in the midst of an unparalleled refugee crisis that involves 65 million people? Such dislocations and displacements have occurred since the late 17th century, when the term was first coined; and they have proliferated over the past century, notably since 1915. Who is a refugee? Who qualifies for asylum, why and why not? What about unaccompanied minors; victims of forced migrations? What is the status of economic migrants; of internally displaced persons? How should we classify those fleeing climate catastrophes? Are these others viewed as human?
This course in critical refugee studies will begin with history (and histories), then focus on the development, successes –and failures--of the human rights regime, humanitarian law and regional instruments, such as those of the European Union. We will examine transnational North-South disparities as drivers of migration, and lastly, the current ideological and nationalist trends that have led to securitization, the closing of borders, and authoritarianism in the post 9/11 world.
We will consider particular cases: the Armenian genocide; the Holocaust; the aftermath of the Vietnam war; the intractable Palestinian problem; persecutions in Darfur and South Sudan; the flight from dictatorships, gangs and failing economies in the Americas (including Haiti); the European Union’s integrity. We will end with the present crisis catalyzed by the Syrian war.
Our approach will be interdisciplinary: critical studies in history, theory and law will combine with close readings of novels, including graphic texts, poetry, memoirs/testimonials, and documentaries that represent/construct figures of refugees as well as themes of longing, remembering and return in refugee art.
Authors/film makers include Abdelrazaq, Agamben, Ai Wei Wei, Arendt, Balibar, Bauman, Butler, Dandicat, Darwish, Derrida, Dummett, Eggers, Erpenbeck, Hisham, Lanzmann, Said, Viet Than Nguyen
Work for the course will involve, beyond close readings of assignments, a class presentation (and write-up) of a case study with other members of a team; a 20 page paper on a topic developed in consultation with the instructor; and a final exam. Course materials will be uploaded to Blackboard cAugust 15, 2018.
Please direct all questions about the course to Domna Stanton (dstanton112@yahoo.com).

 

Fall 2018 Professional Development Seminars

 
Students may register online for these courses, they are listed in the course schedule under “Professional Development”.  Course numbers are listed below. 
The courses are 0 credits and do not appear on student transcripts; they are free of charge and open to all matriculated Graduate Center students.
 
PDEV 79400  Advanced Spoken English: Teaching and Presentation Skills
GC:  Thursday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 0 credits, [63334]
This course is designed to help students improve their spoken English in a variety of academic and casual settings through guided instruction of American-style conversation and direct instruction of spoken English fluency and pronunciation skills.  Additionally, students will be instructed in the standard methods and style of teaching and presenting for the American university classroom.  Students will also be discussing and learning about American culture via themes and topics that are relevant to the students’ interests.
 
PDEV 79401  Teaching Strategies
GC:  Wednesday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 0 credits, Prof. Allen, [63336]
This course is designed to provide students with practical advice and hands-on exercises to help them design future courses and prepare for classroom teaching. It is grounded in an understanding of the social context of teaching at CUNY as well as providing some theoretical discussion of what makes for good pedagogical practice. This course will be especially valuable for graduate students who will soon be teaching undergraduate courses in the Humanities and Social Sciences.
 
PDEV 79403  Effective Academic Writing – for native English speakers
GC:  Thursday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 0 credits, Prof. Jerskey, [63340] Section for native English speakers.
This course is designed to help students improve their academic writing.  This section is meant for native English speakers who want to address issues in their writing and overcome particular writing hurdles.
 
PDEV 79403  Effective Academic Writing – for non-native speakers
GC:  Tuesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 0 credits, Prof. Parmegiani [63342] Section for non-native English speakers.
This workshop course intends to help students improve their academic writing skills.  The section is restricted to students who speak English as a foreign language and will address common issues and problems that they may face when writing.  All students are required to share with the class a draft of their own academic writing in progress.

Research and Writing Seminars

 
Hist. 80010- Literature Survey in American History
GC: Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 5 credits, Prof. Jonathan Rosenberg
Room 3308

This course focuses on some of the key developments in the history of the United States from the end of the Civil War to the late twentieth century. It is designed to help you prepare for the written and oral exams. It is also intended to help you teach your own U.S. history courses when the time comes to do so. The course requires a considerable amount of reading. Thorough preparation and informed participation on a weekly basis are essential. Specifically, for nearly every class, there will be two books that the entire class will be expected to read. In addition, there will usually be supplemental books “on the table” for discussion. These supplemental books will be assigned over the course of the semester, and students will give short presentations on those readings to the class. In addition to weekly response papers, students will be required to write historical and historiographic essays that will be due at the mid-point and conclusion of the semester. Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus


Hist. 84900- Seminar in American History II
GC: Tuesdays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 5 credits, Prof. Michael Rawson
Room 5212

This course is for first-year U.S. history majors and is the continuation of the Seminar in American History I.  Having conceptualized projects in the fall semester, each student will complete the research and writing of an article-length research paper over the course of the spring semester.  The class is designed as a workshop, in which participants will present their works-in-progress, constructively criticize one another’s writings, and tackle common problems of the research and writing process.  Students will be responsible for circulating drafts of their developing works electronically in advance of class and preparing written responses to others’ papers.  Timely completion of the assignments and collegial participation in the seminar are essential requirements. Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus

 
Hist. 80020- Literature Survey in European History
GC: Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 5 credits, Prof. Andreas Killen
Room 5212

This course is intended to provide an introduction to the major themes and historiographic debates in the field of modern European history from the 18th century to the present. We will study a wide range of literature, from works of classic historiography to innovative recent work; themes will range from state building and imperialism to war and genocide to culture and sexuality. After completing the course students should have a solid grounding in the literature of modern Europe, which will serve as a basis for preparation for oral exams as well as for later teaching and research work. Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus


Hist. 84900- Seminar in Non-American History II
GC: Tuesdays, 2-4 pm, 5 credits, Prof. Dagmar Herzog
Room 4433

 This course is a continuation of History 84000 (Seminar in European and Non-American History I.) Students will develop and complete the research project begun in the fall and turn their prospectuses into 35-page papers of publishable quality.
 
Course Learning Objectives: At the end of this course, students should be able to demonstrate the ability 1) to identify, analyze, and succinctly summarize the significance of appropriate primary and secondary sources; 2) to develop an effective and original historical argument; 3) to write a well-organized and compelling scholarly article; and 4) to critique in a helpful way, both in writing and verbally, the work of fellow students.
 
No books are required for this course. Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus


Hist. 84901- Advanced Research Seminar 
GC:  Tuesdays, 11:45 am-1:45 pm, 5 credits, Prof. Thomas Kessner
Room 5212

 In this course students will write and revise a 30- 40 page research paper of publishable quality.  The paper must be based on primary sources and current secondary sources, engage with a clearly defined historiographical problem, and reflect a high level of care for prose and professional standards.  In class, we will discuss research methods and writing strategies and and workshop in-progress drafts.  Students should identify a topic (with accessible sources) for their paper before the first meeting of the course.  The topic should be significantly different from each student's first year seminar paper but may constitute a piece of research that leads toward a dissertation.  The course is only open to students in the PhD Program in History who have completed the first year seminar. 
Syllabus
 
Hist. 89900- Dissertation Seminar 
GC: Mondays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 0 credits, Prof. Kathleen McCarthy
Room 5212

This workshop provides an opportunity for students to develop and complete dissertation chapters.  It will be conducted as a workshop, with students reading and commenting on one another’s drafts under the professor’s guidance. Open only to Level 3 PhD Program in History students who have defended their dissertation prospectus.

American History

 
Hist. 75900 - The Black Radical Tradition
GC:  Mondays, 2-4 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Robyn Spencer
Room 3309

 This course will trace the contours of the Black Radical Tradition in the twentieth century. It will focus on the dialectic between Black intellectual thought and social movement organizing on the ground to consider how Black radicalism impacted movements for change. Students will interrogate the works of some of the major historians defining the field of Black radicalism such as Robin Kelley, Dayo Gore, Russell Rickford, Minkah Makalani, Carole Boyce Davies and learn about organizations ranging from the African Blood Brotherhood to the Third World Women’s Alliance. Race, class, gender and sexuality will be used as intersectional analytical categories to guide our exploration.
Syllabus

Hist. 72800 - Readings in US Cultural History
GC:  Thursdays, 2-4 pm, 3 credits, Prof. David Waldstreicher
Room 6114

  This readings seminar, offered periodically, ranges broadly across U.S. history from the colonial period to the present. This year’s theme is culture wars as an approach to understanding the role of culture in U.S. history, including war.
                During the mid to late twentieth century historians came to see culture, in the form of ideals or ideologies, myths, and rituals, as what held the American nation together. More recently they are at least as likely to trace the roots and evolution of conflicts that are understood in terms of cultural differences. Similarly, US history has been seen as profoundly shaped by war-inspired consensus – or on the other hand marked by divisive wars that were caused by essential conflicts and which may have exacerbated conflict. What does it mean to characterize the culture of particular eras and as marked by war, by war’s aftermath, or by culture war? What is the relationship between how Americans see their culture(s) -- or culture itself -- and how they answer these questions? How have international contexts shape the vicissitudes of cultural conflict, consensus, and a long succession of wars? Does the analysis of culture as conflict akin to war, or as unifying like war, and of wars’ cultural dimensions helpfully inform narratives of history, of politics, and of real wars in the past? Is war an appropriate metaphor -- or is it a euphemism -- for the work of culture in a country made by war? Finally, what was and is the role of memory in a culture and history periodized by wars?
                In addition to active participation, students will be expected to complete and present to the seminar a project that (1) charts scholarly developments in one subfield and period of cultural history and (2) brings to the seminar a primary source that may be especially useful to teachers or curators or citizens in the future.
Syllabus

Hist. 75200 - Abraham Lincoln and His Era
GC:  Wednesdays, 2-4 pm, 3 credits, Prof. David Reynolds
Room 5382

 This course explores the historical contexts of Abraham Lincoln, who is widely recognized as America’s greatest president and its central historical figure. Lincoln provides a unique inroad into understanding the United States, since he led the nation at the time of its greatest crisis and he absorbed social and cultural phenomena that had defined the nation from its inception.  In Ralph Waldo Emerson’s words, “He is the true history of the American people in his time…, the true representative of this continent…, [with] the pulse of twenty millions throbbing in his heart, the thought of their minds articulated by his tongue.”  We shall consider Lincoln as politician, commander in chief, orator, and popular icon. We will read a broad array of his writings—speeches, debates, poems, letters—as well as contemporary observations of him by a variety of figures. We will delve into the controversy over slavery waged by abolitionists, proslavery southerners, ethnographic scientists, and politicians and clergymen on both sides. Examining Lincoln and his contexts is also an instructive exercise in cultural history, since he responded to a range of cultural currents and inspired revelatory commentary by an array of authors, including Walt Whitman, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Karl Marx, and Victor Hugo. The course also considers the perspectives of recent historians of the Civil War era. 
Syllabus
 
Hist. 75700 - America and the Cold War
GC: Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. KC Johnson
Room 4433

This course will address U.S. political and diplomatic history during the Cold War period. Beginning with the aftermath of World War II, it will explore such themes as the growth of the presidency; the militarization of U.S. foreign policy; the domestic and international effects of anti-communism; the impact of the Vietnam War on U.S. politcs and standing abroad; the controversies of the 1970s; the historiographical debates over the end oft he Cold War; and the Cold War's legacy on modern America. We will read a book each week, focused in particular on the ways in which the U.S. involvement in the Cold War spread beyond foreign policy concerns to affect U.S. politics and the nature of the U.S. state. Though the bulk of the course will focus on the period from 1947 through 1989, we will also explore the enduring legacy of the Cold War on contemporary American politics and international relations.
Syllabus

Middle East History

Hist. 78110- Palestine Under the British Mandate 
GC: Tuesdays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Simon Davis  
Room 3305
This course examines how and with what consequences British interests at the time of the First World War identified control over Palestine as a desirable objective, the subsequent forms such projections took, the crises which followed and their eventual consequences. Particular themes will be explored through analytical discussions of assigned historiographic materials, chiefly recent journal literature. Students will be encouraged to evaluate still-contested historical phenomena such as British undertakings with Zionism, colonialist relationships with Arab Palestine, institution-making and economic development, social and cultural transformations, resistance and political violence. Broader contexts will be considered, embracing Middle Eastern politics in the era of late European colonial imperialism, but also the quotidian significance for life in Palestine of British Mandatory administration, especially in sectarian-inflected questions of status, social and material conditions, identity, affinity, expression and political rights. Finally, how and why did the Mandate end in a British debacle, Zionist triumph and Arab Palestinian catastrophe and what main resulting legacies?
Syllabus

 
European History


Hist. 72400- Existentialism: from Dostoevsky to Sartre
GC: Mondays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Richard Wolin  
Room 5382
Syllabus


Hist. 72100- The History of Liberalism from Locke to Rawls
GC: Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Helena Rosenblatt  
Room 3305
This course is an in-depth introduction to some of the founding thinkers and texts of the liberal tradition. We will read canonical texts and works of interpretation in an effort to answer questions such as:  What do we mean when we speak of liberalism? What if any, are its core principles and values? What is alive and what is dead in the liberal tradition? We will focus on works by Locke, Wollstonecraft, Rousseau, Constant, Mill, Green and Spencer, and conclude with an examination of Rawls.  Main Themes: Property and the Role of Government; Women’s Rights and Roles; Social Contract and the Individual; Morals and Empire.
Syllabus

Hist. 71400 - Sex, Society & Politics In Postwar Europe 1945-89
GC:  Thursdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Julia Sneeringer
Room 5383

This course will explore in detail moments in the social history of Europe, East and West, between 1945 and 1989, using sex and gender as key categories of analysis.  We will explore how the story of Europe changes when viewed through the lens of sex and gender. Topics include postwar reconstruction, the Economic Miracle, building socialism, consumer culture, youth culture, 1968, “deviant” subcultures, decolonization, second wave feminism, terrorism, and the revolutions of 1989.
Syllabus

Latin American History

Hist. 76900- Modern Latin America: Constructions of State and Nation
GC: Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Teresita Levy
Room 4433

This course will study the cultures, history, economy, and politics of the nations of Latin America and the Caribbean from the early nineteenth century to the present. Beginning with the wars of independence, we will examine the process of state formation and discuss how national identities, histories, and communities were (and continue to be) constructed. The global political, economic and social developments of the twentieth century brought unforeseen transformations to the Southern American hemisphere and a never-ending struggle between authoritarianism and revolution, tradition and modernity. These dichotomies will serve as the analytical framework to study the impact of the United States in the region and the resulting migrations of people from Latin America and the Caribbean to the United States.  Finally, we will examine recent events in the region and how they continue to impact the population of these nations (and the Latino diaspora) today.
Syllabus

Transnational History

Hist. 72200 - Slavery and the Disciplines
GC:  Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Herman Bennett
 
Room 3308
At its core, this course takes up concerns animated by both the persistent and emergent focus on slavery in the disciplines.  It asks how and why distinct disciplines are suddenly approaching the study of slavery?  Obviously this dynamic portends to far more than an engagement with the study of slavery solely as an economic system or as a technique of power.  Slavery, as a result, is no longer restricted to the domain of historians and the study of the enslaved past.  For this reason, the course“Slavery & the Disciplines” offers a wide-ranging examination of slavery’s presence and impact on disciplinary formation.  In discerning the work of slavery in various disciplines, notably Anthropology, English, Philosophy, Political Theory, Religion, and Sociology, this course explores how scholars of distinction disciplinary formations employ the study of slavery to press on the extant cultural logic but also framings of the past, present and future. 
 
Robert Reid-Pharr has recently written that “even as we joyously celebrate the victories of our enslaved ancestors, even as we take satisfied stock of how far we have come, we must studiously avoid the triumphalist narratives that are the hallmarks of humanist discourse.” Reid-Pharr’s trenchant critique is not alone.  A variety of intellectuals and scholars have leveled a similar broadside against the epistemology configuring Western thinking and its enduring legacy.  Rather than reduce this to a generational critique framed as an inquiry into the history of the present, we might be better served asking how and why this engagement with slavery and its legacy arises at this precise moment among a range of scholars in various disciplines?  What, in other words, does this engagement and critique say about our historical moment, previous representation of the slave past, and slavery’s sublimated presence in contemporary life?  What might be conveyed by invocation of slavery’s enduring afterlife?  What are the implications for the University and its constituent elements—disciplines?
 
Over the course of the semester, the seminar participants will deliberate over slavery and freedom as these subjects have been broached and now are treated by distinct disciplines.
Syllabus


See Also

RSCP 82100 – Research Techniques in Renaissance Studies
GC: Thursdays, 2 - 4pm,  4 credits, Prof. Clare Carroll

The course is designed to help students work on their own research—on the dissertation, the orals, or on a research paper in Renaissance or Early Modern Studies, broadly defined as 1350-1700. Students are not required to be members of the Renaissance Certificate Program to take the class.

We will study how the material conditions of texts as well as those of archives, book sellers, and libraries influence the transmission and interpretation of early modern culture. Readings will include articles on such topics as archives, authorship, literacy, the material make-up of books and manuscripts, the printing press, and reading practices . Students will receive instruction in topics specifically related to research in the early modern period: codicology, paleography, textual editing and analytical bibliography. We will study the history of reading—marginalia, descriptions of reading, and of reading practices. The major assignment for the course is an annotated bibliography related to each student's own particular research interests. Other assignments include exercises in paleography, analytical bibliography, and an oral report related to one of the readings. We will visit the Manuscript and Rare Book Collections at the Morgan Library.  

Reading list (texts from which weekly readings will be selected):

Ann Blair, Too Much to Know: Managing Scholarly Information before the Modern Age

Roger Chartier, Forms and Meanings: Texts, Performances, and Audiences from Codex to Computer
Raymond Clemens and Timothy Graham, Introduction to Manuscript Study
Elizabeth Eisenstein, The Printing Revolution in Early Modern Europe
Adrian Johns, The Nature of the Book

Arlette Farge, Allure of the Archives

Imtiaz Habib, Black Lives in the English Archives, 1500-1677: Imprints of the Invisible
Heidi B. Hackel and Catherine E. Kelly, eds., Reading Women: Literacy, Authorship, and Culture in the Atlantic World 
Andrew Pettegree, The Book in the Renaissance
Armando Petrucci, Writers and Readers in Medieval Italy
Brian Richardson, Manuscript Culture in Renaissance Italy
Bill Sherman, Used Books: Marking Readers in Renaissance England
Articles by Robert Darnton, Anthony Grafton, Lisa Jardine, and Peter Stallybrass.



MES 73900 - Violence and War
GC:  Mondays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Samira Haj

The objective of this seminar is to investigate the various ways that social theorists, philosophers, historians thought of violence, war and ethics. The course is thematically organized around questions about the nature of violence, accountability and responsibility as well as the effects and affects of shifting war technologies on civilian population, combatants and nations.  The questions addressed in this seminar are theoretical, historical, ethical and political. These questions are explored through readings from 19th century to 21st century social theorists and political and strategic thinkers among them Hobbs, Locke, Clausewitz, Arendt, Fanon, Lindqvis, Chamayou, Mbembe, Feldman, Bargu, Devji, Mamdani and others.


Spring 2018 Professional Development Seminars
 
Students may register online for these courses, they are listed in the course schedule under “Professional Development”.  Course numbers and registration codes are listed below.  The courses are 0 credits and do not appear on student transcripts; they are free of charge and open to all matriculated Graduate Center students.
 
PDEV 79400  Advanced Spoken English: Teaching and Presentation Skills
GC:  Thursday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 0 credits
This course is designed to help students improve their spoken English in a variety of academic and casual settings through guided instruction of American-style conversation and direct instruction of spoken English fluency and pronunciation skills.  Additionally, students will be instructed in the standard methods and style of teaching and presenting for the American university classroom.  Students will also be discussing and learning about American culture via themes and topics that are relevant to the students’ interests.
 
PDEV 79401  Teaching Strategies
GC:  Wednesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 0 credits, Prof. Allen
This course is designed to provide students with practical advice and hands-on exercises to help them design future courses and prepare for classroom teaching. It is grounded in an understanding of the social context of teaching at CUNY as well as providing some theoretical discussion of what makes for good pedagogical practice. This course will be especially valuable for graduate students who will soon be teaching undergraduate courses in the Humanities and Social Sciences.
 
PDEV 79403  Effective Academic Writing – for native English speakers
GC:  Monday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 0 credits, Prof. Jerskey
This course is designed to help students improve their academic writing.  This section is meant for native English speakers who want to address issues in their writing and overcome particular writing hurdles.
 
PDEV 79403  Effective Academic Writing – for non-native speakers
GC:  Wednesday, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 0 credits, Prof. Utakis
This workshop course intends to help students improve their academic writing skills.  The section is restricted to students who speak English as a foreign language and will address common issues and problems that they may face when writing.  All students are required to share with the class a draft of their own academic writing in progress.

Research and Writing Seminars

 
Hist. 84900- Seminar in American History l
Monday, 2-4 p.m., 5 credits, Prof. Tom Kessner
Room 3310A


 This seminar is designed to train incoming graduate students in the craft of historical research and writing. Over the course of the term, each student will formulate a research topic, prepare a bibliography of relevant primary and secondary sources, write an historiographic essay, and present and defend a formal project proposal for the substantial research paper that is to be completed in the second semester seminar. Weekly meetings will discuss common readings, share and critique written work, and develop and refine the research proposals.  We will also be devoting some time to methods and issues involved in undergraduate teaching.
Students will focus primarily on framing a topic and honing a well defined, focused and reasonable research proposal for their papers. The purpose of the collateral assignments is to help push this process forward.
Students are advised to give some thought to possible research projects before classes begin this way they can make some early efforts at sampling secondary materials and investigating the availability of sources.
Syllabus
 
Hist. 80010- Literature of American History l
Thursday, 11:45 a.m. - 1:45 p.m., 5 credits, Prof. David Waldstreicher
Room 3305

 
This course introduces Ph.D. students to the historiography of the U.S. through the Civil War and is intended to prepare students for the First Written Examination.

One of our primary concerns will be periodization. To what extent should the colonial period be considered a prologue to U.S. history? And on the other side of the nationhood divide, are there analyses that suggest a coherence or continuity to U.S. history beyond the peculiarities of the early republic or Civil War periods? What is the status of the Revolution and the Civil War, and the political history that drives or used to drive the narrative of U.S. history, amid transformations that might otherwise be seen as social, cultural, economic? Are there explanations that that cut across centuries, or stories that hold up in our time?  What are the most important achievements of recent US historians, and what are the trends in the field now?

The books and articles we shall discuss include prizewinning narratives, monographs born as dissertations, and historiographical essays. An important part of what we will be doing is attempting to read these in light of each other. Be forewarned: the reading is extensive, in recognition of the five credits this course carries and its status as required preparation for qualifying examinations. Our goal is to prepare for the exam, of course, but also to prepare to teach this period at the college level and to lay a substantial foundation for future research and teaching in any period of U.S. history.
Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus
 
Hist. 80900- Seminar in European and non-American History l
Thursday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 5 credits, Prof. Mary Gibson
Room 3310B

 
This course is an introduction to research methods and writing. Each student must develop a prospectus that will become the basis for a 30-page paper in the second semester. Students will learn how to identify appropriate primary and secondary sources for their projects. Throughout the semester, the class will read and discuss model articles that represent different approaches to historical analysis. Final prospectuses will undergo peer review in class. Open only to PhD Program in History students.

 
Hist. 80020- Literature of European History l
Wednesday, 2 - 4 p.m.,5 credits, Prof. David Troyansky
Room 3307
 
This course provides an introduction to the literature of European history from the Late Middle Ages through the eighteenth century.  It explores different conceptual frameworks and methodological approaches to the period and examines an assortment of classic and recent works on a variety of topics: religion and the state; science, technology, and medicine; economy and society; gender and sexuality; and ideas and mentalities.  The course prepares students for the end-of-semester comprehensive examination and for further study of early modern Europe.
Open only to PhD Program in History students.

     European ​History

Hist. 71500- Modern France and its Empire ​Since 1830
Thursday, 2-4 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Clifford Rosenberg
Room 3306
This course will survey the historiography of France and its empire since the conquest of Algeria in 1830. Examining a mix of classic and more recent works, we will pay special attention to two central themes that have preoccupied historians of the past generation: (1) immigration, anti-Semitism, and Vichy, and (2) controversies over the French empire and its relationship to the Republican tradition.
Syllabus

Hist. 72400- The Outcome of German Classical Philosophy
Monday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Richard Wolin
Room 5383
 
Classical German Philosophy – Kant, Fichte, Hegel, and Schelling – has bequeathed a rich legacy of reflection on the fundamental problems of epistemology, ontology and aesthetics. Even contemporary thinkers who claim to have transcended it (e.g., poststructuralists such as Foucault and Derrida) cannot help but make reference to it in order to validate their post-philosophical standpoints and claims.
            Our approach to this very rich material will combine a reading of the canonical texts of German Idealism (e.g., Kant and Hegel) with a sustained and complementary focus on major twentieth-century thinkers who have sought to establish their originality via a critical reading of Hegel and his heirs: Alexandre Kojève, Martin Heidegger, Michel Foucault, Theodor Adorno, and Jürgen Habermas.
The course will primarily focus on the nexus between philosophy, reason, and, autonomy. We will also examine the substantive arguments that the school’s leading representatives have set forth, with special attention to the “healing” role of both reason and the aesthetic dimension. If thought and being are sundered in real life, art and reason offer the prospect of making the world whole once more. Thus, in German Classical philosophy, aesthetic consciousness often plays what one might describe as a redemptory or reconciliatory function.
 
Hist. 72110- The Intellectual Politics of the French Revolution: Then and Now
Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Helena Rosenblatt
Room 3305

This course is an in-depth introduction to the French Revolution and the heated debates it has engendered. We will privilege political/cultural/intellectual perspectives, focusing on the Revolution's relationship with "modernity" and its various ideologies (socialism, liberalism, totalitarianism, feminism, etc.) Scholarship on the French Revolution will be placed in historical and political context in an effort to answer the question: "what is at stake when scholars adopt certain methodologies and perspectives on the French Revolution?"


    American History 

 
Hist. 75600- Eleanor Roosevelt: The War Years and After
Thursday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Blanche Wiesen Cook
Room 5212

 This course will focus on the struggle for democracy in the fascist era.  ER's quest for racial justice, economic security, and human rights -- supported by notable allies, opposed by  congressional Dixiecrats,  Republican isolationists, and fearful American Firsters -- resulted in the failure to rescue refugees, continued segregation, the removal and incarceration of Japanese Americans.  These issues reverberate today, as 65 million refugees seek haven and fascist movements proliferate.  Hence, this will be a discussion course dedicated to controversies of history, politics, and the future.  Class participation,  a term paper and three book reviews from a varied and exciting list [ from Bill Ayers and Angela Davis to ER and Howard Zinn] are required. 

Hist. 75900- Slavery and Freedom: African American History in Comparative Perspective​
Monday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Gunja SenGupta
Room 4419
This course introduces students to the history and historiography of slavery and emancipation in what became the United States, within transoceanic and comparative frames of reference. The blood and toil of human chattel helped knit North America with the Indian Ocean World into international networks of trade and travel, and conquest and colonization, of politics and ideology, and culture and community. It was within and across these networks, that the historical actors and groups  that populate this course circulated, lived, loved, worked, negotiated, and rebelled. We will use the scholarship, archives, and images that they inspired, to connect and compare the ways in which slavery was codified, experienced, imagined, narrated, and contested in the United States, with slavery histories from the western Indian Ocean.
            Our comparative and transoceanic perspectives will invite reflection on the following questions: how exceptional was “American” slavery, and its relationship with notions of freedom? How do we theorize “agency,” “diaspora,” and “difference,” in African American history, and evaluate scholarly debates over the boundaries between law and practice, family and the market, and nation and empire within that history? In what ways did migration remake identities and produce change? We will  grapple with these larger questions by placing U.S. historiography in dialogue with scholarship on the Indian Ocean, comparing, for instance, the Atlantic slave trade with human trafficking on the Trans-Saharan and Indian Ocean routes; considering the ways in which tropes of difference (race, religion, class, gender, sex) and ideas about dependence (especially kinship) shaped ideologies and practices of “master-slave” relationships; discussing the workings of the state, law, political economy, religious institutions, and demography, in constructing slavery, influencing the enslaved’s material conditions, and regulating their access to community membership/citizenship; examining the dynamics of African American family, culture, community, and resistance through the prism of “subaltern” historiography; tracing the transoceanic circulation of debates over slavery and poverty, and abolition and empire; and contextualizing emancipation in the U.S, within the framework of comparative histories of freedom.
Syllabus

     Middle East History

 
Hist. 77950- Middle East Literature of 19th century
Monday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Samira Haj
Room 3310B

The objective is to familiarize students with the main themes and approaches in the history and historiography of the Ottoman Empire in the nineteenth-century. Temporally, the course moves from the late 1700s to World War I.  Geographically, the area includes those regions under the dominion of the Ottoman. We will look at some foundational as well as recent works that address the issues, concerns and anxieties in the region due to fundamental changes in power structures and world politics. These works would cover a wide range of themes including the questions of governance, empire, reform and revival (religious and secular), nation, revolution, law, and political economy.


Hist. 78110- Islamic Rulership: the Caliphate in Theory and Practice
Tuesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Profs. Anna Akasoy and Chase Robinson
Room 5383

This class offers an introductory survey to Islamic political theory and practice. Readings and discussions will address origins and development of principal themes and institutions of the Islamic political tradition, including prophecy, caliphate, imamate, jihad, messianism, sharia, revivalism and modernism. We will be reading a combination of primary and secondary sources, including scripture, history, poetry, political theory, coins, and philosophical literature. Both Sunni and Shiite traditions will be covered. No background in Middle Eastern history required.

     World ​History


Hist. 72600- Human Rights and Nation-States: A Global History
Tuesday, 2 - 4 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Eric Weitz
Room 5383
 
We live in a world of 195 independent, sovereign states. Virtually every one of them has a constitution that proclaims the rights of its citizens – even when those rights are only a veneer, below which the jailer, the torturer, the censor reign supreme. Only as members of particular nations do we become rights-bearing citizens; we never have rights simply as individuals, and global citizenship is rhetoric or ideal, not something that represents any kind of realistic possibility. Rights based in national (or racial) belonging are inherently limiting: only citizens may partake of the full panoply of rights, others are pushed to the margins, granted lesser rights or excluded altogether through policies like forced assimilation, ethnic cleansing, and, ultimately, genocide. The central questions that drive "Human Rights and Nation-States: A Global History" are:  Who, in fact, constitutes the nation, and by what criteria? And who, therefore, has the “right to have rights,” as Hannah Arendt, and, before her, the German Enlightenment philosopher Johann Gottlieb Fichte proclaimed? The course will combine theoretical and empirical readings and move to different cases around the globe from the late eighteenth to the twenty-first centuries to explore the entwined phenomena of nation-states and human rights and all their accompanying achievements, paradoxes, and disasters.
Syllabus


     Ancient ​History

 
HIST 70320 - Rome and the Hellenistic East
Monday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Joel Allen
Room 3306
  
This course explores the vitality of the Hellenistic period, roughly defined as 330-30 BCE, by exploring interactions among the populations of the Mediterranean, including Roman, Hellenic, Egyptian, Punic, Judaean, Celtic, and various hybrids thereamong.  We’ll consider a series of case studies in literature, art, epigraphy, and archaeology to understand new developments in culture, politics, and geopolitics. Knowledge of a foreign language not required.

     Latin American History

 
Hist. 76000- Early Modern Iberian/Colonial Latin America
Wednesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Herman Bennett
Room 5383
 
            In the Fall of 2017, History 76000: Early Modern Iberia/Colonial Latin America will be framed around the political economy of the early modern Atlantic.
 
            In the wake of successive intellectual turns (the linguistic, feminist, cultural, the post-colonial, and archival turn), our engagement with the cultural domain has become finely honed but at the expense of our understanding of the social.  This dynamic, in many respects, reflects the working of related but distinct renderings of the political.  Arguably, for cultural historians narrating the political entails discursive formations and an awareness of how political rationalities are grafted on to cultural codes and grammars.  While we now understand how the political related to the social draws on similar discursive formations, it also embodies a materiality—signified in the relationship of the political to the economy as in ‘political economy’—that configures it as distinct.   To this end, the course will introduce students to a range of authors and texts which will develop our analytical skills as they relate to the realm of political economy.  To be clear, this is not a course in economics or political science for historians.  While abstractions of the “economy” or “politics” figure prominently in the semester’s work, the course focuses on the contextualized meanings that these terms and related concepts implied for various authors and historical actors through time and space.  At the same time, it should be understood that this course does not offer a formalized discussion of ‘political economy’ framed through a historiography self-consciously stylized as such.  Instead by bringing a distinct selection of authors and texts into conversation seminar participants will hopefully refine their acumen for thinking and writing about the temporal and spatial specificity of early modern ‘political economy.’
Syllabus

      ​History and Theory


Hist. 72300- Quantitative Methods
Thursday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Laird Bergad
No auditors

Room C196.03

This course was designed with a mind toward helping students with no background in statistical analysis develop a basic literacy of quantitative methods.  Through computer-lab based tutorials students will gain proficiency in tools commonly used by thequantitative community such as SPSS Statistics, the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Fact Finder, IPUMS datasets, Microsoft Excel, and ArcGIS mapping.  This course will be especially useful for historians, anthropologists, and other social scientists looking to add a statistical component to their work that moves beyond basic secondary source data.  Particular emphasis will be given to the ways social scientists and humanists can use data to formulate new perspectives on their research and challenge prevailing trends in their respective fields. ​No auditors.


Hist. 72300- Contemporary Theory and Historical Practices
Tuesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Barbara Naddeo
Room 5212

This seminar introduces graduate students to the many schools of the contemporary discipline of history and their particular methodologies. To that end, each week this seminar presents one of the many influential theories that have shaped the discipline over the last few decades as well as selections from exemplary histories informed by them. As a result, students will gain familiarity with influential work from other disciplines and learn how that work has contributed to the formulation of subjects and research questions for historical inquiry. Among the many theories and historical practices, in Fall 2017 topics will include studies of class, culture, language, the public sphere, civility, gender and sex, the emotions, the nation, transnational groups, human rights, information, and the Anthropocene. Beyond obtaining extensive knowledge of the variety of theories and historical practices, students will additionally learn to reason historically and exercise the arts of historical criticism both in seminar discussion and in writing.

     See Also


Soc. 83101: Populism, Authoritarianism, & Dictatorship
Tuesday, 2-4 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. John Torpey


This course explores the nature of undemocratic regimes in the modern world.  We will explore different forms of non-democracy against the background of a growing expectation since the time of the democratic revolutions of the late 18th century that democracy should be the normal form of political regime.  In order to achieve our analytical objectives, we will read political and social theory, historical treatments of non-democratic regimes, and comparative assessments of contemporary undemocratic government.  The course should therefore be of interest to those in the political and social sciences and in history who wish to understand the variety and distinctiveness of undemocratic regimes in the modern period.


Phil 76000: Mind, Matter, and Experience in Early Modern Philosophy
Tuesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 4 credits, Prof. Catherine Wilson​


Descartes proposed that the world that science investigates is purely corporeal, consisting of aggregates of corpuscles in motion obeying the laws of mechanics. Animal and human bodies, on his view, are machines. Human bodies alone are inhabited by minds that experience emotions and perceptions and that can innovate, grasp meanings and truths, and initiate movement, all in ways that cannot be scientifically understood. In this seminar, we will examine the reactions to this proposal, including a variety of extensions of, and alternatives to this basic scheme, in early modern philosophy. Topics will include: the materialisms of Gassendi and Locke, the animism of Margaret Cavendish, the phenomenalism or idealism of Leibniz and Malebranche, and the quasi-pantheistic systems of Spinoza and Newton.

Phil 76900: Philosophy Of Social Science
Thursday, 9:30-11:30 a.m., 4 credits, Prof. John D Greenwood
This course will focus on a number of philosophical and meta-theoretical questions concerning the nature of social phenomena and social scientific explanation. We will cover topics common to most social sciences, such as the debate between so-called holists and individualists, the nature of structural and functional forms of explanation; and the place of social values in social science. We will also cover topics specific to particular social scientific disciplines, such as problems associated with the anthropological understanding of alien cultures, the role of isolative experimentation in social psychology, the presumed autonomy of historical explanation, and the instrumentalist conception of theory in economics. We will also consider the historical evolution of the social sciences, including their institutional development in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
 
ASCP 81500: Themes in American Culture: The Black Freedom Movement in the US,
Wednesday, 2:00-4:00pm, 3 credits, Professor Robyn Spencer

The emergence of the movement for Black Lives in the past 5 years has moved racial justice in America to center stage and resulted in wide scale re-examination of the impact and legacy of the Black freedom movement of the post WWII period. This course will examine the major campaigns, personalities, organizations and guiding themes of the civil rights and Black Power movement.  In particular, we will analyze the major historical interpretive debates about the Civil Rights/Black Power movements and place the movements in the broader context of Cuban independence, the Cold War, the US war in Vietnam and  African liberation movements. A close examination of the intersections between the Black freedom movement and the new left, women’s movement, and anti-war movement will broaden how the movement is traditionally conceptualized and foreground the movement’s anti-capitalist, anti-patriarchal and anti-imperial engagements. We will also examine the afterlives and historical memory of these movements and how they continue to animate the contemporary political landscape.

Research and Writing Seminars

 
Hist. 80010- Literature Survey in American History
GC: Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 5 credits, Prof. KC Johnson


The objective of this course is for students to read and discuss important studies in post Civil War American history.  They will be considering the ways in which the critical elements of American history have been conceived, structured and narrated. Some of the readings are classics; others are important because they offer provocative theses about long established historical questions; yet others introduce new viewpoints and new questions for historical inquiry. The broad scope of readings provides an essential immersion in the literature of the field and promotes a textured perspective for subsequent colloquia and seminars. Students will also be considering diverse approaches and methods of historical analysis that will help them shape their own research projects. Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus

Hist. 84900- Seminar in American History II
GC: Tuesdays, 2-4 pm, 5 credits, Prof. Jonathan Sassi


This course is for first-year U.S. history majors and is the continuation of the Seminar in American History I.  Having conceptualized projects in the fall semester, each student will complete the research and writing of an article-length research paper over the course of the spring semester.  The class is designed as a workshop, in which participants will present their works-in-progress, constructively criticize one another’s writings, and tackle common problems of the research and writing process.  Students will be responsible for circulating drafts of their developing works electronically in advance of class and preparing written responses to others’ papers.  Timely completion of the assignments and collegial participation in the seminar are essential requirements. Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus
 
Hist. 80020- Literature Survey in European History
GC: Mondays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 5 credits, Prof. Richard Wolin 

The focus of this course is twofold:
(1) Its primary intention is to introduce students to the main works of scholarly literature on European history from the Enlightenment to the present.
(2) Its complementary goal is to prepare students to take the written exam in modern European history.
In addition to reading major works of scholarship, we will also closely track recent critical discussions and debates in modern European history as they have transpired in organs such as Journal of Modern History, The New York Review of Books, the Times Literary Supplement, the London Review of Books, H-Net reviews, The Nation, Jewish Review of Books, and Chronicle of Higher Education. In keeping with the recent disciplinary trend toward global history, we will also remain attentive toward texts and discussions involving the question of “Europe and the world.”
Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus

 
Hist. 84900- Seminar in Non-American History II
GC: Tuesdays, 2-4 pm, 5 credits, Prof. Dagmar Herzog


This course is a continuation of History 80900 (Seminar in European and Non-American History I). Students will complete the research project developed in the fall, turning their prospectuses into 30-page papers of a publishable quality. The papers should be based on primary sources and should situate their topic within the appropriate historiographical context. During the semester, the class will read and discuss examples of model articles and, most importantly, offer constructive critiques of each others’ papers. Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus

Hist. 84900- Advanced Research Seminar 
GC:  Mondays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Steven Remy

In this course students will write and revise a roughly 30-page research paper of publishable quality.  The paper must be based on primary sources and current secondary sources, engage with a clearly defined historiographical problem, and reflect a high level of care for prose and professional standards.  In class, we will read model essays, discuss research methods and writing strategies, and workshop drafts.  Students should identify a topic for their paper before the first meeting of the course.  The topic should be significantly different from each student's first year seminar paper but may constitute a piece of research that leads toward a dissertation.  The course is only open to students in the PhD Program in History who have completed the first year seminar.
Syllabus

 
Hist. 89900- Dissertation Seminar 
GC: Wednesdays, 2-4 pm, 0 credits, Prof. Kessner, Thomas
 
 
This workshop will give students the opportunity to develop and complete dissertation chapters. It will be conducted as a workshop with students reading and commenting on one another’s work under the professor’s guidance.  Open only to Level 3 PhD Program in History students who have defended their dissertation prospectus.

  • American History

 
Hist. 75400 Colloquium on Public History
GC: Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Andrew Robertson  
 
This seminar will begin by considering the subject matter, methodology and practice of public history.  A broad definition of public history would include historical evidence presented and interpreted for a wide audience outside of the academy. Public historians employ the methods of academic history and expand them by joining traditional and non-traditional evidence, inventing new formats for public presentation and reframing historical questions in a lively and accessible context.  By employing old and new forms of evidence, broadening the intended audience for the reception of historical scholarship, rethinking strategies of presentation and redirecting historical interpretations, public historians are creating an innovative and defined practice.  Public history prepares historians to consider their research in a popular and accessible context.
This seminar will introduce students to the context, methodology and practice of Public History in the following ways:
The first few weeks of the course will examine the definitions of public history, its origins, nature and prospects.  Topics include how versions of the past are created, institutionalized and disseminated as public memory in civic festivities, memorials and monuments; in invented tradition and in popular culture, including print media, film television and social media; and in the creation of public spaces. We will also consider the relationship of public memory and collective memory in museums (e.g. presenting Native America). This seminar will consider controversial case studies over historical presentation, including the Enola Gay Exhibition and the exhibits at the new Museum of African American History at the Smithsonian.  The remainder of the course will examine other aspects of public history including community and local history, oral history and digital history. Course requirements include leading one or more class discussions and a final research paper that describes and analyzes how a particular topic or issue in history has been interpreted and presented in a variety of public history formats.
Syllabus

Hist. 75000- The Era of the American Revolution
GC: Thursdays, 2-4 pm, 3 credits, Prof. David Waldstreicher

Well before the war ended, people were already arguing about what the American Revolution might mean, and the argument goes on. How important, and how revolutionary, was the American Revolution? What kind of revolution was it – political, constitutional, nationalist, localist, social, cultural or ideological, settler-colonial? How much emphasis should be placed on the Revolution in understanding the late eighteenth century? the origins of the United States? or world history? What kinds of before, during, and after stories have historians told about this event? How have trends in politics, in intellectual life, and in the writing of history changed the story? What were – and are --  the relationships between what one influential historian of the Revolution called, fifty years ago,  "rhetoric and reality"? This readings course begins with the debates among scholars as they emerged and developed during the twentieth century in part in response to the revolution’s first chroniclers  and the Revolution's place in American identity; moves on to an efflorescence of recent work that may or may not belie the notion of some practitioners that the field is moribund or stuck in old debates; and concludes with attention to some brand new attempts at synthesis and to the role that memory of the Revolution plays in U.S. politics and culture today.
Syllabus

Hist. 75700- World War/PostWar/Cold War
GC: Mondays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. David Nasaw
 
“Math”:  the old-English term for harvest.  When the cutting is done and the field is barren, there arises a new growth, stunted, near deformed, but alive and reaching upwards for the light.   This is the aftermath. 
 
We shall together explore and investigate the violent transformations wrought by the Second World War and the attempts of Americans and Europeans to make sense of their recent pasts and begin the difficult, but necessary work of social reconstruction, economic reconversion, and political reintegration.
Syllabus


Hist. 75500- History of U.S. Labor and Capitalism
GC: Thursdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Joshua Freeman 
 
 This course will consider the history of work, workers, and labor movements in the context of the changing capitalist economy, from the early 19th to the early 21st centuries.  While the bulk of the course will be devoted to labor and labor relations, attention also will be paid to capitalist development more generally, including finance, commodity trade, the corporation, and globalization.  Topics will include artisan culture and craft unionism, cultural perceptions and representations of capitalism, the constitutive role of labor law, labor radicalism, Fordism, the rise of industrial unionism, gender and race in labor markets and labor movements, capital mobility and deindustrialization, and global supply chains.  Readings will be in secondary works, including both recent and classic studies.  We will consider the historiography of labor and the significance of the emergence of the history of capitalism as an academic field.
Syllabus

  • European History

 
Hist. 72100 The Protestant Reformation and Its Impact
GC: Thursdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Sarah Covington  
 
The year 2017 marks the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther unleashing onto the world the monumental religious revolution that came to be known as the Protestant reformation. But the story of the reformation—which was not one reformation but many, not simply “protestant” but multi-confessional and Catholic—was much more complex than the traditional narratives convey, and presents enormous challenges to scholars wishing to understand the shattering of western Christendom in the sixteenth century. Equally challenging is the attempt to understand the long-terms impact of the reformation, beyond the fact that it changed the history of Europe, the United States, and indeed the world. Weber, of course, attributed the spirit of capitalism to Protestantism, while Marx and Engels believed that it portended the proletarian revolution. Cultural critics discuss the transformation of literature and the arts under Protestant influence, while scholars still debate its role in the rise of modernity, however defined, more generally.
 
Such conclusions about influence are enriching, but they are too often based on a superficial and often sometimes error-prone understanding of what the reformation actually was. This seminar will therefore plunge students into the world of theological battles and religious wars, of persecutions and martyrdom, and not least the often ferocious debates between historians themselves, in order to understand the age on its own terms. Interdisciplinary in scope, the class will read the works of Luther, Zwingli, and Calvin, as well as literature; we will also extend ahead to later centuries, to discover what Americans or Europeans had to say about their forebears, or how interpretations of the reformation changed over time. The goal of the seminar is to therefore deepen students’ knowledge of this key period and the theological and political developments that propelled it, thereby illuminating its impact on states and empires, science and culture, economics and society in the centuries to come.
Syllabus
 
Hist. 73900 Britain and the World
GC: Mondays, 6:30-8:30, 3 credits, Prof. Timothy Alborn  

This course explores different channels of intercourse between Great Britain and the rest of the world between 1750 and the present. It opens with surveys of Britain’s ambivalent location between America and Europe, its status an imperial power in the nineteenth century, and its changing role in the world since then. It then discusses spaces, goods, and people that have travelled, framed, and settled in and among British territories and trade partners: including colonial America and the US, India, Ireland, Jamaica, and Canada. 
Syllabus

Hist. 75700- World War/PostWar/Cold War
GC: Mondays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. David Nasaw
 
“Math”:  the old-English term for harvest.  When the cutting is done and the field is barren, there arises a new growth, stunted, near deformed, but alive and reaching upwards for the light.   This is the aftermath. 
 
We shall together explore and investigate the violent transformations wrought by the Second World War and the attempts of Americans and Europeans to make sense of their recent pasts and begin the difficult, but necessary work of social reconstruction, economic reconversion, and political reintegration.
Syllabus

  • Women’s History

 
Hist. 72200 Readings in Gender and Society in the U.S.
GC: Mondays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Kathleen McCarthy

When Joan Scott’s essay, “Gender: A Useful Category of Historical Analysis” appeared in 1986, historians initially turned their attention to gendered constraints on women’s roles. More recently, the history of masculinities and diverse sexualities have moved men’s histories beyond normative frameworks.  This course will consider the ways in which historians have used gender as an analytical tool for reassessing American politics, cultures, slavery, war, crime, foreign policy, social reform, transnationalism, and  specific events such as the California Gold Rush.  Both men’s and women’s roles will be examined, with the aim of understanding how the shifting parameters of gendered constructs have shaped American history.
Syllabus

  • Transnational History



Hist. 76000 The African Diaspora
GC: Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Herman Bennett  
Cross-listed with AFCP 73100
Syllabus

Hist. 75700- World War/PostWar/Cold War
GC: Mondays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. David Nasaw
 
“Math”:  the old-English term for harvest.  When the cutting is done and the field is barren, there arises a new growth, stunted, near deformed, but alive and reaching upwards for the light.   This is the aftermath. 
 
We shall together explore and investigate the violent transformations wrought by the Second World War and the attempts of Americans and Europeans to make sense of their recent pasts and begin the difficult, but necessary work of social reconstruction, economic reconversion, and political reintegration.
Syllabus

  • History of Public Health

Hist. 78400 Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Corporations, Health and Democracy, 1900 to the present
GC: Tuesdays, 6:05-7:50 pm, 3 credits, Profs. Gerald Markowitz and Nick Freudenberg ​
Classes at CUNY School of Public Health, 55 West 125th Street, New York, NY 10027​
Cross-listed with PH 647

  
This course will present students with historical, epidemiological and sociological perspectives on the impact of corporations on population health.  Through in-depth interdisciplinary investigations of selected industries, products and practices from the last 120 years, students will analyze the changing pathways and mechanisms by which corporate practices influence the health of consumers and workers and of the environment in both the developed and the developing world.  It will also consider the roles of governance, democratic principles, the public health community and civil society in efforts to control harmful practices.  Among the topics to be studied are the food, pharmaceutical, automobile and chemical industries and products such as PCBs and lead.   Students will write an in-depth case study of a specific industry or product.  Masters and doctoral students will have different assignments for this class. The class is open to Masters students in public health, nutrition, urban planning and history and doctoral students in public health, history, sociology, psychology, geography and related disciplines. 

 

  • SEE ALSO:


 ENGL 85410. David Reynolds. Cultural Currents in American Literature: Critical Turns, Historical Contexts, and Archival Discoveries. Wednesdays 2:00PM-4:00PM. 4 credits. 
Cross-listed with Hist 74900

The critical “turns” in recent Americanist scholarship—among them the hemispheric turn, the religious turn, the animal studies turn, the posthuman turn, the disabilities turn, and revised approaches to race and gender—have challenged bygone notions of American exceptionalism and have freshly illuminated the multivalence of the American experience. These issues have implications not only for literary studies but also for American historiography, which has in recent times made a massive “cultural turn,” opening up virtually every historical subject to cultural analysis.  This course considers groupings of American texts, from the seventeenth century to the early twentieth century, organized around five themes: religion and philosophy, race and slavery, gender issues, the city, and revolution. What happens when we juxtapose seventeenth-century Puritan religious writings with later works on religion or philosophy by the likes of Emerson, Hawthorne, and William James? In what ways did antebellum slave narratives and Stowe’s antislavery best-seller Uncle Tom’s Cabin generate debates over race that resonated later in Thomas Dixon’s fiction and W. E. B. Dubois’s The Souls of Black Folk? Is there a continuum in gender-specific devices and themes from the iconoclastic seventeenth-century poet Anne Bradstreet and to nineteenth-century writers like Margaret Fuller, Emily Dickinson, and Kate Chopin? How does urbanization influence the treatment of the American city we compare Brockden Brown’s Arthur Mervyn with antebellum city-mysteries fiction and with a later urban novella like Stephen Crane’s Maggie: A Girl of the Streets, and how does the portrayal of human bodies in such fiction (especially as considered in disability studies) align with shifting commentary on the body politic? How does the trope of revolution, especially as related to the Haitian slave rebellions, develop from Leonora Sansay’s Secret History to Nat Turner’s Confessions, Melville’s “Benito Cereno,” and Stowe’s Dred? We’ll address these and other questions against the background of recent critical turns and of contextual documents unearthed in archives, many of them now digitally available. Among our topics of discussion is the polyvocality of literary texts in dialogic relation to their cultural, social, and political contexts. Requirements include a book review and a term paper.

MSCP 73100 - Foundations of Monasticism
GC: Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Jennifer Ball
Cross-listed with Hist 70800

This course will explore the beginnings of Christian monasticism in Egypt and Palestine and the later divisions into Western monastic orders and early Byzantine foundations.  The course will be arranged both geographically, as well as by the various types of monasticism practiced (hermetic, coenobitic, etc.).  Texts, especially early monastic rules and saints’ lives, alongside architectural and archaeological remains will be used to piece together the everyday life and development of these communities, and their relationship with the secular world around them, which was sometimes fraught with tension. Special attention will be paid to issues of gender and sexuality, as groups ranged from those based on sexual renunciation to communities in which entire families took up the monastic life. The body as a site of monastic practice is of special interest to me. Additionally, the involvement of monasteries in cultural production will be examined, as monastics were generally literate and often housed scriptoria, textile producing workshops or artist workshops of other kinds.

IDS 81630 - The Public and Publics
GC: Thursdays, 2-4 pm, 3 credits, Profs. Setha Low and Amy Chazkel ​
This interdisciplinary course examines the concept of the public, and the plural publics, as an analytical construct of particular importance in both scholarship and political life. Students will master the classic and more recent theoretical literature on space and place with respect to the designation of public and private. We will also go beyond the literature on shared resources and social spaces to think broadly about major approaches to the common, the communal, and the ordinary. We will critically examine such themes as: state versus private jurisdiction in regulating everyday life; feminist and black public spheres; the history and politics of public education; the privatization of urban public space; and political, social, and legal conflicts over copyright, intellectual property and public scholarship and art. We will pay special attention to a dimension of the study of public life of perennial political relevance as a question of global social justice: the privatization of formerly shared or commonly owned resources—the “enclosure of the commons”—as both a historical process and a present-day phenomenon. Readings will include a combination of theoretical inquiries and case studies drawn primarily, but not exclusively, from the North American, Latin American, and European contexts. Students from all disciplines and geographic specialties will be welcomed. Enrollment with permission from the instructors. Contact Setha Low and Amy Chazkel (slow@gc.cuny.edu and amychazkel@gmail.com) for registration permission details.



ART 85000 - Material Culture and the Arts of the Early Modern Iberian World.
GC: Mondays, 2-4 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Amanda Wunder
 
Students in this seminar will explore methodologies from material culture studies and apply them to art objects made in and for the vast territories of the early modern Iberian world (ca. 1500-1700). This course is being offered in conjunction with a panel on the same topic at the College Art Association on Feb. 17 (5:30-7:00), which students are expected to attend. During the semester, we will read classic works on material culture and the most recent scholarship from Spanish/Latin American/global studies. Some classes will meet at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, where we will examine objects made from various materials (textiles, paintings, domestic furnishings, prints, and more). There we will be paying special attention to the relationship between the academic study of art history and museum-based conservation and scholarship. This is an interdisciplinary course that welcomes graduate students from different departments and programs--it is not restricted to art history students. Please email Prof. Wunder (ajwunder@gmail.com) if you need permission to enroll.
Requirements: Active participation during classroom discussions and museum visits; oral presentation on one week's readings. Written assignments: One catalogue entry based on a museum object due mid-semester; object-based final research paper and conference-style presentation at the end of the term.

Research and Writing Seminars

 
Hist. 84900- Seminar in American History l
Monday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 5 credits, Prof. David Nasaw
 
This seminar is designed for and restricted to first year, first semester U.S. history students in the Ph.D. program.   Its primary objective is to introduce students to the craft of historical research and writing.  Over the course of this semester, each student in the course will be expected to formulate a research topic, prepare of bibliography of primary and secondary sources, and write up and present to the class a proposal for the research paper that will be completed in the spring semester. 
 
While the main purpose and activity of the course is the preparation of a proposal for a potentially publishable research paper, there will be additional reading and writing assignments on theory, historiography, and methodology.  We will also read a bit and devote some time to discussing issues that you may confront when you begin your teaching assignments in your second year. 
Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus
 
Hist. 80010- Literature of American History l
Thursday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 5 credits, Prof. David Waldstreicher
 
This course introduces Ph.D. students to the historiography of the U.S. through the Civil War and is intended to prepare students for the First Written Examination.

One of our primary concerns will be periodization. To what extent should the colonial period be considered a prologue to U.S. history? And on the other side of the nationhood divide, are there analyses that suggest a coherence or continuity to U.S. history beyond the peculiarities of the early republic or Civil War periods? What is the status of the Revolution and the Civil War, and the political history that drives or used to drive the narrative of U.S. history, amid transformations that might otherwise be seen as social, cultural, economic? Are there explanations that that cut across centuries, or stories that hold up in our time?  What are the most important achievements of recent US historians, and what are the trends in the field now?

The books and articles we shall discuss include prizewinning narratives, monographs born as dissertations, and historiographical essays. An important part of what we will be doing is attempting to read these in light of each other. Be forewarned: the reading is extensive, in recognition of the five credits this course carries and its status as required preparation for qualifying examinations. Our goal is to prepare for the exam, of course, but also to prepare to teach this period at the college level and to lay a substantial foundation for future research and teaching in any period of U.S. history.
Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus
 
Hist. 80900- Seminar in European and non-American History l
Thursday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 5 credits, Prof. Julia Sneeringer
 
This is the first semester of the year-long seminar that will culminate in the production of a substantial, research-based first-year paper, as required by the History program.  In this course we will discuss methodology and prepare a research topic.  This will include: formulation of a research topic;  preparation of a bibliography of secondary works;  writing of a historiographical essay; and preparation of a detailed research prospectus by semester’s end.  To assist you in this process, we will discuss various examples of and approaches to historical writing, as well as the past and current state of history as a discipline.  We will also visit several research libraries.  Finally, we will workshop as a group each of your research prospectuses.  The first-year paper is a key requirement of the History program - helping you craft it is a main goal of this course.    Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus
 
Hist. 80020- Literature of European History l
Wednesday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 5 credits, Prof. David Troyansky
 
This course provides an introduction to the literature of European history from the Late Middle Ages through the eighteenth century.  It explores different conceptual frameworks and methodological approaches to the period and examines an assortment of classic and recent works on a variety of topics: religion and the state; science, technology, and medicine; economy and society; gender and sexuality; and ideas and mentalities.  The course prepares students for the end-of-semester comprehensive examination and for further study of early modern Europe.
Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus

American History

 
Hist. 75300 - The Gilded Age and Progressive Era
Wednesday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Thomas Kessner

 This course focuses on a number of the major themes of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, the period between 1877-and 1914. In this period the United States was transformed from a largely agricultural and rural nation to one that is industrial and increasingly urban. It is the era of the rise of Big Business and the Industrial Revolution, the years in which America’s post Civil War racial and immigrant absorption policies are cast. Populist, labor and socialist reformers offer their own versions of a better way, but by and large the political lineaments for Modern America are forged from the capitalist market, modest state intervention and broad salience for individual freedoms. We will also investigate social change, the making of a new foreign policy and the multifaceted cultural transformations of these years.
 
Readings will include a sample of classic works along with a selection of more recent monographs and interpretive studies.
Syllabus

Hist. 75200 - The Civil War
Tuesday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. James Oakes

  This is a reading course designed to introduce students to some of the major issues that have preoccupied historians of the American Civil War.  It will be topical more than thematic.  The readings will cover familiar subjects—the secession crisis, military strategy, internal dissent, the confederacy, turning points in the war—as well as more recent themes—violence, gender, and emancipation.  No single approach to the war will be favored. Instead, as much as possible within the space of one semester, we will cover the military, social, political, and economic history of the Civil War.
Syllabus


Hist. 75100 – Fear and Violence in Early America
Wedn
esday 6:30-8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Benjamin Carp

This course will critically examine a number of major themes and scholarly disputes in early American history, from the pre-contact period to the mid-nineteenth century.  Drawing from a number of scholarly disciplines, the class will investigate the historical impact and changing contexts of fear and violence, which set the tone for many of the ideas and actions that motivated people in the colonial, Revolutionary, and early national periods of American history.  Specific themes will include crowd violence; wartime violence, atrocity, and “total war”; legal regimes, violent crime, and criminal punishment; rumors, propaganda, and the transmission of fear; domestic violence and sexual violence; slave revolts and the violence of the slave system; and the intersection of violence with themes of empire, intercultural encounters, colonization, and nation-making.  Students will use these interrelated topics as their window into a relatively broad chronological period, and they will have opportunities to relate their own research interests to the overall theme of the course.
Syllabus

European ​History

 
Hist. 72400- The Political Thought of Hannah Arendt
Monday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Richard Wolin
 
 In the annals of twentieth-century political thought, Hannah Arendt (1906-1975) carved out a unique and enduring niche. Today, some 40 years after her death, her political philosophy seems more relevant than ever. In 1951, she wrote the first important book on totalitarianism, perhaps the central political problem of the twentieth century. Seven years later, Arendt published her landmark contribution to European political thought, the Human Condition, in which she seeks to probe and to delineate the existential bases of human freedom. Avoiding the liberal political idiom of "rights," Arendt broaches this theme in terms of the ontological values of "plurality" and "action" – constituents of human distinctiveness that Arendt traces back to the glories of Periclean Athens. Nevertheless, she also found important modern political corollaries to "action" in the fleeting experience of direct (that is, non-representative) democracy: in the notion of "local democracy" that flourished in pre-revolutionary America and in the emergence of "workers consuls" in the course of the European revolutions of 1905, 1918, and 1956.
 
Our main thematic focus will concern Arendt’s central contributions to twentieth century political thought: The Origins of Totalitarianism (1951), The Human Condition (1958), and On Revolution (1962). However, as preparation for this encounter, attention to Arendt’s formative philosophical and political influences is indispensable. Therefore, in conjunction with these works, we will also selectively read a number of background texts that will assist us in clarifying the conceptual framework that Arendt develops in her mature political works. Essential in this regard are key texts by Aristotle (Nicomachean Ethics) and by Arendt’s legendary and controversial German mentor, Martin Heidegger (Being and Time). At specific junctures, Arendt’s fascinating and voluminous correspondence with another celebrated mentor, Karl Jaspers, will also guide us.
 
Finally, the “Arendt renaissance” of recent years has been punctuated by important cinematic representations of her life and thought – a dimension of the international Hannah Arendt reception story that we will analyze and reflect upon in conclusion.
Syllabus

Hist. 71200- The 18th Century Enlightenment
Monday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Helena Rosenblatt

It is a widely recognized fact that the modern Western world owes many of its fundamental concepts to the European Enlightenment. It is also true that since the mid-20th century, the Enlightenment has come under sustained attack. It is accused of a variety of purported sins, including Euro-centrism, imperialism, racism, sexism, and proto-totalitarianism. In this course, we will read texts by some of the most important writers of the Enlightenment (Hume, Lessing, Locke, Mendelssohn, Montesquieu, Rousseau, and Wollstonecraft) with a focus on the following themes: the social contract and the role of government, property and commerce, religion, race and slavery, sex and gender. We will also read recent critiques and defenses of the Enlightenment, with a view to deciding for ourselves what we might still be able to 
learn from it.
Syllabus

Hist. 70900- Human Science in the Age of Extremes
Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Andreas Killen
 
During the 20th century the human sciences became caught up in large-scale processes of social reform, revolution, war, postwar reconstruction, and decolonization. Many of these disciplines – psychiatry, criminology, psychoanalysis, sexology, anthropology and allied fields – underwent formative phases of their development within the shadow of the political conflicts and wars that marked what the historian Eric Hobsbawm called the “age of extremes.” What was the relation between politics and these disciplines? What kinds of hopes and promises marked the birth and development of these fields? In what way did these “young sciences” (to paraphrase Freud) become entangled within reformist, utopian, or – in some cases – deeply transgressive modes of social and human engineering? What conceptual, methodological, and ethical responses mark the history of these entanglements? This class will be organized around a combination of seminal theoretical readings (ranging from Michel Foucault and Ian Hacking to Franz Fanon) and works of historical scholarship that together will help us explore these issues.
Syllabus

Hist. 78500- Medicine in Early Modern Europe
Thursday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Allison Kavey
 
Early modern Europe saw important changes in approaches to medicine (both in theory and practice) and ideas about the body that reflected broader cultural shifts and the influence of a broadening world of geography and experience.  This course will examine the important medical systems in early modern Europe and the changes that occurred between 1500 and the late 17th century as a means of better understanding prevailing ideas about medicine, the body, and the vexed relationship between humans and the natural world.  Readings will include primary sources and historiographic material.

Gender History

 
Hist. 72300- Gender Theory for Historians
Tuesday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Dagmar Herzog
 
This graduate seminar is designed to introduce students to both classic and more recent texts in the overlapping areas of women’s and gender history, queer studies, and feminist, psychoanalytic, deconstructionist and poststructuralist theory, with forays into a wide range of historiographical styles and occasional excursions into anthropology, sociology, literary criticism, and political philosophy. There will be special emphasis on: the historical intersections of gender, race, economics, empire, religion; the histories of subjectivities and epistemologies; and the histories of psychiatry, sexuality, disability, reproduction. Most of the texts will focus on the U.S., Europe, and the Middle East since the 18th c., with many focused on the recent past and near-present. Throughout, the goal will be to understand the practical usefulness of varieties of gender theory for the diverse historical research projects you all are engaged in. Requirements include thorough reading of the assigned materials, two critical questions about each assigned text sent to instructor and classmates in advance of class every time, thoughtful and active participation in class discussions, two short summary analyses of weekly readings also sent to instructor and classmates in advance of class (we will divide up the reading list amongst ourselves on the first day), and one longer final paper exploring the relevance of and putting to use some aspect(s) of gender theory for your own work. Questions and summaries must be emailed by 7 a.m. on Tues.
Syllabus
 
Hist. 72200- Love, Marriage, and Motherhood in U.S. History
Tuesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Kristin Celello

This course explores gender and the politics of the family in the United States, considering the intimate, private lives of American women over time and place as well as the public manifestations and ramifications of the same.  We will study how ideals of wifehood and motherhood have been constructed, and how who has created and had access to these ideals has changed over time.  We will analyze the evolving meanings and value assigned to women’s reproductive labor, particularly the larger forces that influenced and were influenced by women’s various roles and responsibilities within their families.  Throughout the semester, we will play close attention to questions of race, ethnicity, class, region, and sexuality.  We will also consider how the social history of women’s family lives intersected with politics (domestic and international), law, medicine, social movements, and the economy, among other issues.  Weekly readings will cover topics such as same-sex relationships; courtship/dating; weddings; contraception, pregnancy, and childbirth; adoption; immigration; and welfare.
Syllabus

Latin American History

 
Hist. 76910- Afro-Latin America: Social Science & the Politics of Knowledge Production
Thursday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Herman Bennett
 
In recent years, some Latin Americanists have questioned the hermeneutics defining the field of Latin American History.  The colonial designation some feel posits a disjuncture (or beginning) when it could be argued that continuity characterized the historical narrative.  While students of ideas, political practice, and the cultural domain have been the strongest proponents of this intervention, scholars of indigenous cultures—especially the Nahua Studies groups—share similar sentiments despite differences in scope and method.  Consequently, scholars have been utilizing terms like ‘early’ and ‘early modern’ Latin America to distinguish their work from a colonial project and its association with the rupture that Spanish and Portuguese hegemony allegedly implied.  Concurrently, a self-conscious collection of scholars identified as the Latin American subaltern studies group have called into question the elitist hegemony shaping the structure and content of writings about Latin America.  Scholars of the Latin American subaltern along with those who take issue with the occidental reasoning informing how Latin America history is currently conceived are introducing new terminology (subaltern, postcolonial, Afro-Latin American) that allegedly re-frames the Latin American past and present.  In our semester’s work, we shall explore the meanings and implications, if any, that this and other discursive shifts have had on research and writing Latin America.  Even as this seminar attends to shifts in meaning and context, we will engage the substance of the existing scholarship.
See the syllabus below for a fuller description.
Syllabus

Hist. 76900- Comparative Slavery: Latin American and Caribbean Slavery and The Slave Trade in Comparative Perspective
Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Laird Bergad
Syllabus

Middle East History

 
Hist. 75200- Religion and Society in the Middle East
Monday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Samira Haj

In this class, religion is approached as a social and historical fact with political, legal and economic attributes and ramifications. Accordingly, religion has been constantly defined in response to changes in circumstance and social settings. The focus of this class is to trace the definition and redefinition of Islam in light of the dramatic changes and concerns engendered by modern structures, institutions and power. These changes are drawn out through familiar oppositional categories like the secular and the religious, state sovereignty and religious authority, modern law and shari’a among others.

 

See Also

 
MALS 70200 – Metropolis: A Political, Historical, and Sociological Profile of New York
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Cindy Lobel

This interdisciplinary course will explore New York City’s rise and role as the nation’s metropolis, examining several key themes in the city’s development.  In particular, we will look at Gotham as a center of work, culture and residency as well as at the diverse populations that have called the city home through its four-century history.  We will examine New York City from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, including history, sociology, anthropology, economics, and political science.  


MALS 70600 - Enlightenment and Critique: American Enlightenments
Wednesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Martin Burke
The course will examine a number of seminal texts produced in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries within the contexts of current debates over the contours, and the consequences, of the Enlightenment in America. The interpretive and analytic approaches taken will be ones from cultural and intellectual history, the history of political thought, religious studies and the history of science. Among the sources to be read are: Benjamin Franklin’s Autobiography; St. John de Crèvecoeur’s Letters from an American Farmer; Thomas Paine’s Common Sense; the “Declaration of Independence”; Thomas Jefferson’s Notes on the State of Virginia; the “Federalist” and the “Letters of Brutus”; Charles Brocken Brown’s Alcuin; Sarah Wentworth Morton’s Ouabi; Meriwether Lewis and William Clark’s Journals; and letters and essays by Benjamin Banneker, Mercy Otis Warren, Benjamin Rush and Judith Sargent Murray. Among the contemporary scholarly works are monographs by John Fea, Susan Parrish, Darren Staloff and Leigh Eric Schmidt, as well as a number of articles and historiographic reviews. The course welcome masters-level students from the Liberal Studies Program (especially, but not exclusively, the Western Intellectual Traditions and the American Studies tracks) and doctoral students from the Ph.D. Programs in History and English, and the American Studies Certificate Program.
 

PDEV. 81690 - Colloquium on College Teaching

Mondays, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 0 credits, Prof. Steven Cahn 

 

Next fall semester Professor Steven Cahn of the Philosophy Program will again offer the Colloquium on College Teaching, intended to assist doctoral students in developing strategies for success in academic careers. Among the topics to be discussed are improving teaching, enhancing publications, and succeeding in the search for academic positions. The course is intended both for those early in their graduate studies and for those nearing graduation. Seating is limited, so early registration is suggested. No charge is involved.The course meets during the early weeks of the semester, and students register through on-line course registration.

 

Dr. Cahn, a former Provost and then Acting President of the Graduate Center, is the author of the widely read book FROM STUDENT TO SCHOLAR: A CANDID GUIDE TO BECOMING A PROFESSOR (Columbia University Press).

 

Any questions about the course can be addressed to him at scahn@gc.cuny.edu.

PDEV 79400  Advanced Spoken English: Teaching and Presentation Skills
Tuesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 0 credits, 
This course is designed to help students improve their spoken English in a variety of academic and casual settings through guided instruction of American-style conversation and direct instruction of spoken English fluency and pronunciation skills.  Additionally, students will be instructed in the standard methods and style of teaching and presenting for the American university classroom.  Students will also be discussing and learning about American culture via themes and topics that are relevant to the students’ interests.
 
PDEV 79401  Teaching Strategies
Wednesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 3209, 0 credits, Prof. Allen,  
This course is designed to provide students with practical advice and hands-on exercises to help them design future courses and prepare for classroom teaching. It is grounded in an understanding of the social context of teaching at CUNY as well as providing some theoretical discussion of what makes for good pedagogical practice. This course will be especially valuable for graduate students who will soon be teaching undergraduate courses in the Humanities and Social Sciences.
 
PDEV 79403  Effective Academic Writing – for native English speakers
Thursday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 3309, 0 credits, Prof. Jerskey,  
Section for native English speakers.

This course is designed to help students improve their academic writing.  This section is meant for native English speakers who want to address issues in their writing and overcome particular writing hurdles.
 
PDEV 79403  Effective Academic Writing – for non-native speakers
Wednesday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. 5383, 0 credits, Prof. Utakis, 
Section for non-native English speake
rs.
This workshop course intends to help students improve their academic writing skills.  The section is restricted to students who speak English as a foreign language and will address common issues and problems that they may face when writing.  All students are required to share with the class a draft of their own academic writing in progress.

 
ART 87100 - Selected Topics in Colonial Latin American Art & Architecture: Mellon at The Hispanic Society: Cross-Cultural Connections in the Hispanic World, 1520- 1810
Thursday, 9:30 – 11:30 am, 3 credits, Prof. Judy Sund
 With its defeat of Aztec forces at Tenochtitlan in 1521, Spain’s political and cultural empire (which already incorporated Flanders and parts of Italy) was solidified in the New World. During the period covered by this course (which ends with Mexican independence), Peru likewise became a Spanish viceroyalty (1542), and Spain made Manila the center of its commercial activities in the Far East. This Mellon Seminar at the Hispanic Society – a rich repository of maps, manuscripts, sculptures, paintings and decorative arts – will explore a range of objects from Europe, the Americas and Asia, with particular attention to arts production in New Spain (colonial Mexico). Situated at the confluence of Atlantic and Pacific trade, New Spain emerged a nexus of intercultural exchange in an era of burgeoning global commerce. Wealthy and cosmopolitan, it remained decidedly colonial in relation to the European seat of the Hispanic empire. Its aspirational multiethnic elites not only sought to assert status by lavish displays of imports from Europe and Asia, but constructed a unique national identity, or Mexicanidad, that was shaped from the start by the concept of mestizaje (racial and cultural mixing). Mexicanidad found reflection in a hybridic material culture incorporating indigenous American, European, and Far Eastern materials, motifs and stylistic cues – prime examples of which will serve as focal points of hands-on seminar sessions. Auditors accepted with permission of instructor - email: judysund@mac.com
 
ART 83000 - Selected Topics in Medieval Art and Architecture: Making Jerusalem
Tuesday, 11:45 am – 1:45 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Cynthia Hahn
 Taking advantage of the Metropolitan Museum of Art exhibition to open in the Fall, this seminar, co-taught with Professor Ittai Weinryb of the Bard Graduate Center would consider Jerusalem as a potent religious and geographical center for ideologies, art production, and exchange. The class will read widely in classic art historical material (Richard Krautheimer’s work on the Holy Sepulchre, Oleg Graber on the Dome of the Rock) and more current approaches on material culture and the battle over who controls the city (Annabel Wharton, Selling Jerusalem). All three faith traditions of the holy city will be included in discussion and topics will range from the early Christian pilgrim account of the nun Egeria, to topographic mapping (Madaba) and exchange via the transport of the soil of the sacred city, to the impact of European Crusader rule on the built environment. The class will have a tour of the exhibition guided by the curators and will welcome two visiting lecturers. Students will attend associated Met lectures and be encouraged to work on objects in the show.
email: chahn@hunter.cuny.edu

Research and Writing Seminars

 
Hist. 80010- Literature Survey in American History
GC:  W, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 5 credits, Prof. KC Johnson
Room: 5212

The objective of this course is for students to read and discuss important studies in post Civil War American history.  They will be considering the ways in which the critical elements of American history have been conceived, structured and narrated. Some of the readings are classics; others are important because they offer provocative theses about long established historical questions; yet others introduce new viewpoints and new questions for historical inquiry. The broad scope of readings provides an essential immersion in the literature of the field and promotes a textured perspective for subsequent colloquia and seminars. Students will also be considering diverse approaches and methods of historical analysis that will help them shape their own research projects. Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus
 

Hist. 84900- Seminar in American History II
GC:  T, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 5 credits, Prof. Jonathan Sassi
Room: 6493

This course is intended for first-year U.S. history majors and is the continuation of the Seminar in American History I.  Having framed projects in the fall semester, students will complete the research and writing of an article-length research paper over the course of the spring semester.  The class is designed as a workshop, in which participants will present their works-in-progress, constructively criticize one another’s writings, and tackle common problems of the research and writing process.  Students will be responsible for circulating drafts of their developing works electronically in advance of class and preparing written responses to others’ papers.  Timely completion of the assignments and collegial participation in the seminar are essential requirements. Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus
 
Hist. 80020- Literature Survey in European History
GC:  M, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 5 credits, Prof. Benjamin Hett 
Room: 5417

This course is intended to provide an introduction to the major themes and historians’ debates on modern European history from the 18th century to the present. We will study a wide range of literature, from what we might call classic historiography to innovative recent work; themes will range from state building and imperialism to war and genocide to culture and sexuality. Students will be expected to take the lead in class discussions: each week one student will have the job of introducing the literature for the week, while another student brings to class questions for discussion. Over the semester students will write a substantial historiographical paper on a subject chosen in consultation with the instructor. This paper will be due on the last day of class. After completing the course students should have a solid basic grounding in the literature of modern Europe, which will serve as a basis for preparation for first year written exams, oral exams, and teaching and research work. Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus

Hist. 84900- Seminar in Non-American History II
GC:  T, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 5 credits, Prof. Dagmar Herzog
Room: 5212

This course is a continuation of History 80900 (Seminar in European and Non-American History I). Students will complete the research project developed in the fall, turning their prospectuses into 30-page papers of a publishable quality. The papers should be based on primary sources and should situate their topic within the appropriate historiographical context. During the semester, the class will read and discuss examples of model articles and, most importantly, offer constructive critiques of each other’s papers. Open only to PhD Program in History students.
Syllabus

Hist. 84900- Advanced Research Seminar 
GC:  R, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 5 credits, Prof. Joshua Freeman
Room: 5212
 
In this course students will write, workshop, and rewrite a roughly 30-page research paper of publishable quality.  The paper must be based on primary sources, work with a clearly defined historiographical problem, and reflect a high level of care for prose and professional standards.  In class, we will read model essays, discuss research methods and writing strategies, and workshop drafts.  Students should select a tentative topic for their paper before the first meeting of the course.  The topic should be significantly different from each student's first year seminar paper but may constitute a piece of research that leads toward a dissertation.  The course is only open to students in the PhD Program in History who have completed the first year seminar.
Syllabus

Hist. 89900- Dissertation Seminar 
GC:  T, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 0 credits, Prof. James Oakes
Room: 3306
 
This workshop will give students the opportunity to develop and complete dissertation chapters. It will be conducted as a workshop with students reading and commenting on one another’s work under the professor’s guidance.  Open only to Level 3 PhD Program in History students who have defended their dissertation prospectus.

American History

 
Hist. 74900- Political Cultures, Cultural Politics, United States
GC:  R, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. David Waldstreicher
Room: 5212
 
A distinctive American politics and culture is said to have emerged, clearly and perhaps even triumphantly, during the early republic, the period between the American Revolution and the Civil War or Reconstruction. Several generations of scholarship elucidated this period as the locus classicus of American political ideologies (republicanism, liberalism, democracy, constitutionalism, nationalism, race), cultural forms (the captivity narrative, the boycott, the celebratory parade, blackface minstrelsy) and institutions (the voluntary association, the political party, the press, the presidency). And yet the nature and boundaries of that culture and that politics now appear to have been not only porous but also deeply contested. It seems less certain what the Revolution created or what the Civil War resolved, and thus less clear how the first century of the nation created patterns or cycles followed or broken. Nor is it obvious or settled what mattered more: the formal politics or what occurred seemingly outside it in the culture wars of the time. Or how to characterize the relationship between the two, or those messy middle grounds between politics and culture that scholars began to identify, during the late twentieth century, with terms like ideology, political culture, and cultural politics. Or to put it differently, whether to approach the making of the United States as a state, as states, or as a state or states of mind.

At a time when American exceptionalism has come under renewed and withering criticism for its politicized uses, how should we approach the making of an American politics and culture(s)?  Did the first century of the republic set "American"—or other--patterns?  What was united – or disunited – and how? What was the national state and the states, and what were the stakes of state-making? Is it sufficient to conclude that the battles over what would be American politics and culture constituted the politics, the culture? Are the concepts of culture and of politics with which historians have worked adequate to the task of understanding the history and its significance?    
This seminar will address these questions by comparing classic and recent work by historians, by literary and cultural studies scholars in the American Studies tradition, and by political scientists -- including some scholarship that puts forward longer narratives that reach from the early republic to or through the twentieth century, something historians no longer do as often or as boldly as scholars in cognate fields. During most weeks there will also be a primary source or artifact under consideration that will help us evaluate whether various trends in scholarship are adequate not only to what we want and need to know now, but also to the demands the evidence may make on us. 
Syllabus

Hist. 75700- Paths, Detours, and Barriers to Citizenship: Immigrants, Refugees, and Aliens in U.S. History, Law, & Culture
GC:  M, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. David Nasaw
Room: 5212

We will interrogate the sometimes conflicting, sometimes consonant, but always changing relationships between notions of citizenship—and its cultural significance, political resonance, and legal entitlements—and American immigration policy.  While attentive to European migrations from the seventeenth to the twenty-first centuries, we will focus on twentieth and twenty-first century border crossings from Mexico, immigrations from Asia, Cold War refugees from Europe, and the discordant and unintended consequences of post-World War II legislation.     
 
The readings will explore the separate but entwined historical literatures on “citizenship” and “immigration.”  I have designed them to be global in reach and interdisciplinary in perspective.   We will, as the semester proceeds, read several works of fiction written by authors who have immigrated to the United States in recent years, some with, some without their families.
 
Students may be asked to write short papers in the course of the semester and a major final paper in the form of a “lecture” to undergraduates on the themes and issues discussed in the readings. 
Syllabus

Hist. 75800- History of the City of New York
GC:  W, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Kessner, Thomas
Room: 5383

New York is an ugly city, a dirty city. Its climate is a scandal, its politics are used to frighten children, its traffic is madness, its competition is murderous. But there is one thing about it -- once you have lived in New York and it has become your home, no place else is good enough. All of everything is concentrated here, population, theater, art, writing, publishing, importing, business, murder, mugging, luxury, poverty. It is all of everything. It goes all right. It is tireless and its air is charged with energy. John Steinbeck

Whoever is born in New York is ill-equipped to deal with any other city: all other cities seem, at best, a mistake, and, at worst, a fraud. No other city is so spitefully incoherent. James Baldwin

A hundred times have I thought New York is a catastrophe, and fifty times: It is a beautiful catastrophe. Le Corbusier

For those who would understand the past century of American history, the role of urban society is crucial. The influence of our cities has been considerable, pervasive and shaping. While the founding elite of the early republic fastened upon the nation the ethos of the plantation and southern life, cities assumed a more important part in setting national priorities following the Civil War. America's cities exerted broad economic, political and cultural authority, often steering the transforming forces of nineteenth and twentieth century American life. The impact of cities and especially the major metropolises on national life has been extraordinary.
Herald of twentieth century modernity, New York made itself into the center of world capitalism and American diversity. The variety of its markets and services afforded it a reach in space and influence that remains unmatched.  Its fabled diversity provides a riveting history of relations between groups divided by class, interest, culture, ethnicity, and race.
Shown a portrait of her painted by Picasso in his characteristic style, Gertrude Stein gazed at it with some distaste, protesting: "But I don't look like that". "Don't worry," he replied, "you will, you will." How often New York has been viewed as unique only to discover that it was merely early.
This course will trace various themes in the history of the city through readings, discussions and student research.  

Instructor permission required. Please write to tkessner@gc.cuny.edu (and cc mweber@gc.cuny.edu)

Syllabus
 
Hist. 75900- From Civil Rights to Black Power
GC:  M, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Clarence Taylor
Room: 5212
 
The modern civil rights movement is the most important social protest movement of the twentieth century. The movement helped cultivate national leaders such as Martin Luther King Jr., Bayard Rustin, and Fannie Lou Hamer.  It was responsible for eradicating the American Apartheid system known as Jim Crow and it was the major reason for the passage of some of the most important laws in twentieth century America, including the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965.  While prominent figures were important in shaping the civil rights struggles, the movement was also influenced by countless numbers of ordinary men and women who participated in civil rights campaigns throughout the nation, many whose names shall never be recorded in history books. Although some historians and others date the movement’s origin to the 1954 Brown decision, more recently, scholars in several disciplines contend that the civil rights struggle began much earlier.   More recently scholars have been examining black and brown coalitions in the struggle for social and economic rights. 
 
By the mid 1960s, the goals of the civil rights movement, including a fully integrated society were questioned by several national and grassroots leaders and activists who contended that empowering people of African origins in America should be the paramount objective of the black freedom struggle. On college campuses, among sports figures, politicians, theologians, business owners, and union members, Black Power became the major objective.  This course examines the origins and the impact that the Civil Rights and Black Power movements had on American society.  The course scrutinizes several theoretical explanations of these movements and the assigned books and articles focus on the ongoing debate among scholars over periodization, geography, conceptualization, and leadership of civil rights and Black Power movements in America.
Syllabus

European History

 
Hist. 71500- Spaces and Identities in France and the Francophone World since 1750
GC:  W, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. David Troyansky
Room: 3305
 
A well-known French slogan refers to France as “one and indivisible.”  However, historians know well the various ways in which France has been quite divisible.  We will explore those ways by looking particularly at the theme of spaces and identities.  We will pay attention to the history of the French landscape, the variety of divisions that are associated with the scholarship on history and memory, ideas of neighborhood in Paris in the eighteenth century, provincial cities and their surroundings in the nineteenth, and a variety of locations and “communities” in France and the Francophone world in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.  The first two thirds of the course will involve common and collective readings in the scholarly literature; the last third will involve student research and presentations on particular spaces and identities.
Syllabus

Hist. 72300- After Theory
GC:  M, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Richard Wolin
Room: 5383
 
"Theory" has become historical.
During the 1980s Theory’s cryptic messages and provisos coursed through departments of comparative literature and humanities promising, if always obliquely, a qualitative transformation of our conventional and retrograde intellectual and practical habitudes. Theory traded on the fading aura of 1960s radicalism, implying that, whereas the soixante-huitards ('68ers) had foundered, it would write the next chapter in the Book of Revolution. Its heightened awareness of past failures, nourished by a skepticism vis-à-vis metanarratives, seemingly enhanced its prospects of success.       

But, when all is said and done, how might one, going forward, define "success"? When the entirety of a tradition is presumptively jettisoned or consigned to desuetude, it is difficult to know exactly where to begin – or to re-begin. Derrida implied that once the demons of logocentrism had been vanquished, life and thought would be permanently and positively transformed. However, both he and his acolytes refrained from pointing out that the thinker who had coined the term "logocentrism" was the well nigh unreadable, proto-fascist German Lebensphilosoph Ludwig Klages (cf. Geist als Widersacher der Seele; 3 vols. 1929-32).
In The History of Sexuality, Foucault, mistrusting the allure of collective action, or, in Hannah Arendt's words, "people acting in concert," recommended that we pursue "a different economy of bodies and pleasures," going so far as to invoke - in what can only be described as a prototypical instance of "Orientalism" - the Kama Sutra (sic) by way of illustration. However, in retrospect, this prescription seemed merely to dovetail with the "culture of narcissism" (cf. Christopher Lasch) that succeeded the demise of the contestatory spirit of the 1960s – as such, grist for the mill of an apolitical "lifestyle" or "identity" politics. In other words: an "apolitical politics."
 Circa 1971, Foucault had internalized the deleterious linkage between "knowledge" and "domination" – or, "power-knowledge" – to the point where he was prepared to abandon both "writing" and "discourse" tout court, having concluded that both were merely expressions of hegemony. If we accept the Nietzschean claim that “truth” is little more than an efflux or manifestation of “power” (as Foucault suggests: “truth isn’t a reward for free spirits . . . it is produced by multiple forms of constraint. It induces regular effects of power. Each society has its regime of truth”), and if all norms are “normalizing,” what, then, is the basis of contestation and critique? Has the concept of emancipation remained meaningful, or must it, too, be cynically consigned to the rubbish heap of lost illusions?

 The story of French Theory coincides with the reception of Nietzsche and Heidegger's thought in France during the 1950s and 1960s. Here, Deleuze's 1962 book on Nietzsche as well as Foucault's essay, "Nietzsche, Genealogy, and History" (1971) signify important way stations. Deconstruction, for its part, takes its inspiration from Heidegger's appeal in Being and Time for a "destruction of the history of Western ontology." At the outset, we will focus on pivotal German and French texts in order to secure a solid philosophical grounding in Theory's conceptual intricacies. Thereby, in a post-enlightenment spirit, the obscure shall be rendered clear - or, at least, clearer. 
 Marx once said: "We recognize only one science, the science of history." What, then, might it mean to historicize poststructuralism?

Prospective Book/Reading List:
o   Nietzsche, "On Truth and Lies in an Extra-Moral Sense"
o   Nietzsche, Genealogy of Morals
o   Heidegger, "Letter on Humanism"
o   Heidegger, Being and Time (selections)
o   Derrida, "Structure, Sign and Play in the Discourse of the Human Sciences"
o   Derrida, "Signature, Event, Context"
o   Foucault, Discipline and Punish
o   Foucault, History of Sexuality
o   Deleuze, What is Philosophy?
o   Cusset, French Theory
o   Historicizing Postmodernism
o   Habermas, Philosophical Discourse of Modernity

Syllabus
 
Hist. 78400- Knowledge is Power: The State and its Sciences in the Age of Enlightenment
GC:  T, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Barbara Naddeo
Room: 5212
 
If age-old, the well-known aphorism "knowledge is power" was a watchword of the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment, an age in European history which has traditionally been hailed for its development and codification of the methods and disciplines of the modern sciences. If usually studied as the product of the culture and sociability of the age, the emergence of the modern sciences in Europe was also inextricably tied to the new political culture of the territorial state, which itself sought to sponsor, cultivate and harness the findings of the sciences to its own political ends. As a result, the age of the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment was perhaps the first age of "big science," big-picture theories and large-scale projects which sought to transform the terrain and peoples of Europe's territorial states and their empires. At the same time, "big science" equally transformed the political culture of the state, the jurisdiction of its administration, and, no less, the rights and duties of its citizens. This dualistic trend is perhaps best illustrated by the advent of the human sciences, which more than a set of discourses was also tied to the new institutional culture and political practices of the emergent nation-state in Europe. What were the political ramifications of "big sciences" for the state, its subjects and citizens in the age of Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment? This class will provide the answer to that enduring question with its case studies of the major figures and projects of the new human sciences at the cusp of modernity.
Syllabus

Middle East History

 
Hist. 78110- Imperialism and the Shaping of the Modern Middle East
GC:  W, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Simon Davis
Room: 3306
 
This course surveys how interaction with increasingly influential foreign interests, and responses to them, both assimilative and resistant, shaped leading currents in Middle Eastern experience from the late eighteenth century onwards. Themes include imperialism in historical interpretation, perceptions and framings of the region, forms of political, economic, cultural and social change, and in Middle Eastern intra-regional, international and global relations. Each session will feature a discussion on a theme preceded by suggested readings from course texts, related published documents, and specialized scholarly journal articles relating to each topic. Students will each complete a research essay chosen from a number of assigned titles and reading lists, a number of smaller critical exercises and a final examination.
Syllabus


Latin American History

 
Hist. 77300- Law and Justice in the History of the Latin American City, c. 1500 to the present
GC:  T, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Amy Chazkel
Room: 6300

This doctoral-level course examines the long history of cities in Latin America, from the early colonial era in the fifteenth century to the present day, with a particular focus on scholarship at the intersection of the study of the law and the humanities. We will consider topics that include, but are not limited to: the founding of cities as an expression of imperial power; gender and the question of private and public urban life; the centrality of urban slavery and freedpersons to the sociolegal history of Latin American cities; the long history of urban crime, justice, and policing; urban protest and social movements; architecture and power; and the history of struggles over control of urban space and time.  A topic that we will treat in particular depth is the history of what has come to be called the “right to the city” as it developed out of centuries of struggles over urban resources throughout the region.
 
In addition to our readings, students will work throughout the semester toward producing an in-depth, publishable-quality historiographic essay as a final project.
 
This course is designed equally to explore the law and justice as crucial elements in the humanistic study of cities on the one hand, and, on the other, to familiarize students with a panorama of some of the most cutting-edge new scholarship on Latin American history, from the colonial era to the present. Students in this course do not need to have any prior knowledge of Latin American history, and students from other disciplines are warmly welcomed. All required readings will be in English; reading knowledge or Spanish and/or Portuguese would expand the possibilities available for writing the final paper but it not a requirement.
Syllabus

Transnational History

 
Hist. 72600- Human Rights and the Non-Western World
GC:  W, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Manu Bhagavan
Room: 3310A
 
This graduate class will focus on the idea of human rights as it has been understood and propagated by and in the “non-Western” world.  “Human rights” are at once posited as a universal category, and critiqued as a specifically Western discourse.  But what are “human rights?”  Where and when did the concept originate? Who invested the concept with meaning?  How has the concept been contested, and how how is evolved as a result?  In this seminar, we will explore the answers to these questions while further asking: what is the relationship of universalism to violence? Can there be a just, non-violent universalism? How are human rights defined in relation to, and in juxtaposition to, racism and imperialism? What role do human rights play in foreign policy and diplomatic history, if any?  This seminar, in short, examines what kind of world is imagined and brought into being by human rights.
Syllabus

Hist. 72700- The African Diaspora 
GC:  R, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Herman Bennett
Room: 5383

                       By employing the heuristic concept of diaspora—and specifically the African diaspora—this course focuses on the analytical work generated by studying cultures of movement.  As scholars, we might begin by asking whether diaspora complicates our understanding of disciplinary formations—including the normative assumptions that inform the study of society and culture.  How does diaspora, for instance, enhance our perspectives on imperial, colonial, national and post-colonial formations and the ways in which they have been historically represented?  In utilizing the prism of diaspora we confront the politics of representation through which scholars render meaning out of the past and present.  For this reason, diaspora like other categories of analysis engages the vexed terrain of representation whereby scholars frame the subject of their inquiries.
           
            Diaspora brings into relief many of the principle categories and themes informing the social and human sciences.  It de-naturalizes many of the foundational assumptions on which contemporary social theory rests.  For this reason, we will route our conversations and readings through some of the central concepts defining social theory (state, nation, society, sovereignty, difference, stratification, race, ethnicity, religion, and culture) so as to discern how diaspora might trouble existing forms of knowledge bequeathed to us by the Renaissance, Enlightenment and Modern Era.
 
            On a practical professional level, the course serves as a graduate-level introduction to diasporas in general but the African diaspora in particular.  Scholarship on this subject along with its development over time and in distinct settings (the United States, Latin America and the Caribbean, Sub-Saharan Africa, England and Continental Europe) introduces us to the historical profession and professionalism.  For this reason, we will devote significant time focusing and discussing how various scholars have framed and approached their scholarly projects.  Since the African diaspora as a field of study constitutes a relatively novel endeavor, most of the readings draw on works from the last few years.  While this conveys a sense of where the field is presently at it also serves to delineate how the African diaspora draws and builds on early forms of inquiry (the history of colonial expansion, the history of slavery and freedom, the history of racial formation, etc.)  Over the semester we will constantly need to ask what defines an inquiry, an approach or a perspective as diasporic in scope.  In doing so, we will necessarily focus on an earlier body of scholarship that was associated with different fields of inquiry (slavery, race relations, African Studies, Brazilian history, the study of religion, English Cultural Studies).
Syllabus

Women’s History

 
Hist. 74300- Readings in 19th Century Women's History
GC:  M, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Kathleen McCarthy
Room: 5212
 
When women’s history emerged as a subfield in the 1960s, its initial goal was to write women into the historical record.  Since then, the analytical focus has shifted from an emphasis on “sisterhood” to class relations, political culture, gender constructs, transnationalism, and colonialism and empire.  Cultural analyses have also become increasingly important, illuminating the subtexts that shaped women’s lives in different regions and eras, while microhistories have excavated the lives of ordinary Americans in revealing ways.  This course will chart these historiographical shifts, as well as the ways in which women’s history has reshaped our understanding of American history for the period between 1790 and 1900. 
Within this framework a variety of topics will be explored, including: 1) the legacy of the Revolution; 2) microhistory, female entrepreneurship and crime; 3) charity, “sisterhood” and class; 4) antebellum national and transnational social reform movements; 5) gender and the Gold Rush; 6) slavery and the Civil War; 7) Reconstruction, race and reform; 8) transnationalism and empire; 9) middle and working class cultures; 10) elite culture and cultural elites; 11) Gilded Age politics and labor; and 12) political culture and reform .  Particular emphasis will be placed on the ways in which historians have analyzed the changing cultural subtexts that shaped women’s activities in different regions and times. 

The goal of this course is threefold: 1) to help students prepare for their written and oral examinations; 2) to deepen their knowledge of the ways in which women’s history has reshaped our understanding of American history; and 3) to bolster their research, writing and analytical skills. 

Students will lead one to three discussion sessions, and have a choice of doing weekly abstracts on the assigned readings for the weeks in which they are not presenting, or developing a research proposal on a women’s history topic of their choice for the period between 1790 and 1900.
Syllabus


SEE ALSO:

PDEV 79400  Advanced Spoken English: Teaching and Presentation Skills
GC:  Tuesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 0 credits, [30282]
This course is designed to help students improve their spoken English in a variety of academic and casual settings through guided instruction of American-style conversation and direct instruction of spoken English fluency and pronunciation skills.  Additionally, students will be instructed in the standard methods and style of teaching and presenting for the American university classroom.  Students will also be discussing and learning about American culture via themes and topics that are relevant to the students’ interests.
 
PDEV 79401  Teaching Strategies
GC:  Wednesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 0 credits, Prof. Allen, [30283]
This course is designed to provide students with practical advice and hands-on exercises to help them design future courses and prepare for classroom teaching. It is grounded in an understanding of the social context of teaching at CUNY as well as providing some theoretical discussion of what makes for good pedagogical practice. This course will be especially valuable for graduate students who will soon be teaching undergraduate courses in the Humanities and Social Sciences.
 
PDEV 79403  Effective Academic Writing – for native English speakers
GC:  Tuesday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 0 credits, Prof. Smith, [30284] Section for native English speakers.
This course is designed to help students improve their academic writing.  This section is meant for native English speakers who want to address issues in their writing and overcome particular writing hurdles.
 
PDEV 79403  Effective Academic Writing – for non-native speakers
GC:  Wednesday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 0 credits, Prof. Parmegiani, [30285] Section for non-native English speakers.
This workshop course intends to help students improve their academic writing skills.  The section is restricted to students who speak English as a foreign language and will address common issues and problems that they may face when writing.  All students are required to share with the class a draft of their own academic writing in progress.
 
PDEV 81690  Colloquium on College Teaching
GC:  Monday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 0 credits, Prof. Cahn, [30286]
This colloquium will critically examine issues concerning a professor’s teaching responsibilities and related collegial obligations. Among the subjects to be discussed are academic freedom, institutional governance, teaching strategies, testing and grading, research responsibilities, departmental duties, professorial-administrative relationships, and faculty recruitment (as viewed by both employers and applicants). The colloquium is intended for doctoral students planning for academic careers. 

Fall 2015

Literature and Writing Seminars

Hist. 80010- Literature of American History l
GC:  R, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 5 credits, Prof. David Waldstreicher

This course introduces Ph.D. students to the historiography of the U.S. through the Civil War and is intended to prepare students for the First Written Examination.
 
One of our primary concerns will be periodization. To what extent should the colonial period be considered a prologue to U.S. history? And on the other side of the nationhood divide, are there analyses that suggest a coherence or continuity to U.S. history beyond the peculiarities of the early republic or Civil War periods? What is the status of the Revolution and the Civil War, and the political history that drives or used to drive the narrative of U.S. history, amid transformations that might otherwise be seen as social, cultural, economic? Are there explanations that that cut across centuries, or stories that hold up in our time?  What are the most important achievements of recent US historians, and what are the trends in the field now? 
 
The books and articles we shall discuss include prizewinning narratives, monographs born as dissertations, and historiographical essays. An important part of what we will be doing is attempting to read these in light of each other. Be forewarned: the reading is extensive, in recognition of the five credits this course carries and its status as required preparation for qualifying examinations. Our goal is to prepare for the exam, of course, but also to prepare to teach this period at the college level and to lay a substantial foundation for future research and teaching in any period of U.S. history.
 
  Instead of a seminar paper or historiographical essay, your written work for the course will consist of weekly short (2-3 page) responses to the readings. Each week I will provide prompting questions that will help us work toward the kinds of writing and analysis the faculty will expect for the examination in December. These short essays, while relatively informal, will be due Thursday at noon via email and may serve as jumping off points for our Thursday seminar discussions.
Syllabus
 
Hist. 84900- Seminar in American History l
GC:  W, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 5 credits, Prof. Thomas Kessner

 This seminar is designed to train incoming graduate students in the craft of historical research and writing. Over the course of the term, each student will formulate a research topic, prepare a bibliography of relevant primary and secondary sources, write an historiographic essay, and present and defend a formal project proposal for the substantial research paper that is to be completed in the second semester seminar. Weekly meetings will discuss common readings, share and critique written work, and develop and refine the research proposals.  We will also be devoting some time to methods and issues involved in undergraduate teaching.
Students will focus primarily on framing a topic and honing a well defined, focused and reasonable research proposal for their papers. The purpose of the collateral assignments is to help push this process forward.
Students are advised to give some thought to possible research projects before classes begin this way they can make some early efforts at sampling secondary materials and investigating the availability of sources.
Syllabus

Hist.80100- Middle East Literature of 19th century
GC: T, 
6:30- 8:30 p.m., 5 credits, Prof. Samira Haj

The object of this course is to familiarize students with the main themes and approaches in the history and historiography of the nineteenth-century “Middle East.” Temporally, the course moves from the late 1700s to World War I.  Geographically, the area includes the region from Egypt to Iran, the Balkans to Arabia, in short, those regions under the dominion of the Ottoman and Qajar Empires. We will look at some foundational as well as recent works that address the issues, concerns and anxieties in the region arising from a fundamental change in power structures and world politics. These works would cover a wide range of themes including governance, empire, reform and revival (religious and secular), nation, revolution, law, and political economy.
PLEASE NOTE - All PhD students taking this course for their literature requirement must register for it as an Independent Study (Hist.80100). Use CRN 16936 and change the credits to 5.
Syllabus


Hist. 80020- Literature of European History l
GC:  R, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 5 credits, Prof. Sarah Covington

 This course will introduce students to the basic theories, methodologies, debates, and themes in the historical study of late medieval and early modern history, from the late fourteenth through eighteenth centuries.  In addition to surveying the different conceptual and methodological approaches to the development of “history” as a mode of knowledge across time, we will read works that best reflect these different approaches; we will then move on to study classic and recent texts that approach such essential topics in early modern history as political thought and the emergence of states, nations, and empires; religion and the crisis of the reformation and counter-reformation;, revolutions in science and technology; transformations in social life and gender relations; and the Enlightenment.  This will be an intensive yet supportive course with the goal not only of helping students study for the first-year comprehensive examination, but in laying the critical foundations for future studies and research.
Syllabus

Hist. 80900- Seminar in European and non-American History l
GC: M, 6:30- 8:30 p.m., 5 credits, Prof. Timothy Alborn

 This course seminar will provide an introduction to the nuts and bolts of historical research as well as an introduction to several electronic databases and to the New York Public Library, and a behind-the-scenes look at submitting an article for publication. In the context of this seminar students will be expected to formulate their own research paper topics and produce a paper prospectus, which they will have the opportunity to present to their peers for feedback and constructive criticism.
Syllabus

European History

 

Hist. 71200- Intellectual Politics of the French Revolution
GC: T, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Helena Rosenblatt

This course is an in-depth introduction to the French Revolution and the scholarly debates it has engendered. We will privilege political/cultural/intellectual perspectives, reading some of the most innovative and thought-provoking recent work on a number of topics, such as the causes of the Revolution and its radicalization; the nature and legacies of the revolutionary wars and Terror; the question of Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s influence; and the Revolution’s performance in the areas of gender, race and nationalism. We will have occasion to focus on the Revolution's relationship with "modernity" and its various ideologies (liberalism, socialism, totalitarianism, feminism, etc.) Scholarship on the French Revolution will also be placed in historical and political context in an effort to answer the question: "what is at stake when scholars adopt certain methodologies and perspectives on the French Revolution?"
Syllabus
 
Hist. 72100- Dictatorship: The Career of a Concept from Robespierre to Lenin and Beyond
GC: M, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Richard Wolin

         In retrospect, the “great dictators” of the twentieth century – Lenin, Mussolini, Stalin, and Hitler – have become negative moral and political templates: paragons of political evil. Nor have dictatorship’s ills been confined to the European theatre. According to recent estimates, Chairman Mao was responsible for some 40 million deaths. His disciple, Pol Pot (aka, Saloth Sar or “Brother Number 1”) managed, in three short years, to do away with 15% of the Cambodia’s indigenous population.
         Yet, the contemporary moral aversion to dictatorial rule is the exception. Dictatorship was a hallowed Roman political institution in times of emergency, until its “abuse” by Sulla and Caesar. Philosophes like Voltaire and Diderot, who were otherwise champions of “toleration,” also favored the idea of “enlightened despotism.” The historical verdict on the Jacobin dictatorship is still out; to this day, there is a Paris metro station named after Robespierre, the “Incorruptible.” And as is well known, Marx recommended a transitional period of working class rule he denominated the “dictatorship of the proletariat.” Marx’s Russian disciples, Lenin and Stalin, took this prescription all-too literally. Dictatorship became the cornerstone of Bolshevik rule from October 1917 until Stalin’s death in 1953. (Alluding to Kant, the philosopher Ernst Bloch famously described the Bolshevik Revolution as “The Categorical Imperative with revolver in hand.”)
           Read the full description below!
Syllabus

 
Hist. 70900- Science and Religion in Renaissance and Early Modern Europe
GC: R, 6:30- 8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Allison Kavey

 The period between 1450 and 1700 in Europe is remarkable for its shifts in theological and natural philosophical thought.‎ This seminar will focus on those shifts in their larger cultural context and help produce multiple narratives for framing them and the period.
Syllabus

Hist. 70400- Bastards, Kingship, and Kinship in Medieval Europe
GC: W, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Sara McDougall

 This course will investigate ideas of illegitimate birth in medieval Europe and particularly their role in dynastic succession.  Throughout the Middle Ages some children were classified as less worthy than others: less worthy to inherit royal or noble title, and less worthy to inherit property more generally. This class will critically examine the history of when people in medieval Europe began to identify other people as "bastards," what they meant when they did so, and when calling a child a bastard meant his or her exclusion from succession or an inheritance. We will make use of a wide range of primary sources available in the original and in translation, sources including chronicles, legal texts, theological writings, vernacular literature, and images. 
Syllabus


Hist. 72800- The Medium of Culture
GC: T, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Dagmar Herzog

 This class is an experiment in educating ourselves about important recent developments in theoretically informed writing in history and allied disciplines, focused on puzzles of causation, interpretation, and uses of evidence. The five core topics we will explore, historically and conceptually (knowledge, faith, desire, violence, madness) are ones which have strong resonance in our present, even as assumptions about their meanings and functions have changed dramatically across eras and locations. All five challenge us to think more critically and carefully about the relations between individuals’ values and behaviors and social structures and polities – and the role of culture in mediating all of these. Because of its special expertise in theorizing culture, the discipline from which we will borrow the most is anthropology. But we will also read many historians, as well as philosophers, sociologists, literary critics, and journalists. One goal will be for you to acquire competence in reading a great variety of theoretically informed work, but another will be to understand the practical usefulness of this variety of cultural theory for the diverse historical research projects you are yourselves engaged in. Critical thinking about gender and sexuality will be integrated throughout.

Requirements include: thorough reading of the assigned materials, two critical questions about each assigned text sent to instructor and classmates in advance of class every time, thoughtful and active participation in class discussions, two short summary analyses of weekly readings also sent to instructor and classmates in advance of class (we will divide up the reading list on the first day), and one longer final paper exploring the relevance of and putting to use some aspect(s) of cultural theory for your own work.
Syllabus

Hist. 72110- Histories of Madness in the Modern Era
GC: W, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Andreas Killen

 This course examines the relationship between insanity and its social and historical contexts from the 18th-century birth of the asylum up to contemporary debates about psycho-pharmacology. Beginning with the age of the so-called “Great Confinement,” the course traces the institutional and therapeutic reforms of the revolutionary and post-revolutionary era; the rise of theories of degeneration and hysteria in the late 19th century; the emergence of psychoanalysis; war neurosis and military psychiatry; relations between psychiatry, totalitarianism, and the legacy of imperialism; the anti-psychiatry movement; and contemporary bio-psychiatry.
 
While the principal focus will be on histories of madness and psychiatry in the West, comparisons with non-Western societies will also play a role in the course. Attention will be paid to the intense methodological and interpretive debates that have marked the field over the last 30 years, and to the shifting meanings of madness for social categories like class, race, and gender.
Syllabus

American History

 

 Hist. 75700- Aftermaths: World War, Postwar, Cold War
GC: M, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. David Nasaw

“Math”:  the old-English term for harvest.  
When the cutting is done and the field is barren, there arises a new growth, stunted, near deformed, but alive and reaching upwards for the light.   This is the aftermath. 
 
We shall together explore and investigate the violent transformations wrought by the Second World War in Europe and the attempts of Americans and Europeans to make sense of their recent pasts and begin the difficult, but necessary work of reconstruction.  The bulk of the reading will be secondary sources, though I intend to assign some contemporary novels, autobiographies, and films.   The reading will be heavy at times—at least one book a week, often more than that.   There may be a few brief writing assignments during the semester.   For their final papers, students will prepare and write a lecture in which they introduce advanced undergraduates to the issues, themes, and dilemmas associated with the study of  the immediate postwar period.
Cross-listed with ASCP 82000
Syllabus

Hist. 75900- 20th Century African American History
GC: T, 6:30- 8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Khalil Muhammad

This course is primarily a readings course designed to introduce students to the major topics, themes, and problems in 20th Century African-American history.  Our readings and discussions will explore the following: the rise and evolution of segregation in the South and North, migration, labor and unions, education, crime and punishment, housing, urban life and culture, health and disease, institution-building, intra-racial class and gender dynamics, civil rights, and black nationalism.  Weekly assignments will consist of reading one monograph (most of which have been published recently) and occasionally an article.  
 
By familiarizing students with the literature and major historiographical debates since the end of Reconstruction, the goal of this course is for every student (1) to identify a research topic for a future seminar or thesis; (2) to help prepare students for qualifying exams; and (3) to facilitate and sharpen students’ abilities to engage critically and constructively with scholarship.   Every student will be responsible for at least one presentation a monograph, a short book review, an encyclopedia article, plus an historiographical essay due at semester’s end.  Class participation will be very important to student’s overall performance.  Everyone, including the week’s presenter, is expected to have read the assignment and to be prepared to engage in discussion.
Syllabus


Hist. 75500- The History of Capitalism
GC: T, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. James Oakes 

            This course surveys classic as well as recent approaches to the history of capitalism.  The earliest weeks will focus on historically grounded definitions of capitalism as they were formulated in debates over the transition from feudalism to capitalism.  We will examine competing explanations for the “the great divergence” between Europe and the rest of the world.  The course continues to move chronologically to discussions of the consumer revolution of the eighteenth century, the industrial revolution of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century, and the emergence of finance capitalism in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.  Various relationships will be considered, between, slavery and capitalism, antislavery and capitalism, capitalism and imperialism, capitalism and freedom, and capitalism and socialism.  The course will conclude by examining the “downturn” of the 1970s and debates over the rising maldistribution of wealth in the late twentieth century.
Syllabus
 
Hist. 75400- Seminar on Public History
GC:  W, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Andrew Robertson


This seminar will begin by considering the subject matter, methodology and practice of public history.  A broad definition of public history would include historical evidence presented and interpreted for a wide audience outside of the academy. Public historians employ the methods of academic history and expand them by joining traditional and non-traditional evidence, inventing new formats for public presentation and reframing historical questions in a lively and accessible context.  By employing old and new forms of evidence, broadening the intended audience for the reception of historical scholarship, rethinking strategies of presentation and redirecting historical interpretations, public historians are creating an innovative and defined practice.  Public history prepares historians to consider their research in a popular and accessible context.
This seminar will introduce students to the context, methodology and practice of Public History in the following ways. The first few weeks of the course will examine the definitions of public history, its origins, nature and prospects. Topics include how versions of the past are created, institutionalized and disseminated as public memory in civic festivities, memorials and monuments; in invented tradition and in popular culture, including print media, film television and social media; and in the creation of public spaces. We will also consider the relationship of public memory and collective memory in museums (e.g. presenting Native America). This seminar will consider controversial case studies over historical presentation, including the Enola Gay Exhibition at the Smithsonian.  The remainder of the course will examine other aspects of public history including community and local history, oral history and digital history. Course requirements include leading one or more class discussions and a final research paper that describes and analyzes how a particular topic or issue in history has been interpreted and presented in a variety of public history formats.
Syllabus

Middle East History

Hist. 78110- The Iranian Revolution in Comparative Perspective
GC: W, 6:30- 8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Ervand Abrahamian

The course will explore the diverse theoretical approaches that ave been used to explain the 1979 revolution in  Iran. The main approaches to be  examined will be the Cultural, Weberian, Durkheimian, Behavioral, Intellectual,  Feminist, Discourse, Tillian, Structural, and Marxist.
Syllabus

Latin American History

 
Hist. 76900- Nation-Building in Latin America: The Andean Republics in Comparative Perspective
GC:  R, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. José Rénique


This course examines the making of nations in the Andean region. A process conceived as a complex quest for integration against the backdrop of a millenarian civilization and a thick colonial legacy. The transition from colonies to republics is the point of departure of an examination that mostly concentrate on the last one hundred years. A comparative perspective (Bolivia, Ecuador, Peru mainly) is adopted to examine the national phenomena –from the building of states to the integration of subaltern groups.  Understanding specific Andean peculiarities as opposed to continental-wide generalizations is also an important concern of this course. Particular attention will be given to the historiographic dimension. Classes will follow a seminar format including weekly presentations.
Syllabus

 
Hist. 76910- Comparative Caribbean History
GC: M, 6:30- 8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Teresita Levy


The Caribbean region has been a theater for European and U.S. imperial expansion and colonial administration, post-colonial nation building, migration, and economic subordination since the time of the “discovery.” In this course, we will explore the major themes of Caribbean history, including slavery and abolition, plantation agriculture, labor mobilization, mass migration and the creation of a (or many) Caribbean diaspora(s), industrialization and tourism, and colonialism and post-colonialism.  We will use these converging historical themes to discuss their myriad manifestations throughout the geographic space that is the Caribbean.  Although this course will emphasize the Anglophone and Hispanic Caribbean islands, we will also examine the Francophone islands, as well as the coastal regions of Latin America that face the Caribbean Sea.
Syllabus

Hist. 77300- Afro-Latin America: Social Science & the Politics of Knowledge Production
GC: R, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Herman Bennett

In recent years, some Latin Americanists have questioned the hermeneutics defining the field of Latin American History.  The colonial designation some feel posits a disjuncture (or beginning) when it could be argued that continuity characterized the historical narrative.  While students of ideas, political practice, and the cultural domain have been the strongest proponents of this intervention, scholars of indigenous cultures—especially the Nahua Studies groups—share similar sentiments despite differences in scope and method.  Consequently, scholars have been utilizing terms like ‘early’ and ‘early modern’ Latin America to distinguish their work from a colonial project and its association with the rupture that Spanish and Portuguese hegemony allegedly implied.  Concurrently, a self-conscious collection of scholars identified as the Latin American subaltern studies group have called into question the elitist hegemony shaping the structure and content of writings about Latin America.  Scholars of the Latin American subaltern along with those who take issue with the occidental reasoning informing how Latin America history is currently conceived are introducing new terminology (subaltern, postcolonial, Afro-Latin American) that allegedly re-frames the Latin American past and present.  In our semester’s work, we shall explore the meanings and implications, if any, that this and other discursive shifts have had on research and writing Latin America.  Even as this seminar attends to shifts in meaning and context, we will engage the substance of the existing scholarship.
Syllabus

Transnational/Comparative/Methodological

 

Hist. 78500 -  Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Corporation, Health and Democracy, 1900 to the Present
GC: T,
 4:15-6:15 p.m.,3 credits, Prof. Gerald Markowitz

This course will introduce students to historical, epidemiological and sociological perspectives on the impact of corporations on population health.  Through in-depth investigations of selected industries, products and practices, students will analyze the changing pathways and mechanisms by which corporate practices influence the health of consumers and workers and of the environment in both the developed and the developing world. The class will also consider public health and other responses to harmful corporate practices.  Among the topics to be studied are lead in paint and gasoline, automobiles, tobacco, food and beverages, alcohol and firearms.   Students will write a case study of a specific industry or product.
Syllabus

 
See Also

PDEV. 81690 - Colloquium on College Teaching
 GC: M, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 0 credits, Prof. Cahn 

 
This fall semester Professor Steven Cahn will again offer the Colloquium on College Teaching, intended to help doctoral students develop strategies for success in their academic careers, including advice about teaching, publishing, and searching for academic positions. The course is free and open to all graduate students. Over the years these ungraded seminars have been extremely well-received and have filled quickly. The course meets during the early weeks of the semester, and students register through on-line course registration. Any questions can be addressed to Professor Cahn at scahn@gc.cuny.edu.

PDEV 79401  Teaching Strategies
GC:  Wednesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m.,  0 credits, Prof. Allen
This course is designed to provide students with practical advice and hands-on exercises to help them design future courses and prepare for classroom teaching. It is grounded in an understanding of the social context of teaching at CUNY as well as providing some theoretical discussion of what makes for good pedagogical practice. This course will be especially valuable for graduate students who will soon be teaching undergraduate courses in the Humanities and Social Sciences.

ANTH 82000 – Anthropology and History      
GC:   W, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Skurski


This seminar explores approaches to the interplay of anthropology and history by examining how scholars have grappled with the categories, theories, and methods of work within and beyond these disciplines, including in literary, visual, and performance fields.  The readings focus on key topics, including: culture and power, material vs. spiritual, postcolonial critiques, historical memory, the archive, violence and representation.  Among the authors we will read: Amin, Asad, Cohn, Coronil, Das, Hall, Mueggler, Pedersen, Stoler, Williams.

ART 75000 -  Topics in European Art & Architecture 1300-1750:
The Quest for the Spiritual in German Painting and Graphics from 1375 to 1550
GC: Mon. 4:15 – 6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Barbara Lane, b.g.lane@att.net


This course will study German painting, woodcut, and engraving from the late Gothic period to the Reformation. The spirituality of these works inspired German artists of the Romantic period and were among the most significant sources of German Expressionism. After investigating how spirituality is expressed in the work of early German painters such as Master Bertram, Master Francke, Witz, Lochner, and Pacher, we shall study the development of early fifteenth-century printmaking by concentrating on Master E.S. and Schongauer. We shall then focus on Dürer and Grünewald, who produced some of the most spiritual work of the period, and conclude with a review of how the paintings and prints of Cranach, Altdorfer, and Holbein relate to the aims of the Reformation.
Course Requirements: There will be one midterm and a final examination. Students with a good reading knowledge of German and a strong background in Northern Renaissance art may choose to write a term paper instead of taking the final examination.
Preliminary Reading:
    •    Panofsky, Erwin. The Life and Art of Albrecht Dürer. Princeton, 1967.
 
    •    Snyder, James. Northern Renaissance Art: Painting, Sculpture, the Graphic Arts
from 1350 to 1575. Englewood Cliffs, N.J. and New York, 1985, Ch. IV, XI, XII, XIV, and XVI-XX. Students who have no background in Northern Renaissance Art may find it helpful to read Ch. V-X. 5 auditors will be accepted. Rachel Kousser

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Professional Development

Non-Credit Course Offerings from The Writing Center

The Writing Center manages a range of non-credit professional development courses designed to help students at the Graduate Center in their careers and professional activities. Regular offerings include courses in academic writing for native and non-native English speakers, advanced spoken English for presentations, and teaching strategies. Additional topics vary by semester.

Browse Course offerings from the Writing Center