Course listings and room numbers subject to change. For the most up-to-date course listings, visit CUNY's course listings:

DYNAMIC COURSE SCHEDULE

In some cases, MALS core courses will be cross-listed with other programs. Students who would like to have these courses satisfy the core course requirement for their chosen concentration must register for the MALS course number. Please keep this in mind as you register.   

Africana Studies

  • MALS 73400 Africana Studies: Introduction, 3 credits
  • MALS 73500 Africana Studies: Global Perspectives, 3 credits

American Studies

  • MALS 73100 American Culture and Values, 3 credits
  • MALS 73200 American Social Institutions, 3 credits

Approaches to Modernity

  • MALS 70700 The Shaping of Modernity, 1789-1914, 3 credits
  • MALS 70800 Transformations of Modernity, 1914-present, 3 credits

The Archaeology of the Classical, Late Antique, and Islamic Worlds

  • MALS 74400 Special Topics in the Archaeology of the Classical, Late Antique, and Islamic Worlds, 3 credits
  • MALS 74500 Great Digs: Important sites of the Ancient, Late Antique and Islamic worlds, 3 credits

Biography, Autobiography, and Memoir

  • MALS 70900  Approaches to Life Writing, 3 credits
  • MALS 71000  Forms of Life Writing, 3 credits

Childhood and Youth Studies

  • MALS 78800 Introduction to Childhood and Youth Studies, 3 credits
  • MALS 78900 Childhood and Youth Studies: Approaches and Methods, 3 credits

Data Visualization

  • MALS 75400 Introduction to the Digital Humanities, 3 credits
  • MALS 75300 Data Visualization Methods, 3 credits

Digital Humanities

  • MALS 75400 Introduction to the Digital Humanities, 3 credits
  • MALS 75500 Digital Humanities Methods and Practices, 3 credits

Fashion Studies

  • MALS 71200  The Culture of Fashion: Theories and Practices, 3 credits
  • MALS 71300  Special Topics in Fashion Studies , 3 credits

Film Studies

  • MALS 77100 Cinema Aesthetics, 3 credits
  • MALS 77200 Film Histories & Historiography, 3 credits
  • MALS 77300 Film Theories, 3 credits

Global Early Modern Studies

  • MALS 74600 Introduction to Global Early Modern Studies, 3 credits
  • MALS 74700 Topics in Material History, 3 credits

International Studies

  • MALS 71400 Introduction to International Studies, 3 credits
  • MALS 71500 Critical Issues in International Studies, 3 credits

Latin American, Caribbean, and Latino Studies

  • MALS 78300  Introduction to US Latino Studies, 3 credits
  • MALS 78400 Introduction to Latin American Studies, 3 credits
  • MALS 78600 Introduction to Caribbean Studies, 3 credits

Law and Society

  • MALS 70300  Foundations of Legal Thought, 3 credits
  • MALS 70400  Interdisciplinary Topics in Law, 3 credits

New York Studies

  • MALS 70100  Narratives of New York: Literature and the Visual Arts, 3 credits
  • MALS 70200  Metropolis: A Political, Historical, and Sociological Profile of New York, 3 credits                   

Science and Technology Studies

  • MALS 72500 Narratives of Science and Technology: Literature and the Visual Arts, 3 credits
  • MALS 72600 Social Impacts of Science and Technology: Case Studies, 3 credits 

Social and Environmental Justice Studies

  • MALS 72700  The Political Ecology of Social and Environmental Justice, 3 credits                    
  • MALS 72800  Topics in Environmental Social Science, 3 credits

Sustainability Science and Education

  • MALS 75600  Sustainability and Human Ecodynamics, 3 credits
  • MALS 75700  Field Course in Island Long Term Human Ecodynamics, 3 credits

Urban Education

  • MALS 78100 Issues in Urban Education, 3 credits
  • MALS 78200 The Politics of Contemporary Urban Education, 3 credits

Western Intellectual Traditions

  • MALS 70500  Classical, Medieval, or Renaissance Culture, 3 credits
  • MALS 70600  Enlightenment and Critique, 3 credits

Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

  • MALS 72100 Feminist Texts and Contexts, 3 credits
  • MALS 72200 Contemporary Feminist Theories, 3 credits
  • MALS 72300  Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies, 3 credits

All courses are 30 hours plus conferences, 3 credits, unless otherwise noted. MALS students may also take courses in other programs.

  • MALS 70000 Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies
  • MALS 70100 Narratives of New York City: Literature and the Visual Arts
  • MALS 70200 Metropolis: A Political, Historical, and Sociological Profile of New York City
  • MALS 70300 Foundations of Legal Thought
  • MALS 70400 Interdisciplinary Topics in Law
  • MALS 70500 Classical, Medieval, or Renaissance Culture
  • MALS 70600 Enlightenment and Critique
  • MALS 70700 The Shaping of Modernity, 1789–1914
  • MALS 70800 Transformations of Modernity, 1914–present
  • MALS 70900 Approaches to Life Writing
  • MALS 71000 Forms of Life Writing
  • MALS 71100 Theory of Translation
  • MALS 71200 The Culture of Fashion: Theories and Practices
  • MALS 71300 Special Topics in Fashion Studies 
  • MALS 71400 Introduction to International Studies
  • MALS 71500 Critical Issues in International Studies
  • MALS 71700 Psychology of Work & Family: An Introduction
  • MALS 71800 Cross-cultural & Multi-Disciplinary Perspectives on Work & Family Issues
  • MALS 72100 Feminist Texts and Contexts
  • MALS 72200 Contemporary Feminist Theories
  • MALS 72300 Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies
  • MALS 72500 Narratives of Science and Technology: Literature and the Visual Arts
  • MALS 72600 Social Impacts of Science and Technology: Case Studies
  • MALS 72800 Topics in Environmental Social Science 
  • MALS 72700 The Political Ecology of Social and Environmental Justice
  • MALS 73100 American Culture and Values: Selected Topics
  • MALS 73200 American Social Institutions: Selected Topics
  • MALS 73400 Africana Studies: Introduction
  • MALS 73500 Africana Studies: Global Perspectives
  • MALS 74100 The Conceptual Structure of Science
  • MALS 74200 The Practice of Science and Medicine
  • MALS 74300 Bioethics: Policies and Cases
  • MALS 74400 Special Topics in the Archaeology of the Classical, Late Antique, and Islamic Worlds
  • MALS 74500 Great Digs: Important sites of the Ancient, Late Antique and Islamic worlds
  • MALS 74600 Introduction to Global Early Modern Studies
  • MALS 74700 Topics in Material History
  • MALS 75300 Data Visualization Methods
  • MALS 75400 Introduction to the Digital Humanities
  • MALS 75500 Digital Humanities Methods and Practices
  • MALS 76100 Traditional Patterns of Jewish Behavior and Thought
  • MALS 76200 Continuities and Discontinuities in Modern Jewish Life
  • MALS 77100 Cinema Aesthetics
  • MALS 77200 Film Histories & Historiography
  • MALS 77300  Film Theories
  • MALS 78100 Issues in Urban Education
  • MALS 78200 The Politics of Contemporary Urban Education
  • MALS 78300 Introduction to US Latino Studies
  • MALS 78400 Introduction to Latin American Studies
  • MALS 78600 Intrioduction to Caribbean Studies
  • MALS 79000 Thesis Research
  • MALS 79600 Thesis Workshop
  • MALS 79700 Independent Study

Current and Upcoming Course Schedules

MALS 70000 – Seminar in Interdisciplinary Studies
Thursday, 6:30-8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Elizabeth R. Macaulay (Emacaulay@gc.cuny.edu)
Mode of Instruction: Hybrid

All the World’s a Fair: Culture, Politics, Economics, Art, and Architecture at America’s World’s Fairs 
This course takes its title from Robert Rydell’s book on World’s Fairs in the United States from Centennial Exposition of 1876 in Philadelphia to the expositions in San Francisco and San Diego in 1915. The unexpected success of the “Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of All Nations,” in 1851 in London, established World’s Fairs, or International Expositions, as a major type of cultural event in Western Europe and later in the United States. Hosting a Fair or Exposition was a physical way that a nation and later specific cities could proclaim their innovations, economic development, technological advancements, artistic and architectural achievements, and cultural standing, as well as construct and articulate their history, as well as its current and future standing. But World’s Fairs were far more than the nineteenth-century equivalent of a trade show, they were spaces where imperial aspirations; tensions over race and gender; and questions of historical inclusion and exclusion played out.

This course will take an interdisciplinary approach to the study of World’s Fairs, starting with the early European Fairs and then primarily focusing on specific World’s Fairs and Expositions in the United States. While the Columbian Exposition of 1893 is undoubtedly the most famous of all of the American fairs, it was one of many; cities such as St. Louis and Buffalo held such fairs. Using the fairs, this course will introduce students to graduate-level research, reading, and writing. Students will learn how to write (and demonstrate competency) in different academic genres, including the book review, annotated bibliography, and seminar paper. They will also learn how to investigate and use archival materials and primary sources. Contributions to the course website, discussion forum, and/or other digital platforms will serve as venues where students can exchange their ideas and engage in a reflective, writing process.


MALS 70000 – Seminar in Interdisciplinary Studies
Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Christopher Schmidt (cschmidt@lagcc.cuny.edu)
Mode of Instruction: In-Person

Arts, Imperialism, and U.S. Cultural Policy, 1940–Present
T.S. Eliot argued that poetry is “stubbornly national.” In what variety of ways do aesthetic styles and cultural forms sustain national identity within and beyond territorial borders? How have subjects offered resistance by “writing back” against empire? This course will examine how literature, art, and other aesthetic forms concentrate and complicate national identity from the post-war period to the present. Taking the U.S. as a dominant (but not sole) example, we will examine how select cultural forms have been promoted domestically and globally to advance political agendas. We will survey U.S. state department policy that covertly supported cultural initiatives at home and in the global south to suppress communism, leftist activism, and black nationalism. We will consider how education and the university contribute to these “strategies of containment” by advancing English-language literatures abroad and depoliticized styles of literature domestically. Finally, we will examine how neoliberal disinvestment has affected cultural production, and how communities organized around class and identity have responded. Readings may include Frantz Fanon, Pierre Bourdieu, Benedict Anderson, Frances Stonor Saunders, Pascale Casanova, Sianne Ngai, Juliana Spahr, Mark McGurl, Sarah Brouillette, Roderick Ferguson, Katherine McKittrick, and select literary readings.


MALS 70200 – Metropolis: A Political, Historical, and Sociological Profile of New York
Thursday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Libby Garland (Libby.Garland@kbcc.cuny.edu)
Mode of Instruction: In-Person

This interdisciplinary course will explore New York City’s rise and role as the nation’s metropolis, examining several key themes in the city’s development. The syllabus does not offer a comprehensive historical and sociological survey of New York City. Rather, it draws together a collection of noteworthy explorations of the city’s past and present that open up some larger questions. For example, which people and forces have defined and shaped New York City? How, in turn, has the city itself shaped the social, spatial and cultural worlds of its inhabitants? How has New York been a site of political and economic struggle, and how have such struggles played out differently across different times and spaces? Where is the city headed, and what, if anything, do we want to do or say about that? Students will explore such questions by engaging with the work of historians, sociologists, geographers, and others. Through close reading, discussion, presentations, weekly writing and a longer research project, students will hone the skills, knowledge and critical approaches that will help them to succeed in their interdisciplinary graduate studies.


MALS 70600 – Enlightenment and Critique
Thursday, 4:15-6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Helena Rosenblatt (HRosenblatt@gc.cuny.edu)
Mode of Instruction: Hybrid

Cross listed with WSCP 81000

Globalizing the Enlightenment
The Eighteenth-Century European Enlightenment is widely seen as a transformative moment in Western culture, one which gave birth to many of our most cherished ideals. We are often told, for example, that it is to the Enlightenment that we owe our modern notions of human rights, representative government, and liberal democracy. However, the recent “global turn” in scholarship has led historians to ask some new and questions. How, for example, did eighteenth-century European thinkers perceive the world beyond their own borders? How did they get their information about the outside world and to what purposes was that information put?  What were their attitudes toward race, slavery, imperialism, “primitives” and gender? Did regions outside of Europe experience Enlightenments too? If so, what was the relationship, if any, of these Enlightenments to the European one? With the help of both primary and secondary sources, we will ask how adopting a “global” perspective on the Enlightenment might enrich or even change our view of it. Is it even correct to call the Enlightenment European?


MALS 70700 – The Shaping of Modernity, 1789-1914
Wednesday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Richard Kaye (RKaye@gc.cuny.edu)
Mode of Instruction: In-Person

This course will explore a wide range of significant intellectual, historical, scientific, political, religious, art historical, and creative works of the period as well as recent or contemporary texts considering the era.  We will begin with Burke's "Reflections on the Revolution in France," De Tocqueville's "Democracy in America," Mary Wollstonecraft's "Vindication of the Rights of Women," and John Stuart Mills's "On Liberty." Turning to fiction, we will examine Jane Austen's "Emma," Gustave Flaubert's "Madame Bovary," Henry James's "The Portrait of a Lady," Oscar Wilde's "The Picture of Dorian Gray," and Thomas Mann's "Death in Venice." The class will consider, as well, central poems of the British Romantic movement in the writing of Keats, Shelley, Byron, and Wordsworth as well as the American writings of Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, Henry David Thoreau, and Ralph Waldo Emerson.  Other texts (or excerpts from texts) include Soren Kierkekgaard's "Fear and Trembling," Immanuel Kant's "Critique of Judgement," Charles Darwin's "The Origin of Species," William James' "The Varieties of Religious Experience," Karl Marx's "Capital," Olive Schreiner's "Women and Labour,"

W. E. B. Du Bois's "The Souls of Black Folk," Freud's The Interpretation of Dreams," Hannah Arendt's "On Revolution," E.P Thompson's "The Making of the English Working Class," T.J. Clark's "The Painting of Modern Life: Paris and the Art of Manet and His Followers," Charles Rosen's "The Romantic Generation," and George Dangerfield's "The Strange Death of Liberal England." Class presentations, mid-term paper, and a final paper that may be adapted from the mid-term paper.


MALS 71200 – The Culture of Fashion: Theories and Practices
Wednesday, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Elizabeth Wissinger (ewissinger@gc.cuny.edu)
Mode of Instruction: In-Person

Cross listed with WSCP 81000

From labor politics, raced and gendered power struggles, the quest for selfhood, and urgent issues of globalization and sustainability, fashion is a major cultural force that shapes our contemporary world. At the same time, fashion’s history and aesthetics provide a fascinating cultural backdrop within which to examine issues of power, nation building, technology, and meaning making, especially in terms of the impact of modernity on concepts of self, body, and agency within the complex relations of symbols and exchange that make up the fashion system.

Starting with a brief grounding in theories informing a conceptual approach to fashion and culture, we will explore the politics, technologies, and aesthetics of the fashion system and its histories, by closely reading foundational texts, case studies, and cultural analyses that engage fashion’s ever-changing landscape, especially as it inflects and is inflected by race, class, gender, and power. The course will explore attitudes toward the body as they vary by historical period. We will also consider the technologies of fashion, working through innovation’s impact on fashion’s design and making, from the use of ground up beetles to produce the rarest of reds, through to new developments in biodesign, which employ sea kelp to make fibers woven into clothes, or incorporate living organisms into the clothing’s design.

The course will draw on writings from cultural studies, fashion studies, sociology, feminism, critical theory, media studies and communication scholarship. We will welcome guest speakers, and view and analyze media pertaining to the course themes and those dictated by students’ interests. The course will cover the works of Roland Barthes, Walter Benjamin, Thorsten Veblen, Pierre Bourdieu, Georg Simmel, Dick Hebdige, Caroline Evans, Judith Butler, and Deleuze, among others.


MALS 71400 – Introduction to International Studies
Monday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Tomohisa Hattori (TOMOHISA.HATTORI@lehman.cuny.edu)
Mode of Instruction: In-Person


MALS 72000 – Thesis Writing Course
Tuesday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. George Fragopoulos
Mode of Instruction: In-Person

If you would like to sign up for the thesis writing course, permission of the department is required. To express your interest in taking this course, please fill in this form. This is a 3-credit course and it is not a substitute for MALS 79000.

MALS 72000, Thesis Writing Course, is designed to provide students with the time, space, and tools needed to complete their thesis or capstone projects. This, of course, does not mean that students will be expected to complete an entire project in the span of a single semester, or even to complete anything that might resemble a complete first draft. Rather, this class is meant to get students into the practice of regularly writing, reading, and researching in order to make the process of completing the thesis/capstone project easier, perhaps even enjoyable.

The course will be run like a writing workshop, with students sharing work every week and participating in class discussions. Assigned readings by authors such as Eric Hayot, bell hooks, Fred Moten and others will interrogate the nature of academic discourse and what it means to write in an academic setting. There will be shorter assignments due throughout the course of the semester. 


MALS 72300 – Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies
Monday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. James Wilson (JWilson1@gc.cuny.edu)
Mode of Instruction: In-Person

In Gender Outlaw: On Men, Women, and the Rest of Us Kate Bornstein writes, “The first question we usually ask new parents is: ‘Is it a boy or a girl?’” Bornstein recommends the response, “We don’t know; it hasn’t told us yet.” This course explores the ways in which gender and sexuality are pronounced, embodied, and negotiated within specific historical and cultural contexts. Through a close reading of interdisciplinary, foundational, and recent scholarship the class will examine and theorize the ways in which categories of gender and sexuality inform and shape our understanding of the world. Investigating the intersections and collisions of gender and sexuality with race, class, ability, nationality, ethnicity, and age, the class will consider societal and institutional systems of power, privilege, oppression, and marginalization. Course requirements include an oral presentation, two 4-6 page response papers, and a 15-20 page, staged researched essay.


MALS 72700 – The Political Ecology of Social and Environmental Justice
Wednesday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Tomoaki Imamichi (imamichi@gmail.com)
Mode of Instruction: Online

This seminar is the first part of a three-course sequence introducing students to the multidisciplinary theoretical bases and substantive concerns of Environmental Social Science. Environmental Psychology grew out of a desire among scholars and practitioners to work across disciplines on real world problems of people and the environment. From the start, research was conducted in naturalistic settings and often with an applied orientation. CUNY’s program, which was founded in the late 1960s, has been interdisciplinary in orientation since its inception and, for that reason, we introduce the field within a larger context than psychology alone, hence the designation “Environmental Social Science”. The term is meant to embrace a wide field of study that addresses and seeks to understand the nature of the complex relationships between people and the physical environment. As such we will survey a range of disciplines that comprise the field.


MALS 73200 – American Social Institutions
Tuesday, 6:30 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Karen Miller (kamiller@lagcc.cuny.edu)

Mode of Instruction: In-Person

Cross listed with WSCP 81000

This class will examine American Studies through the lens of social, cultural, political and other kinds of institutions. We will begin by exploring what we mean when we say “institution.” We will think together about why this may be a productive lens for assessing and interrogating the world around us. What does it offer? And what might it elide? How do studies of institutions help expose the myriad ways that power functions in culture, society, and politics? How do institutions, themselves, shape these power relations? And how do different approaches to understanding institutions give us different sorts of answers? American Studies scholars have been asking these questions for decades. We will turn to their texts as sites for exploring them. We will put questions about inequality and how it operates at the core of our inquiry. Thus, we will ask how institutions help amplify and/or mitigate the often-crushing hierarchies that have been (and continue to be) based on racial, gender, sexual, national, and other forms of difference.

The class will be organized thematically. Each week, we will take a specific institution or idea about institutions as our starting point. We will examine how scholars from different American Studies subfields have developed approaches for exploring each institution. The work we examine uses both creative and conventional scholarly tools to explore questions about life, infrastructure, health, race, ethnicity, indigeneity, gender, sexuality, transnationality, borders, architecture, foreign relations, language, politics, economics, literature, art, music, work, social movements, and more. Finally, we will discuss how these institutions may help offer us strategies for imagining new, and possibly better futures

MALS 73400 – Africana Studies: Introduction
Ethnographies of the Black Atlantic

Thursday 4:15 – 6:15 PM, 3 credits, Prof. Jacqueline Brown jnbrown@hunter.cuny.edu
Mode of Instruction: Fully in-person

Cross-listed with AFCP 70100


MALS 73800 – Internship Course
Prof. Elizabeth R. Macaulay (Emacaulay@gc.cuny.edu)

MALS Major Only/Department Permission Required

  • The deadline for students to apply for the internship course is the start of the semester.
  • Students must submit a formal letter or email of an internship offer from the proposed employer via email to liberalstudies@gc.cuny.edu and to the Executive Officer. The proposals will then be reviewed by the department.
  • Candidates will be informed about the outcome of their application in a timely fashion. Successful applicants will then be permitted to enroll in the course, once the proper paperwork is completed and filed. 
  • A minimum of 140 hours of the internship must be completed within the semester that the student enrolls (i.e. if the student enrolls in the internship course during Spring, the internship must be completed during the semester). 
  • If a student wants to do an unpaid internship during the summer, the executive officer has to approve this.
  • The internship must be unpaid.
  • The student must meet with the instructor (typically the Executive Officer) on a regular basis and together with the instructor identifies a series of appropiate assignments for the course. 


MALS 74400 – Special Topics in the Archaeology of the Classical, Late Antique, and Islamic Worlds: Jerusalem - Monuments and Memory from Constantine the Great to Suleiman the Magnificent
Wednesday, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Warren Woodfin (Warren.Woodfin@qc.cuny.edu)
Mode of Instruction: In-Person

Cross listed with MSCP 80500 &ART 83000

Placed by many medieval maps at the center of the word, Jerusalem is a city triply sacred: to Jews as the capital of the kingdom of Judah and the location of the Temple until its destruction in 70 CE; to Christians as the city in which Jesus instituted the Eucharist, suffered, and was buried; and to Muslims as the site of the “farthest place of prayer,” al masjid al aqsa, visited by Mohammed on his night journey. Throughout the holy city and its environs, sites were marked with monuments to their spiritual significance that were in turn remodeled and re-interpreted over the centuries. The figural arts—painting, sculpture, textiles, metalwork, and the arts of the book—similarly played a role in configuring and reconfiguring this landscape of holiness. Jerusalem presents a remarkable series of case studies on the integration and diffusion of artistic and architectural models, the changing discourses around key monuments, the role of pilgrimage and relics, and interreligious competition through artistic patronage. Covering the period from the reign of Constantine (312–337) to the city’s conquest by the Ottomans (1516), the course will consider both the artistic production of Jerusalem itself and arts intended to reproduce the holiness of Jerusalem elsewhere.


MALS 74600 – Introduction to Global Early Modern Studies
Monday, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Clare Carrol (CCarroll1@gc.cuny.edu)
Mode of Instruction: In-Person

Cross listed with GEMS 72100 & HIST 71000

Transculturation in the Atlantic world will be the focus of our study of encounters between Europeans and Africans, peoples of the Caribbean, and the Americas in texts from Portuguese, Spanish, Nahuatl, French and English authors. Topics to be discussed include political versus economic interpretations of the encounter, slavery, and colonization; the geography of empire; visual narration in Meso-American codices; the intersection of gender, class and race in the creation of mestizo cultures; monsters and cannibals in maps and ethnographic writing; the construction of race before race (the pseudo-science of the 18th and 19th centuries). All texts can be read in the original language and in English. Readings will be available on Blackboard.

Readings will be from: The Asia of João de Barros; Columbus, Diario; We People Here: Nahuatl Accounts of the Conquest of Mexico; Hernán Cortés, The Second Letter; Las Casas, A Brief Account of the Destruction of the Indies; Garcilaso de la Vega, Royal Commentaries of the Incas; Sor Juana Inés de a Cruz, Response to the Very Eminent Sor Filotea de la Cruz; Montaigne, ‘On Cannibals,’ ‘On Coaches,’ Jean de Léry, History of a Voyage to the Land of Brazil; Hakluyt, Voyages and Discoveries; Shakespeare, The Tempest. Theoretical and contextual frameworks include Fernando Ortiz, Cuban Counterpoint; Herman Bennett, African Kings and Black Slaves; Nicolás Wey Gόmez, The Tropics of Empire; Diana Magaloni Kerpel, The Colors of the New World: Artists, Materials, and the Creation of the Florentine Codex; Barbara Fuchs, Mimesis and Empire; Surekha Davies, Renaissance Ethnography and the Invention of the Human; Kim Hall, Things of Darkness, Nicholas Jones, Staging Habla de Negros.  There will be guest appearance by the authors of some of the works we will read including Herman Bennett, Amanda Wunder, Surekha Davies, among others.


MALS 77100 – Cinema Aesthetics
Thursday, 4:00 – 7:00 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Nicole Wallenbrock (nwallenbrock@hostos.cuny.edu)
Mode of Instruction: In-Person

Cross listed with FSCP 81000, THEA & ART HIST

Cinema Aesthetics is an essential course for graduate students of any field who wish to write with expertise about film and film matter. In this course students will learn the very specific vocabulary needed to communicate the way in which film generally, and a film specifically, functions—for this reason, Film Art by David Bordwell and Karen Thompson will be our primary text. We will screen films together that will serve as primary examples of one film element under discussion. Articles by film scholars and theorists in Dropbox will supplement our study, such as Robert Stam and Louise Spence, "Colonialism, racism and representation," and Linda Williams, “Mirrors without Memories.”

We will begin with a study of film narration (Carol Todd Haynes, 2016). We will next do a thorough study of how elements of film, such as lighting (Passing, Rebecca Hall, 2021) composition, camera movement (Power of the Dog, Jane Campion, 2021), set design/location (Opening Night, John Cassavetes, 1971), color, duration, editing, sound/music (Sorry to bother you, Boots Riley, 2019), and casting (Wanda, Barbara Loden, 1971) impact the narrative and alter our perception of characters and events. We will constantly question why (and when) a film is canonized and what might represent a disruption (for example the experimental shorts Meshes in the Afternoon Maya Deren, 1941 and Scorpio Rising Kenneth Anger, 1963). Class discussions may at times highlight depictions of race and gender, but also incorporate the effect streaming and small screens have on filmmaking styles and reception.


MALS 77200 – Film Histories & Historiography
Hollywood, Bollywood, Nollywood, and On: The Role of the Studio

Monday, 4:00 – 7:00 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Marc Dolan (fozzielogic1530@gmail.com)
Mode of Instruction: In-Person

Many of the most treasured works in film history have been made in a studio environment, but what is a studio exactly? How does it work? Does the regular presence of hundreds of contracted actors, designers, editors, and directors under a single, centrally managed roof stimulate or discourage cinematic creativity (or maybe a little of both)? 

In this course, we will study the intersections of art and industrialism in a number of studios throughout the world across the last hundred years from Metro-Goldwyn Mayer and Paramount in the early twentieth century US, to UFA and Cinecitta in Fascist Europe to Toho and Shaw Brothers in midtwentieth century Asia to India’s Mehboob Studio and Nigeria’s Rok Studio in the recent, global past.  

Each of us will prepare an annotated bibliography and 15-to-20-minute presentation (to begin one week’s discussion of a specific film studio) and will end the semester with a 5000-word essay on a topic related to any aspect of global film history that sheds light on the influence—positive or negative—of the studio system of production.  No prior knowledge of any of our weekly subjects is assumed, but curiosity is heartily encouraged.


MALS 78200 The Politics of Contemporary Urban Education
Monday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, 3 credits, Professor Hazel M. Carter (hcarter@ccny.cuny.edu)
Mode of Instruction: Fully In-Person 

This course provides an overview of major issues and controversies in the politics of urban education policy. Through a historical, sociological, and political analysis of educational problems, the course explores a variety of policy initiatives and reforms, including access, 21st century skills, curriculum and learning standards, standardized testing, educational partnerships, and school reform. Students will develop a deep understanding of the ways in which urban political realities impact experiences within schools​.


MALS 78500 Introduction to Mass Violence in the Modern Era
Monday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, 3 credits, Prof. Steven Remy SRemy@brooklyn.cuny.edu
Mode of Instruction: Fully in-person

This course introduces students to the problem of mass violence in different global contexts from roughly the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Through case studies we will focus on the origins, nature, and aftermath of colonial violence, genocide and ethnic cleansing, “permanent security,” the concept of “slow violence,” ecocide and environmental warfare, international law and human rights activism, and memory and restitution. Students will develop their reading, writing, and speaking skills and develop their own final project in a format of their choosing.


MALS 78600 – Introduction to Caribbean Studies
Wednesday, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Nathalie Etoke (Netoke@gc.cuny.edu)
Mode of Instruction: Hybrid

Cross listed with WSCP 81000

The Caribbean is a geographical and multilinguistic space where the blending of the Indigenous People of the Americas with more recent arrivals -- the colonial heritage (British, French, Dutch, Spanish) and the African and South Asian legacies -- created unique, hybridized and in short creolized societies. Marked by the doctrine of discovery, the genocide of indigenous people, settler colonialism, slavery and the making of the post-colonial state, the Caribbean challenges the dichotomy of local versus global. It is a place where foundational violence shifted the geography of reason. This course will provide an overview of the social, cultural, political, and economic history of the Caribbean from 1492 to the present. The course will combine a variety of disciplines such as anthropology, art, economics, literature, music and political sciences. It will emphasize transdisciplinary approaches to historical events and contemporary issues that have shaped the

Caribbean as a way to reflect on racial capitalism, domination and freedom.

 

MALS 78500 Introduction to Literary Translation Studies
GC: Wednesday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, 3 credits, Prof. Esther Allen Esther.Allen@baruch.cuny.edu
Mode of Instruction: Fully in-person

In lieu of a welcome video, you’re invited to explore the 2020 online conference “Translating the Future”: https://www.centerforthehumanities.org/programming/translating-the-future

Literature is unimaginable without translation. Yet translation is a disturbing, even paranormal practice, mysteriously conferring xenoglossy upon unwitting or suspicious readers. The literary cultures of English, in particular, have often been resistant to, even contemptuous of translation, or have used it as a tool of colonialism. The problem may lie with prevailing concepts of the original, but translation has often taken the blame. Among the aesthetic, ethical, and political questions it raises — questions increasingly crucial to practitioners of literature worldwide— are: Who translates? Who is translated? What is translated? And—yes—how? And also: what does it mean to think of literature prismatically rather than nationally? What constitutes an anti-colonial translation?

In this seminar, we’ll discuss theoretical and literary readings and engage with the contemporary translation sphere, both in the digital realm and in New York City. We’ll also welcome the perspectives of some notable guest speakers. Students will work towards and workshop a final project, either: 1) a discussion of a specific translation theory or set of theories; 2) an analysis of a specific translation, or comparison of multiple translations, or 3) an original translation into English (of a previously untranslated work) accompanied by a critical introduction and annotation.  For an example of a successful final project from a previous iteration of the class, see Nancy Seidler's "Language is a Foreign Language." The class is taught in English; students should have working knowledge of at least one other language.


MALS 78800 – Introduction to Childhood and Youth Studies
Thursday, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Sarah Chinn (sarah.chinn@hunter.cuny.edu)
Mode of Instruction: In-Person

In this course, we will examine how concepts of childhood and youth have changed over time, responding to historical and economic forces. We will explore the lives and experiences of a variety of children across time and geography, from enslaved children to child workers to children at play, from children regarded as sinners to children seen as angels. Although we’ll primarily be looking at the development of the categories of childhood and adolescence in the United States we’ll also venture into the experience of children around the globe. Along the way we’ll draw on literary, historical, and theoretical texts to ask a number of questions: how have children and the idea of childhood been deployed to define national identity? How are children raced, classed, and gendered? Are children property, and what does that mean? How have young people participated in cultural and political movements? What does it mean to see children and adolescents as historical actors?

This list is just a partial sample of courses; to view full course offerings, please visit the websites for the doctoral, master’s, and certificate programs at the Graduate Center. 

Please note that courses included in this list are subject to change; please contact the program or faculty members involved for additional details.
 


CL 88500 – Italian Fascism: History and Interpretations

Tuesday, 2:00 pm-4:00 pm, Professor Eugenia Paulicelli

Cross-listed with WSCP 81000

On October 28, 1922, fascist squads headed by Benito Mussolini organized “the march on Rome.” One hundred years later (but also in the last two decades), debate on fascism has again taken center stage. Fascism is a term that often comes back in conversation in several historical epochs and political and cultural contexts. Questions have been asked about its origin and its different declinations throughout the years and in various countries.

 

But how historically accurate is it to talk about fascism as a recurring political and cultural phenomenon? When and how did fascism come to the fore in its earliest incarnation in Italy? How did the political, social and cultural terrain in Italy before 1922--the year in which fascism came to power—foster the advent of the regime? What are the implications of Umberto Eco’s notion of “ur-fascism” and of Susan Sontag’s “fascinating fascism”?

 

Starting from the questions emerging from this intense historiographic debate, the course will focus on how Italy was changed by fascism, a regime that took its distance from and drew on the past to realize its ambitions to transform Italy’s institutions and the Italian people. How successful was the regime in achieving totalitarism? How was antifascism organized and what forms did it take (political, armed, existential etc.)?

 

The course focuses on specific themes such as violence, empire, gender, race, war, culture and the arts, antifascisms, propaganda and the impact of fascism abroad.

 

These are today crucial topics in the history and interpretations of fascism. It is in this light that we will investigate the resurgence of neo-fascist groups, nationalism and threats to democracy.

 

The last part of the course will be dedicated to cinematic and interpretations of fascism in films such as “Allarm siam fascisti!” (To Arms, we are fascist!)” (Cecilia Mangini, Lino Miccichè); “A Special Day” (Ettore Scola); “The Night of the Shooting Stars” (The Taviani Brothers); “Salò and 120 days of Sodoma” (Pier Paolo Pasolini).

 

 

CL 86500/FSCP 81000 – Beyond Adaptation: Transmediality, Narrative Ecosystems, and Spreadable Media.

Tuesdays, 4:15pm-6:15pm. Fully In person.

 

[FSCP 3 credits; CL 2/4 credits]

 

This course will focus on the theoretical and practical study of narrative storyworlds depicted across different media and platforms. We will depart from Linda Hutcheon’s seminal study of adaptation to discuss Henry Jenkins’s theorization of transmedia storytelling and spreadable media as well as Guglielmo Pescatore and Veronica Innocenti’s definition of Narrative Ecosystems. The two case studies that will be discussed in class will be Elena Ferrante’s Neapolitan Novels and Roberto Saviano’s Gomorrah. Students will conduct their own independent analysis of a transmedia chains of their choice, across a wide variety of ‘texts’. Examples include the cinematic, operatic, and televisual adaptations of Henry James’s Turn of the Screw; the many revisitations across time and visual arts of Marcel Leblanc’s Arsène Lupin and Allain and Souvestre’s Fantomas; the retelling of Aldo Moro’s kidnapping in theatre, cinema, tv, and fiction; the fictional portrayal of the Banda della Magliana in Giancarlo De Cataldo’s Romanzo criminale and its many adaptations;  the Marvel, Star Wars, Walking Dead, and Star Trek universes; the complex multimedia diegetic worlds of Lost, 24 and, more recently, Game of Thrones; the many multimedia ‘origin stories’ reinventing the birth of western society via popular historical novels, films and television series.

 

 

FRENCH 72000 Montaigne and Intertextuality

Thursday, 6:30PM-8:30PM, Professor Erec R. Koch
 

In-Person
Taught in English
 
Michel de Montaigne’s Essais invite the exploration of intertextuality through both textual performance and content. In those texts, Montaigne establishes the mutual imbrication of reading and writing; he makes copious use of citations of authors drawn from his library or inscribed in the beams of his tower; he adds continuously to the texts up to his death in 1592. Intertextuality defines the very genre that he created and shaped in that the essai is open-ended and invites citation and response. Intertextuality determines the literary heritage of the essai in the succession of essayists over the centuries. Every subsequent example of the genre has been overtly or covertly a reference Montaigne’s text: Pierre Charron, Jean-Pierre Camus, Blaise Pascal, and Pierre Nicole, to name only a few, graft Montaigne’s text into their own in responding to the Essais. In this course, we will use intertextual theory as a way to inform Montaigne’s Essais, but we will also examine the ways in which the Essais inform theories of intertextuality. Principal readings in intertextual theory will include: Gérard Genette on palimpsests, Antoine Compagnon on citation, Julia Kristeva on the semiotics of re-writing, Mikhail Bakhtin on dialogism, Harold Bloom on the “anxiety of influence,” Michael Riffaterre on intertextual signification, and Jacques Derrida on citation and textual grafts. Finally, we will examine new digital humanities methods of exploring intertextuality, particularly on the ARTFL website (TextPair and TopoLogic), and assess how those methods may re-shape our understanding of intertextuality. Readings will be in French; class discussion, in English.​

 

 

FRENCH 87400 – Francophone Literatures and French Literary Prizes
Thursday, 4:15 PM-6:15 PM, Professor Nathalie Etoké
 

In-Person
Taught in French

For some years now, novelists originating from Sub-Saharan Africa, North Africa, and the Caribbean, have been heralded by French literary institutions. Although the distribution of Goncourt, Médicis, Renaudot, or Fémina prizes belongs to a system of recognition and official legitimation, the status of so-called Francophone literatures remains imprisoned within the contradictions of inclusion/exclusion or accepting/rejecting. These literatures demands that we examine the problem of a hierarchic relationship between the center and the periphery. They also question the complementarity, the opposition, and the differentiation between French literature and Francophone literatures. In order to put an end to this binary confrontation, certain writers have proposed the idea of a French-language world literature (littérature-monde). In contrast, the Cameroonian literary critic Ambroise Kom believes that African literature is in exile because it is written outside of the continent, for a Western readership. In the framework of this course, we will read prize-winning works whose authors are from former French colonial spaces. What do the works tell us about these spaces? What do they tell us about France’s gaze upon these spaces and upon itself in its relationship with the continent? Among prize-wining authors, can we identify themes or literary strategies that correspond with the expectations of a French readership? Francophone writers often reject the restriction of an identity that would enclose them within cliches about their country of origin. When university critics task them with representing the continent, these writers instead demand individual creative freedom. In this course, we will equally consider the discourses that authors write about their positioning in the literary sphere. 

 

 

FRENCH 87000 – On Passions, Emotions, Affects: in Theory, History, Texts

Tuesday, 4:15 - 6:15 pm, Professor Domna Stanton
 

In-Person

Taught in English

 
How are passions and emotions different from affects? How do bodies perform passions, sensibility, feelings, emotions and affects? What do affects do and how do they do it? How are they shaped by their contexts?  What is the meaning and significance of the “affective turn”?  Does it mark a rejection of the idea(l) of rational self-control? How is this turn connected to studies of women (and the feminine) and to work on gender and racial embodiments and sexualities?


This course will be structured around three areas: first, theories of affect and in tandem, a study of the cultural politics and ethics of specific affects, including anger, disgust, shame, compassion and happiness. Which emotions mobilize spectators/readers into collectives/communities. Are passions both a source and an obstacle to struggles for freedom and justice? How do they include and exclude? Among the theorists: Ahmed, Artaud, Berlant, Clough,  Cvetkovich, Deleuze and Guattari, Ghandi, M. Hardt, A. Lorde, Massumi, Scheer, Sedgwick, Stewart, M. Warner.


Second, we will grapple with the treatment of passions and emotions through history, especially in philosophy: from Aristotle and Cicero, Descartes, Pascal, Lebrun, Spinoza, and Kant to Darwin, W. James, Freud, Klein, and R. Williams.


And third, in conjunction with this philosophical and historical work, we will read texts (verbal, visual and musical) to see how they inscribe emotional content and how they generate affective responses from readers even when their semantics and narratives do not depict strong emotions. Is feeling as a response to cultural forms different from a human emotion? We will consider the cultural politics of emotion in the work of  Margerie of Kempe, Montaigne,  Gentileschi (Portraits of Judith) , Racine (Phèdre),  Goethe (Sorrows of Young Werther), Wagner (“Leibestod”) , H. Jacobs (Life of a Slave Girl), H. James (Beast in the Jungle),  Woolf  (Mrs. Dalloway) , A. Nin (“Incest” Diary),  Lanzman (Shoah),  Beckett (Happy Days), C. Churchill  (Far Away) , Irigaray (“When our Lips Speak Together”), Morrison (Beloved),  Darwish (Poems),  Labaki (Capernaum), Moore (Watchman, 2019).


The syllabus will be uploaded onto Blackboard by the beginning of the spring semester; all course materials will be on blackboard, except for one or two complete texts which will be indicated on the syllabus.


Work for the course: Whether the course is taken for 2, 3, or 4 credits, all students will be responsible for doing the assigned texts closely and for engaging consistently in class discussion.

 

·students who take the course for 2 credits will present in class a reading of one primary text, which will also be submitted in writing (c 5-7 pp); these students will also take the final exam.    

 

·students who take the course for 3 credits, will do all of the above, but instead of the 5-7 page paper, they will do a 10-13-page paper on a topic they select, after consultation with the instructor. They will also submit a thesis statement, a bibliography, an outline and the introduction (the schedule will be indicated on the syllabus).

 

· students who take the course for 4 credits will do all of the above, but instead of a 10-13 page paper, they will do a 20-25-page paper on a topic they select, after consultation with the instructor. They will also submit a thesis statement, a bibliography, an outline, and an introduction (the schedule will be indicated on the syllabus).

 

 

THEA80300 – (Seminar in Theatre Theory & Criticism) Translating (Contemporary) Theatre and Performance: Theories and Practices

Wednesday, 2:00 pm. – 4:00 pm, Professor Jean Graham-Jones

 

This seminar takes a “translational” view of translating for the stage, expanding upon Walter Benjamin's acknowledgement of relationality in textual translation to consider not only the linguistic-cultural text—the play-script or so-called source and target texts—but also the many other challenges faced when translating, translocating, adapting a play or performance.  To do this, we will study theatre and performance translation’s multiple cultural constraints and constructs in relation to one another--translationally--as part of the translation process itself.  We will begin historically, considering general theories and practices of theatrical translation, as well as the roles of the translator in the theatre.  After this general introduction, we will examine the myriad challenges, limitations, and opportunities specific to translating for the contemporary stage.  These challenges include dramaturgical logic and theatrical genres; actor training, casting and rehearsal practices, and performance styles; choreography, gesture, and embodiment; surtitling and other in-performance translation practices; and performance aesthetics and reception.  Finally, we will look at contemporary performance translation as a political practice: the refusal to (self) translate, the translational potential of the decolonial gesture, and alternative approaches to translating performing bodies.  There will be a practical component to the seminar: students will work throughout the semester with a performance or text that they wish to consider translationally.  Possible projects might be individual in-progress translation work, but they can also involve a critical engagement with one or more extant translations or performances.  The final result of this semester-long project will be a 12-15-page seminar paper.  The course will be taught in English, but reading knowledge of at least one other language is encouraged.  Students will be evaluated on in-class participation and short writing assignments as well as the final seminar paper.

 

 

EES 79903 – Environmental and Climate Justice:  Food, Energy, Water, Governance
Monday, 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm., In Person3 credits, Profs. Mann-Hamilton/Menser

Course open to all GC Students

Environmental and climate justice, though distinct historically and conceptually, are remaking how we understand 21st century social movements and politics across diverse sectors, especially those aiming to rectify or repair past injustices and build societies that are just, sustainable and resilient.  This seminar will look at their history but more so their present and future, from cultural, philosophical, economic, and political perspectives. We will examine how environmental processes and policies interact with race and class to differentially affect people’s exposure to environmental harms and their ability to participate in environmental decision-making.  After a brief recounting of the origins of both, we will focus on how environmental and climate justice play out in the food energy water nexus with  a special focus on governance, self-determination, and the role of the state at different scales.  Key concepts for discussion include participatory governance, socio-ecological resilience, food sovereignty, energy democracy/justice, public power, decolonization, Anthropocene and water/democracy justice.  We will look at cases of social movements, community-based organizations, programs, projects and policies from NYC, NY state and the Caribbean as well as other national and international cases.

 

SOC 82901 –  Black America
Tuesdays, 2:00-4:00pm, 3 credits, Profs. Juan Battle/Allia Abdullah-Matta - jbattle@gc.cuny.edu; amatta@lagcc.cuny.edu

In-Person

This course will serve as a broad survey of the Black experience (mainly) within the United States. Because students will be exposed to (and contribute from) a wide variety of perspectives on the subject, this course is appropriate for students in the traditional social sciences (e.g. sociology, anthropology, psychology, urban education, and history) as well as more contemporary ones (e.g. women’s studies, race studies, American studies, cultural studies, lesbian and gay studies).

MALS 72000 – Thesis Writing Workshop (Department Permission Required)
Wednesdays, 5:30 PM – 8:15 PM, 3 credits, Prof. Tanya Agathocleous (Tagathoc@hunter.cuny.edu)

Mode of Instruction: Online
First Class Starts: June 1st
Last Class: July 13th

This course is designed to help students with the process of writing, researching and working towards completing a thesis or capstone project. As indicated by the course's title, the course is primarily run as a workshop with students sharing and commenting on writing in different stages of development. There will also be readings and discussions on the nature of academic discourse and how writing and research methods differ according to academic disciplines, thus replicating the department's interdisciplinary ethos. We will also work on writing strategies for different stages of the thesis-writing process.

Students in all stages of their thesis and capstone projects are encouraged to take the course.

If you would like to sign up for the thesis writing course, permission of the department is required. To express your interest in taking this course, please fill in this form. This is a 3-credit course and it is not a substitute for MALS 79000.

 

MALS 78500 – Introduction to Race and Ethnicity
Tuesdays & Thursdays, 6:00 PM – 9:00 PM, Room TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Nathalie Etoke (Netoke@gc.cuny.edu)

Mode of Instruction: Hybrid
First Class Starts: May 31st
Last Class: June 30th

Coming together in opposition to police brutality and the killing of George Floyd, protesters stood side by side in the streets of America and across the globe. The powerful impact of the 2020 summer social uprisings marks a turning point in the struggle against anti-black racism. In order to make sense of the current racial reckoning, this course provides an overview of the politics of race and racism in the U.S. Focusing on the longue durée of imperialism since 1492 and accounting for the consequences of the Native American genocide, racial slavery, settler colonialism, historical violence and the reactionary opposition to ongoing struggles for social justice and freedom, we will unearth the roots of white supremacy and systemic racism in the U.S. The course explores the relationship between race and power while analyzing how it shapes American citizenship and identity.  We will draw from a variety of disciplines, spanning the Humanities, Social Sciences and the Arts, in order to think critically about race, racism, identity formation, everyday experience and American history.

We will address the following questions:

  • What does it mean to study race and ethnicity?
  • How have conversations about race changed over the last few years?
  • How are racial hierarchy and racism woven into the fabric of The United States of America?
  • How does race shape our daily life and our sense of self?
  • How does it structure inequality in our society?
  • What are the sociohistorical processes that have shaped our understandings of race and ethnicity?

By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Explain the difference between race and ethnicity.
  2. Describe and explain key ideas and concepts concerning the social construction of race and ethnicity.
  3. Think critically about their own racial position, recognize and appreciate human experiences that differ from their own, and explain the significance of racism in today’s world.
  4. Describe how issues of race and ethnicity have shaped American institutions, laws, and practices over time.
  5. Identify and evaluate the strategies a variety of scholars use to make their argument as well as the theoretical claims that they present.
  6. Have a holistic and complex understanding of what it means to be racialized in the U.S.

 

MALS 78500 – Critical International Studies -- CANCELLED
Tuesday & Thursday, 4:00 PM – 7:00 PM, 3 credits, Prof. Anca Pusca (ancapusca@gmail.com)

Mode of Instruction: Online
First Class Starts: May 31st
Last Class: June 30th

This course provides both a broad theoretical as well as a case specific introduction to some of the most pressing issues surrounding critical international studies today. It introduces the subject matter through a series of key concepts, including: violence; new wars/conflict; peace and new forms of international cooperation and diplomacy; borders and migration; critical security: human, environmental, cyber; development and critical international political economy; post-colonialism and de-colonialism; indigeneity and race; gender and feminism, using related case-studies to underline how these concepts and the theories that utilize them affect contemporary events. Through these concepts and case-studies, the course offers a complex and well-rounded introduction to rising challenges in today’s inter-connected world.

Learning objectives: By the end of the course, students are expected to be able to:

  • Understand the key concepts related to critical international studies
  • Identify different approaches to these concepts and related theories
  • Be able to apply these theoretical concepts and approaches to real life situations and case-studies
  • Reflect critically on main international challenges of today

 

MALS 78500 – Art, Modern, Anti-colonial: Where Now?
Monday, 4:15 PM – 7:00 PM, Room TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Kirsten Scheid (ks28@aub.edu.lb)

Mode of Instruction: In-person
First Class Starts: June 13th
Last Class: July 25th

This course is designed to introduce students to epistemological and methodological questions about modernity, community, and artistic practice through case studies from the Middle East (particularly Lebanon, Syria, Palestine, Egypt, Morocco, Turkey, and Iran). The course bridges art history and anthropology to examine the material and imaginative ways that Middle Eastern communities produced the modern, experienced it, and became progenitors of it, yet often from its “outside.” How did modernity become an urgent time frame and a call for social change? What did decolonizing communities want from “art,” and why was art important to many sociopolitical mobilizations of the 1920s-1960s? What new types of community, identity, economy, and spirituality did artists proffer? How do these relate to the maps, timelines, and categories we rely on to understand globalization and the contemporary today? What obstacles did artists face in their projects for social relevance, and what new entanglements did their negotiations create? The course will provide students with original materials (translated for those unfamiliar with the languages), and non-canonical artwork to prompt discussions of how we think about modernity cross-culturally and the stakes in art research today. Thus, it will also encourage students to reflect on what modernity and art mean to them and how they locate themselves in our unequally shared political world.

Past Course Schedules

Please note that this schedule is subject to change.

Due to the pandemic, in Spring 2022, certain courses will be either fully in-person, hybrid (in-person and online), or HyFlex (simultaneously in-person and online). This website (and CUNYFirst) will be updated when those decisions have been made. 

For hybrid classes, students should be prepared to attend approximately seven meetings in person (socially distanced, masked, following CDC guidelines), while the rest will be online. The in-person meetings will not be streamed or available via zoom. As CDC guidelines change, there may be modifications to the schedule.


In some cases, MALS core courses will be cross-listed with other programs. Students who would like to have these courses satisfy the core course requirement for their chosen concentration must register for the MALS course number. Please keep this in mind as you register.


SPRING 2022 COURSE DESCRIPTION


*All Hybrid courses are subject to change

 
MALS 70000 – Seminar in Interdisciplinary Studies
Tuesday, 4:15-6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Naomi Stubbs (NStubbs@lagcc.cuny.edu)
 
Mode of Instruction: Fully In-Person
 
In this course we will examine the historical, political, social, and philosophical constructs of museums in the US as a means to interrogate disciplinary conventions and interdisciplinary research methods. Beginning with curiosity cabinets and private collections we will explore the links between religion and scientific knowledge. We will then move to nineteenth-century museums such as those of Barnum and Peale in order to investigate the interplay between entertainment, education, and politics in socio-historical context. In looking at contemporary museum spaces, we will question narrative construction, the relationship between architecture and human behavior, and the ethics of display. This course is not so much an introduction to museum studies as it is an introduction to interdisciplinarity in academic discourse. Throughout the semester we will examine academic conventions including conference abstracts, style guides, annotated bibliographies, thesis and capstone formats, and academic reviews. Students will develop their research and writing skills through weekly reading and writing activities, culminating in substantial final project.
 
 
MALS 70100 - Narratives of New York: Literature and the Visual Arts
Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Prathibha Kanakamedala (Prathibha.Kanakamedala@bcc.cuny.edu)
 
Mode of Instruction: Fully In-Person
 
Class Notes: Students will participate in a number of site visits and walking tours across the city. Please allow for travel time (up to max. 1 hour) when scheduling classes. 

New York has had many lives. In this seminar, we will examine the city’s transformation from indigenous lands to a metropolis at the center of a global public health crisis through literature (fiction and non-fiction), the visual arts, and public history. Through an interdisciplinary approach, and drawing upon 400 years of New York City’s history, we will explore the work of writers, artists, and cultural producers who have portrayed this city in its multiplicity. We will look at archives, including oral history collections, from New York Public Library, Museum of the City of New York, Center for Brooklyn History, Weeksville Heritage Center, South Asian American Digital Archive (SAADA), Interference Archive, and The Laundromat Project. Students will be introduced to graduate-level archival research, reading, and writing about the city. We will engage with archival collections virtually, and engage in a number of walking tours to various cultural sites in person. Students will participate in weekly online discussion forums, produce reflections to various readings and archival collections, and complete a final project that draws upon the cultural histories and public history methodologies explored in this seminar.

 
 
MALS 70600 - Enlightenment and Critique: Constructions of the Body, Passions, and Power
Tuesday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Erec Koch (ekoch@gc.cuny.edu)
 
Mode of Instruction: Fully In-Person

In the mid-seventeenth century, a new model of the body emerged that displaced the Galenic model: the new dynamic, “mechanical” body had far-reaching consequences for the understanding of passions—of how they were produced and regulated.  The body became the source and site of sensation and of interaction with the world.  That model exceeded medical discourse and informed other discourses from rhetoric and the art of persuasion, to theatrical spectacle, to the manuals on the regulation of social behavior, to name just a few of its cultural manifestations.  By the early eighteenth century, a second shift began to take place in discourses on the body that moved from self-fashioning and self-regulation to social and political regulation—that is, to the domination of bodies.  Since Michel Foucault, we have come to recognize this period as the dawn of disciplinary society, which inaugurated the social and political control of bodies and coincided with the dawn of capitalism and of colonial investment.  We will follow that passage from self-regulation to the exercise of power, to what Foucault has called technologies of the body and the discourses invested in them.  We will trace and account for this shift in the understanding and use of the body through selected readings from 17th and 18th century science, philosophy, writings on civility, diaries and memoires, and accounts of voyages to and encounters with new worlds; we will focus on French and English traditions.  Critical works will include Stephen Greenblatt and Michel Foucault.

 

MALS 70800 - Transformations of Modernity, 1914 – Present
Friday, 4:15-6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Megan Brandow-Faller (megan.brandow-faller@kbcc.cuny.edu)

Mode of Instruction: Online

Welcome Video
 
Stressing intersections between culture, politics and everyday life, this course moves thematically through the cultural history of the 20th century, 1914-present. Readings interrogate competing definitions of modernity in history, culture and social life and modernism in the visual arts and design as well as different tools for examining these categories, especially gender, class, race. Special emphasis is placed on social historical developments, including consumer history, the history of the family and childhood, and how political ideologies such as fascism and communism were reflected in everyday life and in the visual arts and design. The course is divided into three parts: 1) Methods, Theory and Sources; 2) Politics, Culture and the Everyday; 3) Consumer and Popular Culture into the Present. Brand
 
Part I begins with a theoretical overview of Franco-Centric definitions of Modernism, in which modernism is defined as a movement from realism to the abstract, then moving to newer perspectives on Modernism defined from Eastern and Central Europe, where avant-garde artists never abandoned figuralism and experimented with contemporary movements like abstractionism and cubism in the applied arts. Course readings cover the modernist discovery of the ‘primitive’ (a category variously including the art of children, folk cultures and tribal peoples) and the unequal power relationships embedded in this discovery. The course then pivots to feminist and consumerist histories of modernism/modernity, as well as critical race theory and the material turn, revealing how non-textual material artifacts are valuable sources in unlocking unwritten socio-cultural attitudes and mentalities. Part II provides new perspectives on watershed events like the Great War, the Bolshevik Revolution and the rise of Italian and German Fascism through the lens of everyday life, as well as such revolutions’ aesthetic reverberations. Part III stretches into the post-COVID 19 present, variously examining aspects of popular and consumer culture (including the cult of housework and and the famed Cold War kitchen debate), as well as the ways in which commodity culture has visualized widely-held attitudes towards race, class and the family. The course concludes by examining forms of cultural and political protest in the COVID 19 era, including craftivism and the BLM movement.

 
MALS 71300 - Special Topics in Fashion Studies
Friday, 4:15-6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Veronica Manlow (veronica.manlow@gmail.com)
 
Mode of Instruction: Fully In-Person
 
The fashion system encompasses material and visual culture and represents an important sector of the global economy. This course will explore the field of fashion studies with a focus on the fashion industry while at the same time exploring fashion as a force shaping personal, collective and national identity. A broad exposure to fashion studies will allow us to explore a variety of theoretical approaches and areas of practice including fashion firms, museums, print and social media, television and film. Fashion will be approached as a social and cultural phenomenon that plays a role in shaping identity, interpersonal communication and collective action. Fashion’s reach in a digital and consumer driven society is ever expanding as it forms new partnerships with technology, science and a variety of fields from celebrity culture to politics and the posthuman. Learning about fashion as a business provides us with an opportunity to look at questions concerning diverse areas that encompass design, technology, the customer experience and retail environment, labor, and sustainability.  Academic readings, case studies, industry publications and guest speakers (in person and through podcasts and videos) will give insight into fashion in all its dimensions. We will each decide on a topic to study throughout the semester that broadly intersects with the fashion industry and that contributes to the writing of one’s final thesis. This project allows us to explore issues such as the role of aesthetics in branding, cultural translation, craftsmanship, manufacture, the role played by brands, influencers and consumers in shaping fashion discourses, and the work that designers, artisans, factory workers and machines play in creating fashion.
 
The main book we will be using in class will be The Routledge Companion to Fashion Studies, Paulicelli, Manlow, and Wissinger, eds. [London and New York: Routledge, 2021].  We can expect that several authors will join us virtually or in person as guest speakers over the course of the semester. 
 
 
MALS 71500 - Critical Issues in International Studies
Monday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Peter Bratsis (pbratsis@bmcc.cuny.edu)
 
Mode of Instruction: Fully In-Person

Critical Issues in International Studies, is designed to broaden the student’s perspectives and deepen their understanding of international studies. The course will examine the production of global political order and the multiple ways that political power shapes the relations and hierarchies within and between political communities. Topics will include imperialism and ‘just’ wars, race and ethnicity, social reproduction, climate change and pandemics, libidinal economies, and the transnationalization of classes and states. Readings will include works by Etienne Balibar, Norbert Elias, Sylvia Federici, Cindi Katz, Antonio Negri, Nicos Poulantzas, Carl Schmitt, Bernard Stiegler, Rob Wallace, and Immanuel Wallerstein.


MALS 7200 – Thesis Writing Course
Monday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Justin Rogers-Cooper (jrogers@lagcc.cuny.edu)
 
Mode of Instruction: HyFlex
 
MALS students only

If you would like to sign up for the thesis writing course, permission of the department is required. To express your interest in taking this course, please fill in this form. This is a 3-credit course and it is not a substitute for MALS 79000.

 
 
MALS 72200 - Contemporary Feminist Theories
Wednesday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Jean Halley (jean.halley@csi.cuny.edu)
 
Mode of Instruction: Fully In-Person
 
This in-person course explores Contemporary Feminist Theories through feminist work about racial, economic and sexual justice, and in terms of “bodies with gender.” We investigate what it means to “have” gender and to “be female” with a focus on the United States. Making use of the frame offered by Patricia Ticineto Clough’s book, Feminist Thought, we consider contemporary feminist theories on differences and similarities in the experiences of women and other gendered bodies across lines of race, class, sexuality, species and ability. We examine how gender defines human experiences and how feminists resist these definitions.
 
Sigmund Freud once called work and love the central arenas of human life. We examine contemporary feminist thought on what it means to have gender in love and to be gendered at work, along with an examination of the representation of women and gender in the larger culture, and of violence in the lives of gendered bodies particularly queer bodies, bodies of color and those gendered female. We make use of a variety of texts in exploring feminist thinking on the “nature” of gender, love and sexuality, so-called women’s work, Black feminisms, the expectations “experts” have of diversely gendered bodies, (dis)ability, nonhumans and the representation of gender in the mass media.
 
 
MALS 72800 - Ecological and Social Theories of Human Behavior
Wednesday, 9:30 – 11:30 AM, 3 Credits, Prof. Rebio Diaz (rcardona@lagcc.cuny.edu)
 
Mode of Instruction: Hybrid

In-person Meeting Dates: 3/2, 3/16, 3/30, 4/13, 4/27, 5/11

Theories of how people and environments mutually shape each other are important in helping us think about how research can contribute to more just and sustainable relationships of people to their habitats and societies. This course focuses on the psychological level of analysis. The theories explored lend themselves to accounts of psychology that can mesh with other levels of analysis. The empirical readings illustrate how the theories can be used to address issues of environmental justice and sustainability.

This course is one of the two required courses for the Social and Environmental Justice Studies concentration in MALS.

 

MALS 73100 - American Culture and Values
Thursday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. David Humphries (dhumphries@qcc.cuny.edu)
  
Mode of Instruction: Fully In-Person
 
Using the Keywords in American Cultural Studies project as a way to introduce the histories, theories, and practices of the interdisciplinary field of American studies, this course will begin with an examination of the terms of the course title itself. We will trace the history of “American” as a national and imperial term situated within different contexts; question the extent to which “culture” is an expansive and perhaps exhausted approach for understanding different kinds of representations, identity formations, and collective practices; and consider how common “values” can be identified within existing narratives, power structures, and social institutions. To explore these topics, we will read Saidiya Hartman’s Wayward Lives, Beautiful Experiments: Intimate Histories of Riotous Black Girls, Troublesome Women, and Queer Radicals, Susan Hegeman’s The Cultural Return, Daniel Immerwahr’s How to Hide an Empire: A History of the Greater United States, and Lisa Lowe’s The Intimacies of Four Continents. In addition, we will use American Quarterly as a resource for examining recent scholarship on topics related to social justice, the environment, technology, and representations of geography, class, race, gender, and sexuality. Students will have the opportunity to work on their own interests in American studies and related fields, producing writing in different genres, including a new or updated keyword, a review of a book or event, and proposals for a conference paper and a longer writing project.
 
 
MALS 73500 - Africana Studies: Global Perspectives
Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Nathalie Etoke (netoke@gc.cuny.edu)
 
Mode of Instruction: Hybrid
 
In-Person Class Meeting Dates
02/02, 02/16, 03/02, 03/16, 03/30, 04/13, 04/20, 05/04
 
Existence in Black
This course examines problems of existence and freedom posed by black life. We will explore how the racialization of people of African descent through the means of violence and oppression translates into an existential predicament addressing the human confrontation with hope and hopelessness, freedom and human degradation, being and non-being. We will discuss the existentialist implications, challenges and possibilities of blackness in Africana literature, film and music. How do cultural expressions of black people simultaneously engage being acted upon by the external forces of enslavement and racism, while acting against those forces? Through critical analyses of music, film, fiction, and contemporary events, this class will generate theoretical interventions embedded in the poetics and politics of (self) representation, freedom, and social constructions of black existence
 
 
MALS 74400-The Art and Archaeology of Roman Women
Thursday, 6:30-8:30 PM, 3 Credits Prof. Elizabeth R. Macaulay (Emacaulay@gc.cuny.edu)
 
Mode of Instruction: Fully In-Person

Welcome Video
 
Roman women have been the topic of considerable research since Sarah Pomeroy’s seminal Goddesses, Whores, Wives, and Slaves, published in 1975. Roman women—of all ranks and statuses—are well attested in the archaeological record. Drawing on surviving visual and material culture, this seminar will explore the art and archaeology of women in the Roman World, primarily during the imperial period (27 BCE to 337 CE). After a general introduction to the study of women, gender, and sexuality in Rome as well as a review of the theoretical approaches, such as gender and feminist theories, that scholars use to frame their investigations, the course will take a case study approach, with each weekly seminar being focused on a particular topic. Topics may include the following: imperial portraiture and the portraiture system; representations of imperial women on coinage and historical reliefs;  gender and space; the role of women as architectural patrons; the role of women as priestesses; personifications and goddesses; funerary reliefs and tombs of freed women; women at work; Egyptian mummy portraits; Palmyrene funerary busts; women on the limes and in the western provinces; and/or the reception of Roman women in American art. Visits to the Metropolitan Museum of Art and American Numismatics Society are planned. Students will selected works of art or monuments for class presentations and write final research papers on a topic of their choosing (in consultation with the instructor).
 
 
MALS 77100 - Television Aesthetics: A Comparative Approach to Television Drama
Tuesday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Giancarlo Lombardi (GLombardi@gc.cuny.edu)
 
Mode of Instruction: Fully In-Person
 
This course seeks to understand television drama as an aesthetic object, through a deep analysis of its formal structures tightly informed by several critical methodologies ranging from semiotics and psychoanalysis to cultural studies and deconstruction. We will set out to understand how television makes meaning through the consideration of its aural and visual components as aesthetic objects and will do so in a comparative context that will place American television drama in conversation with similar productions from Europe, Asia, and Latin America. Each week, students will be asked to watch a full season of a television series and will be asked to analyze it at home and during class discussion. Series will include Scenes from a Marriage, Mare of Eastwood, Succession, The Affair (US) as well as Squid Game (Korea), Bad Banks (Germany), Borgen (Denmark), The Paper (Croatia), Beforeigners (Norway), Lupin (France), Money Heist (Spain), 3% (Brazil), and various productions of In Treatment from all over the world. Among its chief learning goals, the course will foster (1) knowledge of primary methods and theoretical frameworks of television analysis; (2) application of such methods and frameworks through textual close reading of the television text; (3) written production of competent television criticism informed by such methods and frameworks.
  
 
MALS 77300 - Film Theories
Wednesday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Jerry Carlson (jwc3467@gmail.co)
 
Mode of Instruction: Fully In-Person

Topic: Narrative Theory Goes to the Movies
The movies – that is, narrative feature films – have always been recognized as a powerful medium for storytelling. Indeed, a century of censorship attests to the fears provoked by film’s seductive spell. FSCP 81000 will explore how that spell is created by the many strategies and tactics of storytelling, some shared with other media, others unique to cinema. To do so, we will engage with the history of narrative theory (or, narratology, as Tzvetan Todorov coined it in 1969). What explanatory powers do different theories offer? Our survey will move from Aristotle’s foundational Poetics to pre-cinematic theories of fiction (for example, Henry James), from the Russian Formalists to French high theory (Barthes, Genette, et al.), and from Neo-Formalist explanations (Bordwell) to ideologically positioned interventions from Marxism, psychoanalysis, queer theory or other approaches. We will put each theory in conversation with a pertinent feature film. The range of screenings will be global and diverse in narrative forms. Filmmakers may include, among others, Buster Keaton, Howard Hawks, Orson Welles, Alfred Hitchcock, Agnes Varda, Alain Resnais, Nicolas Roeg, Raul Ruiz, Chantal Akerman, Wong Kar-wai, and Tomas Gutierrez Alea. A number of questions will recur as we explore different theories. What is plot? How can the effects of plotting be explained? What are the options for cinematic narration? What is in common with other media? What is medium specific? How can narratology explain the nature of cinematic authorship? How does cinema create characters? How can it place them in social context or explore their subjectivity as they journey through the plot. The precision of our answers will help explain the spell of the movies in their social, cultural, historical, and emotional impact.
 
 
MALS 78100 - Issues in Urban Education
Tuesday, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Susan Semel (ssemel@ccny.cuny.edu)
 
Mode of Instruction: Fully In-Person

This course will examine some contemporary issues in Urban Education and provide students with a  context for  their origins from the discipline lenses of Social Foundations. In particular,  students will work backwards through the ,sociology, ,philosophy, history, and politics of education. Race and class as students will see, are the driving forces of unequal life chances through the schools.

 
MALS 78300 – Introduction to US Latino Studies
Wednesday, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Carlos Riobo (criobo@gc.cuny.edu)
 
Mode of Instruction: Fully In-Person

This seminar examines the complex history of the multiple Latino communities across the United States.  Students will explore the literature, politics, and culture of the diverse social groups linked to the greater legacy of Latin American societies in the United States.  A special emphasis will be given to pursuing the specificity of the Latino experience and the historical and political coordinates of each community.  The seminar will employ a strong interdisciplinary approach to analyze issues ranging from race, class and gender relations, cultural productions, linguistics differences, identity politics, civil rights, and the rise of the Latinx communities in current political struggles and debates.  The seminar will combine methodologies of research from the fields of literary studies, linguistics, history, political science, sociology, and anthropology.  Taught in English, the readings will feature works by Gloria Anzaldúa, María Lugones, Junot Díaz, Sandra Cisneros, Ernesto Quiñónez, and Richard Rodríguez.

 
 
MALS 78500 - Patronage, Collecting, and Exhibiting
Thursday, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Anna Akasoy (aakasoy@gc.cuny.edu)
 
Mode of Instruction: Fully In-Person
 
This course will introduce students to the history and present practices of cultural and art museums in the United States, using as an example the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Asian Art. (In the museum’s profile, Asia is understood in a continental sense and includes the Middle East.) Located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., the museum consists of two galleries. Opened to the public in 1923, the Freer Gallery houses the collection in Asian and American art of the American industrialist Charles Lang Freer (1854-1919). In 1987, the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery was established. Chinese jades and pre-Islamic Iranian silver objects are among the best-known items in this collection which has since become the subject of controversies for the role of the Sackler family in America’s opioid epidemic. We will be discussing the history of these collector’s galleries and their collection and display of Asian art in comparison with the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York as an example of an encyclopedic museum.

This course will allow students to explore the history of American museums of the Gilded Age in the context of the socio-economic developments of the time, patronage, the evolving position of the US in the world and representations of cultures. It also allows students to explore the arts, histories and cultures of the represented Asian cultures, as well as a smaller sampling of American art, and the ways knowledge about these traditions is disseminated. Students will be able to discuss the opportunities and challenges of public-facing scholarship, including in digital and global contexts, and familiarize themselves with museums as career options. The course will also address ethical and political topics such as provenance issues, cultural ownership, controversies about funding and the relationship between museums and various public stakeholders.
Course format: The class will meet for three in-person workshops on Saturdays. We will be meeting remotely for short and informal check-in meetings on Thursdays at 4:15pm in order to prepare for the workshops.
February 19; 9am-4pm at the GC
March 26; 10am-5pm; morning at the Met, afternoon at the GC
April 23: either course visit to the National Museum of Asian Art in DC with arrival on the previous day or 9am-4pm at the GC (pending permission for travel due to the public health situation)
 
Interested students are encouraged to contact the instructor with any questions concerning format and contents of the course.
 
 
MALS 78500 The Problem of Race in Early Modern Studies
Monday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Miles Grier (miles.grier@qc.cuny.edu)
 
Mode of Instruction: Fully In-Person
 
In a provocative comparison of witchcraft to the conjuring of races, the historian Barbara Fields and sociologist Karen Fields argue that race is not a legal code or a scientific concept by a collective social process governing “what goes with what and whom (sumptuary codes), how different people must deal with each other (rituals of deference and dominance), where human kinship begins and ends (blood) and how [members of one racial community] look at themselves and each other.” The Fields sisters map an intersectional terrain of race-making that puts traditional historical periodization under pressure.  This course is designed to familiarize students with the trouble that race causes in the study of early modernity (roughly 1450-1820), including challenges to national history and to the very term "early modern period." Readings will come from multiple disciplines and theoretical approaches, helping us consider that fundamental question from the vantage point of Arabs, black Africans, Native Americans, Jews, as well as the French, Spanish, Irish, and English.  
 
 
MALS 78500 – Economics for Everyone
Thursday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Miles Corak (mcorak@gc.cuny.edu)
 
Mode of Instruction: Hybrid

In-person Meeting Dates: March 3, April 7,May 5
 
This may, or it may not be, your first economics course, but it can reasonably be your last. “Economics for Everyone” is specially designed to meet the needs of students in all disciplines and walks of life who may have had only limited exposure to economics. You will learn the fundamental vocabulary and grammar of a subject central to many public policy debates—the big issues ranging from globalization to climate change, from inequality to unemployment—but also the smaller concerns central to everyday life, like why does my cappuccino cost so much? Upon completion of this course you will have the skills and knowledge to be a more informed and engaged citizen. Our study of the subject moves through three themes. The first examines the method and scope of economics, introducing some fundamental principles, and by appealing to some important historical examples illustrates how the definition and methods of the subject have evolved. The second focuses on the “theory of value,” the micro-economics of perfectly competitive markets to illustrate the efficiency of markets and how economists think about the role of public policy when markets “fail.” The third theme introduces national income accounting and macroeconomics, the revolution in thinking in the aftermath of the Great Depression of the 1930s, and how this remains useful in understanding both the Great Recession of the last decade and the COVID pandemic of the last year. Along the way you will be introduced to some of the great thinkers and writers who have contributed to the development of economics as a social science.
 
 
MALS 78500 - Cities and Disaster: Past, Present, and Future -- CANCELED 
Monday, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Profs. Robin Kietlinski & Cary Karacas Karacas (rkietlinski@lagcc.cuny.edu; cary.karacas@csi.cuny.edu)

Mode of Instruction: Fully In-Person
 
Cities are no stranger to disaster. Conflagrations caused by earthquakes destroyed San Francisco and Tokyo. Bombers unleashed a rain of incendiary ruin on European and Asian urban centers in wartime. Hurricane Katrina precipitated the flooding of New Orleans. The COVID-19 pandemic radically upended New York City just as other pandemics have done to cities in the past. And rising seas threaten major coastal cities across the globe. Taking interdisciplinary perspectives related to the emerging field of “critical disaster studies,” this course will first examine key episodes of urban catastrophe from the early twentieth century onward. We will then tackle some of the broader questions central to understanding the nature of how disaster plays out in urban settings. Related themes will touch on issues of gender, power and inequality, community and trauma, nature and society, and the limits of neoliberal governance in adequately preventing and responding to urban catastrophes.
 
 
MALS 78900 - Childhood and Youth Studies: Approaches and Methods
Tuesday, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, 3 Credits, Prof. Colette Daiute (CDaiute@gc.cuny.edu)
 
Mode of Instruction: Fully In-Person
 
This course in Childhood and Youth Studies: Approaches and Methods involves in-depth focus on the interaction of problem, theory and method, with sustained attention to the ways in which researchers working in applied settings design, carry out, and learn from their studies. Students engage with the contemporary study of children, childhood and adolescence as defined and supported in collectives of human cultural development (education, family, social welfare, community organizations, transnational child rights projects).  The course emphasizes sociocultural approaches to childhood/youth in field-based settings with young people growing up amidst contemporary challenges such as displacement, lack of access to economic and sociopolitical resources, and discriminations. Methods addressed in this course, include ethnography/participant observation, activity-meaning system design, narrative analysis, conversation analysis, archival studies, surveys, and participatory-action research. The course uses an inductive approach to research methods, that is we examine research designs in the context of exemplary studies in positive interventions to address inequities in education, health, and social welfare. Course activities involve reading research articles, discussing articles orally and in writing with a focus on method, and applying the course readings and knowledge building to your own research interests.


MALS 78700 - Citational Practices and Politics
Wednesday, 4:15 - 6:15 PM, 1 Credit, Prof. Alyshia Galvez (ALYSHIA.GALVEZ@lehman.cuny.edu)

Mode of Instruction: Hybrid

In-person Meeting Dates: Feb 2, Feb 16, Mar 2, May 4, May 11

How can citational practices be used as a method for pursuing diversity and inclusion in the academy, while improving the caliber of scholarship? How are bibliographies radical documents? In this course, students conducting research will master citational practice with greater understanding of the politics of citation. We will explore:

  • Who gets cited and why?
  • Vicious cycle of popularity and algorithms
  • Hacking the algorithm in the interest not just of representation but of scholarship
  • How to do research in ways that are not the same as buying a pair of shoes
  • Academic integrity: the ethical implications of an inclusive citation practice 

Designed as a companion course with a research methods, capstone or thesis course, this course will enhance students’ familiarity with and use of citational practices in interdisciplinary contexts. Rather than a punitive and meaningless exercise in mastery of format, this course enables students to view citation as an extension of scholarly practices: a way to ensure as broad and inclusive a net as possible of relevant publications in review of literature, while understanding citation as a meaningful means of attribution and construction of scholarly social networks. Recent requests from students indicate that citation is an area of confusion and anxiety for research active students. As a one credit course, this course will be largely centered on the practice of citation.

* Due to the ongoing pandemic, courses will be offered in a mix of hybrid and fully-online models. All indicated modalities are subject to change.


MALS 70000 - Seminar in Interdisciplinary Studies
Thursday, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Elizabeth Macaulay (Emacaulay@gc.cuny.edu)
Mode: HYBRID 

Welcome Video

All the World’s a Fair: Culture, Politics, Economics, Art, and Architecture at America’s World’s Fairs 
This course takes its title from Robert Rydell’s book on World’s Fairs in the United States from Centennial Exposition of 1876 in Philadelphia to the expositions in San Francisco and San Diego in 1915. The unexpected success of the “Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of All Nations,” in 1851 in London, established World’s Fairs, or International Expositions, as a major type of cultural event in Western Europe and later in the United States. Hosting a Fair or Exposition was a physical way that a nation and later specific cities could proclaim their innovations, economic development, technological advancements, artistic and architectural achievements, and cultural standing, as well as construct and articulate their history, as well as its current and future standing. But World’s Fairs were far more than the nineteenth-century equivalent of a trade show, they were spaces where imperial aspirations; tensions over race and gender; and questions of historical inclusion and exclusion played out.

This course will take an interdisciplinary approach to the study of World’s Fairs, starting with the early European Fairs and then primarily focusing on specific World’s Fairs and Expositions in the United States. While the Columbian Exposition of 1893 is undoubtedly the most famous of all of the American fairs, it was one of many; cities such as St. Louis and Buffalo held such fairs. Using the fairs, this course will introduce students to graduate-level research, reading, and writing. Students will learn how to write (and demonstrate competency) in different academic genres, including the book review, annotated bibliography, and seminar paper. They will also learn how to investigate and use archival materials and primary sources. Contributions to the course website, discussion forum, and/or other digital platforms will serve as venues where students can exchange their ideas and engage in a reflective, writing process.

MALS 70000 – Seminar in Interdisciplinary Studies
Wednesday, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Anna Akasoy (Aakasoy@gc.cuny.edu)
Mode: ONLINE

This seminar will introduce students to a range of methods, theories and concepts in humanistic scholarship and public debate. The seminar will focus on questions of cultural ownership and identity, in particular in contexts of cultural contact in both past and present times. Historians of the premodern world increasingly acknowledge the hybridity of cultures and critique stable and homogeneous notions of cultural identity and authenticity. They disaggregate conventional concepts such as ‘the West’, ‘Europe’, the ‘Middle East’ or ‘Asia’ and construct new, emphatically hybrid spaces such as the Mediterranean as analytical alternatives. Recent scholarship has shed light on the transmission of knowledge across cultures, on shared cultural traditions across linguistic, religious and political borders, and on individuals who embodied this hybridity. In contemporary public debates, on the other hand, concerns are frequently voiced about cultural ownership, representation and authenticity, especially about cultural appropriation. Many of these contributions, academic, academic public-facing and public, are animated by similar efforts to challenge hegemonic concepts and narratives of cultural identity and ownership.

In this seminar, we will explore key concepts, theories and approaches in this field, using the example of the Arabian Nights. A literary tradition with roots in India and Persia, the Arabian Nights in its preserved written form dates back to ninth-century Iraq. The text evolved over centuries in Arabic and assumed a global dimension after its translation into French in early eighteenth-century Paris. The translator, Antoine Galland, combined stories preserved in an Arabic manuscript with material presented to him orally by Hanna Diyab, a Syrian traveler. Subsequent to the French translation, Arabic manuscripts reproduced the Arabian Nights in more extensive versions, responding to the interest of Orientalists. The global spread of the Arabian Nights stories is accompanied by a rich tradition of illustrations and adaptations on screen and stage. As the seminar explores the various examples of the evolution of the Arabian Nights corpus, we will be discussing concepts such as canon, world literature and Orientalism, and ask throughout the semester how concepts of cultural ownership and authenticity can be applied to this global literary tradition and how, conversely, the example of the Arabian Nights complicates these concepts. In addition to a selection of Arabian Nights stories and scholarship, we will be considering illustrations, literary adaptations, and cinematic representations such as the 1992 and 2019 Disney versions of Aladdin.

MALS 70000 – Seminar in Interdisciplinary Studies
Tuesday, 6:30 - 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Libby Garland (Libby.Garland@kbcc.cuny.edu)
Mode: ONLINE

Refuge: Seeking Haven and Creating Sanctuary in the United States
What cultural and political work has the idea of “refuge” done in the United States over time? When has the nation served as a refuge, and to whom, and how has it failed? How have the forces of oppression and political or cultural upheavals within the nation, meanwhile, spurred its residents to seek out, create, or define new forms of haven, whether literal or metaphorical? Who has been forced to seek refuge, and who has had the luxury of creating protected bubbles within to seal themselves off from others’ troubles? What can we learn from the fears, visions, and approaches of those who have sought to build or define sanctuary and refuge in new ways? What sorts of refuge have been ephemeral, and which have proved more enduring? In this course, students will explore these questions, and questions that they themselves generate, by engaging with the work of historians, sociologists, geographers, anthropologists, and others. Through close reading, discussion, weekly writing and a longer research project, students will develop skills, knowledge and critical approaches that will serve as a foundation for their further interdisciplinary graduate studies.

MALS 70200 - Metropolis: A Political, Historical, and Sociological Profile of New York
Tuesday, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Darrel Holnes (darrelholnes@mec.cuny.edu)
Mode: ONLINE

This interdisciplinary course will focus on learning ethnographic research methods by completing a field school within the course and doing a close literary review of narratives from the Black community in Brooklyn that led to the city's rise and role as the nation's metropolis. These narratives will be ones that focus on 20th and 21st-century Black migration to the city from the US South and from Latin America and the Caribbean through the study of shifts in the development and evolution of hip hop, poetry, and other spoken-word traditions. The course will especially highlight narratives of the forgotten, erased, and hidden artists, and ask questions about how scholars today can work to make the archive more inclusive, especially of LGBTQIA+ narratives. Student work will culminate in an oral history project of their own or work in the archive of the Central Brooklyn Oral History and Atlas project, an interactive digital humanities project at Medgar Evers College. Through this work, students will also have the opportunity to develop their own research-based performance practice or social art practice and present creative work (rap song, spoken word poems, literary poems, etc...) as an outcome of their research or archive work or write a traditional final paper.

MALS 70400- Interdisciplinary Topics in Law
Thursday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Miryam Segal (miryam.segal@qc.cuny.edu)
Mode: ONLINE

This course is about law and literature in these senses: how literature-as-a-discipline and law (especially as a practice) employ in parallel and at cross-purposes, similar, overlapping and distinct methods of reading and interpretation; how literature and law each give meaning to the other within a legal system.

The intellectual history of law and humanities in the United States as it has so far been written, includes a chapter on the so-called law and literature movement. Its chronology: sprouting and growth in the 1970s, branches and applications in 1980s, slow-down and dissipation in the nineties. This neat proto-history is of course oblivious to the schools of thought, scholars, institutions that continue to engage questions of law, interpretation and meaning with the help of literary fields, especially in Western Europe. This blind spot of academic history has its Rorschachian reflection in the way some practitioners (lawyers, judges and even legal scholars) approach law and its interpretation, valorizing particular historical methods as eternal truths.

This chronology also reduces law and literature to a fashion of 20th century American academia, denying the lessons of classical writing. Within the “western canon,” rhetoric is an obvious meeting point of law and of literature. There are myriad other examples of the necessity of this relationship in ancient documents we might consider “literary” or “legal” but which are necessarily inter-dependent.

This course will attend to aspects and examples of all these phenomena, as well as turning back to the American legal academic context to examine the contemporary debates over “textualism” and statutory interpretation—both examples of uses if the literary that sometimes betray ignorance of the nuances of these tools, their histories, their utility within and beyond the law, therefore affording them an unwarranted authority and final judgement.

Readings include works by Peter Berger, Cleanth Brooks, Benjamin Cardozo, Robert Cover, Ronald Dworkin, Han-Georg Gadamer, Barbara Johnson, Greta Olson, Quintilian, I.A. Richards, Antonin Scalia, James Boyd White, as well as statutes and judicial decisions in U.S. law, Roman Law and the Bible.

MALS 70500 - Medieval Culture
Monday, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Nicole Lopez-Jantzen (nlopezjantzen@bmcc.cuny.edu)
Mode: ONLINE

Cross-listed with MSCP 70100

This course provides an introduction to medieval culture and society, from the fifth to the fourteenth centuries, as well as an introduction to the discipline of Medieval Studies. The course will be interdisciplinary in nature, drawing on approaches from history, literature, art history, and gender studies to explore both scholarly analysis and also the material and textual sources of medieval Europe. We will focus on how scholars have defined the Middle Ages, both temporally and geographically, major people and events in the Middle Ages, as well as emerging fields in medieval studies, such as the study of race. Topics include the end of antiquity, conquest and colonization, and the interaction of Muslims, Christians, and Jews in the Middle Ages.  

MALS 70700 - The Shaping of Modernity, 1789-1914
Wednesday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Susan Smith-Peter (susan.smithpeter@csi.cuny.edu)
Mode: ONLINE

Making a Modern Self: Modernity and the Individual in Ideas, Art and History
This course explores the challenges and opportunities of modernity from the French Revolution to the outbreak of the First World War by focusing on a series of iconic individuals who transformed our ideas of what it has meant to be modern.  Each week will cover the representation of one historical figure through art and ideologies.  Exploring the presentation of the self through official and unofficial images and genres ranging from memoirs to manifestos will allow us to see how these people shaped and were shaped by modernity, from Cornwall to Kamchatka. Students will receive guidance on how to write graduate-level research papers, book reviews, annotated bibliographies and more.  They will exchange ideas through online discussion sessions and oral presentations as well.

MALS 71200 - The Culture of Fashion: Theories and Practices
Thursday, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Elizabeth Wissinger (ewissinger@gc.cuny.edu)
Mode: ONLINE

From labor politics, raced and gendered power struggles, the quest for selfhood, and urgent issues of globalization and sustainability, fashion is a major cultural force that shapes our contemporary world. At the same time, fashion’s history and aesthetics provide a fascinating cultural backdrop within which to examine issues of power, nation building, technology, and meaning making, especially in terms of the impact of modernity on concepts of self, body, and agency within the complex relations of symbols and exchange that make up the fashion system.

Starting with a thorough grounding in theories informing a conceptual approach to fashion and culture, we will explore the politics, technologies, and aesthetics of the fashion system and its histories, by closely reading foundational texts, case studies, and cultural analyses that engage fashion’s ever-changing landscape, especially as it inflects and is inflected by race, class, gender, and power. The course will explore attitudes toward the body as they vary by historical period. We will also consider the technologies of fashion, working through innovation’s impact on fashion’s design and making, from the use of ground up beetles to produce the rarest of reds, through to new developments in biodesign, which employ sea kelp to make fibers woven into clothes, or incorporate living organisms into the clothing’s design.

The course will draw on writings from cultural studies, fashion studies, sociology, feminism, critical theory, media studies and communication scholarship. We will welcome guest speakers, and view and analyze media pertaining to the issues at hand. Off campus site visits will be part of the course. The course will cover the works of Roland Barthes, Walter Benjamin, Thorsten Veblen, Pierre Bourdieu, Georg Simmel, Dick Hebdige, Caroline Evans, Anne Hollander, Judith Butler, and Deleuze, among others.

MALS 71400 - Introduction to International Studies
Monday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Tomohisa Hattori (TOMOHISA.HATTORI@lehman.cuny.edu)
Mode: HYBRID

In-Person Class Meeting Dates: 8/30, 9/13, 9/27, 10/18, 11/1, 11/15, 11/29, and 12/14 (Weeks 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, and 14).

The two main purposes of this course are to introduce you to theoretically informed historical analyses of international relations (IR) and to help you apply one of the theories of IR to an international subject of your choice.  While the historical contexts and theories of IR will help you engage in further studies in IR, your paper will enhance your understanding of how you may gain social scientific knowledge by reviewing relevant theoretical literature, conceptualizing your subject matter, developing research questions, figuring out how to answer them, gathering information about them, organizing the research result as evidence for your answer to the research question, and developing your answer as an argument about a particular phenomenon or relationship on the chosen topic in the context of existing theoretical arguments.

MALS 72000 - Thesis Writing Course
Friday, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Christopher Schmidt (cschmidt@lagcc.cuny.edu)
Mode: HYBRID
In-Person Class Meeting Dates: 8/27, 9/10, 9/17, 9/24, 10/1, 10/8, 0/15

MALS major only

If you would like to sign up for the thesis writing course, permission of the department is required. To express your interest in taking this course, please fill in this form. This is a 3-credit course and it is not a substitute for MALS 79000.

MALS 72300 - Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies
Monday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. James Wilson (jwilson1@gc.cuny.edu)
Mode: HYBRID 
In-Person Class Meeting Dates: 9/13, 9/27, 10/18, 11/1, 11/15, 11/29, 12/13
Cross-listed with WSCP 81000

In Gender Outlaw: On Men, Women, and the Rest of Us Kate Bornstein writes, “The first question we usually ask new parents is: ‘Is it a boy or a girl?’” Bornstein recommends the response, “We don’t know; it hasn’t told us yet.” This course explores the ways in which gender and sexuality are pronounced, embodied, and negotiated within specific historical and cultural contexts. Through a close reading of interdisciplinary, foundational, and recent scholarship the class will examine and theorize the ways in which categories of gender and sexuality inform and shape our understanding of the world. Investigating the intersections and collisions of gender and sexuality with race, class, ability, nationality, ethnicity, and age, the class will consider societal and institutional systems of power, privilege, oppression, and marginalization. Course requirements include an oral presentation, two 4-6 page response papers, and a 15-20 page, staged researched essay.

MALS 72700 - The Political Ecology of Social and Environmental Justice
Wednesday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Tomoaki Imamichi (imamichi@gmail.com)
Mode: ONLINE
Cross-listed with PSYC 79100

MALS 73200 - American Social Institutions
Wednesday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Profs. Karen Miller & Saadia Toor (kamiller@lagcc.cuny.eduSaadia.Toor@csi.cuny.edu)
Mode: ONLINE
Welcome Video

This class will examine American Studies through the lens of social, cultural, political and other kinds of institutions. We will begin by exploring what we mean when we say “institution.” We will think together about why this may be a productive lens for assessing and interrogating the world around us. What does it offer? And what might it elide? How do studies of institutions help expose the myriad ways that power functions in culture, society, and politics? How do institutions, themselves, shape these power relations? And how do different approaches to understanding institutions give us different sorts of answers? American Studies scholars have been asking these questions for decades. We will turn to their texts as sites for exploration.

The texts that we will explore together will put questions about inequality and how it operates at their core. Thus, we will ask how institutions can help amplify or mitigate the often-crushing hierarchies that have been (and continue to be) based on racial, gender, sexual, national, and other forms of difference.

The class will be organized thematically, arranged around a series of inquiries drawn from recent scholarship. Each week, we will take a specific institution as our starting point. These institutions may include (but will not be limited to) the family, the state, courts, race, colonialism, hospitals, prisons, schools, the military, libraries, social networks, media, the corporation, capitalism, etc. We will examine how scholars within a range of American Studies subfields have developed different approaches for exploring institutions. They have used both creative and conventional scholarly tools to explore questions about life, infrastructure, health, race, ethnicity, indigeneity, gender, sexuality, transnationality, borders, architecture, foreign relations, language, politics, economics, literature, art, music, work, social movements, and more. Finally, we will discuss how these institutions may help offer us strategies for imagining new, and possibly better futures.

MALS 73400 - Africana Studies: Introduction
Monday, 4:15 - 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Charles Mills
Mode: ONLINE

MALS 74500 Great Digs: Important sites of the Ancient, Late Antique and Islamic worlds
Tuesday, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Eric Ivison (Eric.Ivison@csi.cuny.edu)
Mode: ONLINE

This class introduces students to the archaeology of the era c. 300-650 CE in the eastern half of the Later Roman or Eastern Roman Empire, also called the Byzantine Empire, with a focus on urban sites in modern Turkey: the imperial capital of ancient Constantinople-modern Istanbul and the cities of Asia Minor-Anatolia. This course draws upon the first-hand expertise of your professor, a Byzantine archaeologist and historian who has worked at numerous late Roman and Byzantine sites, and who from 1994-2009 served as the assistant director of the excavations of the important Byzantine city of Amorium in Turkey. After first surveying the modern history of the field, students are introduced to archaeological methods of survey, excavation, site recording, and the interpretation of archaeological evidence, as well as the preparation of archaeological publications. The rest of the course focuses on key urban sites, identifying key questions and issues in late antique and Byzantine urban archaeology, and exploring how cities and urban life changed between the 4th and 7th centuries. Weekly topics include: the imperial capitals of Rome and Constantinople; the evolution of the late antique city; city walls; streets, public space and civic ceremony; ecclesiastical, monastic and pilgrimage archaeology; palaces and palatine archaeology; elite residences and housing; baths, bathing culture and water supply; the archaeology of ports, trade and economy; funerary archaeology and the Justinianic Plague.  

MALS 74600 Introduction to Global Early Modern Studies
Wednesday, 6:30 - 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Anna Akasoy (aakasoy@gc.cuny.edu)
Mode: ONLINE
Cross-listed with GEMS 72100

The field of global early modern studies operates with the interdependence of two elements, one related to geography, the other to periodization. The period of early modernity gains its distinctive quality by virtue of a new quality of global connections. These connections in turn evoke an interconnected world where regions separated by religion, language and political rule are subject to the same or similar economic, political or cultural processes. A key challenge this field faces is the Eurocentrism potentially inherent in the notion of early modernity and in the legacies of imperialism and colonialism. Related challenges define the concept of the Global Renaissance.

This course will provide an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of global early modern studies. The course will combine two components. Several faculty members of the certificate program in Global Early Modern Studies at the Graduate Center will discuss their research in visits to the course. Students will gain an impression how scholars of different disciplines who focus on different periods, geographical and cultural areas and source material approach the idea of a global early modernity. In a second component we will explore select examples of recent scholarship on Middle Eastern cultural and political history in larger regional, hemispheric or global contexts. These readings will offer insights into different modes of globalization, how global connections were established and how they became manifest. Examples range from similar aesthetic or literary tastes across cultural borders to pandemics. Topics in this component include Ottoman imperial ambitions in the Indian Ocean world, the relationship between the Renaissance and the Islamic world, diplomatic and cultural connections between early modern England and Morocco and different forms of networks (e.g., trade or the pilgrimage). The course does not require any previous familiarity with Middle Eastern history.

MALS 77200 - Film Histories & Historiography
Tuesday, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Ria Banerjee (Ria.Banerjee@guttman.cuny.edu)
Mode: ONLINE
Cross-listed with FSCP 81000

1930-present: “Tradition and the Individual Talent”
This course will engage with the history of cinema from the advent of sound to the present, and take a granular approach to studying particular movements within film history over the last half of the twentieth century. We will pick our way through the diverse and variously situated developments in global film, aiming for geographical breadth in developing our comparative understanding of film history over the almost-century that this course covers. In US cinema, we will study the history of United Artists as an independent production company, and the development of African American cinema from Oscar Michaux and Gordon Parks to Ava DuVernay and Shonda Rhimes. In post-World War II Europe, we will consider how movements like Italian Neorealism, the French New Wave, and New German Cinema overlapped with and departed from each other aesthetically and ideologically. Occurring simultaneously, we will consider the development of arthouse cinema in India in the 1950s-70s and its resistance to the overwhelming influence of the mainstream film industry that has come to be known as Bollywood. Other course modules might consider Dogme 95, US documentary films, and contemporary feminist responses to the New Latin American Cinema.

As we travel through such distinct cinematic terrain, our course will consider the interplay between tradition and individualism, taking the poet T. S. Eliot’s famous essay on the subject as our point of departure. Eliot suggests that there is much porosity between the seeming monolith of “tradition” and individual expressions of aesthetics and ideology, leading us to question the alternate genealogies of film that we will study. We will take a similarly porous approach to our considerations of media beyond the strictly filmic—into photography, web artifacts, and streaming video, for instance.

Students will be asked to contribute weekly discussion questions, to lead one seminar session along specified guidelines, and to produce a final research project developed in consultation with the instructor. While academic writing is welcomed, students will be encouraged to consider culminating responses to the course beyond the 15-20 page research paper, for instance by centering pedagogy in annotated syllabus design, creative projects like video essays, or researched non-academic writing.  

MALS 78100 - Issues in Urban Education
TBA
Mode: ONLINE

MALS 78400 - Introduction to Latin American Studies
Thursday, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Julie Skurski (JSkurski@gc.cuny.edu)
Mode: HYBRID

MALS 78500 - Introduction to Literary Translations
Wednesday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Esther Allen (Esther.Allen@baruch.cuny.eduwww.estherallen.com)
Mode: In Person

Cross-listed with FREN 78400, SPAN 78200, Comparative Literature
As a welcome video, you’re invited to explore the 2020 online conference “Translating the Future”.

Literature is unimaginable without translation. Yet translation is a disturbing, even paranormal practice, mysteriously conferring xenoglossy upon unwitting or suspicious readers. The literary cultures of English, in particular, have often been resistant to, even contemptuous of translation, or have used it as a tool of colonialism. The problem may lie with prevailing concepts of the original, but translation has often taken the blame. Among the aesthetic, ethical, and political questions it raises — questions increasingly crucial to practitioners of literature worldwide— are: Who translates? Who is translated? What is translated? And—yes—how? Also: what does it mean to think of literature prismatically rather than nationally? What constitutes an anti-colonial translation?

In this seminar, we’ll discuss theoretical and literary readings and engage with the contemporary translation sphere, both in the digital realm and in New York City. We’ll also welcome the perspectives of some notable guest speakers. Students will work towards and workshop a final project, either: 1) a discussion of a specific translation theory or set of theories; 2) an analysis of a specific translation, or comparison of multiple translations, or 3) an original translation into English (of a previously untranslated work) accompanied by a critical introduction and annotation. The class is taught in English, but students should have working knowledge of at least one other language.

MALS 78800 - Introduction to Childhood and Youth Studies
Wednesday, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Roger Hart (roghart@gmail.com)
Mode: ONLINE

MALS 78500 - Introduction to Caribbean Studies
Wednesday, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Nathalie Etoke (Netoke@gc.cuny.edu)
Mode: ONLINE

The Caribbean is a geographical and multilinguistic space where the blending of the Indigenous People of the Americas with more recent arrivals -- the colonial heritage (British, French, Dutch, Spanish) and the African and South Asian legacies -- created unique, hybridized and, in short, creolized societies. Marked by the doctrine of discovery, the genocide of indigenous people, settler colonialism, slavery and the making of the post-colonial state, the Caribbean challenges the dichotomy of local versus global. It is a place where foundational violence shifted the geography of reason. This course will provide an overview of the social, cultural, political, and economic history of the Caribbean from 1492 to the present. The course will combine a variety of disciplines such as anthropology, art, economics, literature, music and political sciences. It will emphasize transdisciplinary approaches to historical events and contemporary issues that have shaped the Caribbean as a way to reflect on racial capitalism, domination and freedom.

Learning Goals/Outcomes:
The learning goals/outcomes may include but are not limited to:

  1. Discuss how the plantation economy, colonialism and neo-colonialism continue to impact the Caribbean.
  2. Identify and discuss important events, people, and places in the Caribbean
  3. Analyze the social and historical processes that have shaped the myriad relationships between the United States and the Caribbean.
  4. Analyze the social, political, economic and cultural relationships between the Caribbean and Latin America
  5. Study the cause-and-effect relationship between history and identity making.
  6. Explore the current challenges facing Caribbean nations.
  7. Examine how migrations have

MALS 78500 - Mass Violence in Modern Europe
Monday, 2:00 – 4:00 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Elissa Bemporad (Elissa.Bemporad@qc.cuny.edu)
Mode: ONLINE
Cross-listed with HIST 70900

This course explores instances of unprecedented mass violence in modern Europe during the twentieth century. It is based on several case studies, including events in German South-West Africa, Germany, Ukraine, the Soviet Union, and Chechnya. By analyzing some of the most recent scholarship on genocide and ethnic cleansing, the course examines the short-term and long-term causes for mass violence, assessing the extent to which, in different contexts, it resulted from political ideologies, colonialism, bureaucratic pressures, or ethnic and religious hatred. The course will also focus on the repercussions of mass violence, including acts of revenge, changes in international law and human rights, and attempts to create sites of memory in those places where atrocities were committed. Finally, this course aims at tracing how such unprecedented violence against civilians was experienced by ordinary citizens of European countries, and how it transformed and affected their everyday lives, political choices, and social attitudes during and after the events. 

These courses are provisional. Details about registration will be forthcoming.

* Due to the ongoing pandemic, all summer courses will be offered online.


MALS 72000 – Thesis Writing Workshop (DEPARTMENT PERMISSION REQUIRED; ONLINE COURSE)
Wednesdays, 5:30 – 8:00 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Tanya Agathocleous (Tagathoc@hunter.cuny.edu)
First Class Starts: 6/2/2021
Last Class: 7/14/2021

This course is designed to help students with the process of writing, researching and working towards completing a thesis or capstone project. As indicated by the course's title, the course is primarily run as a workshop with students sharing and commenting on writing in different stages of development. There will also be readings and discussions on the nature of academic discourse and how writing and research methods differ according to academic disciplines, thus replicating the department's interdisciplinary ethos. We will also work on writing strategies for different stages of the thesis-writing process.  
 
Students in all stages of their thesis and capstone projects are encouraged to take the course. 

 If you would like to sign up for the thesis writing course, permission of the department is required. To express your interest in taking this course, please fill in this form. This is a 3-credit course and it is not a substitute for MALS 79000.

 

MALS 78500 – American Icons (ONLINE COURSE)
Tuesdays & Thursdays, 6:00 – 8:00 pm, 3 credits, Prof. David Humphries (dhumphries@qcc.cuny.edu)
First Class Starts: 5/27/2021
Last Class: 7/1/2021

This course will focus on a series of American icons as a way to explore broader issues in American Studies.  As a starting point, we will look at what defines American icons, juxtaposing the “Accidental Napalm” photograph with the late 1960s image of Jackie Onassis to compare icons that were formed spontaneously in a particular historical and political moment with those formed intentionally through the lens of celebrity and the circulation of cultural representations.  We will use these icons as touchstones to consider more recent permutations of American Icons, such as the ways in which images of George Floyd have been used in struggles for racial justice and the ways in which social influencers have used social media to sustain different kinds of attention and fame.  We will also consider why the term “American,” which is typically questioned in an American Studies context, seems to go largely unremarked when coupled with “icons,” using the particular case of James Baldwin and his questioning of foundational national narratives to consider why this might be so.  To broaden our discussion, we will also examine how American icons have recently been canonized, in a sense, in mainstream venues like PBS’s American Experience and the American Icon series presented by the radio program Studio 360.  Using these examples to understand the popular appeal and critical possibilities of American icons, we will recast American icons in wider and more pointed critical and conceptual frameworks, including a questioning of any methodology that takes as its starting point a singular artifact.  Along the way, we will incorporate current permutations of American Icons in popular culture and public discourse, and students will have the opportunity to incorporate their own research interests into our discussions by identifying generally recognized American icons that are worth reexamining and by proposing new icons that may be emerging from our uniquely digital and disruptive age.  This will allow us to address a wide-range of American Icons, drawn from monuments, photographs, fashion, literature, film, television, music, and staged and spontaneous events, while developing a shared vocabulary of critical keywords relevant to current scholarship in American Studies.   


MALS 78500 – Introduction to Race and Ethnicity (ONLINE COURSE)
Mondays & Wednesdays, 6:00 PM – 9:00 PM, 3 credits, Prof. Nathalie Etoke (Netoke@gc.cuny.edu)
First Class Starts: 6/2/2021
Last Class: 7/7/2021


Coming together in opposition to police brutality and the killing of George Floyd, protesters stood side by side in the streets of America and across the globe. The powerful impact of the 2020 summer social uprisings marks a turning point in the struggle against anti-black racism. In order to make sense of the current racial reckoning, this course provides an overview of the politics of race and racism in the U.S. Focusing on the longue durée of imperialism since 1492 and accounting for the consequences of the Native American genocide, racial slavery, settler colonialism, historical violence and the reactionary opposition to ongoing struggles for social justice and freedom, we will unearth the roots of white supremacy and systemic racism in the U.S. The course explores the relationship between race and power while analyzing how it shapes American citizenship and identity.  We will draw from a variety of disciplines, spanning the Humanities, Social Sciences and the Arts, in order to think critically about race, racism, identity formation, everyday experience and American history.
 
We will address the following questions:

  • What does it mean to study race and ethnicity ?
  • How have conversations about race changed over the last few years?
  • How are racial hierarchy and racism woven into the fabric of The United States of America?
  • How does race shape our daily life and our sense of self?
  • How does it structure inequality in our society?
  • What are the sociohistorical processes that have shaped our understandings of race and ethnicity?
     

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Explain the difference between race and ethnicity.

  2. Describe and explain key ideas and concepts concerning the social construction of race and ethnicity.

  3. Think critically about their own racial position, recognize and appreciate human experiences that differ from their own, and explain the significance of racism in today’s world.

  4. Describe how issues of race and ethnicity have shaped American institutions, laws, and practices over time.

  5. Identify and evaluate the strategies a variety of scholars use to make their argument as well as the theoretical claims that they present.

  6. Have a holistic and complex understanding of what it means to be racialized in the U.S.



MALS 78500 - The End of Politics?
Mondays & Thursdays, 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM, 3 credits, Prof. Peter Bratsis (pbratsis@bmcc.cuny.edu) 
Start Date: 7/8/2021
End Date: 8/12/2021

Donald Trump’s vision for addressing the problems of the contemporary world is to return to 1950. Joe Biden has a better idea, to return to 2015. It is striking how the contemporary political moment is met with paralysis, the seeming impossibility of reimagining our social world and working toward its reconstitution.The concept of politics as it was invented in the classical world and rediscovered in the early modern world refers to the understanding that we are the creators of our social world and, thus, the necessary and constant problem of us as a community trying to decide what kind of society we want to create. What is the best way of organizing ourselves and living as a community? How can we improve on how we live together so that we maximize those values that we believe to be the most fundamental and important? The great revolutions of the 18th through 20th centuries, the push for the expansion of democratic institutions, and the apparent victory of secular reason over religion and mysticism seemed to indicate that politics had become a permanent component of societies, that the rediscovery of politics had become a constitutive element of the modern world and that there was no going back to the heteronomy of the past. Recent developments, however, put this assumed permanence into doubt. This includes the notion that 'the market', not humans, is the best judge of public policy (a good policy is one that 'the market' registers as so) as well as the related idea that liberal-capitalism is the most perfect form of society possible, that there is no alternative to liberalism and, thus, there is no longer a need for politics. For the first time in centuries, it is possible to imagine a future where we are bound to blindly reproduce existing social relations with no critical self-reflection and no agency in deciding what the 'good life' may be. Are we on the cusp of a new age of human regression and servitude? Do we still desire a political life? Is this the end of politics? This class will be an attempt to address one of the most fundamental and pressing practical-political questions of our time through a review of classical and contemporary readings in cultural studies, political theory, sociology, psychoanalysis, intellectual history, and legal studies. Readings for this seminar will include Giorgio Agamben, Aristotle, Hannah Arendt, Alain Badiou, Cornelius Castoriadis, Gilles Deleuze, Mark Fisher, Erich Fromm, Francis Fukuyama, Thomas Hobbes, Herbert Marcuse, Jacques Ranciere, and Carl Schmitt. 


MALS 78500 - Unruly Bodies
Mondays & Wednesdays, 5:30 PM - 8:00 PM, 3 credits, Prof. Elizabeth Wissinger (Ewissinger@gc.cuny.edu)
Start Date: 6/2/2021
End Date: 6/23/2021

This course will explore how scholarly interpretations of the body and the technologies within which we live. Our exploration of the body’s unruliness will take students from classic understandings of technological embodiment through an interdisciplinary trajectory encompassing media, feminist, cultural, and sociological studies of how the body is understood and iterated through evolving technological frames. Gender, productivity, knowledge, and power are ineluctably negotiated through the body’s technological entanglements. As such, waves of technological development affect philosophical, sociological, scientific, and political implications for bodies, as this course will explore. These implications are urgently in need of interrogation as digital culture has pushed the primacy of the image in social life to the extreme, made the body’s data almost as valuable as the body itself, and created conditions in which the body’s biological mutability is coming to be seen as a productive resource in and of itself.
 
Employing concepts derived from the readings, we will explore how the body is constructed and framed by technology, touching on ideas from the Marx, Heidegger, Benjamin, Butler, Hayles, as well as Roxane Gay, Kimberly Crenshaw, and Simone Brown to explore feminist and critical race theory’s takes on the body’s data, posthumanity, and materiality. We will use these various conceptualizations of the body to examine the vibrant visual culture of online and social media’s politics of style, the digital body in relation to wearable technology, AI, and algorithmic fairness, and explore the possibilities offered by new technologies of biodesign, design that incorporates living organisms into its function in ways that threaten to upend existing structures of production and consumption, in ways that have potential to save the planet (and us). 
 
Students will become familiar with methodologies, debates, and issues common to different aspects of liberal studies; explore critical scholarly issues; and consider a range of subjects, from a range of disciplinary boundaries and interdisciplinary perspectives. 
 
Scholars new to graduate studies should come away from the course with a sense of possible subjects and avenues for further scholarship; scholars further along in their own research ideas should come away with a sense of how to frame them within a deepened academic vocabulary and practice.
 
Students will have the opportunity to present course material to their peers, write a series of short reflection papers, and write a culminating seminar paper that will illustrate a deeper grasp of one of the course themes as it relates to their area of interest in the program. 
 
This will be an asynchronous and synchronous class.

SPRING 2021 Course Schedule

 


Please note that this schedule is subject to change.

In some cases, MALS core courses will be cross-listed with other programs. Students who would like to have these courses satisfy the core course requirement for their chosen concentration must register for the MALS course number. Please keep this in mind as you register.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic all spring courses will be offered online.



MALS 70000 – Seminar in Interdisciplinary Studies
Mondays, 4:15-6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Anna Akasoy (Aakasoy@gc.cuny.edu)
 
This seminar will introduce students to a range of methods, theories and concepts in humanistic scholarship and public debate. The seminar will focus on questions of cultural ownership and identity, in particular in contexts of cultural contact in both past and present times. Historians of the premodern world increasingly acknowledge the hybridity of cultures and critique stable and homogeneous notions of cultural identity and authenticity. They disaggregate conventional concepts such as ‘the West’, ‘Europe’, the ‘Middle East’ or ‘Asia’ and construct new, emphatically hybrid spaces such as the Mediterranean as analytical alternatives. Recent scholarship has shed light on the transmission of knowledge across cultures, on shared cultural traditions across linguistic, religious and political borders, and on individuals who embodied this hybridity. In contemporary public debates, on the other hand, concerns are frequently voiced about cultural ownership, representation and authenticity, especially about cultural appropriation. Many of these contributions, academic, academic public-facing and public, are animated by similar efforts to challenge hegemonic concepts and narratives of cultural identity and ownership.
 
In this seminar, we will explore key concepts, theories and approaches in this field, using the example of the Arabian Nights. A literary tradition with roots in India and Persia, the Arabian Nights in its preserved written form dates back to ninth-century Iraq. The text evolved over centuries in Arabic and assumed a global dimension after its translation into French in early eighteenth-century Paris. The translator, Antoine Galland, combined stories preserved in an Arabic manuscript with material presented to him orally by Hanna Diyab, a Syrian traveler. Subsequent to the French translation, Arabic manuscripts reproduced the Arabian Nights in more extensive versions, responding to the interest of Orientalists. The global spread of the Arabian Nights stories is accompanied by a rich tradition of illustrations and adaptations on screen and stage. As the seminar explores the various examples of the evolution of the Arabian Nights corpus, we will be discussing concepts such as canon, world literature and Orientalism, and ask throughout the semester how concepts of cultural ownership and authenticity can be applied to this global literary tradition and how, conversely, the example of the Arabian Nights complicates these concepts. In addition to a selection of Arabian Nights stories and scholarship, we will be considering illustrations, literary adaptations, and cinematic representations such as the 1992 and 2019 Disney versions of Aladdin.
 
 
 
MALS 70200 - Metropolis: A Political, Historical, and Sociological Profile of New York
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Profs. Elizabeth Macaulay (Emacaulay@gc.cuny.edu) & Jason Montgomery (jmontgomery@citytech.cuny.edu)
 
Cross listed with IDS 81630 and ASCP 82000
 
Welcome Video
 
Architecture and the built environment are products of their social, political, and economic circumstances. New York City, a perpetually evolving metropolis, has been shaped by successive waves of immigration, shifting economic priorities (from agriculture and manufacturing to finance and technology), and politics. Today, the impact of gentrification, the lack of affordable housing, and climate change is evident in New York City’s built environment. This is not a new story, but one that has been intrinsic to New York City since its founding. Therefore, rather than relying on the written record as the main evidence for exploring New York’s history, this course will introduce students to the built environment and use the urban fabric of New York--its buildings, streets, and places, along with primary source materials about these edifices from libraries and archives--to construct alternative histories of the city. Erected, used, and inhabited by people of all colors, creeds, socio-economic backgrounds and cultures, architecture and the built environment allows us different insights into the development of New York’s history, inviting us to develop alternative stories about the city’s past. The study of architecture and the built environment is inherently interdisciplinary. Students will be introduced to diverse research methods and will be tasked with conducting place-based research on New York City’s built environment during self-guided site visits and virtual visits to archives and libraries. The students in the course will have an opportunity to generate new knowledge about New York City, its built environment, and people.
 
 
 
MALS 70300 - Foundations of Legal Thought
Mondays, 4:15-6:15 PM, 3 credits, Prof. Julie Suk (jsuk@gc.cuny.edu)
 
This course takes up some of the central problems, methods, and ideas that have shaped the theory, study, and practice of law by scholars, jurists, lawyers, and reformers. Students will engage the major schools of legal thought, including legal formalism, legal realism, proceduralism, critical legal studies, critical race theory, and legal feminism.  Special emphasis will be placed on the relationship of law to inequality and social transformation. Ideas to be explored include constitutionalism and the rule of law; the nature of legal authority, legitimacy, and interpretation; the relationship between law, politics, and social movements; the intersections between law and other disciplines or modes of inquiry, including sociology, political science, history, and philosophy; and the potential and limits of law as an instrument of social, cultural, and political change.  Some cases, briefs, statutes, and other primary legal texts will be analyzed to familiarize students with the working methods of lawyers and judges. Some classes may feature distinguished legal scholars, judges, or lawyers as guest speakers throughout the semester.
 
Learning Outcomes and Goals:  The main goal of this course is to bring the modes of reasoning about the law developed in law schools to advanced graduate students in other disciplines, to help them critically approach legal texts and sources in their interdisciplinary research.  Additionally, this course aims to enable the nonlawyer to develop rigorous and nuanced understandings of the legal issues at stake in contemporary public policy debates.  It will be particularly useful to doctoral students writing about law-related topics, and master’s students planning careers in government, public policy, or reform of legal institutions.
 
 
MALS 70600 - Enlightenment and Critique
Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 PM, 3 credits, Prof. Martin Burke (MBurke1@gc.cuny.edu)
 
In this course we’ll examine a number of seminal texts produced in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries within the contexts of current debates over the contours, and the consequences, of the Enlightenment in America. The analytic and interpretive approaches to be taken will be drawn from cultural and intellectual history, the history of political thought, and the history of science. Among the original sources to be read are: Benjamin Franklin’s Autobiography; St. John de Crèvecoeur’s Letters from an American Farmer; Thomas Paine’s Common Sense; the “Declaration of Independence”; Thomas Jefferson’s Notes on the State of Virginia; the “Federalist” and the “Letters of Brutus”; Olaudah Equiano’s Interesting Narrative of the Life; Meriwether Lewis and William Clark’s Journals; and letters and essays by Benjamin Banneker, Mercy Otis Warren, Benjamin Rush and Judith Sargent Murray. Among the contemporary scholarly works are monographs by Caroline Winterer, John Dixon, and John Fea, as well as a number of articles and historiographic reviews. This discussion-centered course welcomes masters-level students from the Liberal Studies Program (especially, but not exclusively, from the Western Intellectual Traditions and the American Studies tracks) and doctoral students from the Ph.D. Programs in History and English, and the American Studies Certificate Program.
 
 
MALS 70800 - Transformations of Modernity, 1914-present
Thursdays, 4:15-6:15 PM, 3 credits, Prof. Christopher Schmidt (cschmidt@lagcc.cuny.edu)

Welcome Video

Mode: Synchronous weekly seminar sessions, with some asynchronous modules possible.
 
This course will provide a fresh account of the major historical, ideological, and aesthetic shifts in modernity, keyed to technological change, political upheaval, and a new sense of the global. We will read foundational texts in modernist studies (e.g., Jameson on imperialism and modernist style, Arendt on fascism, selections from Adorno and Horkheimer). However, we will also complicate and decenter this U.S.–European version of modernism for a global transnational approach that foregrounds feminist, queer, and non-European contributions. The aim is to problematize center-periphery models and interrogate the role of the nation-state in both colonial conquest and postcolonial development. We will pay special attention to the role that archives have played in defining memory and institutional power, and to consider the counter-archives that have emerged in response. For an early assignment, students will draft a short essay on a keyword of their choosing in modernity studies. For a final project, students may write a seminar paper on any course topic; or they may propose a capstone project involving archival curation or creation (with a short essay contextualizing the project). Readings will be interdisciplinary, with a special focus on the ways that art, film, literature, and media interface with the sociopolitical. Authors may include Stein, Loos, de Andrade, de Campos, Bo Bardi, Benjamin, Godard, Varda, Rhys, Fanon, Kittler, Ngai, Ondaatje, Pamuk, Muñoz, Magid, Vadde, NourbeSe Philip, Alves, Santos Perez, and A New Vocabulary for Global Modernism.
 
 
MALS 71300 - Special Topics in Fashion Studies - The Fabric of Cultures: Fashion and Identity in Italy and France
Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 PM, 3 credits, Prof. Eugenia Paulicelli (epaulicelli@gmail.com)
 
Cross-listed with IDS 81620-and WSCP 81000
An interdisciplinary study of fashion, fabric and material culture and their bearing on a heterogeneous cultural identity that interconnects with race, gender, and class. Starting with the Early Modern period and continuing to the present, the course examines the clothing culture of Italy and France in a comparative perspective, focusing on the Italian and French courts and cities, the formation of national kingdoms in Europe (Spain, France, England), international powers such as the Ottoman Empire, and the influences of colonialism and empire. Fashion, however, was not a European invention. The concern for appearance and the desire for beautiful things, as well as the know-how and expertise needed for the production of fashion and textile, had long been at the core of the economies of India, China, Japan, and Mesoamerica. Re-contextualizing fashion in light of the growing scholarship on decolonizing fashion, material culture, global history, the course draws on a range of literary and philosophical traditions to investigate how and when fashion came to establish itself as a powerful economic force, as a threat to morality and religious beliefs, and as a vehicle for gender, class, and ethnic/race definitions. Students are guided to produce innovative projects using texts from literature, film and video, art, visual culture and new media.
 
The course is open to students in other MALS concentrations as well as programs, such as Digital Humanities, French, Spanish, Comparative Literature, History, Women’s Studies, Global Renaissance, Theatre and Art. In addition, the course will provide graduate students with guidance on research methodology and writing techniques consistent with academic research, with an eye towards newer forms of expression beyond the classic essay and geared more to “new media,” such as Web-sites, podcasts, internet journals, blogs and multimedia presentations.
 
MALS 71500 - Critical Issues in International Studies
Mondays, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, 3 credits, Prof. Mark Lewis (mark.lewis@csi.cuny.edu)

After a society undergoes horrific violence (a civil war, widespread rape during ethnic cleansing, systematic torture of civilians, mass deportation or mass murder), how has that society addressed the atrocities, assuming the perpetrators were ousted from power? Historians, political scientists, and legal scholars have developed a field called “transitional justice” that deals with these issues. Historians and political scientists have tried to explain the causes of crimes against humanity and genocide, as well as examine the role of successor governments, other countries, and non-governmental organizations involved in transitional justice. Political scientists and legal scholars have debated the best way to deal with mass atrocities: criminal trials (domestic or international), local customs to reintegrate perpetrators into society, truth and reconciliation commissions, compensation for victims, or a combination? What factors led to success or failure of these efforts?
 
This course will use a multi-disciplinary approach to introduce students to central cases of mass atrocity in the 20th and possibly early 21st century from around the globe, concentrating on causes and contexts. Additionally, we will explore trials that were held after some of these events, working with materials such as records of diplomatic negotiations, trial transcripts, audio testimony, and video recordings of trials. We will explore the goals of trials, the degree to which they contributed to transitional justice, and what their limits and drawbacks were. We will also study the development of international criminal law and international humanitarian law in a historical context, so that students will be able to differentiate concepts such as crimes against humanity, genocide, violations of the laws and customs of war, national jurisdiction, and universal jurisdiction. We will learn about the historical role of non-governmental organizations (such as the International Committee of the Red Cross), the creation of the permanent International Criminal Court, and controversies surrounding them. We will discuss a range of pressing questions: Can trials be fair, or is there always an element of “victors’ justice”? What happens when “competing historical narratives” emerge from a trial, despite the judges’ verdict? Why have courts expanded the definition of genocide to include mass rape? Are the legal concepts used in international trials burdened by ideas from the age of imperialism and colonialism? Is there a double-standard for countries that do not recognize the International Criminal Court’s jurisdiction over their nationals, yet whose militaries or intelligence officers violate international law?

 

MALS 72000 – Thesis Writing Course
Mondays, 6:30-8:30 PM, 3 credits, Prof. Naomi Stubbs (nstubbs@lagcc.cuny.edu)
 
If you would like to sign up for the thesis writing course, permission of the department is required. To express your interest in taking this course, please fill in this form. This is a 3-credit course and it is not a substitute for MALS 79000.
 
This course assists students in making significant progress with their thesis and capstone projects through weekly reading and writing activities. Students will research and write their thesis/capstone projects throughout the semester, sharing substantial sections of their work with the class on at least two occasions. All participants will also provide weekly feedback on their classmates’ work in written and oral formats. These highly practical, hands-on workshop sessions will be framed with discussions of writing practices, disciplinary conventions, and practicalities, such as working with your advisor and the depositing process.
 
 
MALS 72100 – Feminist Texts and Contexts: Feminism 1910
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 PM, 3 credits, Prof. Linda Grasso (lgrasso@york.cuny.edu)
 
Cross listed with WSCP 81000
 
Welcome Video
 
One hundred years before Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie proclaimed “We should all be feminists” and Beyoncé popularized that decree, the word feminist was first being used in the United States. In the 1910s, feminism as idea, lived practice, and social movement was so novel, it prompted much discussion and a new vocabulary. This course explores the historical, political, and cultural emergence of feminism in the U.S. by studying how a selected group of women expressed feminist activism through written and visual artistic forms. In addition to reading stories, novels, speeches, and essays, we will examine artwork and political cartoons as well as periodicals such as The ForerunnerThe Masses, and The Crisis. Students will design and create research projects based on their aesthetic, political, and scholarly interests. We will meet synchronously each week on Wednesday, 4:15-6:15.
 
 
MALS 72200 – Contemporary Feminist Theories
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 PM, 3 credits, Prof. Jean Halley (jeanhalley.netjean.halley@csi.cuny.edujeanomalleyhalley@gmail.com)
 
Cross listed with WSCP 81000

Welcome Video
 
This course explores Contemporary Feminist Theories through feminist work about racial, economic and sexual justice and in terms of “bodies with gender.” We investigate what it means to “have” gender and to “be female” with a focus on the United States. Making use of the frame offered by Patricia Ticineto Clough’s book, Feminist Thought, we consider contemporary feminist theories on differences and similarities in the experiences of women and other gendered bodies across lines of race, class, sexuality, species and ability. We examine how gender defines human experiences and how feminists resist these definitions. Sigmund Freud once called work and love the central arenas of human life. We examine contemporary feminist thought on what it means to have gender in love and to be gendered at work, along with an examination of the representation of women and gender in the larger culture, and of violence in the lives of gendered bodies particularly those gendered female. We make use of a variety of texts in exploring feminist thinking on the “nature” of gender, love and sexuality, so-called women’s work, the expectations “experts” have of diversely gendered bodies, (dis)ability, nonhumans and the representation of gender in the mass media.
 
 
MALS 72800 - Political Ecology and Environmental Justice
Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 PM, 3 credits, Prof. Cindi Katz (Ckatz@gc.cuny.edu)
 
Cross listed with PSYC 80103

Political ecology and environmental justice are areas of great importance and intense contemporary debate, the former commonly associated with the global south and the latter with the north.  Yet scholars and practitioners working in these fields share similar concerns with the uneven effects of production, social reproduction, distribution, social justice, and inequalities in harms and benefits.  This seminar will critically examine contemporary theories of political ecology, environmental justice, sustainable development, and the production of nature across the disparate geographies of north and south, urban and rural, and at a number of scales.  In a series of case studies, we will engage current debates over such issues as climate change and its disparate effects, waste and pollution, environmental conservation, nature preservation, biodiversity, ecotourism, industrial agriculture, green capitalism, and the ‘green new deal.’
 

 
 
MALS 73200 – American Social Institutions
Mondays, 6:30-8:30 PM, 3 credits, Prof. Justin Rogers-Cooper (justinrogerscooper@gmail.com)
 
Welcome Video

Online Teaching Model: Synchronous (with asynchronous components)

The United States is full of political and ideological contradictions. We see these contradictions exploding before us today, with fervor and passion that seem to open towards apocalypse. Understanding the major contradictions of the U.S., and understanding how scholars of American Studies have approached them, is a worthy project for MALS students on any track.

In this course, we will track the ways that the “state” and “nation” of the United States has been continually contested and remade since its founding from above and from below, and the ways its social institutions have been sites of both democracy and repression. From our current vantage, we will 1) review how American Studies defines key concepts – such as “nation” and “citizen” that can help us understand the key contradictions at work; 2) consider key historical junctures when the contradictions of the country have burst open, including slave rebellions, labor uprisings, state and municipal coups, anticommunist raids, urban riots, and protest movements; 3) attend to the legal, cultural, and political “technology” of how racialized and gendered citizens create themselves, and are produced within and recognized by, U.S. social institutions; and 4) in tension with scholarly critiques of U.S. exceptionalism, we will theorize how the key contradictions of the United States might help us expose the mechanics of nation-states themselves, and debate how the structures of state social institutions might work to replicate particular forms of recognition and repression globally.

Key texts, which we will read in their entirety, are likely to include Octavia Butler’s novel Kindred; James Baldwin’s The Fire Next Time; Audre Lorde’s Sister Outsider; and Paul Ortiz’s An African American and Latinx History of the United States. In addition, we will read excerpts from Keywords for American Cultural Studies, Keywords for African American Studies, Keywords for Asian American Studies, Black Reconstruction by W.E.B. Du Bois, Free Labor by Mark Lause, Represent and Destroy by Jodi Melamed, The Reorder of Things: The University and Its Pedagogies of Minority Difference by Roderick A. Ferguson, and Poor People’s Movements by Frances Fox Piven and Richard Cloward. We will also discuss the ideas of Gloria Anzaldua, Angela Davis, Gerald Horne, Grace Lee Boggs, Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Ruth Wilson Gilmore, Frederick Douglass, Lucy Parsons, Emma Goldman, Ida. B Wells, Etienne Balibar, Hubert Harrison, Lisa Lowe, LaRose Parris, Alexander Saxton, Robert Reid-Pharr, Judith Butler, Robert Ovetz, Beth Lew-Williams, David Roediger, and Glen Sean Coulthard, including scholarship from American Quarterly.

Writing for the course will take place throughout the term, and will include six short reflections posted to our private CUNY Academic Commons site (you will need an account); one 250-word conference proposal abstract; a written conference presentation; and an abstract for a MALS program thesis or capstone proposal that integrates concepts and frameworks from the course into your proposal. Students more advanced in their research or thesis/capstone will have the opportunity to substitute a more traditional seminar paper for some of the shorter assignments.
 
 
MALS 73500 - Africana Studies: Existence in Black
Thursdays, 4:15-6:15 PM, 3 credits, Prof. Nathalie Etoke (Netoke@gc.cuny.edu)
 
Cross listed with AFCP 70100


This course examines problems of existence and freedom posed by black life. We will explore how the racialization of people of African descent through the means of violence and oppression translates into an existential predicament addressing the human confrontation with hope and hopelessness, freedom and human degradation, being and non-being. We will discuss the existentialist implications, challenges and possibilities of blackness in Africana literature, film and music. How do cultural expressions of black people simultaneously engage being acted upon by the external forces of enslavement and racism, while acting against those forces? Through critical analyses of music, film, fiction, and contemporary events, this class will generate theoretical interventions embedded in the poetics and politics of (self) representation, freedom, and social constructions of black existence.


MALS 73800 - Internship Course
3 credits, Prof. Elizabeth Macaulay (Emacaulay@gc.cuny.edu

​Whether you're seeking your first job or trying to explore a career change, internships can be a valuable way to gain experience and make career decisions. Internships enable students to earn credits while gaining valuable academic and/or professional experience. These internships provide you with the opportunity to apply what you’ve learned in class in the working environment. They also help to build your professional network, and to expand your skill sets. Students can set up an appointment with the Office of Career Planning and Professional Development for guidance.

MALS students who wish to participate in an internship for credit must enroll in course MALS 73800. This course is run as an independent study course with Professor Macaulay.

  • Students must apply for the internship the semester prior to enrolling.
  • The deadline for students to apply for the internship course before the start of the semester.
  • Students must submit a formal letter or email of an internship offer from the proposed employer via email to liberalstudies@gc.cuny.edu and to the Executive Officer. The proposals will then be reviewed by the department.
  • Candidates will be informed about the outcome of their application in a timely fashion. Successful applicants will then be permitted to enroll in the course, once the proper paperwork is completed and filed. 
  • A minimum of 140 hours of the internship must be completed within the semester that the student enrolls (i.e. if the student enrolls in the internship course during Spring, the internship must be completed during the semester). 
  • The internship must be unpaid.
  • The student must attend all classes (either in person or online, if the course runs as a hybrid course), and complete all assignments required for the course. 

 
MALS 74400 - Cultural Property, Heritage, and Rights
Tuesdays, 11:45 am -1:45 pm., 3 credits, Prof. Alexander Bauer
Cross-listed with ANTH 84400

Is culture a commodity or a vanishing resource? Can cultural property be owned by one person or does it belong to the entire world? Can culture be copyrighted?  In our increasingly global society, competing claims regarding the ownership of cultural objects, customs, and traditional knowledge, are becoming more frequent. This course will address the current debates over the ownership and preservation of tangible and intangible cultural property from the built to the natural environment, and will review the competing interests and values that have been implicated in these debates. We will consider how heritage is entwined with the politics of identity, ethnicity and nationalism as a local reaction to globalization. Attention will be paid to the development of both international and U.S. law and policy regarding the possession, use, preservation, and destruction of cultural heritage, and we will explore ways in which future policies might better deal with these issues. We will also confront both the promises and pitfalls of heritage work, and consider the role that anthropologists can play in thinking critically about heritage practice.

 
MALS 74700 - Topics in Material History: The Early Modern Atlantic World
Mondays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 Credits, Prof. Clare Carroll (ccarroll1@gc.cuny.edu)
 
Cross-listed with GEMS 82100 and Comp Lit 80900
 
Transculturation in the Atlantic world will be the focus of our study of encounters between Europeans and Africans, peoples of the Caribbean, and the Americas in texts from Portuguese, Spanish, Nahuatl, French and English authors. Topics to be discussed include political versus economic interpretations of the encounter, slavery, and colonization; the geography of empire; visual narration in Meso-American codices; the intersection of gender, class and race in the creation of mestizo cultures; monsters and cannibals in maps and ethnographic writing; the construction of race before race (the pseudo-science of the 18th and 19th centuries). With each text we will examine digitized versions of originals in order to study how their material properties condition their meaning.
 
Readings will be from: The Asia of João de Barros; Gomes Eanes de Zurara, The Chronicle and Discovery of Guinea; Columbus, DiarioWe People Here: Nahuatl Accounts of the Conquest of Mexico; Hernán Cortés, The Second Letter; Las Casas, A Brief Account of the Destruction of the Indies; Garcilaso de la Vega, Royal Commentaries of the Incas; Sor Juana Inés de a Cruz, Response to the Very Eminent Sor Filotea de la Cruz; Montaigne, ‘On Cannibals,’ ‘On Coaches,’ Jean de Léry, History of a Voyage to the Land of Brazil; Hakluyt, Voyages and Discoveries; Shakespeare, The Tempest, and Antony and Cleopatra. Theoretical and contextual frameworks include: Fernando Ortiz, Cuban Counterpoint; Herman Bennett, African Kings and Black Slaves; Nicolás Wey Gόmez, The Tropics of Empire; Diana Magaloni Kerpel, The Colors of the New World: Artists, Materials, and the Creation of the Florentine Codex; Barbara Fuchs, Mimesis and Empire; Serge Gruzinski, The Mestizo Mind; Alessandra Russo, The Untranslatable Image; Surekha Davies, Renaissance Ethnography and the Invention of the Human; Kim Hall, Things of Darkness.

Links to early modern manuscripts, and printed books in digitized form will be available; excerpts from English translations, and secondary readings will be posted as pdfs on Blackboard.
 

MALS 77300 - Film Theories: Film and Media Theory in the Global South
Thursdays, 4:15-6:15 PM, 3 credits, Prof. Ria Banerjee (Ria.Banerjee@guttman.cuny.edu)
 
Cross listed with FSCP 8100
 
This course will provide a survey of film and media theory, with special consideration to how filmmakers of the Global South were inspired by classic writings in cinema and sought to use them to develop their own unique creative idioms. We will move chronologically through key cinema studies and performance theory readings, each week juxtaposing them with works by filmmakers working outside traditional or mainstream cinema in linguistic cultures such as Hindi, Bengali, French, Italian, Spanish, and Japanese, as well as Anglophone indie filmmaking in Britain and North America. 
 
 
MALS 78100 – Issues in Urban Education
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 PM, Room TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Carol Huang (chuang@ccny.cuny.edu)
 
Issues in Urban Education explores the crisis in urban education reform in the US and NYC by asking mainly three questions: 1. Who should be taught? 2. What should be taught? 3. How to teach to meet our vision of society? In this course we will analyze our own educational experiences and learn to formulate theories we can apply to issues facing urban schools.  Taking an interdisciplinary approach—with perspectives from history, sociology, urban politics, anthropology, and educational and social policies—the course aims to create a foundation for research and practice in urban education.

Throughout the course, the theme of change will serve as a thread through selected significant social, political, economic forces which influence the school as an institution and which in turn are influenced by the school. Students are introduced to the ways in which schools are related to larger societal institutions, including political economy, family, media, religion, and the business community to examine the possibilities of social change.  Special emphasis will be placed on NYC settings that educate students from diverse ethnic and cultural backgrounds in order to examine the deeper structure of schools, schooling and school reforms.
 
The semester curriculum is divided into three parts: Part I, historical development and its traces in modern day schools; part II, democratic constraints and educational reform; and part III, critical theories and the possibilities of educational reform efforts.
 
 
MALS 78200 – The Politics of Contemporary Urban Education: Equity, Elitism, and Public Higher Education
Tuesdays, 6:30-8:30 PM, 3 credits, Profs. Matt Brim & Katina Rogers (Matt.Brim@csi.cuny.edukrogers@gc.cuny.edu)
 
Higher education can be a powerful engine of equity and social mobility. Yet many of the structures of colleges and universities—including admissions offices, faculty hiring committees, disciplinary formations, institutional rankings, and even classroom pedagogies and practices of collegiality—rely on tacit values of meritocracy and an economy of prestige. In other words, many academic structures actually undermine the values that we associate with possibilities for the most challenging and productive and diverse academic life. In this course, we examine the purposes and principles of universities, especially public universities; consider whether various structures advance or undermine those goals; and imagine new possibilities for educational systems that weave equity into the fabric of all they do. Our privileged methodology for considering the inequities and opportunities of university life will be queer of color and feminist materialist analyses, an interdisciplinary set of methods and methodologies that lend themselves to identifying, historicizing, and resisting institutional norms that produce queer-class-race-gender stratification in the university. Crucially, because these intellectual tools are themselves housed within institutional formations, they will be objects of our investigation as well as methods of analysis. CUNY—and more particularly, CUNY in the time of COVID—will serve as our chief test-object, as we consider the op-eds, institutional statements, and student experiences that have emerged since March 2020. Throughout, we will ask how our own educational experiences inform our work.
 
 
MALS 78300 – Introduction to US Latino Studies
Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15 PM, 3 credits, Prof. Alyshia Galvez (ALYSHIA.GALVEZ@lehman.cuny.edu)
 
Even while Latinxs constitute the largest minority in the United States and are a majority in K-12 education and other spaces, they are still often treated as newcomers and outsiders, especially within contemporary nativist discourses. Centuries long presence of Latinxs in the United States are often overlooked, with many discussions centering on immigration and assimilation. This course will delve into a variety of topics including naming (Latinx/Latino/Hispanic), counting (Census), representation, and reckoning with the great internal diversity among US Latinx populations. Topics include: the arts, immigration, citizenship, politics, ethnic studies, health, and more. With emphasis on debates and discussions within and by the Latinx intellectuals, artists, activist communities, this course will explore the regional, historical, social, and political trends that keep Latinx populations from being categorizable or predictable.           
 
 
MALS 78500 - Economics for Everyone
Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Miles Corak (mcorak@gc.cuny.edu)
 
This may, or it may not be, your first economics course, but it can reasonably be your last. “Economics for Everyone” is specially designed to meet the needs of students in all disciplines who may have had only limited exposure to economics. You will learn the fundamental vocabulary and grammar of a subject central to many public policy debates—the big issues ranging from globalization to climate change, from inequality to unemployment—but also the smaller concerns central to everyday life, like why does my cappuccino cost so much? Upon completion you will have the skills and knowledge to be a more informed and engaged citizen. Our study of the subject moves through three themes. The first examines the method and scope of economics, introducing some fundamental principles, and by appealing to some important historical examples illustrates how the definition and methods of the subject have evolved. The second focuses on the “theory of value,” the micro-economics of perfectly competitive markets to illustrate the efficiency of markets and how economists think about the role of public policy when markets “fail.” The third theme introduces national income accounting and macroeconomics, the revolution in thinking in the aftermath of the Great Depression of the 1930s, and how this remains useful in understanding the Great Recession of the last decade.

FALL 2020 COURSE SCHEDULE

 


Please note that this schedule is subject to change.

In some cases, MALS core courses will be cross-listed with other programs. Students who would like to have these courses satisfy the core course requirement for their chosen concentration must register for the MALS course number. Please keep this in mind as you register.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic all fall courses will be offered online.


 

 

FALL 2020 COURSE DESCRIPTION
 

 

MALS 70000 – Seminar in Interdisciplinary Studies (ONLINE COURSE)
Thursdays, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. David Humphries (dhumphries@qcc.cuny.edu)

Online Teaching Model: Synchronous (with asynchronous components)
Syllabus

This course will introduce students to graduate level research, reading, and writing, with a loose theme around the idea of “parallax,” or the ways in which different perspectives can seem to change the very position and values of our objects of study.  The course will be organized into three broad units: The first unit will include various foundational texts from critical theory, more recent writings on aesthetics and institutional politics, and an application case study to one or more cultural texts.  The second unit will look at how fascist and anti-fascists movements in the United States have been defined in relation to international reference points and how these definitions can limit our understanding of the dangers and possibilities inherent in domestic politics.  The third unit will be based on critical university studies and include current analyses of the ways in which higher education reproduces both aspirations for social mobility and the reality of social class structures.  In addition to our normal class sessions, students will be asked to attend one or more events at the Graduate Center and at least one other cultural institution in New York City.  By the end of the term, students will be able to define key critical concepts, apply them to various texts, and acknowledge and consider multiple critical frameworks and perspectives.  Students will be able to consider how academic disciplines define knowledge and topics and modes for further research.  Students will also demonstrate the ability to write in different genres, from life writing, to a review, to an annotated bibliography, to self-reflection and self-evaluation, and in the culminating writing for the term, they will demonstrate the ability to incorporate additional sources which they have identified and evaluated using the university library.  In addition, students will also choose and select an approved text to present to the class as a work relevant to their planned studies and chosen concentration, as a first step towards mapping their next steps in the program.
 
 
MALS 70000 – Seminar in Interdisciplinary Studies (ONLINE COURSE)
Tuesdays, 4:15 - 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Elizabeth Macaulay (Emacaulay@gc.cuny.edu

Online Teaching Model: Students may select a synchronous or an asynchronous option, or a combination thereof. The instructor will be in touch with enrolled students about the different options before the course starts. For more details on the options, see the course website.

Course Website 
Course Welcome Video


All the World’s A Fair: Culture, Politics, Economics, Art, and Architecture at America’s World's Fair
This course takes its title from Robert Rydell’s book on World’s Fairs in the United States from Centennial Exposition of 1876 in Philadelphia to the expositions in San Francisco and San Diego in 1915. The unexpected success of the “Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of All Nations,” better known as the Crystal Palace or the Great Exposition of 1851 in London, established World’s Fairs, or International Expositions, as a major type of cultural event in Western Europe and later in the United States. Hosting a Fair or Exposition was a physical way that a nation and later specific cities could proclaim their innovations, economic development, technological advancements, artistic and architectural achievements, and cultural standing, as well as construct and articulate their nation’s or city’s history, as well as its current and future positions. But World’s Fairs were  far more than the nineteenth-century equivalent of a trade show, they were spaces where imperial aspirations; tensions over race and gender; and questions of historical inclusion and exclusion played out. This course will take an interdisciplinary approach to the study of World’s Fairs, starting with the early European Fairs and then primarily focusing on specific World’s Fairs and Expositions in the United States. While the Columbian Exposition of 1893 is undoubtedly the most famous of all of American fairs, it was one of many; cities from St. Louis to Buffalo held such fairs. Using the fairs, this course will introduce students to graduate-level research, reading, and writing. Students will learn how to write (and demonstrate competency) in different academic genres, including the book review, annotated bibliography, and seminar paper. They will also learn how to investigate and use archival materials and primary sources. Contributions to the course website, discussion forum, and/or other digital platforms will serve as venues where students can exchange their ideas and engage in a reflective, writing process.
 
 
MALS 70000-Seminar in Interdisciplinary Studies (ONLINE COURSE)        
Wednesdays, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Annette Saddik (ASADDIK@CITYTECH.CUNY.EDU)

Online Teaching Model: Synchronous
 
The Politics of Excess, Ambiguity, and Laughter in 20th Century Culture
Laughter can serve as a powerful social commentary, particularly the kind of ambivalent laughter associated with grotesque, tragicomic, or black humor--what Frances K. Barasch has called "ludicrous-horror"--which breaks through imposed social limitations, destabilizes fixed boundaries, and juxtaposes contradictions in order to challenge what is considered stable or acceptable.  
 
In this course we will be studying works that embrace a subversive politics of excess and laughter in order to celebrate the irrational and the undefinable, often employing exaggeration, distortion of reality, and irony for the purpose of social resistance.  These works highlight the ambiguities and inconsistencies of living in the world--the excesses that leak out of closed systems of meaning, that seep through the cracks of the rational, the stable, the complete, and point toward the essence of the real.   
 
Objects of study will include literature, theatre, painting, philosophical texts, and subversive performance culture such as circus aesthetics, "freak shows," burlesque, and cabaret.  
 

MALS 70100 - Narratives of New York: Literature and the Visual Arts (ONLINE COURSE)
Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 Credits, Prof. Prathibha Kanakamedala (prathibha.kanakamedala@bcc.cuny.edu)


Online Teaching Model: Narratives of New York will be a combination - Synchronous sessions (Sep 1, Sep 15, Oct 6, Oct 20, Nov 3, Nov 17, Dec 8, Dec 15), all other sessions asynchronous.
Course Video

New York has had many lives. In this seminar, we will examine the city’s transformation from indigenous lands to a metropolis at the center of a global public health crisis through literature (fiction and non-fiction), the visual arts, and public history. Through an interdisciplinary approach, and drawing upon 400 years of New York City’s history, we will explore the work of writers, artists, and cultural producers who have portrayed this city in its multiplicity. We will look at archives, including oral history collections, from New York Public Library, Museum of the City of New York, Brooklyn Historical Society, Weeksville Heritage Center, South Asian American Digital Archive (SAADA), Interference Archive, and The Laundromat Project. Students will be introduced to graduate-level archival research, reading, and writing about the city. We will engage with archival collections and cultural sites virtually, and complete a physical fieldtrip, if possible. Students will participate in weekly online discussion forums, produce reflections to various readings and archival collections, and complete a final project that draws upon the cultural histories and public history methodologies explored in this seminar. 


 
MALS 70500 – Renaissance Culture: Global Renaissance (ONLINE COURSE)
Wednesdays, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Anna Akasoy (Aakasoy@gc.cuny.edu)

Online Teaching Model: Primarily synchronous with some asynchronous activities
 
This course focuses on two historical periods and phenomena which are considered key to the formation of the modern West: the Renaissance and the Reformation. The Renaissance has been considered the period in which Europe or the West more generally came into its own. Having recovered the classical Greek heritage from its Arab custodians after the ‘dark ages’, Europe, led by Italian humanists, prepared itself for Enlightenment, secularization and modernization. Complementing this, the Reformation is associated with the profound transformation of religious culture and the confining of religion to the private sphere, eventually allowing for the rise of the secular state.
 
In this course, both Renaissance and Reformation will be analyzed critically as concepts considered unique to Western history and essential to modernity. To contrast these narratives, we will explore parallels primarily in Islamic history, especially against the backdrop of arguments that a ‘Renaissance’ or a ‘Reformation’ are ‘lacking’ in Islamic culture. Furthermore, we will consider both phenomena in larger geographical and diverse cultural settings and explore to what extent they developed in emerging global contexts. In particular we will be considering to what extent developments in western European intellectual and cultural history unfolded against the backdrop of a competition and exchanges with the Ottoman Empire and Morocco under the Saadi dynasty.
 
Literature discussed in this class includes:
Jack Goody, Renaissances. The One or the Many?
Charles Homer Haskins, The Renaissance of the Twelfth Century
Joel Kraemer, Humanism in the Renaissance of Islam
Margaret Meserve, Empires of Islam in Renaissance Historical Thought
The Renaissance and the Ottoman World, edited by Anna Contadini and Claire Norton
Natalie Zemon Davis, Trickster Travels: A Sixteenth-Century Muslim Between Worlds
María Antonia Garcés, Cervantes in Algiers. A Captive’s Tale
Giancarlo Casale, The Ottoman Age of Exploration
Natalie Rothman, Brokering Empire. Trans-Imperial Subjects between Venice and Istanbul
Deborah Howard, Venice and the East. The Impact of the Islamic World on Venetian Architecture 1100-1500
Early Modern England and Islamic Worlds, edited by Linda McJannet and Bernadette Andrea
Jerry Brotton, This Orient Isle: Elizabethan England and the Islamic World
Noel Malcolm, Useful Enemies: Islam and The Ottoman Empire in Western Political Thought, 1450-1750
Nabil Matar, Europe through Arab Eyes, 1578-1727
Stephen Cory, Reviving the Islamic Caliphate in Early Modern Morocco
 
  
MALS 70700 – The Shaping of Modernity 1789-1914 (ONLINE COURSE)
Wednesday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. David Gordon (dmgordon@mindspring.com)

Online Teaching Model: Synchronous
Syllabus
 
In 1800 the rhythm of rural European life, ruled by the movement of the seasons, had barely changed since ancient days. Yet within a hundred years, a new world was born.  Industrialization and urbanization transformed the lives of millions.  A transportation revolution promised to annihilate distance.  Traditional beliefs, already weakened by eighteenth century science, were exploded by the work of Darwin and others in the nineteenth.  A crisis of belief, combined with an emergence of democratic, revolutionary ideologies, had begun to turn the world upside down.   A whole continent was suddenly faced with the need to adjust to this unprecedented and terrifying economic, political and social change.  How millions were able to do this is largely the story of the nineteenth century, and a salutary (and necessary) tale for our own time.  It is a lesson that can be learned in MALS 70700 The Shaping of Modernity, 1789-1914. 
 
 
MALS 71200 – The Culture of Fashion (ONLINE COURSE)
Thursdays, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, Room TBA, 3 Credits, Prof. Elizabeth Wissinger (ewissinger@gc.cuny.edu


Online Teaching Model: Synchronous (with asynchronous components)
Syllabus

From labor politics, raced and gendered power struggles, the quest for selfhood, and urgent issues of globalization and sustainability, fashion is a major cultural force that shapes our contemporary world. At the same time, fashion’s history and aesthetics provide a fascinating cultural backdrop within which to examine issues of power, nation building, technology, and meaning making, especially in terms of the impact of modernity on concepts of self, body, and agency within the complex relations of symbols and exchange that make up the fashion system.

Starting with a thorough grounding in theories informing a conceptual approach to fashion and culture, we will explore the politics, technologies, and aesthetics of the fashion system and its histories, by closely reading foundational texts, case studies, and cultural analyses that engage fashion’s ever-changing landscape, especially as it inflects and is inflected by race, class, gender, and power. The course will explore attitudes toward the body as they vary by historical period. We will also consider the technologies of fashion, working through innovation’s impact on fashion’s design and making, from the use of ground up beetles to produce the rarest of reds, through to new developments in biodesign, which employ sea kelp to make fibers woven into clothes, or incorporate living organisms into the clothing’s design.

The course will draw on writings from cultural studies, fashion studies, sociology, feminism, critical theory, media studies and communication scholarship. We will welcome guest speakers, and view and analyze media pertaining to the issues at hand. The course will cover the works of Roland Barthes, Walter Benjamin, Thorsten Veblen, Pierre Bourdieu, Georg Simmel, Dick Hebdige, Caroline Evans, Anne Hollander, Judith Butler, and Deleuze, among others.
 

  
MALS 71400 – Introduction to International Studies (ONLINE COURSE)
Mondays, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Tomohisa Hattori (TOMOHISA.HATTORI@lehman.cuny.edu)

Online Teaching Model: A combination of synchronous and asynchonous
 
The two main purposes of this course are to introduce you to theoretically informed historical analyses of international relations (IR) and to help you apply one of the theories of IR to an international subject of your choice.  While the historical contexts and theories of IR will help you engage in further studies in IR, your paper will enhance your understanding of how you may gain social scientific knowledge by reviewing relevant theoretical literature, conceptualizing your subject matter, developing research questions, figuring out how to answer them, gathering information about them, organizing the research result as evidence for your answer to the research question, and developing your answer as a causal argument about a particular phenomenon or relationship on the chosen topic in the context of existing theoretical arguments.

 Welcome Announcement
 
Welcome to a synchronous and asynchronous online course introducing you to International Studies.  I am Professor Hattori, the instructor of the course about the history of international relations.  The course starts with wars in hunting-gathering-fishing societies, followed by wars in agrarian and then industrial societies.  It also examines colonial wars and decolonization, which necessarily takes us to the examination of national development, national interest, and national identity briefly toward the end.  While coronavirus has made us aware of a truly global phenomenon, the prior phases of a long history of globalization may be summarized in four phases: (1) colonization, its demise through (2) decolonization, which simultaneously meant that colonies became independent states and members of the international society, thus (3) internationalization, followed by the contemporary phase led by transnational corporations that produce and freely trade commodities around the world: (4) transnationalization. 
 
You could imagine how people in Espanola (today's Haiti and Dominican Republic) in the Caribbean were scared of the Europeans who were left on the island and transmitted small pox, a deadly disease for those without any immunity.  Just as some people attributed coronavirus as a Chinese virus and demonized the Chinese in 2020, it would be easy for these Caribbean natives to demonize the Europeans and be scared of them from 1492 onward.  While we think about effects on individuals, this course will focus on how a different system of states organized the world in the way that had become quite distinct from the previous time, that is, before Columbus' employer like Spain's absolutist king began to develop the European system of absolutist kings in the course of 15th century.   The colonial world was literally an appendage – colony – to the European system of absolutist states.  And this system of absolutist states, which lasted almost 500 years, has been completely replaced by new systems of states in the course of the twentieth century through two world wars and the Cold War.
 
Syllabus (scheduled to be posted by Monday, August 17):
Please click class information tab at the upper left-hand corner of this web page (or the course link below) to find the link to the course syllabus, which describes course requirements, course schedule, and assignments.  This is the document you and I will come back every week.  To be successful in this course, please check not only overall course requirements listed in the first page but also guidelines, which help you do the assignments.  The course schedule is organized week by week in the syllabus, but the course materials in Blackboard Course Contents are not. So, if you are interested in doing the required work, do use the syllabus as your constant guide.  Please print the syllabus to keep it handy. 
 
Course Contents and Weekly Blackboard (Bb) Collaborate Ultra Sessions:
Check the left side menu and go down to Course Contents.  That is where you can find reading materials, web links, and assignment that are due that particular week.  Each week will end on Monday, the day of the class in this course with a synchronous (meaning real-time, the East Coast Time) Blackboard (Bb) Collaborate Ultra session between 6:30 and 7:30 p.m. (In the left side menu of Bb, please go down, and you will find Blackboard Collaborate Ultra).   Bb Ultra is a real-time face-to-face session in which you can see me speak and do a lecture almost like a normal class.  Office hours will follow (initially between 7:30 and 9 so that I can meet with everyone; then, between 7:30 and 8:30). I hope I will have a brief individual meeting with everyone in the first few weeks. So, after the first Bb Ultra session on Monday, August 31, Week 2 will start, meaning you will start reading the assignments for Week 2 from the syllabus and by identifying them in the long list of Course Contents (sorry! not alphabetically ordered). If you follow the syllabus closely throughout the semester and use Bb's tools like Bb Ultra sessions, Bb Discussion Board, and assignments based on the syllabus, you will be successful in this course. 
 
To get the sense of what you need to do, use the syllabus as your guide.  It is the syllabus that says what is required (e.g., required pages), what is recommended, and what is not assigned.  Please participate in the Discussion Forum of the Week in the Discussion Board by scrolling down to "Discussion Board" in the left-side menu.   There will be a separate Discussion Forum for each week in Discussion Board where you are required to participate, that is, to post a discussion thread: post (Author Year, chapter X: page A to B) in the subject line.  In the body of the post, you should pose author's key question in that specific chapter, why it is significant in the context of the chapter and the whole book, the approach the author uses in answering the question, and the evidence s/he uses to answer it.  All these should be in the first paragraph (probably the longest).  In the second paragraph, please briefly answer the question.  Try to find a neat quote of a few sentences to answer his/her question.  You should supplement with your own words, introducing the quote and elaborating on it to provide the answer. This should be as long as the first paragraph.  The third paragraph is your brief reaction.  It can be your question(s) after reading the chapter or the whole book.  Your primary participation point comes from posting this three-paragraph essay every week on week's Discussion Forum and responding to other students' and my comments on your thread.  After posting your thread, write at least two comments on other students' thread.  
 
Contacts and Communications
I will log on to the Blackboard classroom nearly every day during the week (but not so on weekend).  Discussion Board's Q&A forum is generally the best place to ask most questions as they may be pertinent to all students. If you have any question regarding the syllabus or other course-related questions like assignments, Q&A Forum is the right place to ask questions.
 
But if you need to contact me on an individual basis, please use Bb Course Message to send a message to me.  I will try to reply within 1 day during the week, but on weekend, 2 days. Your communication is important to me!  If you want to send an individual message to tomohisa.hattori@lehman.cuny.edu because for some reason you have not received a reply from me after a day (or two on weekend), in order to ensure that I see your message in my Lehman email account, please make sure to use  MALS 71400 (Introductory International Studies) and your first and last name in your subject line.
 
Looking forward to working with you this semester.
 
Tom Hattori

 
 
MALS 72000 – Thesis Writing Course (ONLINE COURSE)
Tuesdays, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. George Fragopoulos (gfragopoulos@gc.cuny.edu)
 
If you would like to sign up for the thesis writing course, permission of the department is required. To express your interest in taking this course, please fill in this form. This is a 3-credit course and it is not a substitute for MALS 79000.

As anyone who has ever attempted it knows, writing is difficult. Aside from the terror of the blank page, it can often feel like an isolating and confounding process. As such, Thesis Workshop is designed to help MALS students complete their final thesis or capstone projects. The primary goals of the course are to provide students with the time, space, and tools needed to write, and to write with purpose. As with all workshops, the class will primarily revolve around the sharing of writing and commenting on the work of others. Writing is, fundamentally, a social exercise, even if it doesn’t often feel that way. This class will also help to provide a community of like-minded writers and thinkers for those who might be struggling to find others to share their work with. Class time will also be devoted to considerations and discussions regarding the nature of academic discourses, how to establish productive writing habits, and the importance of disciplinary requirements. Students will be expected to write every week and to respond, in one way or another, to the readings assigned. The class is open to students at all stages of the writing process and to all MALS concentrations.   
 
Readings for the class may include but are not limited to: Eric Hayot’s The Elements of Academic Style, Wendy Belcher’s Writing Your Journal Article in 12 Weeks, Helen Sword’s Stylish Academic Writing, and Joan Bolker’s Writing Your Dissertation in 15 Minutes a Day.
 
Please email gfragopoulos@gc.cuny.edu if you have any questions. 
 

MALS 72300 – Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies (ONLINE COURSE)
Mondays, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. James Wilson (jwilson1@gc.cuny.edu)

Online Teaching Model: This online course will use a synchronous teaching model, but students may select an asynchronous option upon consultation with the instructor.

Syllabus (Subject to modification)
 
In Gender Outlaw: On Men, Women, and the Rest of Us Kate Bornstein writes, “The first question we usually ask new parents is: ‘Is it a boy or a girl?’” Bornstein recommends the response, “We don’t know; it hasn’t told us yet.” This course explores the ways in which gender and sexuality are pronounced, embodied, and negotiated within specific historical, cultural, and theoretical contexts. Through a close reading of interdisciplinary, foundational, and recent scholarship the class will examine and theorize the ways in which categories of gender and sexuality inform and shape our understanding of the world. Investigating the intersections and collisions of gender and sexuality with race, class, ability, nationality, ethnicity, and age, the class will consider societal and institutional systems of power, privilege, oppression, and marginalization. A sampling of the writers will include, but is in no way limited to, Sara Ahmed, Judith Butler, Simone de Beauvoir, Eli Clare, Patricia Hill Collins, Angela Y. Davis, John D’Emilo, Michel Foucault, Jack Halberstam, bell hooks, Luce Irigaray, Audre Lorde, José Estaban Muñoz, Jasbir Puar, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, and Dean Spade. Course requirements include an oral presentation with class discussion facilitation; two 4-6 page response papers based on course topics and readings; and a 15-20 page, staged researched essay related to current developments in gender and sexuality studies as they pertain to the student’s own academic and/or professional pursuits.  ​

 
MALS 72700 – The Political Ecology of Social and Environmental Justice (ONLINE COURSE)
Wednesdays, 6:30 - 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Tomoaki Imamichi (imamichi@gmail.com)

Online Teaching Model: A combination of synchronous and asynchronous
Syllabus
Course Video

This seminar introduces students to the multidisciplinary theoretical bases and substantive concerns of Environmental Social Science. Environmental Psychology grew out of a desire among scholars and practitioners to work across disciplines on real world problems of people and the environment. From the start, research was conducted in naturalistic settings and often with an applied orientation. CUNY’s program, which was founded in the late 1960s, has been interdisciplinary in orientation since its inception and, for that reason, we introduce the field within a larger context than psychology alone, hence the designation “Environmental Social Science”. The term is meant to embrace a wide field of study that addresses and seeks to understand the nature of the complex relationships between people and the physical environment, and the links to health and well being, environmental justice, and sustainability. As such we will survey a range of disciplines that comprise the field.

 
MALS 73100 – American Culture and Values (ONLINE COURSE)
Thursdays, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Karen Miller (kamiller@lagcc.cuny.edu)

Online Teaching Model: This course will hold synchronous online meetings via Zoom videoconferencing during our scheduled meeting times—from 4:15 to 6:15 on Thursdays. All of the course materials will be available digitally. All of the assignments, including writing reflections and papers will be submitted via Blackboard. Please contact me if you have any questions about the course or its format.

Syllabus
Course Video
 
This class will serve as a graduate level introduction to the field of American Studies. We will examine how scholars within a range of subfields have used both creative and conventional scholarly tools to explore questions about life, infrastructure, health, race, ethnicity, indigeneity, gender, sexuality, transnationality, borders, architecture, foreign relations, language, politics, economics, literature, art, music, work, social movements, and more. The class will be organized thematically, arranged around a series of inquiries drawn from recent scholarship. Each week, we will examine a narrow set of questions that scholars have posed within a specific subfield. We will explore parts of two books that are thematically related and consider how authors’ approaches have invited different kinds of studies and produced different sorts of questions. We will consider texts that engage directly with other American Studies scholars, as well as studies that we may consider American Studies, but whose self-conscious target audiences are elsewhere in the academy. Students will be asked to write at least one book review, one “keyword” study, and one research paper.
 
 
MALS 73400 – Africana Studies: Introduction (ONLINE COURSE)
Monday, 2:00-4:00 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Juan Battle (JBattle@gc.cuny.edu)

Online Teaching Method: Synchronous
 
This course will serve as a broad, historical survey of the Black experience (mainly) within the United States. Because students will be exposed to (and contribute from) a wide variety of perspectives on the subject, this course is appropriate for students in the traditional social sciences (e.g. sociology, anthropology, psychology, urban education, and history) as well as more contemporary ones (e.g. women’s studies, race studies, American studies, cultural studies, lesbian and gay studies).   
 
 
MALS 74500 – Great Digs: Important Sites of the Ancient, Late Antique, and Islamic Worlds (ONLINE COURSE)
Mondays, 4:15 - 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Eric Ivison (Eric.Ivison@csi.cuny.edu)

Online Teaching Model: Synchronous (via Zoom)

This class introduces students to the archaeology of the era c. 300-900 CE in the lands of the Later Roman Empire, and its Eastern Roman half, also called the Byzantine Empire, with a particular focus on urban sites in modern Turkey, ancient Asia Minor or Anatolia. This course draws upon the first-hand expertise of your professor, a Byzantine archaeologist and historian who has worked at numerous late Roman and Byzantine sites, and who from 1994-2009 served as the assistant director of the excavations of the important Byzantine city of Amorium in Turkey. After first surveying the modern history of the field, students are introduced to archaeological methods of survey, excavation, site recording, and the interpretation of archaeological evidence, as well as the preparation of archaeological publications. The rest of the course is focuses on key urban sites, including Rome, Constantinople, Athens, Corinth, Ephesus, Sardis, and Amorium, identifying key questions and issues in late antique and Byzantine urban archaeology, and exploring how cities and urban life changed between the 4th and 9th centuries. Classes will be a combination of lecture and seminar discussions (exact class format subject to change if classes are transferred on-line). 
 

MALS 74600 – Global Early Modern Studies (ONLINE COURSE)
Wednesdays, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Anna Akasoy (aakasoy@gc.cuny.edu)

Online Teaching Model: Primarily synchronous with some asynchronous activities
 
This course focuses on two historical periods and phenomena which are considered key to the formation of the modern West: the Renaissance and the Reformation. The Renaissance has been considered the period in which Europe or the West more generally came into its own. Having recovered the classical Greek heritage from its Arab custodians after the ‘dark ages’, Europe, led by Italian humanists, prepared itself for Enlightenment, secularization and modernization. Complementing this, the Reformation is associated with the profound transformation of religious culture and the confining of religion to the private sphere, eventually allowing for the rise of the secular state.
 
In this course, both Renaissance and Reformation will be analyzed critically as concepts considered unique to Western history and essential to modernity. To contrast these narratives, we will explore parallels primarily in Islamic history, especially against the backdrop of arguments that a ‘Renaissance’ or a ‘Reformation’ are ‘lacking’ in Islamic culture. Furthermore, we will consider both phenomena in larger geographical and diverse cultural settings and explore to what extent they developed in emerging global contexts. In particular we will be considering to what extent developments in western European intellectual and cultural history unfolded against the backdrop of a competition and exchanges with the Ottoman Empire and Morocco under the Saadi dynasty.
 
Literature discussed in this class includes:
Jack Goody, Renaissances. The One or the Many?
Charles Homer Haskins, The Renaissance of the Twelfth Century
Joel Kraemer, Humanism in the Renaissance of Islam
Margaret Meserve, Empires of Islam in Renaissance Historical Thought
The Renaissance and the Ottoman World, edited by Anna Contadini and Claire Norton
Natalie Zemon Davis, Trickster Travels: A Sixteenth-Century Muslim Between Worlds
María Antonia Garcés, Cervantes in Algiers. A Captive’s Tale
Giancarlo Casale, The Ottoman Age of Exploration
Natalie Rothman, Brokering Empire. Trans-Imperial Subjects between Venice and Istanbul
Deborah Howard, Venice and the East. The Impact of the Islamic World on Venetian Architecture 1100-1500
Early Modern England and Islamic Worlds, edited by Linda McJannet and Bernadette Andrea
Jerry Brotton, This Orient Isle: Elizabethan England and the Islamic World
Noel Malcolm, Useful Enemies: Islam and The Ottoman Empire in Western Political Thought, 1450-1750
Nabil Matar, Europe through Arab Eyes, 1578-1727
Stephen Cory, Reviving the Islamic Caliphate in Early Modern Morocco
 
 
MALS 77200 – Film Histories & Historiography (ONLINE COURSE)
Tuesdays, 4:15 – 8:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Leah Anderst (landerst@qcc.cuny.edu)

Online Teaching Model: Synchronous (with asynchronous components)
CUNY Commons Page
 
 Film Histories & Historiography surveys the cinematic medium from its inception to the present day with a focus on major historical, cultural, technological, and industrial developments. These may include: the growth of international silent cinema, Hollywood and the industrialization of film in relation to Bollywood, Nollywood, and the development of other sites of film production, nonfiction and nontheatrical traditions, European New Waves, Third Cinema, independent film movements, and the rise of television, digital, and streaming cinema. The course will also cover different strategies and theories of historiography that reflect the research interests of the students in the class and may include a unit linked to a local archive under the auspices of the New York Public Library’s research divisions. The semester will include instruction on research methods taught in conjunction with the Mina Rees Library staff.
 
 
MALS 78400 - Introduction to Latin American Studies (ONLINE COURSE)
Tuesdays, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Julie Skurski (JSkurski@gc.cuny.edu)

Online Teaching Model: Synchronous

This seminar examines the making of Latin America as a region and as a concept, with a focus on conflicting efforts to imagine, define, and name the region and its social sectors.  These efforts have been integral to the processes of colonialism, imperialism, nation formation, revolution, and resistance that continue to shape these heterogeneous societies.  We will look at differing visions of the past and the future in the region, including cultural practices and social movements that challenge prevailing ideologies.  Key categories of race and ethnicity, themselves gendered, will be at the center of our discussion of processes that range from dispossession and enslavement to emancipatory struggles for freedom, land, and rights.
 
Each unit of the seminar will examine a theme or a topic, including major theoretical approaches to the region.  Our readings will examine case studies that exemplify central themes, such as the U.S. intervention and subsequent racialized civil conflict in Guatemala, and the related Zapatista movement in Chiapas, Mexico.  The politics of culture and the production of cultural forms are central dimensions of the processes we will discuss, and students are welcome to contribute to the visual and musical materials we will draw on. Students will have the opportunity to carry out a research project on a topic of their choice. ​
 

 
MALS 78500 - Comparative Revolutions: from the English Revolution of 1688 to the Arab Spring (ONLINE COURSE)
Mondays, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Helena Rosenblatt (HRosenblatt@gc.cuny.edu)
 
What makes a revolution a revolution? Scholarship has recently moved away from social-scientific, Marxist-inspired explanations to approaches that explore how revolutionaries themselves understood what they were doing, how they interpreted their contexts, and how their ideas shaped their actions. With such questions in mind, we will look at and compare a number of revolutions, including the so-called “Glorious Revolution” of 1688,  the American, French and Haitian Revolutions, the Russian Revolution of 1917 and the recent Arab Spring. In the eyes of their participants, what characteristics did these revolutions share? What might they have learned and borrowed from each other? Is there something we can call a revolutionary “script”?
 
 
MALS 78800 - Introduction to Childhood and Youth Studies (ONLINE COURSE)
Wednesday, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, 3 Credits, Prof. Roger Hart (roghart@gmail.com)

Online Teaching Model: Synchronous (Zoom seminars with CUNY Commmons communication)
Syllabus

The interdisciplinary study of childhood has emerged over the past three decades, primarily as a reaction to the past failure of the social sciences to take seriously the study of children and childhood and leaving the study of children and youth largely to the field of psychology. Some also say that the impetus for what is sometimes called the “new sociology/anthropology of childhood” can be traced to the 1989 United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, which has been adopted by all countries except the United States: ‘The interlocking Articles of the Convention offer children an internationally recognized set of rights that they can hold in independence of the interests and activities of the adults that directly surround them’ (Lee 2001, 92). But whatever the combination of forces was for the burgeoning of this interdisciplinary activity, it has become an important complement to the field of psychology. It often called “critical” childhood study because of a felt need to distance itself from the taken-for-granted, universalizing, views of childhood that have been dominant in the past, through a perspective of critique.
 
The seminar begins with an introduction to the social construction of childhood and to changing concepts of childhood and adolescence from a variety of historical periods, asking what we mean by “childhood” or “youth” and what is at stake in these definitions?  We examine various historical models of childhood and how they survive in different degrees and combinations today, including the romantic child, the sinful child, the sacred child, the child as miniature adult and the developing child.  As we do so, we will examine how our shifting—and often contradictory—conceptions of childhood both align and clash with the way children actually live. 
 
We will also look at the ways in which age intersects with other dimensions of social experience:  sex/gender, race, class, nation, and religion.  In addition, we consider what young people do, how they live their lives and imagine their futures. In doing so we will discuss alternative theories to what has been called the “socialization” of children in order to recognize that children participate actively in society, not only constrained by the existing social structures and processes whereby society is reproduced but also contributing to it and changing it.
 
Finally, we will look at some childhood experiences that challenge the historically recent notion of a “protected” and “innocent” childhood, including child labor, child sex, and child criminals. We will examine how different institutions, discourses and systems shape how childhood is experienced: including family, school, media and consumer culture.  While attending to the force of structural inequalities in cultural and economic arrangements, we will give equal attention to the methodological strategies used by various researchers and practitioners for working with rather than on or about children.

Please note that this schedule is subject to change.

In some cases, MALS core courses will be cross-listed with other programs. Students who would like to have these courses satisfy the core course requirement for their chosen concentration must register for the MALS course number. Please keep this in mind as you register.


MALS 70000 -- Seminar in Interdisciplinary Studies (MALS students only)
Tuesdays, 4:15 -6:15 pm, Room 5383, 3 Credits, Prof. Lisa Rhody (lrhody@gc.cuny.edu)

This course will introduce students to graduate level reading and research through an investigation of the term “text” and its material, conceptual, spoken, artistic, interdisciplinary, and scholarly traditions. What does it mean to be a reader today? How do the material conditions of texts construct cultures of reading? We’ll also consider how the creation, production, and distribution of texts animate or challenge our work as students and researchers. How might our practices need to adapt to meet the challenges presented by scale, accessibility, and reproduction? What happens when we consider “text” as “data”? We will consider text as both spatial and time-based, and the tensions created by texts that transgress the philosophical domain of images. 
 
The semester will be divided into three segments: text, reading, and writing. By the end of the course, students will be able to craft their own definition of “text” that is reflective of disciplinary interests, and historical and technical contexts. Students will be able to create connections among texts and forms of textual production in writing and spoken discourse. Students will create texts in multiple media for various audiences with an attention to changing perceptions of reading and writing as methodologies. Finally, students will also learn how to search for, evaluate, access, and use text in print, digital, and manuscript forms. 
 
Students should be prepared to take short field trips to local libraries and galleries during the semester (no more than four times). Readings will include but are not limited to work by Eve Sedgewick, M.H.Abrams, Johanna Drucker, Jerome McGann, Audre Lorde, Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth Alexander, Espen Aarseth, Kandice Chuh, Paul DeMan, and others. Assignments will include regular blog posts, participation in workshops across the Graduate Center, an annotated bibliography, an oral presentation, and a final portfolio that collects the semester’s work with a self-evaluative and reflective introduction. 


MALS 70100 --  Narratives of New York: Literature and the Visual Arts
Mondays, 6:30 – 8:30 pm, Room 6495, 3 Credits, Prof. Gemma Sharpe (gsharpe@gradcenter.cuny.edu)

A “power city,” “world city,” even an “alpha city,” New York is at once a center of the world, the world in a city, and home to millions from elsewhere. This somewhat paradoxical narrative of New York has its own unique history that rests upon, among other things, patterns of national and international migration during the twentieth century and a shift of geopolitical power from Europe to North America after 1945. This course traces New York’s role in the development of an “internationalist” world order during the middle of the twentieth century, and via the institutions, artists, and writers that supported, intercepted, and challenged that process. Each seminar highlights a different institution or institutional case study—from the United Nations to the Rockefeller Foundation, and from the Museum of Modern Art and Andy Warhol’s Factory to Stonewall Inn. These case studies provide an anchor for a broader internationalist narrative of New York and varied sites of artistic, literary and cultural production. Along with artistic and literary narratives of New York, we will consider the archive as a site of narration. Students will have the opportunity to collect new and untold histories of New York through original archival research projects that we will evaluate both individually and as a group.  

 
MALS 70300  -- Foundations of Legal Thought: The Theory of Justice
Tuesdays, 4:15 - 6:15 pm, Room 5382, 3 Credits, Profs. Leslie Paik (LPAIK@CCNY.CUNY.EDU) and Julie Suk (jsuk@gc.cuny.edu)
Cross-listed with SOC 85000 and WSCP 81000

This course introduces students to the basic methods of legal and social science analysis/research to study law and the legal system. It focuses on specific substantive topics (e.g., access to justice and reform in the civil, criminal and juvenile justice systems). As part of the course, we will do site visits to justice institutions, policy agencies and innovative programs; we also would have speakers present their work and agencies’ missions during class. The goal of the course is to provide students with the legal knowledge and real-world encounters to support their pursuit of jobs and careers in justice reform, in government agencies, nonprofit organizations, and firms.

 
MALS 70500 -- Classical Culture--- CANCELLED
Thursdays, 6:30 – 8:30 pm, Room TBA, 3 Credits, Prof. Marie Marianetti (MARIE.MARIANETTI@lehman.cuny.edu)
 
The course will be a survey of selected pieces of ancient literature and legend that have subsequently influenced Western civilization.  The chosen literary works will be analyzed from an interdisciplinary perspective, combining literature, history, archaeology, religion, culture, politics and philosophy. Certain universal issues will be considered as they are conveyed through the literary genres. The class will concentrate upon a thorough examination and discussion of the following primary sources: The Epic of Gilgamesh, Hesiod's Theogony, Homer's Odyssey, Aeschylus' Oresteia, Sophocles' Oedipus Cycle (the Theban plays), Euripides' Iphigeneia in Aulis, Aristophanes' The Clouds, Plato's Apology and Symposium and Virgil's Aeneid.
 
 
MALS 70700 -- The Shaping of Modernity, 1789-1914
Tuesdays, 6:30 – 8:30 pm, Room 4422, 3 Credits, Prof. George Fragopoulos (GFragopoulos@qcc.cuny.edu)

This section of the Shaping of Modernity will begin with an examination of what historian Eric Hobsbawm has called the dual revolutions: the French revolution of 1789 and the English industrial revolution of the 1800s. Readings from thinkers such as Immanuel Kant, Karl Marx, Fredric Jameson, Peter Osborne, Lisa Lowe, to name a few, will help us lay the ground work for that most vexing of term, “modernity.” Finally, a good portion of the class will focus on how these dual revolutions, and others like them, have come to shape our relationship with the natural world, considering, for example, that there is no story of modernity that occludes humanity’s shifting and changing relations with the natural world over the last three-hundred years or so. As such, we will also be reading authors such as William Wordsworth, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Charles Darwin, Fredrick Douglass, and others in an attempt to better understand our current geological age, one that some have come to call the Anthropocene. 


MALS 71300 -- Special Topics in Fashion Studies: Empower, Sustain, Change, Repeat
Wednesdays, 6:30 – 8:30 pm, Room 5383, 3 Credits, Prof. Eugenia Paulicelli (epaulicelli@gmail.com)
Cross-listed with WSCP 81000

The course aims to critically understand global fashion as it bears on the environment, climate change and social justice. It aims at a deeper understanding of the relationship between craft and technology, at identifying the art of making and at mapping alternative modes of production.
 
The mechanization of the production of fashion has exploited and continues to exploit human beings through slavery, child labor, and prison labor. Human labor, especially women’s, is still an integral part of the supply chain and in the last few years, women, the driving force behind fashion, clothing and textile since classical antiquity, have come to the fore in disrupting the fashion industry in a variety of ways. They have also offered alternative modes of production and consumption based on new understandings of the process and the cost of labor. Through an exploration into rhythmanalysis and its philosophical underpinning (Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault, Gilles Deleuze, Henri Lefebvre) in fashion, craft, textile and material culture (Richard Sennett, Daniel Miller, Jane Schneider), the class will focus on temporality, geography and space,(David Harvey) climate change and how new modes of production are changing the landscape. The course will also focus on recent New York-based initiatives that highlight crafts and local traditions, through contact with organizations that work to integrate and requalify immigrant women. The class, as a further development of the Fabric of Cultures Project (http://fabricofcultures.qwriting.qc.cuny.edu) will include field trips, guest speakers and collaborative workshops with the founders of the Fashion in Process Lab from the Milan Politecnico.
 

MALS 71500 -- Critical Issues in International Studies
Tuesdays, 6:30 – 8:30 pm, Room 3307, 3 Credits, Prof. Peter Bratsis (pbratsis@bmcc.cuny.edu)

Critical Issues in International Studies, is designed to broaden the student’s perspectives and deepen their understanding of international studies. The course will examine the production of global political order and the multiple ways that political power shapes the relations and hierarchies within and between political communities. Topics will include imperialism, human rights and ‘just’ wars, political corruption, race and ethnicity, social reproduction, libidinal economies, and the transnationalization of classes and states. Readings will include works by Etienne Balibar, Nikolai Bukharin, Norbert Elias, Sylvia Federici, Cindi Katz, Antonio Negri, Nicos Poulantzas, Carl Schmitt, Bernard Stiegler, and Immanuel Wallerstein.
 

MALS 72000 -- Thesis Writing Course (Department Permission Required)
Wednesdays, 6:30 – 8:30 pm, Room 4419, 3 Credits, Prof. Christopher Schmidt (cschmidt@lagcc.cuny.edu)

The Thesis Writing Course offers support to students hoping to move forward with their thesis or capstone projects, no matter the stage of development—beginning, nearing completion, or anywhere in between. Successful writing depends on creating a regular structure of writing and reading. At the beginning of the course, we will discuss how to create healthy writings habits. Twice throughout the term, students will share excerpts from their thesis or capstone writing-in-progress for workshopping. Students will also write weekly feedback on other students’ submissions. Aside from student submissions, the reading load will be light to give us plenty of time to work on our own writing. Taken together, these practices will create a sense of community in the classroom and help us become more productive and happier writers. 

If you would like to sign up for the thesis writing course, permission of the department is required. To express your interest in taking this course, please fill in this form. This is a 3-credit course and it is not a substitute for MALS 79000.

 
MALS 72300 -- Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies
Mondays, 6:30 – 8:30 pm, Room 6494, 3 Credits, Prof. James Wilson (jwilson1@gc.cuny.edu)
Cross-listed with WSCP 81000
 
In Gender Outlaw: On Men, Women, and the Rest of Us Kate Bornstein writes, “The first question we usually ask new parents is: ‘Is it a boy or a girl?’” Bornstein recommends the response, “We don’t know; it hasn’t told us yet.” This course explores the ways in which gender and sexuality are pronounced, embodied, and negotiated within specific historical and cultural contexts. Through a close reading of interdisciplinary, foundational, and recent scholarship the class will examine and theorize the ways in which categories of gender and sexuality inform and shape our understanding of the world. Investigating the intersections and collisions of gender and sexuality with race, class, ability, nationality, ethnicity, and age, the class will consider societal and institutional systems of power, privilege, oppression, and marginalization. Course requirements include an oral presentation, two 4-6 page response papers, and a 15-20 page, staged researched essay.

 
MALS 72600 -- Social Impacts of Science and Technology: Case Studies--- CANCELLED
Wednesdays, 4:15 - 6:15 pm, Room TBA, 3 Credits, Prof. Jason Tougaw (jason.tougaw@qc.cuny.edu)

 
The neurodiversity movement—and neurological difference more generally—will be our case study for this section of “Social Impacts of Science and Technology.”
 

“It must be difficult . . . to imagine a totally different way of perceiving the world,” writes autism advocate Temple Grandin. Similarly, Kay Redfield Jamison writes of bipolar disorder, “I have become fundamentally and deeply skeptical that anyone who does not have this illness can truly understand it.” Nonetheless, writers like Grandin and Jamison write about neurological difference with the intention of reaching readers with a wide variety of brains and minds. During the last two decades, the neurodiversity movement has emerged as a social and political response to developments in psychology, neuroscience, and education. Neurodiversity demands multidisciplinary conversations—and the consideration of various genres. We’ll read influential early works about neurological difference by Oliver Sacks, Temple Grandin, and Leslie Jameson alongside NeuroTribes, science journalist’s Steve Silberman’s recent book on the emergence and future of the movement. We’ll read contemporary studies in neuroscience, manifestos, and policy proposals. We’ll watch episodes of Amethyst Schaber’s YouTube show Neurowonderful and DJ Savarese’s documentary film DEEJ. We’ll listen episodes of Shankar Vedantam’s podcast Hidden Brain. We’ll read first-person accounts of neurological difference, including Tito Rajarshi Mukhopadhyay’s How Can I Talk If My Lips Don’t Move: Inside My Autistic Mind, Ellen Forney’s Marbles, Siri Hustvedt’s The Shaking Woman; or a History of My Nerves, and Bassey Ikbi’s I’m Telling the Truth, But I’m Lying. Students will write in multiple genres, including critical and personal essays, blog posts, and reading responses. Those interested may also opt to compose in genres like the graphic narrative, podcast, or video.


MALS 72800 -- Topics in Environmental Social Science
Tuesdays, 2:00-4:00pm, Room 3212, 3 credits, Prof. Susan Saegert (SSaegert@gc.cuny.edu)
Cross-listed with PSYC 79102


MALS 73200 --  American Social Institutions
Thursdays, 4:15 – 6:15 pm, Room 5382, 3 Credits, Prof. David Humphries (DHUMPHRIES@QCC.CUNY.EDU)

In this course, we will examine how American Studies approaches social institutions and is in turned shaped by its own institutional settings. In order to present a broad range of questions, keywords, and topics for further inquiry, the course is organized around different units, each of which includes one or more prominent books as well as recent articles from American Quarterly and other contemporary journals that present a variety of methodologies and theoretical frameworks. We will begin by examining the relationship between nationalism and national borders, using Daniel Immerwahr’s recent book How to Hide an Empire: A History of the Greater United States as our starting point. Following Cornell West’s lead, we will read Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness as a means of reexamining other efforts to shed light on institutionalized racism and promote racial justice. Following a similar approach, we will revisit Michael Harrington’s classic The Other America: Poverty in the United States as a way of reading J.D. Vance’s Hillbilly Elegy, responses to it, and the continued media interest in “middle America” and those “left behind” following the 2016 elections. We will then consider how genre and questions of form often can be seen as being grounded in social institutions. After reviewing how popular musical genres grew out of conceptions of race and geography and considering how recent artists like k.d. lang, Janelle Monáe, and Lil Nas X have reimagined these genres through their music and performances, we will turn our attention to two spy novels by Asian American writers, Chang-rae Lee’s Native Speaker and Leonard Chang’s Over the Shoulder. Finally, we will look at how universities function as social institutions in relation to other cultural and economic trends, using John Marx and Mark Garrett Cooper’s Media U: How the Need to Win Audiences Has Shaped Higher Education and Tressie McMillan Cottom’s Lower Ed: The Troubling Rise of For-Profit Colleges in the New Economy. Writing for the course will take place throughout the term in a workshop setting and will include a book review, a conference proposal, an annotated bibliography, and a final paper and reflection piece; students more advanced in their research will have the opportunity to structure their writing in ways that contribute to their work on their thesis.


MALS 73500 -- Africana Studies: Global Perspectives Refugees and Forced Migration
Mondays, 4:15-6:15 pm, Room 6114, 3 credits, Prof. Juan Battle (JBattle@gc.cuny.edu)
Cross-listed with SOC 82800
 
Over the past decade, the global population of forcibly displaced people – as a result of persecution, conflict, violence, or human rights violations – grew substantially from 43.3 million in 2009 to 70.8 million in 2018, reaching a record high. This course is designed to give students an understanding of the major causes of contemporary migration and population displacement. Global, regional, and national processes contributing to and driving refugee and migration flows will be examined. Students will consider a range of critical issues and factors contributing to displacement, particularly under conditions of poverty, uneven development, competition for resources, political instability, weak governance, violence, environmental degradation, and natural disasters. International challenges including human rights, human trafficking, citizenship, and statelessness will be addressed as well.


MALS 73800 --  Internship Course
3 credits, Prof. Elizabeth Macaulay (Emacaulay@gc.cuny.edu
Whether you're seeking your first job or trying to explore a career change, internships can be a valuable way to gain experience and make career decisions. Internships enable students to earn credits while gaining valuable academic and/or professional experience. These internships provide you with the opportunity to apply what you’ve learned in class in the working environment. They also help to build your professional network, and to expand your skill sets. Students can set up an appointment with the Office of Career Planning and Professional Development for guidance.


MALS students who wish to participate in an internship for credit must enroll in course MALS 73800. This course is run as an independent study course with Professor Macaulay.

  • Students must apply for the internship the semester prior to enrolling.

  • The deadline for students to apply for the internship course is November 15 at 5PM for the Spring semester or May 15 at 5 PM for the Fall semester. If you miss this deadline please email Professor Macaulay.

  • Students must submit the proposal form, and a formal letter or email of an internship offer from the proposed employer.

  • The entire application must be submitted via email to liberalstudies@gc.cuny.edu. The proposals will then be reviewed by the department.

  • Candidates will be informed about the outcome of their application in a timely fashion. Successful applicants will then be permitted to enroll in the course, once the proper paperwork is completed and filed. 

  • A minimum of 140 hours of the internship must be completed within the semester that the student enrolls (i.e. if the student enrolls in the internship course during Spring, the internship must be completed during the semester). 

  • The internship must be unpaid.

  • The student must attend all classes (either in person or online, if the course runs as a hybrid course), and complete all assignments required for the course. 


 
MALS 74400 -- Special Topics in Archeology: Alexander to Mohammed
Wednesdays, 4:15 - 6:15 pm, Room 6494, 3 Credits, Prof. Anna Akasoy (aakasoy@gc.cuny.edu)
Cross-listed with MES 73500
 
Classical Greek culture is often seen as an exclusively Western European heritage, its legacy as one of the West’s defining features. This course, taught in English translation, offers an introduction to the profound impact of Greek civilization in the Middle East and Asia and the cultural, political and economic dynamics behind this development, focusing on Alexander the Great as a historical figure and as a legend. We will begin with the conquests of Alexander the Great and his successor states and explore Hellenistic settlements in Central Asia and the Graeco-Buddhist art of Gandhara as an early example. We will then focus on examples from the medieval Middle East such as Greek art in the Umayyad ‘desert castles’, the translation of Greek philosophy and science into Arabic and subsequent developments in both areas, the Alexander legend in the Qur’an and in Arabic and Persian biographies. Primary sources include visual as well as textual material. Recurrent themes in the scholarship we will be discussing include connected history, global or hemispheric history, cultural exchanges and encounters, the transmission of knowledge, and issues of cultural heritage. One of the aims of this class is to explore possibilities for alternative narratives beyond the binaries of East and West.


MALS 74700 -- Topics in Material History: Reading Folklore in the Early Modern World
Tuesdays, 4:15 – 6:15 pm, Room 6421, 3 Credits, Prof. Sarah Covington (sarah.covington@QC.cuny.edu)
 
Folklore has traditionally been viewed as quaint and supplementary material illustrating “hidden” voices of “the people.” This seminar will question if not overturn virtually all of the previous statement, including the use of “folklore” as a term. Folklore, or more properly, vernacular expressions and practices, emerged wherever there existed a social group, of whatever status, which expressed its shared identity by calling on past traditions. It could also enter the most elite literature, move back and forth between oral culture and text, or be entirely invented as “fakelore.” This seminar will explore these enormously fertile vernacular worlds, including the often-overlooked discipline of folkloristics, which offers historians and literary scholars new insights and methodologies into reading pre-modern texts or interpreting often opaque stories from the deeper past. Extending across Europe and the Atlantic World (including colonial North America and the Americas more generally), from the late medieval period through the eighteenth century, we will study stories and the verbal arts (including jokes and ballads), material culture and landscape, rituals and performance; we will also learn to recognize the motifs and narrative structures of tales, their contribution to the formation of group identities, and their connection to larger political, economic, social and religious contexts across time. In addition to extensive readings on this material and classic and current works of folkloristics, students will be expected to write a substantial research paper that ideally feeds into their own dissertation or thesis/capstone topics, providing possible new sources and perspectives on their work and fields of study. 
 
 
MALS 77100 --  Aesthetics of Film: Narrative Theory Goes to the Movies
Wednesdays, 4:15 - 8:15 pm, Room 3416, 3 Credits, Prof. Jerry Carlson (jwc3467@gmail.com)
Cross-listed with FSCP 8100

The movies – that is, narrative feature films – have always been recognized as a powerful medium for storytelling. Indeed, a century of censorship attests to the fears provoked by film’s seductive spell. FSCP 81000 will explore how that spell is created by the many strategies and tactics of storytelling, some shared with other media, others unique to cinema. To do so, we will engage with the history of narrative theory (or, narratology, as Tzvetan Todorov coined it in 1969). What explanatory powers do different theories offer? Our survey will move from Aristotle’s foundational Poetics to pre-cinematic theories of fiction (for example, Henry James), from the Russian Formalists to French high theory (Barthes, Genette, et al.), and from Neo-Formalist explanations (Bordwell) to ideologically positioned interventions from Marxism, psychoanalysis, queer theory or other approaches. We will put each theory in conversation with a pertinent feature film. The range of screenings will be global and diverse in narrative forms. Filmmakers may include, among others, Buster Keaton, Howard Hawks, Orson Welles, Alfred Hitchcock, Agnes Varda, Alain Resnais, Nicolas Roeg, Raul Ruiz, Chantal Akerman, Wong Kar-wai, and Tomas Gutierrez Alea. A number of questions will recur as we explore different theories. What is plot? How can the effects of plotting be explained? What are the options for cinematic narration? What is in common with other media? What is medium specific? How can narratology explain the nature of cinematic authorship? How does cinema create characters? How can it place them in social context or explore their subjectivity as they journey through the plot. The precision of our answers will help explain the spell of the movies in their social, cultural, historical, and emotional impact.
 
 
MALS 77200 -- History of the Cinema I, 1895-1930---CANCELLED
Tuesdays, 4:15 – 8:15 pm, Room 6495, 3 Credits, Prof. Leah Anderst (landerst@qcc.cuny.edu)
Cross-listed with FSCP 81000
 
History of Cinema I is an intensive examination of film history before 1930 that introduces students to international silent cinema, to the scholarly literature on early cinema, and to the practices of researching and writing film history. Subjects covered will include the emergence of cinema, the cinema of attractions, the narrativization of cinema, theater and early film, sound, color, and the “silent” image, the industrialization of film production, national cinemas of the 1910s, the Hollywood mode of filmmaking, women and African-American filmmakers, and film movements of the 1920s. Students will study the work of such filmmakers as Lumière, Méliès, Porter, Paul, Bauer, Christensen, Feuillade, Weber, Micheaux, Murnau, Dulac, Eisenstein, and others while considering the ways that silent films were exhibited and received in diverse contexts.


MALS 78200 -- The Politics of Contemporary Urban Education
Wednesdays, 6:30 – 8:30 pm, Room 5382, 3 Credits, Prof. Molly Makris (Molly.Makris@guttman.cuny.edu)

This course provides an overview of major issues and controversies in the politics of urban education. Through a historical, sociological, and political analysis of educational issues, the course explores a variety of policy initiatives and reforms, including the areas of desegregation, curriculum, standardized testing, school choice, and privatization. Students will develop a deep understanding of the ways in which urban political realities impact experiences within schools.

 
MALS 78900 -- Childhood and Youth Studies: Approaches and Methods
Thursdays, 4:15 - 6:15 pm, Room 3308, 3 Credits, Prof. Colette Daiute (CDaiute@gc.cuny.eduhttps://colettedaiute.org)

This course in Childhood and Youth Studies involves in-depth focus on the interaction of problem, theory and method, with sustained attention to the ways in which researchers frame their investigations, develop research questions, design, implement, and report findings. Students engage with the history and contemporary study of children, childhood and adolescence as defined and supported in organizations and other collectives of human cultural development (education, family, social welfare, community organizations, children’s rights projects, museums), public media (broadcast, digital media), and research settings.  The course encompasses sociocultural approaches to childhood/youth in field-based settings with young people growing up amidst contemporary challenges to human thriving, normative circumstances, and in relation to educational opportunities, community interventions, and policies. Methods addressed in this survey course, include ethnography/participant observation, activity-meaning system design, narrative analysis, conversation analysis, archival studies, surveys, and participatory-action research. The course is, in brief, an inductive approach to research methods, which we study in the context of exemplary contemporary research. Course activities involve reading research articles, discussing the articles with a focus on method, applying practices and insights to students’ research interests, and writing scholarly essays.
 

MALS 78500 --  Economics for Everyone
Tuesdays, 6:30 – 8:30 pm, Room 3212, 3 Credits, Prof. Miles Corak (mcorak@gc.cuny.edu)
 
This may, or it may not be, your first economics course, but it can reasonably be your last. “Economics for Everyone” is specially designed to meet the needs of students in all disciplines who may have had only limited exposure to economics. You will learn the fundamental vocabulary and grammar of a subject central to many public policy debates—the big issues ranging from globalization to climate change, from inequality to unemployment—but also the smaller concerns central to everyday life, like why does my cappuccino cost so much? Upon completion you will have the skills and knowledge to be a more informed and engaged citizen.
Our study of the subject moves through three themes. The first examines the method and scope of economics, introducing some fundamental principles, and by appealing to some important historical examples illustrates how the definition and methods of the subject have evolved. The second focuses on the “theory of value,” the micro-economics of perfectly competitive markets to illustrate the efficiency of markets and how economists think about the role of public policy when markets “fail.” The third theme introduces national income accounting and macroeconomics, the revolution in thinking in the aftermath of the Great Depression of the 1930s, and how this remains useful in understanding the Great Recession of the last decade. Syllabus
 

MALS 78500 --  Introduction to Engaged Teaching for Transformative Learning in the Humanities and Social Sciences
Thursdays, 2:00 – 4:00 pm, Room 3309, 3 Credits, Profs. Cathy Davidson (cdavidson@gc.cuny.edu) and Eduardo Vianna (evianna@lagcc.cuny.edu)
Cross-listed with IDS 81670

What does it mean to “introduce” a student to a field? This course is intended for any graduate student in the humanities or social sciences who is thinking seriously about the deepest “why” and “how” questions about their discipline and how those apply to their own research and teaching. We will begin with theoretical questions about disciplines, fields, foundations, pedagogy, research, aesthetics, and institutional structures alongside issues of equity, diversity, inclusion, social justice, engagement, and transformation. In each class and in final projects, we will encourage students to transform critique into engaged practice. Students will work collaboratively on analyzing and then designing: (1) a standard anthology or textbook in their field; (2) key articles or critical texts in their field; (3) standard syllabi of introductory or “core” courses in their field; (4) keywords in their field. Students will leave the course with a deeper understanding of the assumptions of their field and new methods for transformative learning that support diversity, inclusion, and a more equitable form of higher education. Our aim is to work toward “research with a transformative activist agenda” and teaching and mentoring as a “collaborative learning community project” that, in the end, contributes to education as a public good and a more just and equitable society.


MALS 78500 -- Critical University Studies
Mondays, 4:15 – 6:15 pm, Room 3212, 3 credits, Prof. Stephen Brier (Sbrier@gc.cuny.edu)
Cross-listed with UED 71200
 
This seminar on Critical University Studies (CUS), offered in the Urban Education program and cross-listed in MALS, will explore the role of higher education, especially public universities, at the intersection of issues of race, class, gender, culture, political economy, and politics, with a particular emphasis on the City University of New York. CUS is a relatively new field of interdisciplinary inquiry, drawing theoretical inspiration from the fields of Cultural Studies and Critical Legal Studies. It focuses on the critical examination of the institutional structures, ideologies, histories, and changing curricular forms and methods of scholarly inquiry and teaching in higher education institutions in the United States and beyond. It analyzes the neoliberal attacks over the past four decades on public universities by politicians and business interests and the oppositional responses of college faculty and staff as well as undergraduate and graduate students and the larger communities they serve to the savage funding cuts and ideological and intellectual critiques faced by public higher education systems around the country. We will read deeply in recent and landmark literature on CUS and seminar members will conduct scholarly research and writing on relevant CUS topics or areas of interest in public higher education, with a special emphasis on the historical development and contemporary situation of the City University of New York.
The seminar will:

  • explore the history of public university systems (especially, though not exclusively, CUNY);

  •  analyze recent and current efforts to transform public higher education institutions and systems across the country.

  • hypothesize about where the public university is headed in the coming decades in the midst of austerity and neoliberal politics and policies as well the unrelenting impact of new technologies and the rise of contingent forms of academic labor.

We will read both classic and contemporary studies of public universities, explore available physical and digital university archives (including the CUNY Digital History Archive [CDHA] currently being developed at the Graduate Center), and undertake new research and scholarly and public publication projects on CUS. Graduate student participants will be expected over the course of the semester to conceive and launch individual and/or collaborative research and publication projects in CUS, with a special focus on CUNY.
The seminar is open to all GC PhD students in social science and humanities disciplines, as well as MALS and other Master’s students interested in exploring the changing nature and role of public higher education in contemporary society. The course is taught by Professor Stephen Brier, faculty member in the PhD program in Urban Education and in the MALS and M.A. in Digital Humanities programs and the certificate programs in Interactive Technology and Pedagogy and American Studies. Brier recently co-authored (with Michael Fabricant) a CUS-themed book, Austerity Blues: Fighting for the Soul of Public Higher Education (Johns Hopkins Univ. Press, 2016). The seminar sessions will include presentations by several GC and outside presenters active in the CUS field.

We will make full use of the digital affordances of the CUNY Academic Commons to extend the reach of the seminar, including developing our own public-facing blog on CUS- and CUNY-related issues (similar to the “Remaking the University” blog developed by faculty in the University of California system, which everyone in the seminar should subscribe to and read).
The course focuses on a series of key questions that have roiled American society over the last century and a half (and especially since the end of World War II) about the nature and meaning of public education:

  • What is the purpose/role of public higher education in a democratic society?

  • Is the role of public higher education solely practical (i.e., job training to assure national economic progress and individual social mobility)?

  • Or is the role of education broadly political and/or ideological (educating students for their role in a democracy and teaching them how to be critical thinkers vs. providing students with tools to help them become productive members of and advanced capitalist society)?

  • How should those who work and learn in institutions of higher education respond to efforts to transform the mission of the public university in the face of increasing uses of technology and contingent labor?



MALS 78500 -- Key Concepts in the Western Tradition
Mondays, 4:15 – 6:15 pm, Room 3308, 3 credits, Prof. Helena Rosenblatt (Hrosenblatt@gc.cuny.edu)
Cross-listed with HIST 72100
 
In recent decades there has been a new development in the academic study of political and social thought. Much attention is now being paid to “key concepts” and their historicity. The so-called “linguistic turn” has played an important role in this process.
 
By “key concepts” we mean the big ideas and indispensable terms without which it would be virtually impossible to engage in any meaningful political discussion. We use such concepts daily to make sense of our world and communicate with others. And yet, as scholars today are increasingly realizing, the meanings of these concepts are not static or timeless. They are constantly evolving and being contested. Key concepts can be seen as tools and weapons wielded at specific times for specific political purposes.
  
In this course we will examine the meaning and evolution of a number of key concepts essential to our current vocabulary, among which “democracy”, “populism” and “liberalism,” as well as “happiness,” “fear,” “genius” and “woman”. We will consider questions such as the following: What did “democracy” mean to the ancient Greeks and what does it mean to us today? How does our notion of “genius” compare to that of the Renaissance? When and why was the word “liberalism” coined and how has its meaning changed over time? Has our understanding of “woman” remained the same across the centuries?

Please note that this schedule is subject to change.

In some cases, MALS core courses will be cross-listed with other programs. Students who would like to have these courses satisfy the core course requirement for their chosen concentration must register for the MALS course number. Please keep this in mind as you register.


 

  Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
11:45 

1:45

 

MALS 70400 - Suk, Julie and McDougall, Sara
Rm C415A

     
4:15 

6:15

 
MALS 70600 - Rosenblatt, Helena
Rm 3207

MALS 73400 - Battle, Juan
Rm 3309

 
MALS 70200 - Garland, Libby
Rm 3207


MALS 78500 - Grier, Miles
Rm 3212



 

MALS 78500 - Saegert, Susan
Rm 8202


MALS 78500 - Hart, Roger
Rm 5383
MALS 70000 - Chopra, Samir
Rm 5383

MALS 70800 - Miller, Karen and Morrell, Andrea
Rm 3309

MALS 72700 - Imamichi, Tomo
Rm 4419
4:15 

8:15

 
  MALS 78500 - Alsop, Elizabeth
Rm C415A
 
  MALS 78500 - Dolan, Marc (4:15-7:15 PM)
Rm 3416
 
6:30 

8:30

 
MALS 70000 - Zarour Zarzar, Victor
Rm 3309

MALS 71400 - Hattori, Tomohisa
Rm 4419

MALS 78400 - Tovar, Patricia
Rm 6495
MALS 70000 - Grasso, Linda
Rm 5383

MALS 72000 - Eversley, Shelly
Rm 3309

MALS 72200 - Halley, Jean
Rm 3207

MALS 73100 - Rogers-Cooper, Justin
Rm 4419
 
MALS 72500 -Kavey, Allison
Rm 4419

MALS 74500 - Macaulay, Elizabeth
Rm 3207

MALS 78100 - Forbes, David
Rm 3309
MALS 71200 - Wissinger, Elizabeth
Rm 5382

MALS 78800 - Hintz, Carrie
Rm 4419
 

 

 

FALL 2019 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


MALS 70000 – Seminar in Interdisciplinary Studies
This course presents interdisciplinary method as a tool for academic study. It is a topics class. This means that each faculty who teaches the course will choose a subject of study related to their own research and design a syllabus that explores that topic through a range of disciplinary and interdisciplinary lenses. The class is designed to help students understand both disciplinary and interdisciplinary research, academic writing, and methodology. It is also designed to support students as they develop their own interdisciplinary research strategies and hone their written, oral, and analytic skills. Students will write frequently in this class. They will also be encouraged to begin thinking about their culminating thesis/capstone projects. One or more visiting faculty may be invited to speak about their research, writing, and methodology.  


SECTION 1 of MALS 70000 – Seminar in Interdisciplinary Studies
Decoding Celebrity: Georgia O’Keeffe as Case Study
Tuesday, 6:30-8:30 PM, Room 5383, 3 Credits, Prof. Linda Grasso (lgrasso@york.cuny.edu)


What is celebrity? How is it achieved? What purposes does it serve? In this course, we explore these questions using twentieth-century painter Georgia O’Keeffe as a focal point. Reading cultural criticism, art history, autobiography, and popular culture biography, we consider the ways in which O’Keeffe’s celebrity enables an understanding of larger issues such as how celebrities are commodified and consumed by a variety of constituencies for a multitude of reasons. Viewing works of art, photographs, advertisements, documentaries, and You Tube videos, we also consider the complex ways in which celebrity images are created and circulated in multiple public domains. Conducted as a research seminar, the course requires students to study texts intensively, design and execute a research project, and share findings with peers.
 
SECTION 2 of MALS 70000 – Seminar in Interdisciplinary Studies
Law and Literature
Thursday, 4:15-6:15 PM, Room 5383, 3 credits, Prof. Samir Chopra (schopra@brooklyn.cuny.edu)


This course will provide students with an introduction to interdisciplinary research by examining the relationship between law and literature via an investigation of the following related questions about law as literature and literature about law: When are literary texts and writings considered literary? What makes legal texts literature? How do great literary works conceive of law? What kind of writing is legal rhetoric? What moral, ethical, and political issues are present in great works of literature that are about the law? 
Students will be asked to read literary works like novels, plays, and short stories as well as legal texts such as opinions and briefs. They will write weekly responses to the assigned reading as well as a final term paper. 
 
SECTION 3 of MALS 70000 – Seminar in Interdisciplinary Studies
Borders, 2019
Monday, 6:30-8:30 PM, Room 3309, 3 credits, Prof. Victor Zarour Zarzar (vzarourzarzar@gradcenter.cuny.edu)


In 2016, The Washington Post reported that work had started on more new barriers around the world in the previous year than at any other point in modern history. How to reconcile the openness commonly ascribed to a globalizing world with the recent increase of barriers demarcating nation-states? How do borders contribute to a sense of nation-building while being, as Wendy Brown has pointed out, a “monstrous tribute to the waning viability of sovereign nation-states”?


Drawing on readings from a broad range of fields—from political theory, anthropology, and urban planning to philosophy, literature, and the visual arts—this course will critically examine the concept of border, paying particular attention to forms of material and immaterial bordering and the marginal identities that these produce.
After examining the current proliferation of physical barriers, we will proceed to investigate border cultures and identities. We will reflect on ways in which the imago of intact sovereignty can be transposed into the fantasy of an impenetrable body, discussing how writers like Kristeva and Ferrante engage with the body’s porosity. Moreover, we will consider how the implementation of rigid boundaries is contested by the existence of marginal identities—racial, ethnic, and social. How are borders intended to produce the bounds of acceptability, thus rendering marginal bodies as unacceptable, as beyond the pale?


Some authors we will consider include Wendy Brown, Gloria Anzaldúa, Elena Ferrante, Stephen Graham, Carolyn Heilbrun, Kapka Kassabova, Yuri Herrera, Julia Kristeva, Eyal Weizman, Ai Wei Wei, Ali Abbasi, and Assia Djebar. This course is structured to develop the capacity to engage in disciplinary and interdisciplinary research about a specific subject. Students will be asked to produce a range of different kinds of academic writing and forms of communication. These will include frequent response papers, at least one review essay, and either an annotated bibliography or a prospectus. Students will write a final research paper.
 
MALS 70200 -- Metropolis: A Political, Historical, and Sociological Profile of New York
Tuesday, 4:15-6:15 PM, Room 3207, 3 credits, Prof. Libby Garland (Libby.Garland@kbcc.cuny.edu)


This interdisciplinary course will explore New York City’s rise and role as the nation’s metropolis, examining several key themes in the city’s development. The course draws together a collection of noteworthy perspectives on the city’s past and present that open up some larger questions. For example, which people and forces have defined and shaped New York City? How, in turn, has the city itself shaped the social, spatial and cultural worlds of its inhabitants? How has New York been a site of political and economic struggle, and how have such struggles played out differently across different times and spaces? Where is the city headed, and what, if anything, do we want to do or say about that? Students will explore such questions by engaging with the work of historians, sociologists, geographers, and others. Through close reading, discussion, presentations, weekly writing and a longer research project, students will hone the skills, knowledge and critical approaches that will help them to succeed in their interdisciplinary graduate studies.
 
MALS 70300 --Foundations of Legal Thought---CLASS CANCELED
Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 PM, 3 credits, Prof. Miryam Segal (miryam.segal@yale.edu)


The foundations in the course’s name are distinctly American, shaped by USian history and politics, its past as a British colony and as a world “superpower,” as well as by the pedagogic theories and goals of legal education particular to this country.
 

This is a course on ways of thinking about the law and the sequence of productive critiques of those ways of thinking that in turn generated new schools of thought over the course of the long American 20th century. All this with the goals of revisiting/renewing critique and salvaging parts. As the names indicate, the modes, schools and movements we will study are not the sole invention of legal thought, but parallel and derive from thinking in other fields: Formalism and the Case Method, Realism, Pragmatism, New Formalism, Law and Society, Critical Legal Studies, Feminist Theory, Critical Race Theory, and Social Scientific inquiries into the nature and function of law.
 

Nevertheless, our goals will necessarily involve some temporary blindering, as we try to understand the critiques that seemed to grow organically from one mode of legal thought and that encouraged new ways of thinking, and our own 21st century appreciation of the shortcomings of each of these modes and the value and utility we can yet find in them.
 

Since the academic and judicial discourses overrun each other, we will bring the more scholarly writings in the syllabus into closer contact with the law by supplementing our readings with a sampling from case law (i.e. an emphasis on judge-made law, with passing attention to statute), all the while attending to the exigencies of legal education. Although we will touch on contracts, criminal law, constitutional law and property law, the organizing principle of the course is neither these public law v. private law divides nor other typical divisions of pedagogy and/or practice, but the essential descriptive and prescriptive questions around which the movements of the late 19th and 20th centuries may be productively organized. What is the law? A form to be applied according to pre-determined rules? Or what we make of a set of rules in the the name of justice—efficiency—liberty—social progress?  
 
MALS 70400 -- Interdisciplinary Topics in Law: Mothers in Law
Monday, 11:45 AM -1:45 PM, Room C415A, 3 credits, Profs. Julie Suk and Sara McDougall (jsuk@gc.cuny.edu) (smcdougall@jjay.cuny.edu)


This course will introduce students to central issues in the history and sociology of law, through the study of motherhood.  The lens of motherhood will open up broader themes in the study of law and society, including categories such as gender, constitutionalism, and criminal justice. Studying the socio-legal history of motherhood will enable students to learn the skills of legal reasoning, utilize methods of legal-historical research, and pursue experiential learning through field studies, panel discussions open to the public, and the authoring of publicly available teaching materials on select topics.


First, we will explore how ideas of women as mothers have been enshrined in law, from the legal definition of the mother in civil law, to the legal treatment of pregnancy.


Second, this course will study women as lawmakers, as "founding mothers" of twentieth-century constitutions, and laws more generally.  We will explore biographies of women lawyers and lawmakers.


Third, we will consider mothers as law-breakers, by engaging the history of mothers in prison, and the current legal issues arising from incarceration of mothers.  This component of the course may include field trips to engage the criminal justice system.
 
MALS 70600 -- Enlightenment and Critique
Monday, 4:15-6:15 PM, Room 3207, 3 credits, Prof. Helena Rosenblatt (hrosenblatt@gc.cuny.edu)


The Eighteenth Century Enlightenment is widely seen as a transformative moment in Western culture, one with radical consequences for almost all aspects of Western modern thought. But recent scholarship has also exposed the sexism, racism and imperialism of Enlightenment thought. This course will explore how eighteenth century thinkers perceived of the world outside of Europe. We will consider if the very notion of an “Enlightenment” is Euro-centric and, at best, condescending idea, of little use today and that should perhaps be discarded. We will consider whether regions outside of Europe experienced an Enlightenment too—and, if so, was it different from that of Europe’s? Finally, was there a cross-fertilization between European “enlightened” ideas and those from other countries beyond? With the help of both primary and secondary sources, we will investigate the Enlightenment from a global perspective.
 
MALS 70800 -- Transformations of Modernity, 1914-present
Thursday, 4:15-6:15 PM, Room 3309, 3 credits, Profs. Karen Miller and Andrea Morrell (kamiller@lagcc.cuny.edu) (andrea.morrell@guttman.cuny.edu)


This class will put colonial relations of power at the center of our study, exploring how claims about modernity have been used to both amplify and challenge inequalities on both intimate and global scales. It will interrogate the widely held assumption that “modernity” is linked to liberty, freedom, and state-protected equality. Instead, it will examine the multiple, contested, and conflicting meanings that people have used to understand the concept of modernity from the early 20th century into the present. How, we will ask, have various people used the moniker “modern” and to what end? How have modernity’s opposites – primitivity / backwardness / tradition – also been used to characterize spaces, people, institutions, states, “cultures,” geographies, technologies, etc.? In other words, we will explore the incredibly mixed set of foundations and legacies that shape the notion of modernity, as well as a range of responses from a range of different positions to its contradictory sensibilities. This class is interdisciplinary and will examine these questions through a range of texts, disciplines, and methodologies.
 
MALS 71200 – The Culture of Fashion
Thursday, 6:30-8:30 PM, Room 5382, 3 credits, Prof. Elizabeth Wissinger (betsywissinger@gmail.com)


From labor politics, raced and gendered power struggles, the quest for selfhood, and urgent issues of globalization and sustainability, fashion is a major cultural force that shapes our contemporary world. At the same time, fashion’s history and aesthetics provide a fascinating cultural backdrop within which to examine issues of power, nation building, technology, and meaning making, especially in terms of the impact of modernity on concepts of self, body, and agency within the complex relations of symbols and exchange that make up the fashion system.


Starting with a thorough grounding in theories informing a conceptual approach to fashion and culture, we will explore the politics, technologies, and aesthetics of the fashion system and its histories, by closely reading foundational texts, case studies, and cultural analyses that engage fashion’s ever-changing landscape, especially as it inflects and is inflected by race, class, gender, and power. The course will explore attitudes toward the body as they vary by historical period, especially in terms preoccupations with different body zones within fashion’s evolution. We will also consider the technologies of fashion, working through innovation’s impact on fashion’s design and making, from the use of ground up beetles to produce the rarest of reds, through to new developments in biodesign, which employ sea kelp to make fibers woven into clothes, or incorporate living organisms into the clothing’s design.


The course will draw on writings from cultural studies, fashion studies, sociology, feminism, critical theory, media studies and communication scholarship. We will welcome guest speakers, and view and analyze media pertaining to the issues at hand. Off campus site visits will be part of the course. The course will cover the works of Roland Barthes, Walter Benjamin, Thorsten Veblen, Pierre Bourdieu, Georg Simmel, Dick Hebdige, Caroline Evans, Anne Hollander, Judith Butler, and Deleuze, among others.
 
MALS 71400 -- Introduction to International Studies
Monday, 6:30-8:30 PM, Room 4419 , 3 credits, Prof. Tomohisa Hattori (TOMOHISA.HATTORI@lehman.cuny.edu)


The two main purposes of this course are to introduce you to theoretically informed historical analyses of international relations (IR) and to help you apply one of the theories of IR to an international subject of your choice.  While the historical contexts and theories of IR will help you engage in further studies in IR, your paper will enhance your understanding of how you may gain social scientific knowledge by reviewing relevant theoretical literature, conceptualizing your subject matter, developing research questions, figuring out how to answer them, gathering information about them, organizing the research result as evidence for your answer to the research question, and developing your answer as a causal argument about a particular phenomenon or relationship on the chosen topic in the context of existing theoretical arguments.
 
MALS 72000 – Thesis Writing Course
Tuesday, 6:30-8:30 PM, Room 3309, 3 credits, Prof. Shelly Eversley (shelly.eversley@baruch.cuny.edu)


If you would like to sign up for the thesis writing course, permission of the department is required. To express your interest in taking this course, please fill in this form.  This course is being offered in both Summer 2019 and Fall 2019. Please sign up for the appropriate section. This course was oversubscribed in Spring 2019 and so if you are interested in registering for it, please fill out the form at your earliest convenience. This is a 3-credit course and it is not a substitute for MALS 79000.
MALS 72000, Thesis Writing Course, is designed to provide students with the time, space, and tools necessary for thesis and capstone writing projects.  It is designed to help graduate students develop a practice of regular writing, reading, and researching in order to make the process of completing the thesis/capstone project efficient and enjoyable.  Writing is an important feature of a community of scholars.  As members of that community, we will respectfully and rigorously engage each others’ works-in-progress. Course participants will share their writing twice during the course of the semester, and they will provide readers’ reports for other members’ drafts.  This kind of engagement—reading and writing—is a critical aspect of our scholarly work.
 
MALS 72200 -- Contemporary Feminist Theories
Tuesday, 6:30-8:30 PM, Room 3207, 3 credits, Prof. Jean Halley (jeanomalleyhalley@gmail.com)


This course explores Contemporary Feminist Theories through feminist work about “bodies with gender,” and about what it means to “have” gender and to “be female” with a focus on the United States. Making use of the frame offered by Patricia Ticineto Clough’s book, Feminist Thought, we consider contemporary feminist theories on differences and similarities in the experiences of women and other gendered bodies across lines of class, race and sexuality. We examine how gender defines human experiences and how feminists resist these definitions. Sigmund Freud once called work and love the central arenas of human life. We examine contemporary feminist theories on what it means to have gender in love and to be gendered at work, along with an examination of the representation of women and gender in the larger culture, and of violence in the lives of gendered bodies particularly those gendered female. We make use of a variety of texts in exploring feminist thinking on the “nature” of gender, love and sexuality, so-called women’s work, the expectations “experts” have of diversely gendered bodies, and the representation of gender in the mass media.
 
MALS 72500 -- Narratives of Science and Technology: Literature and the Visual Arts
Wednesday, 6:30-8:30 PM, Room 4419, 3 credits, Prof. Allison Kavey (akavey@jjay.cuny.edu)


Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein has been a rich source of scholarly and artistic work addressing questions in bioethics, the history of science and medicine, and the medical humanities. This course will start with the novel and work outward, engaging both scholarly and artistic offshoots of the Frankenstein family tree.
 
MALS 72700 -- The Political Ecology of Social and Environmental Justice
Thursday, 4:15-6:15 PM, Room 4419, 3 credits, Prof. Tomo Imamichi (imamichi@gmail.com)


This course is an introduction to Environmental Social Science and surveys a range of disciplines that comprise the field and addresses the relationships between people and their physical environments. The course will focus on how the relationships between people and their physical environments impact health and well-being, social and environmental justice, and sustainability.  
 
MALS 73100 -- American Culture and Values
Tuesday, 6:30-8:30 PM, Room 4419, 3 credits, Prof. Justin Rogers-Cooper (justinrogerscooper@gmail.com)


The History, Method, & Praxis of American Studies: Digital Edition. Russ Castronovo and Susan Gillman begin the introduction to their collection States of Emergency: The Object of American Studies (2009), with two deceptively straightforward questions: “What does ‘American studies’ study, and what does it want?” The answers aren’t straightforward. The field is an anomaly in the academy, residing somewhere between (or perhaps outside) normative disciplinary boundaries. One goal of our course thus will be to consider the histories, theories, and practices of American studies as an academic discipline. In addition, we’ll look at a range of texts that represent some of major transnational “studies” that form the network of fields within American Studies: Asian American studies (Lisa Lowe), critical race and ethnic studies (Angela Davis), gender studies (Lauren Berlant), black diasporic and Africana studies (LaRose Parris), queer of color feminism (Roderick Ferguson), and black Marxism (C.L.R. James). We’ll also read from the “Keywords” in American Cultural Studies project from New York University Press. To practice “doing” American studies, our class will collaborate on an open-source digital project using the Manifold publishing platform developed by the University of Minnesota and the CUNY Graduate Center. We’ll create a dynamic, media-rich digital edition of Hubert Harrison’s sadly neglected The Negro and the Nation (1917), and over the semester we’ll customize a publicly accessible digital textbook with media, citations, questions, and annotations developed from our class readings and discussions. Students will also compose three writing assignments that practice American Studies methods: an event review, a new keyword, and a mock-abstract for an academic conference.  
 
MALS 73400 -- Africana Studies: Introduction
Black America
Monday, 4:15-6:15 PM, Room 3309, 3 credits, Prof. Juan Battle (jbattle@gc.cuny.edu)


“One ever feels his two-ness – an American, a Negro; two souls, two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings; two warring ideals in one dark body.” So wrote WEB Du Bois in 1897. Black history, Du Bois maintained, was the history of this double-consciousness. Black people have always been part of the American nation that they helped to build. But they have also been a nation unto themselves, with their own experiences, culture, and aspirations. Black-American history cannot be understood except in the broader context of American history. Likewise, American history cannot be understood without Black-American history.
 --- excerpt from Hines, et al.’s (2014) preface.


This course will serve as a broad, historical survey of the Black experience (mainly) within the United States. Because students will be exposed to (and contribute from) a wide variety of perspectives on the subject, this course is appropriate for students in the traditional social sciences (e.g. sociology, anthropology, psychology, urban education, and history) as well as more contemporary ones (e.g. women’s studies, race studies, American studies, cultural studies, lesbian and gay studies).
 
MALS 73800 – Internship
3 credits, Professor Elizabeth Macaulay (Emacaulay@gc.cuny.edu)


Whether you're seeking your first job or trying to explore a career change, internships can be a valuable way to gain experience and make career decisions. Internships enable students to earn credits while gaining valuable academic and/or professional experience. These internships provide you with the opportunity to apply what you’ve learned in class in the working environment. They also help to build your professional network, and to expand your skill sets. Students can set up an appointment with the Office of Career Planning and Professional Development for guidance.


MALS students who wish to participate in an internship for credit must enroll in course MALS 73800. This course is run as an independent study course with Professor Macaulay.

  • Students must apply for the internship the semester prior to enrolling.
  • The deadline for students to apply for the internship course is November 15 at 5PM for the Spring semester or May 15 at 5 PM for the Fall semester. If you miss this deadline please email Professor Macaulay-Lewis.
  • Students must submit the proposal form, and a formal letter or email of an internship offer from the proposed employer.
  • The entire application must be submitted via email to liberalstudies@gc.cuny.edu. The proposals will then be reviewed by the department.
  • Candidates will be informed about the outcome of their application in a timely fashion. Successful applicants will then be permitted to enroll in the course, once the proper paperwork is completed and filed. 
  • A minimum of 140 hours of the internship must be completed within the semester that the student enrolls (i.e. if the student enrolls in the internship course during Spring, the internship must be completed during the semester). 
  • The internship must be unpaid.
  • The student must attend all classes (either in person or online, if the course runs as a hybrid course), and complete all assignments required for the course. 

 
MALS 74500 -- Great Digs: Important sites of the Ancient, Late Antique and Islamic Worlds
Wednesday, 6:30-8:30 PM, Room 3207, 3 credits, Professor Elizabeth Macaulay-Lewis (emacaulay_lewis@gc.cuny.edu)


Archaeology offers new and different perspectives on the past, as artifacts, ecofacts, the built environment, and architecture speak for people rather than texts. This course introduces students to major archaeological methods and important archaeological sites from the Classical, Late Antique, and Islamic worlds. The two primary methods of archaeological inquiry—excavation and survey—are introduced, discussed, and problematized in this course. We will then consider a range of different classes of archaeological evidence often with regard to specific sites, in order to understand how archaeology has contributed to our knowledge of these sites, debates in archaeology, cultural studies, and/or history. Cultural Heritage, museum practices, and the preservation of archaeological sites will also be considered. Classes will be a combination of seminar and lecture. Guest lecturers will speak on different aspects of archaeological study and there will be site visits to cultural institutions in New York City.
 
MALS 78100 -- Issues in Urban Education: Critical Introduction to Mindfulness 
Wednesday, 6:30-8:30, Room 3309, 3 credits, David Forbes (DForbes@brooklyn.cuny.edu)


Mindfulness has become popular in education. The New York City DOE endorses mindfulness programs in schools and even has a Director of Mindfulness and Yoga. In this class we will ask, to what extent does mindfulness help students and teachers self-regulate, adjust to, and succeed at the individualist and competitive demands of neoliberal schooling? To what extent should mindfulness instead be a critical social endeavor that questions and transforms inequitable and troublesome practices and promotes optimal development and social justice for all? Is mindfulness true to its original Buddhist moral intent to let go of attachment to the self, or does it serve neoliberal interests to bolster and market the self?  We will critically examine mindfulness programs in schools and community agencies and consider an alternative integral, social, and moral mindfulness founded not on privatized individualism but on the underlying inseparability of the self with all others.  
 
MALS 78400 -- Introduction to Latin American Studies
Monday, 6:30-8:30 PM, Room 6495, 3 credits, Prof. Patricia Tovar (ptovar@gc.cuny.edu)


This seminar surveys five centuries of Latin American history, culture and politics from an interdisciplinary perspective, and introduces students to some of the most important issues, problems and debates in the region at large and the sub-regions within it. The course explores the rich diversity of peoples, geographies and histories that distinguish the region, and the experiences that have shaped it. By looking at the symbolic and political configurations of the region through a wide spectrum of materials (film, music, art, fiction, essays, and photography), students will think critically about major landmarks in the field of Latin American studies including the legacy of European colonialism, national fictions, modernity, social movements, conflict, memory, gender politics, religious beliefs, and the ways race, class, and gender intersect.
At the same time, students will examine various theoretical frameworks to approach the study of Latin America, including literary studies, linguistics, history, political science, sociology and anthropology. A chronological and thematic approach will give attention to the enduring legacies and challenges from the pre-Columbian era, the Spanish colonies, the nineteenth-century processes of independence, the emergence of the new nation-states, and the overall development of modern Latin American societies in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. 
 
MALS 78500 -- Research with Children and Youth: Cross Disciplinary Perspectives
Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 PM, Room 5383, 3 credits, Prof. Roger Hart (roghart@gmail.com)
 
MALS 78500 -- Sustainability and Democratic Practice
Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 PM, Room 8202, 3 credits, Prof. Susan Saegert (ssaegert@gc.cuny.edu)
 
MALS 78500 -- The Biographical Film: Editing a Life
Thursday, 4:15-7:15 PM, Room 3416, 3 credits, Prof. Marc Dolan (fozzielogic1530@gmail.com)


This course will survey a range of examples of one of the most common film genres of the last century: the biographical film.  In our meetings, we will pay special attention to how the preparation and execution of film biographies resemble and depart from that of their print equivalents.
In our introductory class we will watch a sampling of one-reel biographies from the first few decades of filmmaking, and then move swiftly in our second week to Abel Gance’s wide-screen tricolor epic Napoleon (1927).  (We will probably view the latter film in conjunction with Stanley Kubrick’s notes for his ultimately unproduced film on the same subject.)  Next, we will engage Alexander Korda’s pioneeringly satirical The Private Life of Henry VIII (1933) and Roberto Rossellini’s neorealist The Flowers of St. Francis (1950), two films that are oddly resonant with contemporary trends in midcentury print biography, the debunking and Annales strains respectively.  Our early twentieth-century unit will then conclude with Daniel Mann’s sincerely melodramatic I’ll Cry Tomorrow (1955), a popular biographical film of its time that had been almost instantly adapted from Lilian Roth’s bestselling 1954 memoir.
By this point in film history, the biographical genre was so well-established that filmmakers could play with it more.  In the late twentieth-century, biographical film took more turns toward segmented or selective depictions of a subject’s life, as witnessed by David Lean’s grand slice of a life Lawrence of Arabia (1962), Andrei Tarkovsky’s six-piece, meditative Andrei Rublev (1966), and Spike Lee’s stylized and similarly segmented Malcolm X (1992).  Our survey will conclude with two special cases: Todd Haynes’ range of archetypal biography from Superstar: The Karen Carpenter Story (1988) to I’m Not There (2007); and Shkehar Kapur and Cate Blanchett’s decade-long collaboration on a single biographical subject in Elizabeth (1998) and Elizabeth: The Golden Age (2007).  Our last weeks of meetings before student presentations will form a transhistorical coda for the course, with classes on parallel film biographies of Cleopatra (from DeMille/Colbert, Mankiewicz/Taylor, Roddam/Varela, and others) and Abraham Lincoln (from Griffith/Huston, Ford/Fonda, Spielberg/Day-Lewis, and others).
Students will be expected to prepare an annotated bibliography, 15-to-20-minute presentation, and a 5000-word essay on a topic related to biographical film.
Readings will be assigned from such works as George F. Custen‘s Bio/Pics: How Hollywood Constructed Public History, Dennis P. Bingham’s Whose Lives Are They Anyway?: Biopic as Contemporary Film, Ellen Cheshire’s Bio-Pics: A Life in Pictures, and at least chapter 3 of Rick Altman’s Film/Genre, as well as individually apposite biographical excerpts.   
 
MALS 78500 -- The Problem of Race in Early Modern Studies
Tuesday, 4:15-6:15 PM, Room 3212, 3 credits, Prof. Miles Grier (Miles.Grier@qc.cuny.edu)


The goal of this course is to ascertain the extent to which the technology of racial characterization troubles--and is troubled by--the temporal designation "early modern" as well as the geography of Mediterranean or Atlantic worlds. Readings will include classic and recent scholarship concerning world systems, purity of blood, religion, the history of slavery, imperial history, performance history, and black feminist theory, among other topics. Although the scholarship we read will be in English, we will study people of African, Native American, Ottoman, English, French, and Spanish descent as they move, trade, copulate, and comment on one another.
 

 
MALS 78500 -- Women and Film
Tuesday, 4:15-8:15 PM, Room C415A, 3 credits, Prof. Elizabeth Alsop (Elizabeth.Alsop@cuny.edu)


This course will explore female filmmakers’ contributions to global cinema from the studio era to the present, with a particular focus on the ways women have navigated and responded to dominant modes of film production, distribution, and representation. Our primary goals will be to examine the history of women’s labor and creativity in the cinema, while also reckoning with the devalorization of that labor, both in film studies curricula—which has often deprecated the work of women in popular Hollywood genres—and in film history, which continues to minimize the role of female directors in epochal movements. We’ll analyze our weekly screenings in terms of aesthetics and ideology, and consider the ways female filmmakers have engaged with the discourses of feminism, as well as questions of race, class, and sexual identity. We’ll conclude by considering how recent developments, including the #TimesUp and #MeToo movements, have affected women’s roles within the 21st-century media landscape. Screenings may include work by Ida Lupino, Agnès Varda, Věra Chytilová, Chantal Akerman, Barbara Loden, Claudia Weil, Elaine May, Lina Wertmüller, Susan Seidelman, Lizzie Borden, Jane Campion, Julie Dash, Cheryl Dunye, Andrea Arnold, Claire Denis, and Lucrecia Martel. Students will be asked to read essays by scholars such as Laura Mulvey, bell hooks, Claire Johnston, Judith Mayne, Teresa de Lauretis, Tania Modleski, Lúcia Nagib, and Patricia White, among others. 
 

Among the questions we might ask: What have been the prevailing structural constraints faced by female directors in various national contexts? How have industry expectations and cultural biases—regarding gender, genre, and audience—shaped the careers of female filmmakers, and in turn, existing canons? How might film history better account for the work of female editors, producers, and writers, and what is the feminist potential of less auteurist accounts? What should feminist viewers do with the “bad” objects of popular culture? Finally, what “progress,” if any, has been made when it comes to women’s representation behind the camera? How and to what extent might the rise of streaming television platforms be changing the game?
Students will be asked to produce weekly 1-page response papers and a final, 15-20 page paper or creative project. Members of the class would be responsible for facilitating one class session, which includes generating questions and curating additional resources about our screening using a class blog on the CUNY Academic Commons.
 
MALS 78800 – Introduction to Childhood and Youth Studies
Thursday, 6:30-8:30 PM, Room 4419, 3 credits, Prof. Carrie Hintz (chintz@gc.cuny.edu)


In this introductory seminar, we will consider changing concepts of childhood and adolescence from a variety of cultures and historical periods.  What do we mean by “childhood” or “adolescence”?  What is at stake in these definitions?  Drawing on literary, cinematic and philosophical texts, we examine various historical models of childhood, including the romantic child, the sinful child, the working child, the sacred child, the child as miniature adult, the developing child, and the child as radically other. As we do so, we will examine how our shifting—and often contradictory—conceptions of childhood both align and clash with the way children actually live. After considering key moments in the history of childhood, we will look at the ways in which age intersects with other dimensions of social experience: sex/ gender, race, class, nation, and religion.  In addition, we consider how young people live their lives and imagine their futures, as illustrative of the ongoing development of society, including practices of professionals working with them. Finally we will look at childhood experiences that challenge the historically recent notion of a “protected” and “innocent” childhood: child sex, child labor, child soldiers and child criminals.

The MALS program is delighted to offer a summer session with four courses. Courses will start the day after Memorial Day on Tuesday, May 28, 2019. Courses that meet twice a week will end the week of June 24, 2019, whereas courses that meet once a week will end the week of July 22, 2019.

Courses will not meet on Thursday, July 4, 2019 as the Graduate Center is closed on the Fourth of July.  

The deadline to Add/Drop courses is Thursday, June 6, 2019.

Please note that this schedule is tentative and subject to change.  

  Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
4:00 – 6:00       Prof. Anderst
MALS 70000

Intro. to Grad. Liberal Studies
4:00 – 8:00   Prof. Anderst
MALS 70000

Intro. to Grad. Liberal Studies
   
6:00 – 9:00    Prof. Schmidt
MALS 72000

Thesis Writing Course
  Prof. Schmidt
MALS 72000

Thesis Writing Course
6:00 – 9:45 Prof. Fox
MALS 72300

Intro. to Gender and Sexuality Studies
  Prof. Fragopoulos
MALS 70700

The Shaping of Modernity
 

 



SUMMER 2019


MALS 70000 - Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies #
"Imagining Gotham: Cinematic Depictions of New York City"
Tuesday, 4:00 - 8:00 PM, and Thursday, 4:00 - 6:00 PM, Rm. TBA, 3 Credits, Prof. Leah Anderst (landerst@qcc.cuny.edu)
First Class: May 28, 2019 - Last Class: June 27, 2019
Open to MALS students only.

This course will focus on cinematic representations of urbanism and specifically New York City. From its earliest days, cinema has regularly turned its eye, an eye both critical and celebratory, to the densely populated spaces and the vertical structures of New York City. In fact, large population shifts into cities, domestic and international, in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries closely coincided with the birth and the infancy of this mass medium, initially localized, in the United States, in and around New York City. In the course, we will look at a variety of films, from mainstream to art films and including fiction and nonfiction. These may include early city symphonies and silent shorts produced in NYC, crime dramas from the 1940s through the 1970s, science fiction fantasies of the 1980s and 1990s that imagine the city under attack, and documentaries from across the medium’s history that provide a window onto NYC’s past. We will explore a number of questions: How has film accurately reflected urban realities, and conversely how has it imagined or distorted perceptions of urban life and populations? How have the city’s immigrant populations and minority groups represented themselves and their neighborhoods in films? How has the New York City of cinema changed throughout the history of film? A research focused seminar that will introduce students to graduate work, this course will require students to design and write a research project. Additional course requirements include: weekly responses to course readings and viewings, a midterm scene analysis, and a presentation as part of a mini research conference at the end of the term. 


MALS 70700 - The Shaping of Modernity, 1789–1914 #
Wednesday, 6:00 - 9:45 PM, Rm. TBA, 3 Credits, Prof. George Fragopoulos (GFragopoulos@qcc.cuny.edu)
First Class: May 29, 2019 - Last Class: July 17, 2019

In an essay on the work of Flemish painter Peter Paul Rubens, Fredric Jameson makes a claim that he himself declares as being an “outrageous assertion, namely that modernity begins with the Council of Trent (ending in 1563)—in which case the Baroque becomes the first secular age.” We begin with this quote not to affirm or deny the legitimacy of Jameson’s claim but to illustrate one theory, among many, regarding the nature of modernity itself. This section of Transformations of Modernity will begin by examining different theoretical and historical conceptions of what we have come to define as the “Modern,” all the while aware that there is no singular definition that will ever satisfy the fragmented story that is modernity.  
            If there is one general theme to this course it will be in following the historical, political and social upheavals that were brought about by what historian Eric Hobsbawm calls the dual revolutions of the French revolution and the British Industrial revolution. As such, we will examine institutions, ideologies and political and social structures that are inseparable from the historical actuality of these two revolutions.
            Readings will include source materials from the historical period that will be our primary frame of reference: 1789-1914. Authors may include but not be limited to Mary Wollstonecraft, Edmund Burke, Olaudah Equiano, Karl Marx, Percy Shelley, Charles Darwin, Sigmund Freud and Virginia Woolf. Finally, secondary readings from authors such as C.L.R James, Jürgen Habermas, Paul Gilroy, Lisa Lowe and the aforementioned Jameson will provide us with contemporary reflections on the modern and modernity. 



MALS 72000 - Thesis Writing Course #
Tuesday and Thursday, 6:00 - 9:00 PM, Rm. TBA, 3 Credits, Prof. Christopher Schmidt (cschmidt@lagcc.cuny.edu)
Permission by the Department required for registration. Contact liberalstudies@gc.cuny.edu as soon as possible.
First Class: May 28, 2019 - Last Class: June 27, 2019


MALS 72000, Thesis Writing Workshop, is designed to help students with the process of writing, researching and working towards completing a thesis or capstone project. As indicated by the course's title, the course is primarily run as a workshop with students sharing and commenting on writing in different stages of development. There will also be readings and discussions on the nature of academic discourse and how writing and research methods differ according to academic disciplines, thus replicating the department's interdisciplinary ethos. Students in all stages of their thesis and capstone projects are encouraged to take the course.


MALS 72300 - Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies #
Monday, 6:00 - 9:45 PM, Rm. TBA, 3 Credits, Prof. Meghan Fox (mefox@lagcc.cuny.edu)
First Class: June 3, 2019 - Last Class: July 22, 2019

What does it mean to “to ‘do’ one’s gender,” as Judith Butler has put it? And how might “failing, losing, forgetting, unmaking, undoing” established gender and sexual norms subvert existing power structures, as J. Jack Halberstam has asked? This course will explore these questions and provide an introduction to the interdisciplinary and intersectional study of gender and sexuality. Through our reading of foundational gender studies texts and contemporary feminist and queer theory, we will consider how gender is felt and understood in terms of lived experience and how it has been constructed within specific historical and cultural contexts in relationship to other identity categories, namely race, class, sexual orientation, ability, ethnicity, and nationality. Likewise, we will examine how conceptions of identity rooted in sexual preferences and/or sex acts have changed over time and differ based on socio-cultural and political conditions. The course will cover a range of topics including but not limited to intersectionality, privilege, marginalization, compulsory heterosexuality, and gender performativity, and will include readings by Gloria Anzaldúa, bell hooks, Patricia Hill Collins, Kimberlé Crenshaw, Michel Foucault, Judith Butler, J. Jack Halberstam, Sara Ahmed, David Eng, Michael Kimmel, Kate Bornstein, and Nancy Mairs among others.

SPRING 2019 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


MALS 70000 – Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies

The Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies course is required for all MALS students who do not come into the program with a Master's degree. The course is a topics class. Faculty who teach it choose a subject of study – usually related to their own research interests – and explore that topic through a range of disciplinary lenses. The class is designed to help students understand interdisciplinary work, develop their written, oral, and analytic skills, and create a cohort experience. We encourage students to take this class in their first or second semester in the program.

SECTION 1 of MALS 70000 – Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies # 59803
“Social Media Meets Social Justice”
Wednesday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, Rm. TBA, 3 Credits, Prof. Joan Greenbaum (JGreenbaum@gc.cuny.edu)
 
Students will critically examine the social and political economy of the broad range of technologies that today are called social media, and the ways that they are useful as well as potentially disruptive to issues of social justice. To get behind the digital interfaces we will look at some current issues such as: surveillance; data collection; privacy; legal structures and the lack there of, and the ways that data is collected and sold. Of equal importance students will also dig into current issues in activist social justice, which may include, depending on student interest: prisoner rights; immigrant rights; voting rights; black lives matter; environmental justice; and of course current gender concerns. In both our examination of technologies and justice we will read and study historical cases.
 
In order to better understand the contextual situations and specific places where social media supports and enhances social justice, as well as those areas where it is problematic, the course draws on a mix of readings, images, sites, films, tweets and other digital media. Deepening our understanding we will delve into theoretical perspectives and methods from environmental social science, sociology and political economy that help us place larger issues in perspective. Students will be encouraged to select a topic and develop a small research project which will be reported on in two short and one longer written assignments and one oral presentation.
 
SECTION 2 of MALS 70000 – Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies # 59805
Thursday, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, Rm. TBA, 3 Credits, Prof. Elizabeth Wissinger (ewissinger@gc.cuny.edu)
 
What do the Kardashians have to do with contemporary race and gender politics? How do fashionable images play into world power relations? How is today’s explosive availability of images affecting concepts of selfhood, agency, and bodily worth?
 
This course will explore theories of visualization technologies and bodies, taking students from classic approaches to ways of seeing through an interdisciplinary trajectory encompassing media, feminist, cultural, and sociological studies of how the body is performed and iterated through evolving technological frames. Representation, always a thorny issue, has philosophical, sociological, scientific, and political implications. These implications are urgently in need of interrogation as digital culture has pushed the primacy of the image in social life to the extreme, where a picture can speak a thousand words (or launch a thousand tweets).
 
Using curated readings to guide our thinking, we will make use of the vibrant visual culture of online and social media, as well as examine key examples of the cultural institutions, built environment, and streets of NYC, to explore how the body is constructed by the gaze of cinema, diced and sliced by the glance of television, and shattered into bits by the digitization of the internet and social media. Throughout, we will consider the role of the malleable body, artifice and authenticity, gender politics, and the rise of self-branding as it feeds into neoliberal values and biopolitical frames.
 
While building an intellectual framework from which to develop their Master’s thesis, students will have the opportunity to explore this course’s ideas by engaging in critical making, creating their own media or imaging objects. In so doing, students will hone their thinking and analytic abilities through critically examining the 
lenses through which we experience our contemporary visual world.
 
Course Requirements:
This course requires your active and engaged class participation, required attendance at any field site class activities (outside of the classroom), weekly writing and analysis assignments, weekly student leaders of the class, and a final paper and project.

MALS 70100 – Narratives of New York: Literature and The Visual Arts # 59838
Monday, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, Rm. TBA, 3 Credits, Prof. Tanya Agathocleus (tagathoc@hunter.cuny.edu)
 
By the mid-nineteenth century, writers and artists had become fascinated with the subject of the city and the way it seemed to function as a microcosm of the world. How did New York become a global city? How did the city come to stand for the condition of modern life? Is it a place of liberation—home to an unprecedented diversity of peoples—or a mechanistic nightmare of crime and depravity: a sign of the impossibility of social harmony? When did “gentrification” start and how does it change perceptions and experiences of the city? This course will pose these questions through the survey of a wide range of visual and verbal representations of New York from the nineteenth century to the present day.
We will read short stories, novels and poetry by Edgar Allan Poe, Walt Whitman, Nella Larsen, Ralph Ellison and others, watch films such as The Warriors (1979) and Do the Right Thing (1989), and visit New York museums.

MALS 70600 – Enlightenment and Critique # 59844
Tuesday, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, Rm. TBA, 3 Credits, Prof. Iakovos Vasiliou (ivasiliou@gc.cuny.edu)
 
While the Enlightenment played a crucial role in the founding of the United States and other liberal Western democracies, its legacy and even its content remain contested up to the present day. Does the Enlightenment consist in some set of principles or fundamental ideas? Or is it rather (or also?) a certain methodology or type of critical thinking? Concepts central to the Enlightenment, such as freedom, reason, truth, and the individual, have been criticized both from the right as well as from the left. Some have claimed it a self-serving fiction, while others ardently defend it as the best hope for humanity. It has escaped no one that in the roughly three hundred years since Enlightenment ideas in the modern West began to gain currency, the world has also seen the development of the nation state, the violent and exploitive colonialism of almost the entire world by Western powers, the genocide of indigenous populations, "white" supremacy, racism, and centuries years of chattel slavery. While Enlightenment ideas sparked women's rights movements including, crucially, voting rights for women, an examination of the status of women through the world, including in the West, shows that patriarchy is still firmly in place. Moreover, in the twentieth century the West engaged in the most destructive and murderous wars the world has ever known. Now, in the 21st century, we are witnessing the rise of a virulent nationalism and populism in the West, along with xenophobia and racism, and are being, and will continue to be, confronted with the catastrophic ramifications of climate change. The rise of modern science and medicine, with its technological advances, played a major role in all these events, as well as in the many historic and positive developments experienced to varying degrees across the world. This seminar will examine a range of philosophical and theoretical treatments of the Enlightenment from defense to critique. We will consider different views about what the Enlightenment is, as well as what defenders find right and valuable about it, and critics wrong and harmful. Authors may include Descartes, Kant, Wollstonecraft, Hume, Foucault, Marx, Dubois, Douglass, Jefferson, Berlin. We will also read a number of contemporary philosophers and critics.

MALS 70700 – The Shaping of Modernity, 1789-1914 # 59850
Wednesday, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, Rm. TBA, 3 Credits, Prof. Richard Kaye (rkaye@gc.cuny.edu)
 
This course will explore a wide range of significant intellectual, historical, scientific, political, and creative works of the period as well as recent or contemporary texts considering the era.  We will begin with Burke's "Reflections on the Revolution in France," De Toqueville's "Democracy in America," Mary Wollstonecraft's "Vindication of the Rights of Women," and John Stuart Mills's "On Liberty." Turning to fiction, we will examine Jane Austen's "Emma," Gustave Flaubert's "Madame Bovary," Henry James's "The Portrait of a Lady," and Edith Wharton's "The House of Mirth." The class will consider, as well, central poems of the British Romantic movement in the writing of Keats, Shelley, Byron, and Wordsworth.  Other texts (or excerpts from texts) include Darwin's "The Origin of Species," William James' "The Varieties of Religious Experience," Freud's The Interpretation of Dreams," Hannah Arendt's "On Revolution," E.P Thompson's "The Making of the English Working Class," T.J. Clark's "The Painting of Modern Life: Paris and the Art of Manet and His Followers," and Charles Rosen's "The Romantic Generation." Class presentations and a final paper.

MALS 70900 – Approaches to Life Writing # 59852
Monday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, Rm. TBA, 3 Credits, Prof. Annalyn Swan (annalyn.swan@gmail.com)
 
Ever since Plutarch brought Alexander the Great blazingly to life in his seminal Lives (2nd century CE), people have loved to read—and write—biographies. Approaches to Life Writing will be an exploration of the art and craft of the genre. What do great biographies and autobiographies have in common--and how do they differ? How are scenes set, facts organized, context provided? How novelistic can a biography be? And is there, finally, such a thing as “truth” in biography or autobiography, or a “definitive” account? From biography as gossipy inside edition (Boswell’s The Life of Samuel Johnson), to biography as irreverent debunking (Lytton Strachey’s Eminent Victorians), to biography as detective story (A.J.A. Symons’ Quest for Corvo), to life-writing at its most personal and poetic (Annie Dillard’s An American Childhood), we will explore the many ways a writer can tease out the “figure UNDER the carpet,” as Leon Edel, the great biographer of Henry James, put it. But this is also a course about practicing the art ourselves. For the final paper, everyone will have the opportunity either to write an autobiographical chapter, or else research and write a chapter of a biography.
 
MALS 71300 – Special Topics in Fashion Studies # 59857
"Film, Fashion, Cities and Cultural Heritage"
Thursday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, Rm. TBA, 3 Credits, Prof. Eugenia Paulicelli (epaulicelli@gmail.com)
 
Fashion and Film share a highly interactive quality. As two of the most well=-known and widespread commercial industries to grow out of modernity, cinema and fashion have always had a synergetic relationship insofar as both use the technology of the camera and that of the body and performance. Costume is integral both to the actor’s performance and to the cinematic rendition of visual narratives and experience. Since the birth of cinema in the late nineteenth century, the film scene has constituted a virtual shopping window for clothes, exhibiting and making desirable the newest fashions and goods available at department stores. Film costumes have not just borrowed from fashion and haute couture, but have also inspired the production of the newest fashion. Costumes in cinema have been used as narrative tools for telling stories on screen that emphasize character identity and development while also attracting a larger audience. More recently, the digital genre of “fashion film” has become a widespread advertising and storytelling tool for fashion luxury brands such as Ferragamo, Fendi, Louis Vuitton, and Gucci, among others. The course will be structured in four sections that will explore in depth the historical context of the interaction of film/fashion/costume from the silent era up to the present. Some rare American, Italian, and French films will be shown from the 1920s. The course will also include   Hollywood films from the 1930s; films from the 1950s and 1960s; and contemporary production in film, fashion, music video and screen media.  The role of women as audience, actors, characters and designers as well as gender representation will be studied as will race, queer and ethnic identities. Many actors, and performers, for instance, were immigrants from Europe and established a high profile in the Hollywood industry from the beginning of the 20th century. Fashion and film are multibillion industries that are nourished by immaterial narratives and emotions and as such play a pivotal role in attracting tourism, business and culture. This is particularly crucial in a global city such as NYC where the creative industries thrive. The course will include guest speakers and visits in NY based sites of studio and costume archives and a “Practice Lab” with a NY based designer.

MALS 71500 – Critical Issues in International Studies # 59858
Thursday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, Rm. TBA, 3 Credits, Prof. Peter Bratsis (pbratsis@bmcc.cuny.edu)

Critical Issues in International Studies, is designed to broaden the student’s perspectives and deepen their understanding of international studies. The course will examine the production of global political order and the multiple ways that political power shapes the relations and hierarchies within and between political communities.  Topics will include imperialism, world-systems and dependency, human rights and ‘just’ wars, political corruption, race and ethnicity, social reproduction, and the transnationalization of classes and states.

MALS 72000 – Thesis Writing Course # 59860
Wednesday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, Rm. TBA, 3 Credits, Prof. Naomi Stubbs (NStubbs@lagcc.cuny.edu)
Permission by the Department required for registration. Contact liberalstudies@gc.cuny.edu.

The Thesis Writing Workshop is designed to help students with the process of writing, researching and working towards completing a thesis or capstone project. As indicated by the course's title, the course is primarily run as a workshop with students sharing and commenting on writing in different stages of development. There will also be readings and discussions on the nature of academic discourse and how writing and research methods differ according to academic disciplines, thus replicating the department's interdisciplinary ethos. Students in all stages of their thesis and capstone projects are encouraged to take the course.

MALS 72100 – Feminist Texts and Contexts # 59862
Monday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, Rm. TBA, 3 Credits, Prof. Linda Grasso (lgrasso@york.cuny.edu)
"Feminism 1910"
 
One hundred years before Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie proclaimed “We should all be feminists” and Beyoncé popularized that decree, the word feminist was first being used in the United States. In the 1910s, feminism as idea, lived practice, and social movement was so novel, it prompted much discussion and a new vocabulary. This course explores the historical, political, and cultural emergence of feminism in the U.S. by studying how a selected group of women expressed feminist activism through written and visual artistic forms. In addition to reading stories, novels, speeches, and essays, we will examine artwork and political cartoons as well as periodicals such as The ForerunnerThe Masses, and The Crisis. Students will design and create research projects based on their aesthetic, political, and scholarly interests.

MALS 72200 – Contemporary Feminist Theories # 59863
Wednesday, 6:30 8:30 PM, Rm. TBA, 3 Credits, Prof. Alexandra Juhasz (alexandra.juhasz@brooklyn.cuny.edu)
 
The Nowheres and Everywhere of Online Feminism: This class will provide a theoretical and hands-on background for considering, using, and remaking space, race and community within feminist cybercultures. You will write about and also within digital technologies and spaces. You will perform an online ethnography. You will be asked to consider the theoretical and activist stakes of translating academic thinking and writing to digital formats. You will produce your own working definitions of feminism, race, space and politics online. You will be asked to make something better. 

MALS 72600 – Social Impacts of Science and Technology: Case Studies # 59865
Tuesday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, Rm. TBA, 3 Credits, Prof. Al Coppola (acoppola@jjay.cuny.edu)
 
This course will examine some of the great discoveries in science and inventions of technology that have changed the course of human history, with a view to assessing their origins, impact, and eventual consequences, both foreseen and unintended.  Our concern will be to trace the complex traffic between “science” and “society” an untenable binary if there ever was one, by exploring the material, social and intellectual grounds of scientific innovation, what Andrew Pickering has termed the “mangle of practice.” After a survey of some influential science studies theories, such as Bruno Latour, Karen Barad, Donna Haraway, and Pamela Smith, we will dig into a handful of exemplary case studies, which are oriented around a major scientific figure and the innovation ascribed to them, but which radiate out into the social world out of which they emerge and which they in turn remake:
 
Galileo, the experimental verification of a new cosmology, and the negotiation of political and religious resistance.
Newton, the mathematization of the nature, and the enterprise of applied technology.
Franklin, the discovery of electricity, and the radical politics of ”the fire of life.”
Pasteur, the discovery of microbes, and the reorganization of health and society around invisible agents.
The Santa Fe Institute, complexity science, and a new theology for the information age.
 
Expect to write a couple of papers, research a presentation or two, and read deeply in fascinatingly human story of what we will come to call, “science in the making.”

MALS 72800 – Topics in Environmental Social Justice # 59867
Tuesday, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, Rm. TBA, 3 Credits, Prof. Susan Saegert (SSaegert@gc.cuny.edu)
Cross-listed with PSYC 79102
 
Theories of how people and environments mutually shape each other are important in helping us think about how research can contribute to more just and sustainable relationships of people to their habitats and societies. This course focuses on the psychological level of analysis. The theories explored lend themselves to accounts of psychology that can mesh with other levels of analysis. The empirical readings illustrate how the theories can be used to address issues of environmental justice and sustainability. 
 
Learning Objectives:
The overall objective of the course is for each student to develop a reasoned and reasonably satisfying answer to the following question: How is the psychologically experienced self related to the social and physical context?
 
Achieving this objective requires answering another question: What is the unit of analysis of psychology? Some of the positions prominent in psychology assume the answer would be either particular psychological processes or the biological substrate/determinants of experience and behavior. This course introduces an alternative approach in which we see selves as socially and materially contingent. In the latter approach a student must develop an answer to the question “Contingent in what way?”
 
The second learning objective is to come to an understanding for yourself of the goals of psychological knowledge. There are many contenders for this crown in psychology including: prediction and control, valid description, consciousness raising, mental and physical health improvement, resolution of social problems, and social justice to name a few. This course explores the contingency of the goals of psychology as well as of psychological processes.
 
A third learning objective is for you to build on the knowledge you are developing in your methods and ethics course to understand how these goals are best achieved.
 
A final learning objective is to help you develop your scholarly craft. The steps in this involve learning the following:

  • 1.  How to read theoretical material (somewhat quickly);
  • 2.  How to paraphrase an argument in a non-distorting way;
  • 3.  How to critique an argument;
  • 4.  How to make an argument;
  • 5.  How to use theory in the development of your own empirical research and practice;
  • 6.  How to improve your writing

 
MALS 73200 – American Social Institutions # 59869
"The Rise and Fall of the American Prison"
Tuesday, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, Rm. TBA, 3 Credits, Prof. Lucia Trimbur (ltrimbur@jjay.cuny.edu)

Today in the United States, seven million adults are under custodial supervision–in prisons and jails or on probation and parole. More African American adults are under this system of control than were enslaved in 1850. In some postindustrial cities, young black men are more likely to be in prison than are able to access wage labor or enroll in high school and higher education. And the US currently incarcerates more people than any country in the world. Though some argue that crime, or what Nils Christie called, “unwanted social acts,” is responsible for this expansion of imprisonment, crime rates fell as uses of forced confinement rose. How do we explain this contradiction? The expansion of jails and prisons is often referred to as the “prison industrial complex,” and increasingly scholars locate its foundations in the long-standing anti-black racism of plantation slavery that continued through Jim Crow, urban segregation, and deindustrialization. This course analyzes configurations of the prison from its roots in slavery through to our contemporary moment. We consider the relationship of the prison to other US social institutions as well as whether or not our current patterns of forced confinement are a new expression of older systems of racial capitalism or something different altogether. 

MALS 73500 – Africana Studies # 59872
"Existence in Black"
Thursday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, Rm. TBA, 3 Credits, Prof. Nathalie Etoke (netokeil@conncoll.edu)
Cross-listed with AFCP 70400

This course examines problems of existence and freedom posed by black life. We will explore how the racialization of people of African descent through the means of violence and oppression translates into an existential predicament addressing the human confrontation with hope and hopelessness, freedom and human degradation, being and non-being. We will discuss the existentialist implications, challenges and possibilities of blackness in Africana literature, film and music. How do cultural expressions of black people simultaneously engage being acted upon by the external forces of enslavement and racism, while acting against those forces? Through critical analyses of music, film, fiction, and contemporary events, this class will generate theoretical interventions embedded in the poetics and politics of (self) representation, freedom, and social constructions of black existence.

MALS 73800 – Internship Couse # 59875 
TBA, TBA, Rm. TBA, 3 Credits, Prof. Elizabeth Macaulay-Lewis (emacaulay-lewis@gc.cuny.edu)
Restricted - please contact instructor for permission.

MALS 74400 – Special Topics in the Archeology of the Classical, Late Antique, and Islamic Worlds # 59876
Wednesday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, Rm. TBA, 3 Credits, Prof. Erin Thompson (ethompson@jjay.cuny.edu)
 
This course examines current debates in the acquisition, display, and repatriation of cultural heritage. We will begin by looking at the historical development of various motivations for the movements of cultural property, including war-time looting, aesthetic appreciation, and political action. We will then consider the current wide range of ethical dilemmas faced by those who must make decisions about the fate of cultural heritage, including its preservation, presentation, and interpretation, using case studies ranging from calls to dismantle Confederate monuments, to sales of looted antiquities, to digital recreations of destroyed heritage. We will see these debates in practice during trips to New York museums, and students will be expected to contribute to an ongoing debate by conducting original research.
 
MALS 75300 – Data Visualization Methods # 59880
Tuesday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, Rm. TBA, 3 Credits, Prof. Andrea Silva (asilva@york.cuny.edu)

See description for MALS 75500.
 
MALS 75500 - Digital Humanities Methods and Practices # 59896
Tuesday, 6:30 - 8:30 PM, 3 Credits, Rm. TBA, Prof. Andrea Silva (asilva@york.cuny.edu)

During the Fall 2018 semester, students explored the landscape of the digital humanities, considering a range of ways to approach DH work and proposing potential DH projects. In the spring, we will put that thinking into action by refining and producing a small number of those projects. This praxis-oriented course will ask students to organize into teams and, by the end of the semester, produce a project prototype. Upon completion of the course, students will have gained hands-on experience in the conceptualizing, planning, production, and dissemination of a digital humanities project. Student work for this course will demonstrate a variety of technical, project management, and rhetorical skills. One of our goals is to produce well-conceived, long-term projects that have the potential to extend beyond the Spring 2019 semester. A range of advisors will be matched to support the needs of each individual project. Successful completion of the class will require a rigorous commitment to meeting deadlines and benchmarks established at the beginning of the course.
 
The class will hold a public event at the end of the semester where students will launch their projects and receive feedback from the DH academic community.
 

MALS 78300 – Introduction to US Latino Studies # 59898
Wednesday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, Rm. TBA, 3 Credits, Prof. Alyshia Galvez (alyshia.galvez@lehman.cuny.edu)

In this course, students will become familiar with the major themes relevant to the study of Latinxs in the United States including historical Latinx communities, migration patterns, push and pull factors for migration to the United States from Latin America and the Caribbean and the challenges faced by Latinx immigrants and U.S. born Latinxs in the United States. Students will develop a working knowledge of social theoretical concepts such as racialization, assimilation, agency, structure, cultural shift, and more. They will read materials from various disciplines and practice a range of qualitative, quantitative and mixed research methods. Students will explore and practice interview techniques, narrative and visual analysis, fieldwork, archival work, and how to frame research questions. Participatory Action Research, collaborative research, and other methods for decolonized or subject-centered research will be discussed.
 
MALS 78500 – Diversity: The American Experience # 59920
Wednesday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, Rm. TBA, 3 Credits, Deborah Vietze (dvietze@gc.cuny.edu)
 
This course is designed to demonstrate the depth and breadth of diversity in the United States. This diversity has dramatically increased along sexual identity, political, and race and ethnic dimensions since the 1960s. If an expanding taxonomy of diversity is properly understood and managed, it strengthens our security, economic prosperity, and innovation. The second goal of this course is to describe how diversity is reflected in people, groups, institutions, and cultures, and how and why we react to these forms of diversity in the ways that we do. Prejudice and discrimination result not only from the actions of bigots but also from the unexamined actions and attitudes of those of us who consider ourselves “unprejudiced.” The course will show that prejudice is “normal” in that it is rooted in basic human cognitive, neurological, and emotional processes. As a consequence, we must overcome powerful and ordinary predispositions in order to reduce prejudices. The course reviews research-based strategies and methods for overcoming some of these prejudices to create a more favorable social and institutional environment for diversity to flourish. The course may empower students to actualize goals regarding equity and democracy. The course also reviews some of the problems, challenges, and differing perspectives on diversity, including its benefits.
 
MALS 78500 – Quantitative Methods Course # 59923
Monday, 6:30 – 8:30 PM, Rm. TBA, 3 Credits, Prof. Juan Battle (JBattle@gc.cuny.edu)
Cross-listed with U ED 74100

Description forthcoming.

MALS 78500 – Film Theory: Documenting the Self: Performance in Nonfiction Media # 59927
Wednesday, 4:15 – 8:15 PM, Rm. TBA, 3 Credits, Prof. Edward Miller (Edward.Miller@csi.cuny.edu)
Cross-listed with FSCP 81000, THEA 81600
 
This seminar examines theories of nonfiction media and performances of the self. We begin by looking at depictions of the self in cinéma vérité and direct cinema in the 1960s. Filmmakers such as D.A. Pennebaker, the Maysles Brothers, and Fred Wiseman eliminated the artifice of voice-over, interviews, archival footage, and incidental music and made use of new lightweight equipment to create a new mode of documentary. They were especially drawn to capturing backstage views of rock stars (such as Bob Dylan, The Rolling Stones, David Bowie) as well as gaining access to interactions of ordinary people in extraordinary situations (such as in mental institutions, on the road selling bibles, working in political campaigns). In their attempt at recording life as it occurs, an unintended consequence emerged as an aspect of these films--theatricality. This theatricality arises not from the staging of situations per se, but in the freedom the filmmaker gives subjects to act out and to pretend as if the filmmaker was not there. Indeed this contradiction generates riveting performances of self as the presence of the camera motivates and frames conscious and unconscious techniques of playing a role.

MALS 78500 - Seminar in Historical Anthropology and Archaeology # 59925
Thursday, 4:15 - 6:15 PM, Rm. TBA, 3 Credits, Prof. Matthew Reilly (mreilly@ccny.cuny.edu)
Cross-listed with ANTH 83900

Description forthcoming.

MALS 78500 - Mind the Gap: Technologies, trends, and policies that will shape the future of work  #65706
Wednesday, 4:15 - 6:15 PM, Rm. TBA, 3 Credits, Prof. Ann Kirschner (ann.kirschner@cuny.edu)
Cross-listed with IDS 81670

Mind the Gap will study the future of work.  We will address this question:  As we think about the range of possibilities for the future of work -- from the utopian to the dystopian -- what are the policies, technologies, and social systems that should be anticipated today to ensure positive outcomes?  We will take an interdisciplinary approach to developing our skills as analysts and policy-makers, looking at trends in technology, globalization, and demographics, and evaluating alternative interventions by government, industry, educators, and other stakeholders.  The course will also bring in distinguished speakers to share their experience and ideas. 
 
MALS 78900 – Childhood and Youth Studies: Approaches and Methods # 59899
Thursday, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, Rm. TBA, 3 Credits, Prof. Colette Daiute (cdauite@gc.cuny.edu)
Cross-listed with PSYC 80103
 
This course in Childhood and Youth Studies involves in-depth focus on the interaction of problem, theory and method, with sustained attention to the ways in which researchers frame their investigations, develop research inquiries, and thereby contribute to understandings of human development broadly. Students engage with the history and contemporary study of children, childhood and adolescence as defined and supported in collectives of human cultural development (education, family, social welfare, community organizations, children’s rights, museums, etc.), public media (broadcast, digital media), and everyday life environments (barbershop culture, playgrounds).  The course encompasses sociocultural approaches to childhood/youth, field-based studies with young people growing up amidst various kinds of challenges, educational opportunities, community interventions, and policies. Methods and measures addressed include ethnography/participant observation, narrative, interactive digital storytelling, conversations with and among children, archive studies, participatory-action research, and play across global as well as domestic settings.  Course activities involve reading research articles, discussing the articles with a focus on method, applying practices and insights to students’ research interests, and writing scholarly essays. No prerequisites.

FALL 2018 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

 

MALS 70000 - Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies CRN # 64147

"Guns in Society"
Wednesdays, 4:15 - 6:15 PM, Rm. 4419, 3 credits, Prof. Stephanie Rupp (stephanie.rupp@lehman.cuny.edu)

Attitudes towards guns reflect social, cultural, and political values; appropriate management of gun use requires social and political action.  This course will examine the history, culture, and politics of gun ownership and use in New York City and the United States, bringing in international comparative cases.  The aim of the course is to generate new perspectives on contemporary “gun culture” and novel policy recommendations for the management of guns in our community.  With an ethnographic focus on New York City—but placed in national and international comparative perspectives—this course will introduce students both to foundational, interdisciplinary literature that is crucial to understanding contemporary contexts of guns in society, as well as to advanced methods in ethnographic research and social analysis.  Students will integrate their original research with secondary literature—scholarly materials as well as policy papers and reports from the “gray” literature—to develop a robust understanding of gun issues in New York City, the U.S., and in international comparative contexts.


MALS 70000 - Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies CRN# 64149

"Object Lessons: Learning from Waste and Other Matter"
Tuesdays, 6:30 - 8:30 PM, Rm. 4419, 3 credits, Prof. Christopher Schmidt (cschmidt@lagcc.cuny.edu)

Why are some objects enchanted, while others are considered “junk” and “trash”? Do you worry about where your garbage travels—and who carries it—as it moves from the realm of private property into public waste management? What happens when human life and object life merge, and whole classes of humans are stigmatized and treated as expendable?
It’s undeniable that waste and pollution have become pressing threats in a world confronting dire ecological damage. However, before demonizing waste, in this class we’ll pause and consider what forms of symbolic value we can unearth in rubbish and other ordinary matter. We’ll survey the fields of “dirt studies” and “new materialisms” through readings across the disciplines, from philosophy and political science (Jane Bennett’s Vibrant Matter) to anthropology (Arjun Appadurai, Mary Douglas) to ecocriticism and African American studies. My own background is in literature and art, and some writer–artists we’ll consider include Francis Ponge, Clarice Lispector, Robert Smithson, Roland Barthes, Ishmael Reed, Mierle Laderman Ukeles, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Tom McCarthy, Kara Walker, and Sianne Ngai.
For their final projects, students may write about any aspect of waste or waste management. Alternately, students may write a final essay on the “hidden life” and history of an ordinary object (e.g.: the shipping container, the blanket, the remote control, concrete, etc.)—inspired by the Object Lessons book series from Bloomsbury.   
 

MALS 70000 - Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies CRN# 64146
"Dividing Lines: Borders in the American Landscape

Thursdays, 6:30 - 8:30 PM,  Rm. 4419, 3 credits, Prof. Libby Garland (Libby.Garland@kbcc.cuny.edu)

How has the demarcation of spatial boundaries both reflected and shaped the social divisions that have defined the United States? How do different kinds of borders—the formal and informal lines between nations, regions, states, jurisdictions, electoral districts, neighborhoods, and properties, for example—delimit economic and political possibilities? How have these different kinds of spatial borders produced racial, class, and ethnic divides in new ways over time? When and how have people challenged the boundary lines designed to contain them? In this course, students will explore these questions by engaging with the work of historians, sociologists, geographers, anthropologists, urban planners, and artists. Students will present on and lead discussion regarding a text in class. They will also design, workshop and complete a final research project, which may be a traditional article-length piece of writing or a digital project of comparable sophistication.

MALS 70000 - Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies CRN# 64148

"Peaceful Conflict Transformation"
Fridays, 4:15 - 6:15 PM, Rm. 4419, 3 credits, Prof. Jill Strauss (jstrauss@bmcc.cuny.edu)

The United States and the world seem more polarized than ever. For many of us it is increasingly difficult to discuss political and social issues or a range of topics and ideas. Perhaps now more than ever we need the skills of how to resolve our differences nonviolently. The fields of peace and conflict resolution are based in interdisciplinary theory and practice involving social psychology, nonviolence, power, human rights, identity and citizenship, social (in)justice, conflict transformation and restorative justice practices, and from a variety of perspectives. This course is intended to provide an overview of these concepts and their application in real world situations so that students will develop and improve their skills in conflict prevention and de-escalation and build peace.
 

MALS 70200 - Metropolis: A Political, Historical, and Sociological Profile of New York CRN# 64153 - CANCELLED

Tuesdays, 4:15 - 6:15 PM, 3 credits, Prof. Cindy Lobel (CINDY.LOBEL@LEHMAN.CUNY.EDU)

This interdisciplinary course will explore New York City’s rise and role as the nation’s metropolis, examining several key themes in the city’s development.  In particular, we will look at Gotham as a center of work, culture and residency as well as at the diverse populations that have called the city home through its four-century history.  We will examine New York City from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, including history, sociology, anthropology, economics, and political science.

MALS 70300 - Law, Politics, and Policy CRN# 64154

Tuesdays, 4:15 - 6:15 PM, Rm. 6421, 3 credits, Prof. Leslie Paik (lpaik@ccny.cuny.edu)

This seminar examines the relationship between law and society, considering how the law shapes social life and how social change affects law and legal institutions. The seminar takes a “law in action” approach to studying law that focuses on the social, political, economic, and cultural contexts of law. We will discuss readings about classic sociological theories of law, the limits and power to “rights” discourses to lead to social change, peoples’ perceptions and experiences of the law (e.g., legal consciousness) and the everyday workings of law. We then will apply those concepts to consider how the law has defined and evolved from our experiences and understandings of race, family and immigration in the US. This seminar will provide a broad socio-legal foundation for students working on those substantive topics, as well as for those interested in social control, social movements and social change. 

MALS 70400 - Refugee Crises: History and Law, Narrative, Poetry and Film CRN# 66736
Tuesdays, 4:15 - 6:15 p.m., Rm. 6496, 3 credits, Prof. Domna Stanton (dstanton112@yahoo.com)
Cross-listed with FREN 87200 and CL 80100.

Why are we in the midst of an unparalleled refugee crisis that involves 65 million people? Such dislocations and displacements have occurred since the late 17th century, when the term was first coined; and they have proliferated over the past century, notably since 1915. Who is a refugee? Who qualifies for asylum, why and why not? What about unaccompanied minors; victims of forced migrations? What is the status of economic migrants; of internally displaced persons? How should we classify those fleeing climate catastrophes? Are these others viewed as human?
This course in critical refugee studies will begin with history (and histories), then focus on the development, successes –and failures--of the human rights regime, humanitarian law and regional instruments, such as those of the European Union. We will examine transnational North-South disparities as drivers of migration, and lastly, the current ideological and nationalist trends that have led to securitization, the closing of borders, and authoritarianism in the post 9/11 world.
We will consider particular cases: the Armenian genocide; the Holocaust; the aftermath of the Vietnam war; the intractable Palestinian problem; persecutions in Darfur and South Sudan; the flight from dictatorships, gangs and failing economies in the Americas (including Haiti); the European Union’s integrity. We will end with the present crisis catalyzed by the Syrian war.
Our approach will be interdisciplinary: critical studies in history, theory and law will combine with close readings of novels, including graphic texts, poetry, memoirs/testimonials, and documentaries that represent/construct figures of refugees as well as themes of longing, remembering and return in refugee art.
Authors/film makers include Abdelrazaq, Agamben, Ai Wei Wei, Arendt, Balibar, Bauman, Butler, Dandicat, Darwish, Derrida, Dummett, Eggers, Erpenbeck, Hisham, Lanzmann, Said, Viet Than Nguyen
Work for the course will involve, beyond close readings of assignments, a class presentation (and write-up) of a case study with other members of a team; a 20 page paper on a topic developed in consultation with the instructor; and a final exam. Course materials will be uploaded to Blackboard August 15, 2018.

MALS 70500 - Renaissance Culture: Global Renaissance CRN# 64155

Mondays, 4:15 - 6:15 p.m., Rm. 3212, 3 credits, Prof. Anna Akasoy (aa739@hunter.cuny.edu)

The Renaissance has been considered the period in which Europe or the West more generally came into its own. Having recovered the classical Greek heritage from its Arab custodians after the ‘dark ages’, Europe, led by Italian humanists, prepared itself for Enlightenment, secularization and modernization. In this course, we will explore this historical narrative critically, focusing on two aspects:
1) We will discuss to what extent the Renaissance is a uniquely western European phenomenon of the early modern period. We will be discussing Jack Goody’s Renaissances. The One or the Many? as well as Charles Homer Haskins’s idea of a twelfth-century Renaissance and Joel Kraemer’s study of intellectual culture in medieval Iraq under Buyid rule (Humanism in the Renaissance of Islam).
2) We are going to explore the Renaissance and the formation of European identity within the context of entangled or connected histories, focusing especially on the relationship between Italy and the Ottoman Empire. We will survey responses to the Ottoman conquest of Constantinople in 1453 and the attempts of Italian humanists to explain the origins and rise of the Ottomans in terms of classical geography and history. We will select examples from Margaret Meserve’s Empires of Islam in Renaissance Historical Thought and analyze by way of contrast the Saidian paradigm in Nancy Bisaha’sCreating East and West. Renaissance Humanists and the Ottoman Turks. We will also discuss Renaissance crusade literature and the reformulation of medieval tropes. While most of the material covered in this course is textual, we will also pay attention to visual and material sources such as Gentile Bellini’s portrait of Mehmed II and the circulation of objects around in the Mediterranean in particular. For the latter, we will be discussing contributions in The Renaissance and the Ottoman World, edited by Anna Contadini and Claire Norton. While most of the course will focus on Italy (including Natalie Rothman’s Brokering Empire. Trans-Imperial Subjects between Venice and Istanbul and Deborah Howard’s Venice and the East), for comparative purposes we will also consider the relationship between England and the Islamic world (Early Modern England and Islamic Worlds, edited by Linda McJannet and Bernadette Andrea).

MALS 70600. Global Perspectives on the Enlightenment CRN# 66741
Tuesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 3208, 3 credits, Prof. Helena Rosenblatt (HRosenblatt@gc.cuny.edu)
Cross-listed with HIST 72800.

The Eighteenth Century Enlightenment is widely seen as a transformative moment in Western culture, one with radical consequences for almost all aspects of Western thought. But how did eighteenth century thinkers perceive the world outside of Europe? Did regions outside of Europe experience an Enlightenment too? Finally, was there a cross-fertilization of ideas between the regions and, if so, how did it happen and how did it manifest itself? With the help of both primary and secondary sources, we will investigate the Enlightenment from a global perspective.

MALS 70800 - Transformations of Modernity, 1914-Present CRN# 64156

Wednesdays, 6:30 - 8:30 PM, Rm. 4419, 3 credits, Prof. David Gordon (Dmgordon@mindspring.com)

Modernism, and modernity can be discussed in terms of bureaucracy, rationalization, secularization, alienation, commodification, individualism, subjectivism, objectivism, universalism, chaos, mass society, homogenization, diversification, hybridization, democratization, centralization, mechanization, totalitarianism, and many, many more. The meanings of “Modernity” and “Modernism” have been debated to a great extent in scholarship and are often applied differently in history, prose, philosophy, art, music, theater or poetry. Its counterpart “Postmodernism” also provides important juxtaposition and meaning to the terms.  There are a myriad of ways in which one can discuss the transformations of modernity in the twentieth century: this course will look through the lens of intellectual history. Starting with the viewpoint of Marshall Bermann’s seminal discussion of modernity, “All that is Solid Mets into Air,” this course will look at the challenges of modernity in the intellectual history of the twentieth century: The modernity and postmodernity of: Totalitarianism; Existentialism; anti-Colonialism and the challenge of Human Rights; etc. Among others, we will read authors such as Hannah Arendt, Michael Foucault, Edward Said, Walter Benjamin, Franz Fanon, Joseph Conrad, etc.
 

MALS 71000 - Forms of Life Writing CRN# 64157

Mondays, 6:30 - 8:30 PM, Rm. 4419, 3 credits, Prof. Brenda Wineapple (bwineapple@earthlink.net)

"To live over people's lives," wrote Henry James, "is nothing unless we live over their perceptions, live over the growth, the change, the varying intensity of the same-- since it was by these things they themselves lived."  This course will interrogate various forms of so-called "life writing" (biography/fictional biography/memoir) to investigate the meaning, aims, ethics, pitfalls, and possibilities of the genre as practiced in literature.  We will therefore examine a wide range of topics: the relation between fact and fiction; the significance of politics and historical context; the impact of individual psychology; point of view in narration; the function of imagination; the use or exploitation of marginal figures.  And to the extent that biographical narratives depend on the creation of character, this course looks closely at how such characters are created from real people: how a living, breathing person seems to arise out of a mass of sometimes contradictory “facts”; how characters are made to change, that is, if they do; how characters can make a story move; and of course how or if traditional forms of biographical writing might be liberated from its brick-like borders. 

Writers/books will likely include such authors as Lytton Strachey, Natalie Zemon Davis (The Return of Martin Guerre), Virginia Woolf, Richard Holmes (Footsteps), Janet Malcolm (on Sylvia Plath biographies), Henry James, The Aspern Papers, Adam Phillips on Freud and biography, Julia Blackburn and her biographical inventions about Daisy Bates, Robert A. Caro on Lyndon Johnson, Hilton Als.
 

MALS 71400 - Introduction to International Studies CRN# 64158

Mondays, 6:30 - 8:30 p.m., Rm. 3212, 3 credits, Prof. Tomohisa Hattori (TOMOHISA.HATTORI@lehman.cuny.edu)

The two main purposes of this course are to introduce you to theoretically informed historical analyses of international relations (IR) and to help you apply one of the theories of IR to an international subject of your choice.  While the historical contexts and theories of IR will help you engage in further studies in IR, your paper will enhance your understanding of how you may gain social scientific knowledge by reviewing relevant theoretical literature, conceptualizing your subject matter, developing research questions, figuring out how to answer them, gathering information about them, organizing the research result as evidence for your answer to the research question, and developing your answer as an argument about a particular phenomenon or relationship on the chosen topic in the context of existing theoretical arguments. 

 

MALS 72000 - Thesis Writing Course CRN# 65098

Mondays, 6:30 - 8:30 p.m., Rm. 3309, 3 credits, Prof. George Fragopoulos (GFragopoulos@qcc.cuny.edu)

MALS 72000, Thesis Writing Workshop, is designed to help students with the process of writing, researching and working towards completing a thesis or capstone project. As indicated by the course's title, the course is primarily run as a workshop with students sharing and commenting on writing in different stages of development. There will also be readings and discussions on the nature of academic discourse and how writing and research methods differ according to academic disciplines, thus replicating the department's interdisciplinary ethos. Students in all stages of their thesis and capstone projects are encouraged to take the course.
 

MALS 72300 - Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies CRN# 64159

Thursdays, 6:30 - 8:30 PM, Rm. 3207, 3 credits, Prof. James Wilson (JWilson1@gc.cuny.edu)

In Gender Outlaw: On Men, Women, and the Rest of Us Kate Bornstein writes, “The first question we usually ask new parents is: ‘Is it a boy or a girl?’” Bornstein recommends the response, “We don’t know; it hasn’t told us yet.” This course explores the ways in which gender and sexuality are pronounced, embodied, and negotiated within specific historical and cultural contexts. Through a close reading of interdisciplinary, foundational, and recent scholarship the class will examine and theorize the ways in which categories of gender and sexuality inform and shape our understanding of the world. Investigating the intersections and collisions of gender and sexuality with race, class, ability, nationality, ethnicity, and age, the class will consider societal and institutional systems of power, privilege, oppression, and marginalization. Course requirements include an oral presentation, two 4-6 page response papers, and a 15-20 page, staged researched essay.
 

MALS 72700 - The Political Ecology of Social and Environmental Justice CRN# 64160

Wednesdays, 9:30 - 11:30 AM, Rm. 4419, 3 credits, Prof. Rebio Diaz Cardona (rcardona@lagcc.cuny.edu)

Cross-listed with PSYC 79100.
 

This seminar is the first part of a three-course sequence introducing students to themultidisciplinary theoretical bases and substantive concerns of Environmental Social Science. The will survey a range of disciplines that comprise the field, encompassing historical and theoretical overviews as well as contemporary analyses concerning people’s engagements with the environment from the fields of anthropology, sociology, geography, urban planning, architecture, landscape architecture, environmental design and management, and psychology. Topics include environmental perception, ecological approaches to the city, place identity and attachment, meanings of home, housing, gentrification, environmental justice, sustainability, and the psychology of climate change action.

 

MALS 73100 - American Culture and Values CRN# 64161
"The Object(s) of American Studies: History, Method, & Praxis"

Tuesdays, 6:30 - 8:30 PM, Rm. 3212, 3 credits, Prof. Justin Rogers-Cooper (jrogers@lagcc.cuny.edu)

 

Russ Castronovo and Susan Gillman begin the introduction to their collection States of Emergency: The Object of American Studies (2009) with a deceptively straightforward question: “What is the object of American studies?” They continue by unpacking the ramifications of that question by noting its imbrication in two corollary questions: “What does ‘American studies’ study, and what does it want?” For all of its centrality, after all, American studies remains an anomaly in the academy - as a program and not a department, it resides somewhere between (or, perhaps, outside) normative disciplinary boundaries. The object of our course is to explore these questions by considering the histories, theories, and practices of American studies from its inception as an academic discipline to the present. We will consider how American studies transformed from a movement into an institution (marked by one of the largest annual academic conferences in the United States). We will address the present state of the field – particularly inquiry into the politics of American exceptionalism – and whether the field is best understood in tension with an emergent vocabulary of keywords (such as “transnational”), and/or perhaps as a constellation of converging sub-fields or critical orientations, such as indigenous and postcolonial studies, critical race and ethnic studies, queer of color feminism, and/or black Marxism. In addition to discussions, we will compose writing assignments based on key genres of the discipline, including the book review, the event review, the keyword, and the conference abstract.
 

MALS 73400 - Africana Studies: Introduction CRN# 64170

Mondays, 4:15 - 6:15 PM, Rm. 3207, 3 credits, Prof. Juan Battle (jbattle@gc.cuny.edu)

Cross-listed with AFCP 73100.

American society is highly unequal in terms of income and wealth, education, and health. Individuals face very different opportunities for obtaining an education, for developing important social, psychological, and cognitive skills and competencies during childhood and youth, and for finding satisfactory employment as adults. Levels of consumption and material comfort are highly unequal. Moreover, some individuals live in highly precarious situations, and are buffeted by economic and other setbacks, while others are better protected against risks, can feel secure and plan ahead. Over the life course, substantial gaps in health and longevity emerge between different groups within our population, such that some ‘age’ and die faster than others.
 
When inequalities in life chances follow the boundaries of social groups – socioeconomic classes, racial or ethnic groups, genders, or age cohorts – we envision society as a hierarchy of groups, and call this pattern ‘social stratification.’ Sociologists ask why stratification exists, how it changes over time, and whether inequality is unavoidable or is a matter of political policy and popular will. We also debate normative issues: whether or when social inequality is just and productive, and when it is unjust and undesirable.
 
The sociology of inequality and stratification is a huge area so this course will only be able to provide an introduction or overview suitable for doctoral students. The principal focus of the course will be theoretical, discussing the conceptual basis of our understandings of stratification. Many of the core concepts of sociology are intended to describe or explain aspects of social inequality: social class and SES; upward and downward social mobility; discrimination in labor markets and firms; “winner take all” and “big fish in small pond” concepts; ideas of social exclusion & notions of an underclass; theories of prejudice, discrimination, and group conflict; ideas about the intersectionality of race, class and gender. Debates rage around many of these ideas, and in large part this course will provide an introduction to these concepts and controversies.
 
Because students will be exposed to (and contribute from) a wide variety of perspectives on the subject, this course is appropriate for students in the traditional social sciences (e.g. sociology, anthropology, psychology, urban education, and history) as well as more contemporary ones (e.g. women’s studies, race studies, American studies, cultural studies, lesbian and gay studies).
 
Required Texts:
Grusky, David. 2014. Social Stratification: Class, Race, and Gender in Sociological Perspective, 4th Edition. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.
 

MALS 75400 - Introduction to the Digital Humanities CRN# 64171

Tuesdays, 4:15 - 6:15 p.m., Rm. 6417, 3 credits, Profs. Matthew Gold and Stephen Brier (MGOLD@gc.cuny.edu)

What are the digital humanities, and how can they help us think in new ways? This course offers an introduction to the landscape of digital humanities (DH) work, paying attention to how its various approaches embody new ways of knowing and thinking. What kinds of questions, for instance, does the practice of mapping pose to our research and teaching? When we attempt to share our work through social media, how is it changed? How can we read “distantly,” and how does “distant reading” alter our sense of what reading is?

Over the course of this semester, we will explore these questions and others as we engaging ongoing debates in the digital humanities, such as the problem of defining the digital humanities, the question of whether DH has (or needs) theoretical grounding, controversies over new models of peer review for digital scholarship, issues related to collaborative labor on digital projects, and the problematic questions surrounding research involving “big data.” The course will also emphasize the ways in which DH has helped transform the nature of academic teaching and pedagogy in the contemporary university with its emphasis on collaborative, student-centered and digital learning environments and approaches.

Among the themes and approaches we will explore are evidence, scale, representation, genre, quantification, visualization, and data. We will also discuss broad social, legal and ethical questions and concerns surrounding digital media and contemporary culture, including privacy, intellectual property, and open/public access to knowledge and scholarship.

Though no previous technical skills are required, students will be asked to experiment in introductory ways with DH tools and methods as a way of concretizing some of our readings and discussions. Students will be expected to participate actively in class discussions and online postings (including on our course blog) and to undertake a final project that can be either a conventional seminar paper or a proposal for a digital project. Students completing the course will gain broad knowledge about and understanding of the emerging role of the digital humanities across several academic disciplines and will begin to learn some of the fundamental skills used often in digital humanities projects.

Note: this course is part of an innovative "Digital Praxis Seminar," a two-semester long introduction to digital tools and methods that will be open to all students in the Graduate Center. The goal of the course is to introduce graduate students to various ways in which they can incorporate digital research into their work.

 

MALS 77100 - Aesthetics of Film CRN# 64176

Tuesdays, 4:15 - 8:15 PM, Rm. C419, 3 credits, Prof. Leah Anderst (LAnderst@qcc.cuny.edu)

Film Aesthetics provides students with the basic skills necessary to read and analyze the formal and stylistic components of film, both historical and contemporary. This course introduces the student to various genre of narrative cinema and categories of film (for example, silent comedy, melodrama, film noir, documentary, animation, and experimental, among others) produced in the United States and internationally. As students survey the work of important film theorists and apply it to films screened in class, they will master the fundamental vocabulary of film analysis and will learn to recognize the techniques and conventions that structure the cinematic experience – narrative systems, mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, sound, genre – in order to understand how these various components combine to yield film form and have developed over the history of the form.
Each student will lead discussion on one of our weekly readings and write two formal papers: a scene analysis essay due around the midterm point, and a longer seminar paper at the end of the semester on a topic of their choosing related to our course screenings, readings, or topics. This second paper will require a project proposal as well as an annotated bibliography of research sources. Readings for the course will be drawn heavily from Film Art: An Introduction by David Bordwell and Kristen Thompson (11th edition) as well as additional articles provided. 
 

MALS 77300 - History of Cinema II CRN# 64179

Tuesdays, 11:45 AM - 3:45 PM, Rm. C419, 3 credits, Prof. Michael Gillespie (mgillespie1@ccny.cuny.edu)
Cross-listed with FSCP 81000

This class engages with how cinema complicates, renders, and critiques the idea of history. In this way, this class will examine how cinema narrativizes or enacts a writing of history in the terms of ‘visual historiography.’ If historiography is the study of the writing of history, then this class will consider the cinematic writing of history with attention to narrativity, the purpose of historical narratives, and the significant values and meanings attributed to history. Furthermore, the class will focus on the emplotment of history by the visual and the significant epistemological questions about the shared impulse of narrativity between history and film as visual art. We will explore questions of truth and authenticity, temporality, the production of historical knowledge, memory and remembrance, trauma, and power. Our focus will take a critically disobedient approach in the sense that we will treat the films as historiographic interventions while also avoiding the fidelity concerns that most often shadow discussion of film and history. Thus, these films will be treated as distinct acts of visual historiography that consequentially confound and enliven our understanding of history and the critical capacities of visual art.
 

MALS 78100 - Issues in Urban Education CRN# 64180
"
Foundations of American Education"

Wednesdays, 6:30 - 8:30 PM, Rm. 3309, 3 credits, Prof. Susan Semel (ssemel@ccny.cuny.edu)

This course provides an overview of major issues and controversies in urban education in the United States. Through a historical, sociological, philosophical and political analysis of educational problems, the course explores a variety of progressive and traditional approaches to improving urban education in the 20th century. The course focuses on current neoliberal reforms to reduce educational inequality, including curriculum and common core learning standards, teacher education reform, school choice, tuition vouchers, charter schools, privatization, whole school reform, small schools, and value added models of teacher evaluation. Finally, the course examines the limits and possibilities of these reforms in improving urban education and reducing racial, ethnic and social class based educational inequalities.
 

MALS 78400 - Introduction to Latin American Studies CRN# 65001

Mondays, 6:30 - 8:30 PM, Rm. 4422, 3 credits, Prof. Patricia Tovar (ptovar@jjay.cuny.edu)

This seminar surveys five centuries of Latin American history, culture and politics from an interdisciplinary perspective, and introduces students to some of the most important issues, problems and debates in the region at large and the sub-regions within it. The course explores the rich diversity of peoples, geographies and histories that distinguish the region, and the experiences that have shaped it. By looking at the symbolic and political configurations of the region through a wide spectrum of materials (film, music, art, fiction, essays, and photography), students will think critically about major landmarks in the field of Latin American studies including the legacy of European colonialism, national fictions, modernity, social movements, conflict, memory, gender politics, religious beliefs, and the ways race, class, and gender intersect.
 
At the same time, students will examine various theoretical frameworks to approach the study of Latin America, including literary studies, linguistics, history, political science, sociology and anthropology. A chronological and thematic approach will give attention to the enduring legacies and challenges from the pre-Columbian era, the Spanish colonies, the nineteenth-century processes of independence, the emergence of the new nation-states, and the overall development of modern Latin American societies in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.
 

MALS 78500 - The United States in a Global Context CRN# 64182

Thursday, 4:15 - 6:15 p.m., Rm. 4419, 3 credits, Prof. Karen Miller (kamiller@lagcc.cuny.edu)

This class will explore the role of the US in the world. We will examine transformations in the meanings and material consequences of U.S. power from the beginning of the nineteenth century to the present. We will also consider the experiences of a wide range of American and non-American subjects as they manage their often-vexed relationships to various aspects of the United States. One of our tasks will be to interrogate U.S. global power and international relations, to understand how they changed over time, to examine their dynamics and contradictions, to consider their limitations, failures, and challengers. We will also explore how global engagements have transformed both U.S. citizens and the United States’ domestic terrain: just as the U.S. helps shape the world, the world also reshapes the United States, through immigration, culture, commerce, and a myriad of other connections. Our interdisciplinary study of these questions will be organized both chronologically and thematically. Students will be asked to write frequently and to produce a final paper. 
 

MALS 78500 - Mind the Gap: Technologies, trends, and policies that will shape the future of work CRN# 64183

Tuesdays, 6:30 -  8:30 PM, Rm. 3309, 3 credits, Prof. Ann Kirschner (ann.kirschner@cuny.edu)
 

Mind the Gap will study the future of work.  We will address this question:  As we think about the range of possibilities for the future of work -- from the utopian to the dystopian -- what are the policies, technologies, and social systems that should be anticipated today to ensure positive outcomes?  We will take an interdisciplinary approach to developing our skills as analysts and policy-makers, looking at trends in technology, globalization, and demographics, and evaluating alternative interventions by government, industry, educators, and other stakeholders.  The course will also bring in distinguished speakers to share their experience and ideas. 

MALS 78500 - Lingusitic and Cultural Anthropology CRN# 66682

Fridays, 8:45-10:45 a.m., Rm. 6494, Profs. Miki Makihara and Patricia Tovar (ptovar@jjay.cuny.edu)
Cross-listed with ANTH 78000
This course introduces students to some of the major social theories and debates that inspire and inform analysis in linguistic and cultural anthropology. Over the course of the semester, we will investigate a range of theoretical propositions concerning such topics as agency, structure, discourse, ideology, subjectivity, history, social change, power, culture, and the politics of representation.  This course fulfills a requirement for physical anthropology and archaeology students in the anthropology program, and should also be of interest for MA students and others who seek an introduction to these two subfields. The course is led by a linguistic anthropologist and a cultural anthropologist, who introduce their respective subfields. 

MALS 78500 - Genre and Global Conflict CRN# 66527
Wednesday, 4:15pm-8:15pm, Rm. C-419, Prof. Ria Banerjee (ria.banerjee@guttman.cuny.edu)
Cross-listed with FSCP 81000 and THEA 81500

This course will examine the interaction between a film’s employment of genre and the conflicts it depicts, defined broadly and globally. We will begin with the opening premise that genre fundamentally affects subject matter, so any analysis of film involves attention to the interpellation of form and content. War, an enormity of violence, seems to ask for “serious” filmic forms such as the documentary or drama; what happens, then, when it appears in forms that appear on the surface to be less serious, frivolous even?
This redefinition of the parameters of a “war film” means that we will begin the course with a rigorous discussion of what the term means to us as a class using a classic of the genre such as Apocalypse Now. We will then consider the way that other genres have deployed conflicts: for instance, the American Civil War in the classic Western, The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly, and the fantasy thriller Pan’s Labyrinth set in Franco’s Spain. World War II will inevitably form a bulk of our investigations. We will range from documentary film with a turbulent reception history like Night and Fog, to the depiction of Vichy France in the romance Casablanca, and World War II intrigue in The Third Man. Class discussions will also cluster around the Partition of India in 1947, a displacement of fourteen million people that is considered one of the bloodiest recent upheavals. We will discuss the ways that it is invoked in big budget Bollywood musicals like Earth versus in Ritwick Ghatak’s low budget indie trilogy from the 1960s. Can comedy accommodate serious conflicts? We will approach this question by discussing the Crusades and holy war in light of the self conscious silly-serious medievalism of Monty Python and the Holy Grail. Other genres we might consider include historical romances (Gladiator), horror/sci-fi (District 9), and animation (Waltz with Bashir), keeping an eye on the different conflicts they reference. Television has contributed its own powerful note to this question of genre; time permitting, we will consider treatments of conflict in The Twilight Zone and Prisoners of War (Hatufim), among others.
Since we will range widely in both genres we consider and the conflicts shown on film, students will be asked to present on one conflict of their choice from the syllabus; they will also contribute weekly to blog posts and class discussions. Final paper of 15-20 pages with view to publication in a suitable academic forum.

MALS 78500. The Evolution of The Neoliberal University CRN# 66796 (CANCELLED)
Thursday, 4:15 – 6:15 PM, Rm. 3207, Prof. Charles Jordan (Charles.Jordan@guttman.cuny.edu)
Cross-listed with UED 75100.

From a pivotal moment in the history of higher education, our course will redefine the undercurrents of neoliberalism within a nationalist context.  A decade ago, the Great Recession authored a dramatic shift in the ways in which higher education was funded, aligning the mission of the university to a corporate schema organized by some of the nation’s most powerful foundations.  Today, systems of accountability, assessment, evaluation and performance-based funding have become commonplace to the postsecondary system.  While these measures have reduced overhead costs and increased the efficiency of programs they have failed to address the critical divisions that plague campus life.  Racial inequity, socioeconomic divides, and impossibly high tuition costs have kept America’s colleges segregated.  Although there have been some advances in equity, the system is contending with a wholesale identity crisis, one that has been aggravated by the political polarization of the past two years.

This seminar will focus on the analysis of stubborn trends in higher education policy.  We will attend to issues of race, social class, free speech, partisan politics, and the remnants of the neoliberal assault from the Great Recession.  Using a range of ethnographic, historical, and policy-focused texts, our course will interrogate systemic sociological factors that have narrated the history of higher education.  We will examine higher education broadly and will use CUNY as a case study throughout the semester to underscore salient findings in a local context.  In this sense, we will draw from historical, qualitative, and quantitative studies that have examined key pieces of policy at the university.  Participants will be active in weekly discussions and will write a term paper focused on a policy issue of their choosing.

MALS 78800 - Introduction to Childhood and Youth Studies CRN# 64184

Tuesdays, 4:15 - 6:15 p.m., Rm. 3305, 3 credits, Prof. Roger Hart (RHart@gc.cuny.edu)

This seminar offers an introduction to how childhood and youth is investigated across the different disciplines of the social sciences, psychology and the humanities. Beginning with the recognition that concepts of childhood and adolescence are socially constructed and vary across culture and historical periods, we will examine how our shifting conceptions of childhood both align and clash with the way children actually live. We will examine how different institutions, discourses and systems shape how childhood is experienced: including family, school, the juvenile system, media and consumer culture.  While attending to the force of structural inequalities in cultural and economic arrangements, we will not risk rendering children passive or invisible. We consider what young people do, how they live their lives and imagine their futures. In doing so we will discuss alternative theories to what has been called the “socialization” of children in order to recognize that children participate actively in society, not only constrained by the existing social structures and processes whereby society is reproduced but also contributing to it and changing it.

SUMMER 2018


MALS 71500 - Critical Issues in International Studies
Wednesdays, 6:00 - 9:45 p.m., 3 credits, Rm. 6421, Prof. Anca Pusca

This course provides both a broad theoretical as well as a case specific introduction to some of the most pressing issues surrounding security studies today. The course introduces the subject matter through a series of key concepts, including: violence, war/conflict, peace, terror/terrorism, borders, nuclear security, human/environmental security, and cyber security, and related case-studies. Through these concepts and case-studies, the course offers a complex and well rounded introduction to the rising challenges of security in today’s globalized world. 

MALS 73100 - American Culture and Values
Mondays, 6:00 - 9:45 p.m., 3 credits, Rm. 5382, Prof. George Fragopoulos

To begin with a seemingly simple question: What is American studies? And what is the object of its study? This section of American Culture and Values begins with this somewhat fraught question regarding the purpose and object, and therefore objectives, of American studies as an academic discipline and as a field of knowledge. We will therefore begin by questioning and interrogating the current state of the field, before delving into its institutional past within the university. During the course of the semester, our scope will broaden to include cultural and historical structures beyond those of the academy and its disciplinary concerns. Evoking the interdisciplinary ethos of American Studies as field, we will also spend time interrogating the histories, communities, and cultural products—literature, film, music and art—of “America” itself, however it is that we define that geographical notion.   

MALS 75700 - Field Course in Island Long Term Human Ecodynamics
View Course Syllabus for Schedule, 3 credits, Brooklyn College, Ingersoll Room 4215, Prof. Rebecca Boger
 
This course is designed to introduce graduate students to geospatial technology skill sets that can be employed in a wide variety of geography, social science, and natural resource applications. Learners interact with 21st century technology tools, gain familiarity with GIS, and develop expertise using social media to share and disseminate data and analyses. Additionally, you will be gaining field mapping and surveying techniques extensively used in the environmental and archaeological sciences. These include use of GPS, smart phone technologies, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) air photography, surveying using real time kinematic (RTK) GPS and total stations. Field data are then brought into GIS for analysis and visualization.
 
Spatial tools are extremely useful to monitor, analyze and interpret landscape-scale changes. Because climate change is large contributor to the changes we see on the Earth’s surface, we are going to use the applications in this course to understand the impacts of a changing climate, with an emphasis on sustainability, particularly with reference to water and food. By the end of the course you will have a solid understanding of the impacts of a changing climate on the Earth’s surface, the tools that scientists use to understand and interpret change, and insight into how these changes, and especially changes related to changes in the Earth’s climate, will impact human societies
 
Course Structure
This will be a hybrid (mixture of online and face-to-face meetings) course. Students will meet for 2 day-long sessions (8 hours each) to learn mapping and surveying techniques (e.g., aerial photography, GPS, RTK GPS, total stations). For online materials we will have a combination of asynchronous and synchronous interactions as we work on the module assignments. You will be required to interact with the instructor weekly for one hour, participate in online discussions and submit homework assignments. Assignments will require about 7 hours of work each week. Online assignments will be geared toward learning how to use geospatial technologies in the field and analyzing in the lab. I will be available to meet with students individually or as a group during the scheduled time, as needed.

MALS 77200 - History of the Cinema I, 1895-1930
Thursdays, 6:00 - 9:45 p.m., 3 credits, Rm. C419, Prof. Leah Anderst

History of Cinema I is an intensive examination of film history before 1930 that introduces students to international silent cinema, to the scholarly literature on early cinema, and to the practices of researching and writing film history. Subjects covered will include the emergence of cinema, the cinema of attractions, the narrativization of cinema, theater and early film, sound, color, and the “silent” image, the industrialization of film production, national cinemas of the 1910s, the Hollywood mode of filmmaking, women and African-American filmmakers, and film movements of the 1920s. Students will study the work of such filmmakers as Lumière, Méliès, Porter, Paul, Bauer, Christensen, Feuillade, Weber, Micheaux, Murnau, Dulac, Eisenstein, and others while considering the ways that silent films were exhibited and received in diverse contexts.

MALS 70000 - Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies CRN #38132
“’Things Done Changed’: The Crack Era and Its Lasting Impact on the American Nation”
Mondays, 4:15 - 6:15 p.m., Rm. 5383, 3 credits, Prof. Jill Toliver Richardson (jirichardson@bmcc.cuny.edu)
 
This course examines the historical moment of the War on Drugs, from 1986-1992, and the resulting phenomena, which transformed the urban black and Latinx experience in contemporary American society. We will analyze film, fiction, hip hop music and sociological, anthropological and cultural studies that discuss topics such as the culture of surveillance, the desire for upward mobility, youth violence, the culture of resistance, outlaw identity and the impact of policing and incarceration on urban communities of color. Each week we will closely study a topic such as women’s access and mobility during the crack era, the construction of the drug lord persona, trauma, haunting and loss and the question of post-Civil rights era leadership. Students will be required to engage in weekly discussions based on the course readings, give an in-class presentation, complete short analytical writing assignments and one long paper.

MALS 70000 - Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies CRN #38131
"Object Lessons: Learning from Waste and Other Matter"
Thursdays, 6:30 - 8:30 p.m., Rm. 5383, 3 credits, Prof. Christopher Schmidt (cschmidt@lagcc.cuny.edu)

Why are some objects enchanted, while others are considered “junk” and “trash”? Do you worry about where your garbage travels—and who carries it—as it moves from the realm of private property into public waste management? What happens when human life and object life merge, and whole classes of humans are stigmatized and treated as expendable?
It’s undeniable that waste and pollution have become pressing threats in a world confronting dire ecological damage. However, before demonizing waste, in this class we’ll pause and consider what forms of symbolic value we can unearth in rubbish and other ordinary matter. We’ll survey the fields of “dirt studies” and “new materialisms” through readings across the disciplines, from philosophy and political science (Jane Bennett’s Vibrant Matter) to anthropology (Arjun Appadurai, Mary Douglas) to ecocriticism and African American studies. My own background is in literature and art, and some writer–artists we’ll consider include Francis Ponge, Clarice Lispector, Robert Smithson, Roland Barthes, Ishmael Reed, Mierle Laderman Ukeles, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Tom McCarthy, Kara Walker, and Sianne Ngai.
For their final projects, students may write about any aspect of waste or waste management. Alternately, students may write a final essay on the “hidden life” and history of an ordinary object (e.g.: the shipping container, the blanket, the remote control, concrete, etc.)—inspired by the Object Lessons book series from Bloomsbury.   

MALS 70600 - Enlightenment and Critique CRN #38142
Mondays, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m., Rm. 3207, 3 credits, Prof. Sarah Danielsson (SDanielsson@qcc.cuny.edu)
 
Bookended by Kant’s “What is Enlightenment?” (1784) and Foucault’s “What is Enlightenment?” (1984), this course looks at the enlightenment both as a movement seen as responsible for modern democracies, equality and individual rights, and at the same time seen as the origin of many of the ills of modern society, including totalitarianism. After tracing some of the most important thinkers of the enlightenment, the course will then look at both nineteenth century and more contemporary critics. Some critical lenses to be used include feminism, romanticism, Marxism and postmodernism.
 
MALS 70700 - The Shaping of Modernity, 1780-1914 CRN #
38133
Wednesdays, 4:15 - 6:15 p.m., Rm. 5383, 3 credits, Prof. Richard Kaye (krichar@hunter.cuny.edu)

This course will explore a wide range of significant intellectual, historical, scientific, political, and creative works of the period as well as recent or contemporary texts considering the era.  We will begin with Burke's "Reflections on the Revolution in France," De Toqueville's "Democracy in America," Mary Wollstonecraft's "Vindication of the Rights of Women," and John Stuart Mills's "On Liberty." Turning to fiction, we will examine Jane Austen's "Emma," Gustave Flaubert's "Madame Bovary," Henry James's "The Portrait of a Lady," and Edith Wharton's "The House of Mirth." The class will consider, as well, central poems of the British Romantic movement in the writing of Keats, Shelley, Byron, and Wordsworth.  Other texts (or excerpts from texts) include Darwin's "The Origin of Species," William James' "The Varieties of Religious Experience," Freud's The Interpretation of Dreams," Hannah Arendt's "On Revolution," E.P Thompson's "The Making of the English Working Class," T.J. Clark's "The Painting of Modern Life: Paris and the Art of Manet and His Followers," and Charles Rosen's "The Romantic Generation." Class presentations and a final paper.

 
MALS 70900 – Approaches to Life Writing CRN #38134 
Mondays, 6:30 - 8:30 p.m., Rm. 4419, 3 credits, Prof. Annalyn Swan (annalyn.swan@gmail.com)
 
Ever since Plutarch brought Alexander the Great blazingly to life in his seminal Lives (2nd century CE), people have loved to read—and write—biographies. Approaches to Life Writing will be an exploration of the art and craft of the genre. What do great biographies and autobiographies have in common--and how do they differ? How are scenes set, facts organized, context provided? How novelistic can a biography be? And is there, finally, such a thing as “truth” in biography or autobiography, or a “definitive” account? From biography as gossipy inside edition (Boswell’s The Life of Samuel Johnson), to biography as irreverent debunking (Lytton Strachey’s Eminent Victorians), to biography as detective story (A.J.A. Symons’ Quest for Corvo), to life-writing at its most personal and poetic (Annie Dillard’s An American Childhood), we will explore the many ways a writer can tease out the “figure in the carpet,” as Leon Edel, the great biographer of Henry James, put it.
But this is also a course about practicing the art ourselves. For the final paper, everyone will have the opportunity either to write an autobiographical chapter, or else research and write a chapter of a biography.
 
MALS 71200 - The Culture of Fashion: Theories and Practices CRN #38135
Wednesdays, 6:30 - 8:30 p.m., Rm. 5383, 3 credits, Prof. Eugenia Paulicelli (epaulicelli@gmail.com)
Cross-listed with IDS 81660
 
The course will take the form of an interdisciplinary exploration into the art of making, craftsmanship and technology in today’s globalized world. In particular, we will call attention to the larger systems that influence the state of fashion, craft and aesthetics constantly under development and in flux. The course will focus on specific case studies such as the Made in Italy, Made in New York etc. within a transnational context and in relation to gender, race, class and labor.
 
Bringing to the fore new systems developing within the industry, the course will emphasize the intersection of tradition, sustainability, social justice, ethics and beauty as they influence new collaborative modes and design and production.
 
The course will draw on writings from critical theory, history, fashion studies, material culture, literature, and the objects that are part of a digital archive project and exhibition at the Art Center, Queens College (October-December 2017). In addition, the course will feature guest speakers, field work and a research lab component that requires students to carry out a creative project. A visit will be scheduled to the Brooklyn/Pratt Fashion + Design accelerator and other sites. Major authors to be studied will include Richard Sennett, Pierre Bordieau, Peter Stallybrass, Walter Benjamin, Georg Simmel, David Harvey, Jane Schneider, Roland Barthes and others.

MALS 71500 - Critical Issues in International Studies CRN #38149
Thursdays, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m., Rm. 5382, 3 credits, Prof. Peter Bratsis (pbratsis@bmcc.cuny.edu)

This course is designed to broaden the student’s perspectives and deepen her/his understanding of international studies. The course will examine the production of global political order and the multiple ways that political power shapes the relations and hierarchies within and between political communities. Topics will include imperialism, world-systems and dependency, human rights and ‘just’ wars, political corruption, race and ethnicity, the financialization of capitalism, and the transnationalization of classes and states.
 
MALS 72200 – Contemporary Feminist Theories CRN # 38136
Tuesdays, 6:30 - 8:30 p.m., Rm. 5383, 3 credits, Prof. Jean Halley (jean.halley@csi.cuny.edu)
 
This course explores Contemporary Feminist Theories through feminist work about “bodies with gender,” and about what it means to have gender and to “be female” with a focus on the United States.  We consider contemporary feminist thought on differences and similarities in the experiences of women and other gendered bodies across lines of class, race and sexuality.  We examine how gender defines human experiences and how feminists resist these definitions.  Sigmund Freud once called work and love the central arenas of human life.  We examine contemporary feminist thought on what it means to have gender in love and to be gendered at work, along with an examination of the representation of women and gender in the larger culture, and of violence in the lives of gendered bodies particularly those gendered female.  We make use of a variety of texts in exploring feminist thinking on the “nature” of gender, love and sexuality, so-called women’s work, the expectations “experts” have of diversely gendered bodies, and the representation of gender in the mass media.
 
MALS 72800 - Topics in Environmental Social Science CRN #38137
Tuesdays, 2:00 - 4:00 p.m., Rm. 3308, 3 credits, Prof. Susan Saegert (ssaegert@gc.cuny.edu)
Cross-listed with PSYC 79102
 
Theories of how people and environments mutually shape each other are important in helping us think about how research can contribute to more just and sustainable relationships of people to their habitats and societies. This course focuses on the psychological level of analysis. The theories explored lend themselves to accounts of psychology that can mesh with other levels of analysis. The empirical readings illustrate how the theories can be used to address issues of environmental justice and sustainability. 
 
Learning Objectives:
The overall objective of the course is for each student to develop a reasoned and reasonably satisfying answer to the following question: How is the psychologically experienced self related to the social and physical context?
 
Achieving this objective requires answering another question: What is the unit of analysis of psychology? Some of the positions prominent in psychology assume the answer would be either particular psychological processes or the biological substrate/determinants of experience and behavior. This course introduces an alternative approach in which we see selves as socially and materially contingent. In the latter approach a student must develop an answer to the question “Contingent in what way?”
 
The second learning objective is to come to an understanding for yourself of the goals of psychological knowledge.  There are many contenders for this crown in psychology including: prediction and control, valid description, consciousness raising, mental and physical health improvement, resolution of social problems, and social justice to name a few. This course explores the contingency of the goals of psychology as well as of psychological processes.
 
A third learning objective is for you to build on the knowledge you are developing in your methods and ethics course to understand how these goals are best achieved.
 
A final learning objective is to help you develop your scholarly craft. The steps in this involve learning the following:

  1. How to read theoretical material (somewhat quickly);
  2. How to paraphrase an argument in a non-distorting way;
  3. How to critique an argument;
  4. How to make an argument;
  5. How to use theory in the development of your own empirical research and practice;
  6. How to improve your writing

 
ASSIGNMENTS AND GRADING: Written assignments will include almost weekly responses or group presentations (40% of grade) and longer assignments (20% of grade) and a final paper (20% of grade). Unless it is noted that there is a larger assignment or a group presentation, written responses are required each week. Responses must be sent in by midnight the Sunday before the class meets on Tuesday.  Responses should be three to four double spaced pages. You do not need to prepare a response for the days when longer assignments are due or when you have a group presentation. Note that longer assignments are due on the date they are listed–You should come to class with a draft of your paper. Longer assignments should be between 10 and 12 pages. If you have questions, raise them in class and revise the draft to submit by Friday 5 pm after the Tuesday class. Class participation will count as 20% of your grade. Please come to class prepared to ask questions about the readings and converse with other students about the content.  Final papers will be due by 5 pm on Friday May 19. Final papers may be up to 20 double spaced pages.
 
The assignments should be considered essays and composed accordingly. Please consider the structure of the essay and allow yourself time for revisions for clarity, completeness and coherence.
 
MALS 73100 - American Culture and Values CRN #38151
Wednesdays, 4:15 - 6:15 p.m., Rm. 3307, 3 credits, Prof. Natalie Havlin (nhavlin@lagcc.cuny.edu)
Cross-listed with ASCP 81000
 
This course aims to resolve and interconnect the manifold dimensions of movement as an analytical and methodological framework for American Studies. American Studies scholarship on nation formation and im/migration – as well as the study of U.S. social justice struggles – has long been animated by a concern with the ways that people, ideas, texts, and goods circulate. American Studies research has also investigated movement as a key component in the management and control of people and resources through U.S. colonialisms, systems of racial capitalism, imperialism, enslavement, forced labor, incarceration, and militarized borders.
 
This course will begin by examining frameworks of im/mobility and stasis in American Studies scholarship that traces the relationship of im/migration to settler colonialism, slavery, and U.S. imperialism in the Caribbean, the Pacific, Central America and Southeast Asia. Then we will explore movement as a performative method and corporeal analytic to understand embodied experience in relation to structural social inequalities along co-constitutive axes of race, class, gender, sexuality, and disability. In this portion of the class we will pay special attention to American Studies scholarship about corporeal ways of knowing and expression that engage disability justice frameworks, U.S. Women of Color and Third World feminist theory, and queer of color critique. The course will conclude by considering the methodological limits and political possibilities of attending to the complex material, spatial, temporal, and corporeal dimensions of movement within indigenous, Latinx, Asian American, and Black diasporic struggles for sovereignty and justice that cross, and contest, U.S. borders.

MALS 73200 - American Social Institutions CRN #38138
“(Re)Fashioning Boundaries and Borders”
Fridays, 4:15 - 6:15 p.m., Rm. 3212, 3 credits, Prof. David Humphries (DHumphries@qcc.cuny.edu)


 
Using our current vantage, we will 1) examine the origins and development of American Studies in terms of its institutional settings, key methodologies, and relationship with nationalism and the Cold War; 2) consider the ways in which popular culture serves as a testing- and battle-ground for conceptions of race, class, and gender, with a special focus on popular music culture, from minstrelsy to Run the Jewels’ reflections on “the protest album”; 3) debate the productive evolution of “borderlands” and transnational perspectives in American Studies in light of resurgent nationalism and border enforcement; 4) and consider how our own institutional experiences and circumstances shape our interests, scholarship, and impact, paying particular attention to the “academy” itself and debates about how higher education is valued as a site of social replication and transformation. Key texts, which we will read in their entirety, are likely to include Eric Lott’s Love and Theft: Blackface Minstrelsy & the American Working Class (20th Annniversary Edition); Gloria Anzaldua’s Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza (Fourth Edition); and Michal Fabricant and Stephen Brier’s Austerity Blues: Fighting for the Soul of Public Higher. In addition, we will read excerpts from The Machine in the Garden by Leo Marx, The Origins of American Literature Studies: An Institutional History by Elizabeth Renker, The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double-Consciousness by Paul Gilroy, The Reorder of Things: The University and Its Pedagogies of Minority Difference by Roderick A. Ferguson, and Haunted by Hitler: Liberals, the Left, and the Fight against Fascism in the United States by Christopher Vials, as well as numerous pieces from recent editions of American Quarterly. It is impossible to consider “American Social Institutions” without considering identify formation as well, and we will look together at three novels that address this relationship in suggestive ways, while also providing us with the opportunity to build and apply a common set of keywords: Willa Cather’s The Professor’s House, Louise Erdrich’s Plague of Doves, and Caryl Phillips’ Dancing in the Dark. Writing for the course will take place throughout the term in a workshop setting and will include multiple genres and shorter pieces, from life writing, to a book review, conference proposal, annotated bibliography and capstone proposal and reflection; students more advanced in their research will have the opportunity to substitute a more traditional seminar paper for some of the shorter assignments.
 
MALS 73500 - Africana Studies: Global Perspectives CRN #38148
"Race and Racism of Interior Worlds"
Wednesdays, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m., Rm. 3309, 3 credits, Prof. Jessie Daniels (jdaniels@hunter.cuny.edu)
Cross-listed with AFCP 72000, PSYC 80103, SOC 85700

Description forthcoming.



MALS 73800 - Internship Course CRN #38139 
Wednesdays, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m., Rm. 8202, 3 credits, Prof. Elizabeth Macaulay-Lewis (emacaulay_lewis@gc.cuny.edu)

The aim of the internship course is for students to gain valuable work experience through an internship in their chosen field and to afford students an opportunity to apply their academic knowledge in a professional environment. This course is composed of an internship (140 hours over the course of the semester) with weekly class meetings (predominately in person and several online). Students will be expected to relate their internship to their course of study and career goals through a series of assignments and presentations. Students will also work on their professional development, with workshops on career planning, resumes and cover letters, hosted by the Office of Career Planning and Professional Development. Alumni from the MALS program and speakers from non-academic sectors will discuss the role of internships in their careers. This course is restricted and students must apply via the online form before the semester starts. All questions about this course should be directed to Prof. Macaulay-Lewis (emacaulay_lewis@gc.cuny.edu).  

MALS 74400 - Special Topics in Archaeology CRN # 
38147
“Debates in Cultural Heritage”
Tuesdays, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m., Rm. 3212, 3 credits, Prof. Erin Thompson (ethompson@jjay.cuny.edu)
 
This course examines current debates in the acquisition, display, and repatriation of cultural heritage. We will begin by looking at the historical development of various motivations for the movements of cultural property, including war-time looting, aesthetic appreciation, and political action. We will then consider the current wide range of ethical dilemmas faced by those who must make decisions about the fate of cultural heritage, including its preservation, presentation, and interpretation, using case studies ranging from calls to dismantle Confederate monuments, to sales of looted antiquities, to digital recreations of destroyed heritage. We will see these debates in practice during trips to New York museums, and students will be expected to contribute to an ongoing debate by conducting original research.
 
MALS 75300 - Data Visualization Methods CRN #38145
Mondays, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 5382, 3 credits, Prof. Lev Manovich (lmanovich@gc.cuny.edu)

Description forthcoming.

MALS 75500 - Digital Humanities: Methods and Practices CRN #38140
Wednesdays, 4:15 - 6:15 p.m., Rm. 5382, 3 credits, Prof. Andrea Silva (asilva@york.cuny.edu)
Cross-listed with IDS 81670


During the Fall 2017 semester, students explored the landscape of the digital humanities, considering a range of ways to approach DH work and proposing potential DH projects. In the spring, we will put that thinking into action by refining and producing a small number of those projects. This praxis-oriented course will ask students to organize into teams and, by the end of the semester, produce a project prototype. Upon completion of the course, students will have gained hands-on experience in the conceptualizing, planning, production, and dissemination of a digital humanities project. Student work for this course will demonstrate a variety of technical, project management, and rhetorical skills. One of our goals is to produce well-conceived, long-term projects that have the potential to extend beyond the Spring 2018 semester. A range of advisors will be matched to support the needs of each individual project. Successful completion of the class will require a rigorous commitment to meeting deadlines and benchmarks established at the beginning of the course.
 
The class will hold a public event at the end of the semester where students will launch their projects and receive feedback from the DH academic community.

MALS 77300 - History of the Cinema II, 1930-Present CRN #38144
Tuesdays, 4:15 - 8:15 p.m., Rm. C419, 3 credits, Prof. Elizabeth Alsop (ealsop@gc.cuny.edu)
 
This course will explore the international development of film as an art form, industry, and medium of communication from approximately 1930 to the present. That is to say, it will survey the evolution of film culture from the advent of sound, to an era in which modes of production and reception are once more undergoing transformation as a result of digital technologies, globalization, and media convergence.
 
Through weekly screenings and readings, students will gain familiarity with key traditions and trends in U.S. and global cinema. Subjects will include early sound film; French Poetic Realism; Italian Neorealism; postwar Japanese cinema; film noir and other classical Hollywood genres; the rise of international “new waves”; the impact of European art cinema; American independent film; emergent non-Western cinemas (including filmmakers from Latin America, Iran, and New Zealand); and the global blockbuster.
 
Several topics will recur throughout the semester: the trajectory of realism as a cinematic aesthetic; the persistence and global transformation of Hollywood genres; the historical contributions of female directors to world cinema; and the ways international filmmakers have responded to and challenged Hollywood modes of production. We will pay particular interest to the challenges of historiography, and discuss the ethics, politics, and logistics of “doing” film history, as well the role critics and scholars play in consolidating (or revising) dominant film historical narratives.
 
Students will be asked to engage in close analyses of individual films, while also examining the various contexts from which these films emerged. Films to be screened might include: M (Fritz Lang, 1931), The Rules of the Game (Jean Renoir, 1939), To Be or Not to Be (Ernst Lubitsh, 1942), Paisà (Roberto Rossellini, 1946), Rashomon (Akira Kurosawa, 1950), In a Lonely Place (Nicholas Ray, 1950), Breathless (Jean-Luc Godard, 1960), Daisies (Věra Chytilová, 1966), Blow-Up (Michelangelo Antonioni, 1966), Black Girl (Ousmane Sembene, 1966), Ali: Fear Eats the Soul (Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1974), Taxi Driver (Martin Scorcese, 1976), Do the Right Thing (Spike Lee, 1988), Close Up (Abbas Kiarostami, 1990), The Piano (Jane Campion, 1993), Children of Men (Alfonso Cuaròn, 2006), and Zama (Lucrecia Martel, 2017). In-class screenings will be supplemented with clips and occasional at-home viewings.
 
Readings will be drawn from a number of sources and posted to our course site on the CUNY Academic Commons; in addition, students will also be asked to purchase Robert Sklar’s Movie-Made America. (David Bordwell and Kristin Thompson’s Film History (3e) is recommended, but not required.)
 
Students will complete a 15-page paper on a topic of their choosing, which engages with the concerns of the course; a formal proposal will be due midway through the semester. In addition, they are also expected to actively contribute to class discussions; to submit weekly blog posts in response to that week’s screening and reading/s; and to make at least one presentation.
 
MALS 77500 - Global Cities CRN #38150
"Migrant and Immigrant New York City"

Tuesdays, 2:00 - 4:00 p.m., Rm. 6114, 3 credits, Prof. Margaret Chin (mmchin@hunter.cuny.edu)
 Cross-listed with SOC 82800

 Over the course of the twentieth century, New York City has witnessed two major waves of immigration: from the Irish, Italian and Jewish immigrants who arrived at the turn of the twentieth century to the Chinese, Jamaican and Mexican immigrants who now constitute the majority of the city’s immigrant population. New York City has also been on the receiving end of the great migration of African Americans. Together, these successive waves of newcomers and their children have changed the socioeconomic, political and cultural landscape of the city. We will examine migration across a diverse spectrum; distinguishing between forced and voluntary migration, “classic” issues of immigration, immigrant adaptation - assimilation and incorporation/integration; social mobility- the labor market, race and ethnic relations, gender and the family, transnationalism and the second generation. Throughout the course, we will use NYC experiences to highlight how these immigration and migration streams have transformed the city in the past and the present.

MALS 78200 - Politics of Urban Education CRN #38141
Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 5383, 3 credits, Prof. Susan Semel (ssemel@ccny.cuny.edu)
 
The Politics of Urban Education investigates the social, economic and political forces that shape contemporary urban education. Readings and discussions focus on school reform as a political, rather than technical, construct. We will consider historical and contemporary efforts to reform urban public schooling by locating them within a wider political arena. The class will examine how both local and national political dynamics have helped shape and drive varying school reform strategies, including market-based choice models, state and federal accountability programs, changes to school funding mechanisms, and mayoral control. Particular attention will be paid to issues of race and class as frames for understanding the politics of urban education.

MALS 78300 - Introduction to US Latino Studies CRN #38143
“Performing Latinidad”
Thursdays, 4:15 – 6:15 p.m., Rm. 3309, 3 credits, Prof. Vanessa Perez Rosario (vperezrosario@brooklyn.cuny.edu)
 Cross-listed with SPAN 87200

What is “latinidad"? How has "the Latino" been constructed in U.S. culture? What has been the importance of "latinidad" in the social and political history of people of Latin American descent in this country? What place does "latinidad" occupy within the North American academy? This seminar examines the complex history of the multiple Latino communities across the United States present in the country’s history from its emergence to the present day. Students will explore the history, politics and culture of the diverse social groups linked to the greater legacy of Latin American societies in the United States. The seminar will employ a strong interdisciplinary approach to analyzing issues ranging from race, class and gender relations, cultural productions, linguistic differences, identity politics, civil rights, and the rise of Latino communities in current political struggles and debates. The seminar will combine methodologies of research from the fields of literary studies, linguistics, history, political science, sociology and anthropology. The course will study the history of the field of Latinx studies, literary and cultural studies, community activism, feminism, sexuality, migration and the emergence of pan-Latino culture. We will focus on the development of the field of Latinx Studies over the past 60 years, its critical and intellectual genealogies and its theoretical contributions to cultural studies, the understanding of race, gender and sexuality, performance studies, and migration. Some readings will include Black Behind the Ears by Ginetta Candelario, Loosing My Espanish by H.G. Carrillo, Undocumented Dominican Migration by Frank Graziano, The Trouble with Unity by Cristina Beltrán, The Latino Body by Lazaro Lima, Performing Queer Latinidad:Dance, Sexuality, Politics by Ramón Rivera-Servera, among others.

MALS 78500 – World Fairs: 1851-1964 CRN #38152  CANCELLED
Mondays, 4:15 – 6:15 p.m., Rm. 3308, 3 credits, Prof. Romy Golan (RGolan@gc.cuny.edu)
 
Described as “phantasmagoria of Capital” by Walter Benjamin, World Fairs—exhibits of machines, manufactured goods, high and applied arts in architecturally fanciful pavilions--rank among the great spectacles of the last two centuries. Some drew as many as 50 million visitors. The main argument advanced by this course is that while world fairs were based on a similar format, they have a morphology: each is a picture of a society and its imaginary at a given moment in history. The course begins in 1851 with the Great Exhibition at the Crystal Palace in London, the site of the first international fair, and ends with the 1964 New York World’s Fair in Flushing Meadow Park, Queens. The fairs spread outward, from the “center” to the “periphery,” from Paris and Vienna to Calcutta, Osaka, and Tasmania. The fairs allowed host countries, supposedly, to enter the community of modern world powers.
    Any attempt to study such events must reckon with the imbalance between their massive scale and the surviving documentation. As “non-places”--in the phrase of the sociologist Marc Augé—or spaces conceived as nodes or points of exchange of people, merchandise, and vehicles, where everybody and everything is on the move, they left few traces. While reviewers repeatedly lamented the use of ersatz materials and what they called the “isolated,” “exiled,” and “homeless” art “made expressly for exhibitions,” this was the very nature of such time-based events, as architects and artists both recognized. Among these materials it is especially the artworks--murals, paintings, sculptures, and decorative arts—that survive.
    Although ephemeral, each world fair had its own temporality. Predicated on progress, the 1889 Paris Word Fair and the 1893 Columbian fair in Chicago celebrated the centennials of very different historical events: a class revolution and a colonial conquest. The 1900 Paris World Fair was Janus-faced: viewers viewed ornate historicist buildings while walking on swift-moving electric platforms. The 1931 Paris Colonial Exposition was intentionally anachronistic, oriented to 19th-century imperial grandeur. With the Molochs of its Nazi and Soviet pavilions facing one another across the Champs de Mars, the Paris 1937 World Fair was dramatically anchored in the present. Later, Salvador Dali’s Dream of Venus Pavilion, the Perisphere, and General Motors’s Futurama, the three blockbusters of the 1939 New York World’s Fair reflected a mentality obstinately tuned, only a few months before World War II, to “the bright tomorrows.” The 1958 Brussels Word Fair, dominated by the Atomium (an iron crystal magnified 165 billion times) professed a humanist and ecumenical message in the midst of the Cold War.
With the advent of mass communication and mass travel, and the loss of interest on the part of artists and architects in the concept of the “Synthesis of the Arts” the 1964 New York World Fair set (again) in Queens was, arguably, already passé.
 
MALS 78500 - Latinos, Schooling and Identities CRN # 38621
Fridays, 4:15 - 6:15 p.m., Rm. 3308, 3 credits, Prof. Mellie Torres (mtorres2@gc.cuny.edu)

The purpose of this course is to explore the theoretical and empirical conversations related to the education of Latino students in the U.S. with a particular focus on the construction of racial and gender identities and their intersection with other identities, including sexuality and immigrant generation. This course is designed to introduce graduate students to the varying sociological explanations (e.g., social and cultural reproduction theories, feminist theories, etc.) of how and why social demographic factors among Latinos students (immigrant status, generation, skin color, gender identity, and national group identification) operate in learning and social outcomes.  Students are expected to have some familiarity with these theories.

MALS 78800 – Introduction to Childhood and Youth Studies CRN # 38146
Thursdays, 4:15 - 6:15 p.m., Rm. 5382, 3 credits, Prof. Colette Daiute (cdaiute@gc.cuny.edu)


This course in Childhood and Youth Studies allows for an in-depth focus on the interaction of problem, theory, and method in research with children and adults across the globe. We pay special attention to how researchers in the field critically and creatively frame research investigations, develop research questions, design, implement, and report their studies. Students engage with the history and contemporary study of children, childhood, and adolescence as defined and supported in organizations and collectives of human development (education, family, social welfare, community organizations, children’s rights), public media (children’s literature, broadcast, digital media), and research settings. The course encompasses sociocultural approaches to childhood/youth through field-based studies with young people encountering various kinds of challenges, opportunities, interventions (educational, community, civic, etc.), and policies. Methods and measures addressed include ethnography/participant observation, narrative inquiry, interactive digital storytelling, conversation with and among children, participatoryaction research, play- and arts-based approaches, and archival research across a variety of global settings. Course activities involve reading research articles, discussing the articles with a focus on method, and applying course materials to the design of students’ research projects and interests. The readings introduce diverse perspectives on learning about and with young people, challenges to their participation and development, interventions, research purposes, and approaches. Weekly guiding questions integrate the readings toward scholarly and activist research. Guest speakers who are experts in specific areas of child/youth research present their work and join us to discuss readings, ideas, and issues.

MALS 70000 - Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies CRN# 36294  

“Decoding Celebrity: Georgia O’Keeffe as Case Study”

Mondays, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 4419, 3 credits, Prof. Linda Grasso (grasso@york.cuny.edu)


What is celebrity? How is it achieved? What purposes does it serve? In this course, we explore these questions using twentieth-century painter Georgia O’Keeffe as a focal point. Reading cultural criticism, history, autobiography, and popular culture biography, we consider the ways in which O’Keeffe’s celebrity enables an understanding of larger issues such as how celebrities are commodified and consumed by a variety of constituencies for a multitude of reasons. Viewing works of art, photographs, advertisements, documentaries, and You Tube videos, we also consider the complex ways in which celebrity images are created and circulated in multiple public domains. Conducted as a research seminar, the course requires students to study texts intensively, design and execute a research project, and share findings with peers.

 

MALS 70000 - Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies CRN# 36295

“Envisioning the Body”

Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 4419, 3 credits, Prof. Elizabeth Wissinger (ewissinger@gc.cuny.edu)

 

What do the Kardashians have to do with contemporary race and gender politics? How do fashionable images play into world power relations? How is today’s explosive availability of images affecting concepts of selfhood, agency, and bodily worth? 

 

This course will explore theories of visualization technologies and bodies, taking students from classic approaches to ways of seeing through an interdisciplinary trajectory encompassing media, feminist, cultural, and sociological studies of how the body is performed and iterated through evolving technological frames. Representation, always a thorny issue, has philosophical, sociological, scientific, and political implications. These implications are urgently in need of interrogation as digital culture has pushed the primacy of the image in social life to the extreme, where a picture can speak a thousand words  (or launch a thousand tweets). 

 

Using curated readings to guide our thinking, we will make use of the vibrant visual culture of online and social media, as well as visit key examples of the cultural institutions, built environment, and streets of NYC, to explore how the body is constructed by the gaze of cinema, diced and sliced by the glance of television, and shattered into bits by the digitization of the internet and social media. Throughout, we will consider the role of the malleable body, artifice and authenticity, gender politics, and the rise of self-branding as it feeds into neoliberal values and biopolitical frames. 

 

MALS 70000 - Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies CRN # 36296

Thursdays, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 4419, 3 credits, Prof. Karen Miller (kamiller@lagcc.cuny.edu)

 

Is the United States an empire? If so, what might that mean? If not, what other metaphors can we use to explain U.S. global relations? We will examine transformations of U.S. global power and international relations from the middle of the nineteenth century to the present. Clearly, the United States does not hold political sovereignty over a broad range of colonies. Aside from the 50 United States, the U.S. holds Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands of the United States, the Northern Marianas, and American Samoa. But, the U.S. has the largest military in the world, sustains the world’s biggest economy, and has unparalleled political power. That power is constantly shifting, under continuous challenge, and never as complete as U.S. leaders would like. Our task in this class is to interrogate that power, to understand how it emerged and changed over time, to explore its relationship to other forms of global power and other colonial projects, to examine the dynamics and contradictions that animate it, to consider its limits, and to understand its challengers. We will also explore how global engagements have transformed the United States’ domestic terrain: just as the U.S. helps shape the world, the world also changes the United States, through immigration, culture, commerce, and other connections. Our interdisciplinary study of these questions will be organized both chronologically and thematically. Students will be asked to write frequently and to produce a final paper. 

 

MALS 70000 - Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies CRN # 36297
"Tragedy: Classical, Modern, Postmodern"
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 6421, 3 credits, Prof. Maureen Fadem (Maureen.Fadem@kbcc.cuny.edu)

This course assesses tragedy across time, from its roots in classical Greece through to the contemporary moment. In a broad sense, we will read tragedy over the long arc of Western (literary) history in order to think through the politics and history of the genre. Through an analytic frame linking postcolonial and poststructural theories, we’ll ask why has tragedy seen a resurgence in recent times? Why is it this genre, particularly, that intercepts, interrupts and inspires the postmodern and postcolonial literary imagination? And why is intertextual writing so often linked to earlier tragedies? Also interesting is to explore why tragedy is a creative structure and motif to which writers turn in conditions of political strife—situations of intractable conflict or eras of substantial social change. Tragedy is deeply political, a type of work that compels our interrogation of its ‘exalted’ canonical legacy while also impelling us to ask how, as Robert Williams Jr. argues in Savage Anxieties, it has functioned (along with the Homeric epics) as agent, establishing and maintaining the ideology of Western civilization and consolidating imperialist and patriarchal discourses. Equally and paradoxically, why do the concerns of tragedy—justice, revenge, ethics, heroism, the private and the public—make it serviceable to writers who are critical of those very discourses? That is, contemporary authors of Africa, Asia, Ireland and America—figures like Tom Paulin, Marina Carr and Colm Toíbín, Michael Ondaatje and Wole Soyinka, Spike Lee and Toni Morrison. Starting with an examination of tragedy’s genesis, we’ll read a number of Greek plays followed by looking at the early modern form and how it changes (and doesn’t) in the hands of Renaissance dramatists working in a quite different moment and milieu. Lastly, we’ll read contemporary tragedies in the genres that hold sway in late modernity (fiction and film, with theatre continuing). Each tragedy will be paired with theory and criticism. We’ll look at tragedy theory, the long-established interpretations (Aristotle, Nietzsche, Miller, George Eliot, Hume, others), the Marxist treatments (Lukács, Benjamin, Williams, others) and responses by contemporary thinkers who find in tragedy a new (political, poetical) urgency (Eagleton, Cleary, Butler, others). Students in this seminar will actively participate in the production of knowledge; they will write and share weekly reflections, make a presentation on at least one reading, and write a comprehensive term paper with clear methodological grounding.
 

MALS 70200 – Metropolis: A Political, Historical, and Sociological Profile of New York CRN# 36298 
Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 4419, 3 credits, Prof. Libby Garland (Libby.Garland@kbcc.cuny.edu)

 

This interdisciplinary course will explore New York City’s rise and role as the nation’s metropolis, examining several key themes in the city’s development.  In particular, we will look at Gotham as a center of work, culture and residency as well as at the diverse populations that have called the city home through its four-century history.  We will examine New York City from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, including history, sociology, anthropology, economics, and political science.

 

MALS 70300 - Law, Politics, and Policy CRN# 36299
“Immigration, the State, and Justice: On The Margins of Membership” 

Tuesdays 4:15-6:15pm, Rm. 3207, 3 credits, Prof. Monica Varsanyi (mvarsanyi@jjay.cuny.edu)

 

 With a focus on immigration (as opposed to immigrants), our primary task is to interrogate and explore the ways in which the state mediates and controls the membership and movement of people across national boundaries and within the territory of the nation-state, both historically and in the contemporary era. In exploring the changing relationship between migrants and the state, we will define “state” broadly to include the local, national, and supranational. Topics include, inter alia, the changing landscape and rescaling of immigrant enforcement, the construction of migrant illegality, the role of discretion in immigration enforcement, deportation and detention, debates over immigration and criminality, and the expanding “crimmigration” system. While the class focuses most specifically on the US context, international examples will also be discussed and papers based on international case studies are welcome. 

  

MALS 71000 – Forms of Life Writing CRN# 36300
Mondays, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 6421, 3 credits, Prof. Brenda Wineapple

"To live over people's lives," wrote Henry James, "is nothing unless we live over their perceptions, live over the growth, the change, the varying intensity of the same-- since it was by these things they themselves lived."  This course will interrogate various forms of so-called "life writing" (biography/fictional biography/memoir) to investigate the meaning, aims, ethics, pitfalls, and possibilities of the genre as practiced in literature.  We will therefore examine a wide range of topics: the relation between fact and fiction; the significance of politics and historical context; the impact of individual psychology; point of view in narration; the function of imagination; the use or exploitation of marginal figures.  And to the extent that biographical narratives depend on the creation of character, this course looks closely at how such characters are created from real people: how a living, breathing person seems to arise out of a mass of sometimes contradictory “facts”; how characters are made to change, that is, if they do; how characters can make a story move; and of course how or if traditional forms of biographical writing might be liberated from its brick-like borders. 

Writers/books will likely include such authors as Lytton Strachey, Natalie Zemon Davis (The Return of Martin Guerre), Virginia Woolf, Richard Holmes (Footsteps), Janet Malcolm (on Sylvia Plath biographies), Henry James, The Aspern Papers, Adam Phillips on Freud and biography, Julia Blackburn and her biographical inventions about Daisy Bates, Robert A. Caro on Lyndon Johnson, Hilton Als.

 

MALS 71400 - Introduction to International Studies CRN# 36301
Mondays, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 3207, 3 credits, Prof. Tomohisa Hattori (tomohisa.hattori@lehman.cuny.edu)

 

The two main purposes of this course are to introduce you to theoretically informed historical analyses of international relations (IR) and to help you apply one of the theories of IR to an international subject of your choice.  While the historical contexts and theories of IR will help you engage in further studies in IR, your paper will enhance your understanding of how you may gain social scientific knowledge by reviewing relevant theoretical literature, conceptualizing your subject matter, developing research questions, figuring out how to answer them, gathering information about them, organizing the research result as evidence for your answer to the research question, and developing your answer as an argument about a particular phenomenon or relationship on the chosen topic in the context of existing theoretical arguments. 

 

MALS 72300 – Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies CRN#  36302
Tuesdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 5382, 3 credits, Prof. James Wilson (jwilson1@gc.cuny.edu)

 

In Gender Outlaw: On Men, Women, and the Rest of Us Kate Bornstein writes, “The first question we usually ask new parents is: ‘Is it a boy or a girl?’” Bornstein recommends the response, “We don’t know; it hasn’t told us yet.” This course explores the ways in which gender and sexuality are pronounced, embodied, and negotiated within specific historical and cultural contexts. Through a close reading of interdisciplinary, foundational, and recent scholarship the class will examine and theorize the ways in which categories of gender and sexuality inform and shape our understanding of the world. Investigating the intersections and collisions of gender and sexuality with race, class, ability, nationality, ethnicity, and age, the class will consider societal and institutional systems of power, privilege, oppression, and marginalization. Course requirements include an oral presentation, two 4-6 page response papers, and a 15-20 page, staged researched essay.

 

MALS 72600 - Social Impacts of Science and Technology: Case Studies CRN# 36304

Online, 3 credits, Prof. Joseph Dauben (jdauben@lehman.cuny.edu)

This course will examine some of the great discoveries in science and inventions of technology that have changed the course of human history, with a view to assessing their origins, impact, and eventual consequences, both foreseen and unintended. Through individual case studies, from the origins of agriculture and exploitation of the arch to atomic energy and genetic engineering, we will investigate human ingenuity across time and in particular parts of the world, including studies of such individuals as Galileo, Newton, Darwin, and Einstein, or such comparative contexts as ancient Greece versus Han-dynasty China, or modern societies contrasting the roles of science and technology in modern Britain and Nazi Germany or the Soviet Union and communist China.
 
This is a writing intensive, wholly on-line, digital course designed to engage students for more than the usual in-class two-hour seminar. Using the interactive resources of Blackboard, the instructor and seminar participants will be able to interact throughout each week, during which discussion and elaboration of written material will provide opportunities to probe deeply into the subject matter for each week’s discussion. Among questions we will be considering: What led ancient civilizations to advance from superstitious explanations of natural phenomena relying on magic and religion to the rational and scientific explanations associated with the Greek “miracle” and its later development, especially in technology, by the Romans? How did science and technology differ in ancient Greece or China during the Han dynasty, and what were the social reasons for and consequences of such differences? How did discovery of the arch or the use of concrete by the ancient Romans affect both the economy and character of urbanization? What were the social consequences for both science and religion of the Inquisition’s trial and condemnation of Galileo? What have been the major consequences of the Industrial Revolution in different parts of the world? How did Darwinian evolution challenge models of society in the 19th century, and how should the development of creationism and its critics in the 20th century be understood? What moral and ethical questions arise from the development and use of the atomic bomb during World War II? Has science been affected differently in democratic or capitalistic societies like Britain or the US, as opposed to socialist or communist countries like the former Soviet Union or post-Mao China? How did the rise of large laboratory science and competition for such rewards at the Nobel Prize affect the race to discover the double-helical structure of DNA and the sequencing of the human genome? How have computers and mass media, including new technologies and the internet, affected societies around the world in the 21st century? These are just a few of the topics this course will explore through the lens of science, technology, and their interactions with and influence on society in general.
  
Upon successful completion of this course, students will possess a basic understanding of the methods, concepts, and theories employed by scholars concerned with science and technology studies, who approach their subjects from diverse perspectives. Student progress will be measured on the basis of their class participation, written work, and PowerPoint presentations designed to combine visual with textual information in ways that are uniquely instructive and at the same time make use of the entire spectrum of electronic resources available to students via the internet.
 

MALS 72700 - The Political Ecology of Social and Environmental Justice CRN# 36779

Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 4419, 3 credits, Prof. Michael Lamb (Mike.Lamb@mhc.cuny.edu)

 

This course introduces various social science approaches to problems of social and environmental justice drawn from environmental psychology, anthropology, geography and critical studies.   Using a multidisciplinary framework that emphasizes both a scientific and ethical commitment to social justice and to understanding human/non-human-environment interactions, students will participate in constructing an integrated model of current social and environmental problems that will aid them in their future research and application.  A series of social justice and environmental issues will be surveyed each exploring different approaches and concepts so that students emerge with the ability to make effective and thoughtful choices about the constructs they employ when framing problems.  The course will require extensive reading and discussion in class concluding with a final fieldwork or literature review project in preparation for their later coursework.  The objective of this course is to provide a broad, intellectual base to the understanding of social and environmental justice as a values position as well as a form of practice to be employed in student’s ongoing research and work.

 

MALS 73100 - American Culture and Values CRN# 36305
“The Object(s) of American Studies: History, Method, & Praxis”

Tuesdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 4419, 3 credits, Prof. Justin Rogers-Cooper (jrogers@lagcc.cuny.edu)

Russ Castronovo and Susan Gillman begin the introduction to their collection States of Emergency: The Object of American Studies (2009), with a deceptively straightforward question: “What is the object of American studies?” They continue by unpacking the ramifications of that question, in particular by noting its imbrication in two corollary questions: “What does ‘American studies’ study, and what does it want?” For all of its centrality, after all, American studies remains an anomaly in the academy - as a program and not a department it resides somewhere between (or, perhaps, outside) normative disciplinary boundaries. The object of this course is to explore these questions by considering the histories, theories, and practices of American studies from its inception as an academic discipline to the present. In other words, we will consider how in the span of about sixty-five years – using the first publication of American Quarterly in 1949 as a marker of discernable communal birth – American studies transformed from a movement into an institution (an institution marked by one of the largest annual academic conferences in the United States). As we undertake these questions, we will also address the present state “American” studies and whether it’s best understood in tension with such concepts as the “transnational," as a vocabulary of keywords, or perhaps even as a constellation of emerging or converging set of inter-disciplinary sub-fields, such as critical race and ethnic studies and/or queer of color feminism. In addition to our discussions, we will conduct workshops that guide assignments related to key publication genres in the discipline, including the book review, the conference abstract, the keyword, and the event review. 

 

MALS 73400 - Africana Studies: Introduction CRN#  36306
"Politics and Government of NYC"

Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Room 6114, 3 credits,  Prof. John Mollenkopf (jmollenkopf@gc.cuny.edu)
Cross-listed with  AFCP 73100, PSC 82510, and SOC 82800


MALS 74500 - Great Digs: important sites of the Classical, Late Antique and Islamic Worlds CRN#  36307
Thursdays, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 6421, 3 credits, Prof. Elizabeth Macaulay-Lewis (emacaulay_lewis@gc.cuny.edu)

 

This course introduces students to archaeological methods and important archaeological sites from the Classical, Late Antique and Islamic worlds. The course assumes no previous knowledge of archaeology. The two primary methods of archaeological inquiry—excavation and survey—are first introduced, discussed and problematized in this course. We will then consider specific sites – cities, towns and, in certain cases, residences – to understand how archaeology has contributed to our knowledge of these sites. Sites, such as Athens, Alexandria, Rome, Palmyra, Jerusalem and others, will each be the focus of a lecture or seminar. By the end of the course students will gain a knowledge of the principles of archaeological excavation and survey; an understanding of major classes of archaeological evidence and key archaeological theories; some of the important issues and challenges, such as war and cultural destruction, confronting archaeologists today; and a knowledge of important archaeological sites from the Classical, Late Antique and Islamic worlds.

 

MALS 75400 - Introduction to Digital Humanities   CRN#  36309
Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 5383, 3 credits, Profs. Anne Donlon and Stephen Brier
Cross-listed with IDS 81680

The dramatic growth of the Digital Humanities (DH) over the past half dozen years has helped scholars re-imagine the very nature and forms of academic research and teaching across a range of scholarly disciplines, encompassing the arts, the interpretive social sciences, and traditional humanities subject areas. This course will explore the history of the digital humanities, focusing especially on the diverse pioneering projects and core texts that ground this innovative methodological and conceptual approach to scholarly inquiry and teaching.  It will also emphasize ongoing debates in the digital humanities, such as the problem of defining the digital humanities, the question of whether DH has (or needs) theoretical grounding, controversies over new models of peer review for digital scholarship, issues related to collaborative labor on digital projects, and the problematic questions surrounding research involving “big data.” The course will also emphasize the ways in which DH has helped transform the nature of academic teaching and pedagogy in the contemporary university with its emphasis on collaborative, student-centered and digital learning environments and approaches. Along the way, we will discuss broad social, legal and ethical questions and concerns surrounding digital media and contemporary culture, including privacy, intellectual property, and open/public access to knowledge and scholarship. Students will be expected to participate actively in class discussions and online postings (including on blogs and wikis) and to research and write a final multimedia presentation on a key topic in the digital humanities. Students completing the course will gain broad knowledge about and understanding of the emerging role of the digital humanities across several academic disciplines and will begin to learn some of the fundamental skills used often in digital humanities projects.

 

Note: this course is part of the "Digital Praxis Seminar," a two-semester long introduction to digital tools and methods that will be open to all students in the Graduate Center. The goal of the course is to introduce graduate students to various ways in which they can incorporate digital research into their work.

 

MALS 75600 - Sustainability and Human Ecodynamics CRN#  36308
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 6493, 3 credits, Prof. Sophia Perdikaris (sophiap@brooklyn.cuny.edu)

 

Sustainability for environments, economies, and societies (the triple bottom line) has become a central objective that unites disciplines in sciences, arts, and humanities; engages educators, activists, policy makers, NGO’s and indigenous rights organizations; and is prioritized by multiple international organizations. However, the term and concept have acquired a range of interpretations and understandings–some mutually incompatible–and there is an ongoing need to provide a common knowledge base and vocabulary, and to effectively connect education and activism for sustainability with cutting-edge method and theory in resilience, robustness, vulnerability. This course will provide a grounding in the basic literature and vocabulary of sustainability science and education, expose students to a range of interdisciplinary case studies, and engage them directly with cutting edge resilience and sustainability scholars and ongoing field research and cross-disciplinary integration.

 

The intensive course will provide students with multi-disciplinary perspective on sustainability (on a variety of temporal and spatial scales), tools for assessing resilience and vulnerabilities in linked social-ecological systems (SES), an extensive set of readings/on-line resources on different aspects of sustainability research and introduce them to scholars and organizations engaged in sustainability science and education. The course will present case studies in interdisciplinary human ecodynamics research as focal points for readings and discussion, and will include interactions (live or virtual) with scholars directly involved in the case studies, NGO representatives, and active field researchers. This course establishes a common vocabulary and knowledge base, bibliography, and scholarly contacts for further work and specialization by students intending to pursue studies focusing on sustainability approaches in biosciences, geosciences, social sciences, environmental history, policy and development studies, environmental activism, and education for sustainability.

 

MALS 77100 - Aesthetics of Film CRN# 36310
Tuesdays, 4:15-8:15 p.m., Rm. C419, 3 credits, Prof. Racquel Gates (racquel.gates@csi.cuny.edu)

Cross listed with FSCP 81000 and THEA 71400

 

This course emphasizes a formal approach to viewing, interpreting, and critically engaging with film. We will organize the semester around a single provocation. How do the formal aspects of film (and media) make blackness comprehensible? In other words, how did audiences learn to recognize blackness, in a visual as well as in a thematic sense, beginning with early cinema? And, what are the formal elements that have since become synonymous with blackness on screen? In order to answer these questions, we will examine a wide array of film and media texts and analyze how mise-en-scene, narrative, cinematography, editing, sound, and genre invented the codes of cinematic blackness. We will also look at the ways that Black filmmakers and performers have used aesthetics to directly interrogate and challenge the limiting tropes typically associated with the black image on screen.

We will use the eleventh edition of David Bordwell and Kristin Thompson’s textbook, Film Art: An Introduction, as the primer for the course, and we will also read several other books that explicitly address the relationship between aesthetics and race. These include Richard Dyer’s White, Nicole Fleetwood’s Troubling Vision: Performance, Visuality, and Blackness, Krista Thompson’s Shine: The Visual Economy of Light in African Diasporic Aesthetic Practice, and Phillip Brian Harper’s Abstractionist Aesthetics: Artistic Form and Social Critique in African American Culture. Screenings will consist of a mix of classic and newer titles, films produced in Hollywood as well as those made by independent filmmakers. Some of these include Birth of a Nation (D.W. Griffith, 1915), Gone with the Wind (Victor Fleming, 1934), Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner (Stanley Kramer, 1967), Daughters of the Dust (Julie Dash, 1990), Da Sweet Blood of Jesus (Spike Lee, 2014), and Moonlight (Barry Jenkins, 2016).

Students will complete weekly reading reports and a final paper on the topic of their choice.

 

MALS 77400 - International Migration CRN# 36314

“Undocumented, Illegal, Citizen: The Politics and Psychology of Belonging in the United States”

Thursdays, 4:15-6:15pm, Rm. 3309, 3 credits, Profs. Colette Daiute and David Caicedo (CDaiute@gc.cuny.edu)

Cross-listed with IDS 81620 , PSYC 80103, U ED 75100

 

This course will focus on the recent history of citizenship challenges, as related to contemporary migration and higher education. The current movements of people fleeing violence and injustice worldwide have been met with some innovative policies, yet also with fences, detentions, travel bans, and other means. After reviewing such migration patterns and reactions, we focus, in particular, on the politics and psychology of what it means to belong in the U.S. today, officially and unofficially. Interestingly, much of this process has been mediated in public higher education, especially the community college. Course topics include history of 21st century migration, the Dream Act, DACA, DAPA, state policies, social movements, human rights treaties, and critical education programs as mechanisms of change. We also consider diverse perspectives on the issues, such as by generations of refugees, unaccompanied children, sanctuary movements, and relevant contexts, primarily higher education but also agricultural and domestic employment, child/family detention centers, and public media. As an offering in the “Futures Initiative,” the course design will be adaptable to students’ interests.  Pending student goals, for example, we will focus on projects such as a) considering different ways of thinking about contemporary migration and citizenship; b) examining databases of narratives, survey responses, and conversations by students and faculty reflecting on the role of the community college for belonging in America; c) developing methods for examining discriminatory language and action; d) curating debates in blogs about migration and human rights; e) interacting with initiatives like “CUNY Citizenship Now!” and Dreamer clubs;  f) developing a tool kit of analytic methods sensitive to social science and humanities inquiries. The course involves reading scholarly articles, policy documents, reporting on relevant innovations, writing reflection papers, and designing practice-based research projects.

 

MALS 78100 - Issues in Urban Education CRN# 36311

Rethinking Higher Education for the Knowledge Economy

Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 3309, 3 credits, Profs. Ann Kirschner and Gilda Barabino (ann.kirschner@cuny.edu)

Cross-listed with UED 75100, IDS 81660, and SOC 84503

 

What does it take to prepare students for success in the 21st century? This graduate seminar will explore innovations in higher education, with a special focus on technology and new pathways that lead to lifelong learning.

The course will be interdisciplinary in its approach, and will look at the web of assumptions about democracy and social mobility that underlie the American system of higher education. It is appropriate for future faculty members, administrators, or anyone who plans a career in education or public policy, or is interested in innovation, technology, and entrepreneurship in education.

Leaving aside the philosophical question of what constitutes “success,” we start with a set of observations:

  • For the foreseeable future, the majority of good paying jobs will require some kind of
  • postsecondary education.
  • America’s faith in the importance of a college degree is, however, declining among prospective students and their families. About half of today’s graduates question the value of their diploma.
  • The undergraduate student body has changed dramatically: what was once the “nontraditional” student—older, working, diverse, more likely to be first generation to graduate from college, more likely to transfer at least once—is now the mainstream of America’s 20 million college students.
  • Liberal arts majors are less and less popular, as students grapple with the challenge of debt, pragmatic concerns about employability, and outmoded pedagogy and curricula.
  • University curriculum and pedagogy in technology-related majors cannot keep up with the velocity of change in the private sector, a misalignment that will only increase in the future. Moreover, as computer science enrollments grow, universities struggle to maintain adequate instructional capacity.

And a set of questions, intended to be broad and provocative:

  • Is higher education set up to serve today’s students?
  • Is the college diploma the future “coin of the realm” for students? For employers?
  • Is the six year graduation rate the right standard of success? What are possible new pathways to success? Should college be shorter? Longer? In residence? Online?
  • Is “vocational” vs. “academic” an anachronistic construct? In an era when the majority of students say they go to college to get a job, how should we think about balancing career-consciousness vs. intellectual aspiration?
  • Should every student study coding? Shakespeare? How will student confidence in their diploma be affected by the need to pursue high tuition “boot camp” programs to gain employment in competitive new economy jobs?
  • Most employers use a college degree as a proxy for skills attainment; that confidence is perhaps the most important asset of higher education. If we lose this confidence either through outmoded curriculum or more reliable or more precise forms of skills assessment, what happens to the value of higher education?
  • What is the role of experiential learning: internships, study abroad, undergraduate research?
  • What pedagogies or newfangled approaches to the disciplines produce the kind of critical thinking that employers say they want? What is critical thinking, anyway?

Imagine a child of six today, graduating from high school in 2028. What do we think college will look like and how do we get ready for that student?

The course will be conducted in a seminar format, emphasizing class presentations and participation. There will be visitors drawn from leaders in higher education and technology. Students will interview students and leaders at other universities, as well as corporate leaders. Each seminar meeting will include a weekly lightning round, where each student will present an article/new study. Some may elect to be embedded with companies for group strategy projects.

As a final assignment, students will choose an area of innovation and present a case for CUNY adoption.


MALS 78900 - Childhood and Youth Studies: Approaches and Methods CRN#   36312
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 6421, 3 credits, Prof. Roger Hart (rhart@gc.cuny.edu)
Cross-listed with PSYC 80103

This seminar offers an introduction to how childhood and youth is investigated across the different disciplines of psychology, the social sciences and the humanities. Beginning with the recognition that concepts of childhood and adolescence are socially constructed and vary across culture and historical periods, we will examine how our shifting conceptions of childhood both align and clash with the way children actually live. This will include childhood experiences that challenge the historically recent notions of a “protected” and “innocent” childhood and such issues as child sex, child labor, child soldiers and child criminals. We will examine how different institutions, discourses and systems shape how childhood is experienced: including family, school, the juvenile system, media and consumer culture.  While attending to the force of structural inequalities in cultural and economic arrangements, we will not risk rendering children passive or invisible; we will recognize the methodological strides that have been made in recent years by researchers in working with rather than on or about children.

 
MALS 79600 - Thesis Workshop  CRN#  36313
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 6495, 1 credit, Prof. George Fragopoulos (GFragopoulos@qcc.cuny.edu)

SUMMER 2017 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

 
MALS 71400 - Introduction to International Studies, CRN # 36006
"Understanding New Security Discourses"
Wednesdays, 6:00 - 9:45 PM, Rm. 3207, Prof. Anca Pusca 

This course offers a critical engagement with our contemporary understanding of security, closely engaging with a series of key concepts - violence, resilience, (in)security, emergency - within the context of an increasingly expanded conceptualization of security that goes well beyond traditional associations with military and defense, as well as the overarching agency of the state. New discourses such as the 'Islamic threat', 'migration waves', or 'cyber warfare' combined with revived fears of 'nuclear warfare' and new forms of extinction, including environmental extinction, provide a rich background against which to assess our ability, or in some cases lack thereof, to deal with new and old threats. 


MALS 77200 - Film History I, CRN #  36005
Thursdays, 6:00 - 9:45 PM, Rm. C419, Prof.  Leah Anderst

History of Cinema I is an intensive examination of film history before 1930 that introduces students to international silent cinema, to the scholarly literature on early cinema, and to the practices of researching and writing film history. Subjects covered will include the emergence of cinema, the cinema of attractions, the narrativization of cinema, theater and early film, sound, color, and the “silent” image, the industrialization of film production, national cinemas of the 1910s, the Hollywood mode of filmmaking, women and African-American filmmakers, and film movements of the 1920s. Students will study the work of such filmmakers as Lumière, Méliès, Porter, Paul, Bauer, Christensen, Feuillade, Weber, Micheaux, Murnau, Dulac, Eisenstein, and others while considering the ways that silent films were exhibited and received in diverse contexts.
 

MALS 78500 - Readings on Fascism, CRN # 36004
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 6:30 - 8:30 PM, Rm. 3207, Prof. Sarah Danielsson
 

Understanding the nature and practice of Fascism has become vital in recent years, reaching an urgency in Europe and the US not felt since the 1920s and 30s. A product of modernity and its contradictions, Fascism’s mix of nationalism, national-rebirth, rejection of democratic liberties, cult of the leader, etc. has seen a dramatic resurgence. Through a look at the rich literature on fascism and authoritarianism, this course offers a deeper understanding of a thoroughly modern phenomenon with contemporary wide reaching impact.

SPRING 2017 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

MALS 70000 - Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies, CRN # 35161
"Waste Matters: Economy, Ecology, and the Cultures of Trash​"
M, 6:30 - 8:30 PM, Rm. 5383, Prof. Christopher C. Schmidt 

In his book Garbage, the poet A.R. Ammons writes, “Garbage has to be the poem of our time because / garbage is spiritual, believable enough / to get our attention.” It’s true that garbage, trash, waste and pollution are increasingly prevalent concerns in a culture riveted by ecological and economic damage. But before we demonize waste outright, let’s pause and consider what it means to assign the negative value of “waste” to an object or even a class of persons. By looking at the symbolic and real uses of waste, this class will make a survey of the burgeoning field of “dirt studies” as a way of exploring different disciplinary frameworks within Liberal Studies, including art history, economics, anthropology, ecocriticism, and literary studies. We'll read Mary Douglas, Julia Kristeva, Vinay Gidwani, Timothy Morton, Jane Bennett, Eve Sedgwick, Italo Calvino, Hilda Hilst, Samuel Delany, and other critics, poets, and artists. Students will present on a text in class and compose a final essay or digital project.


MALS 70000 - Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies, CRN # 35162
“Finding Our Own Subjects: An Institutional Field Guide”
W, 6:30 - 8:30 PM, Rm. 5383, Prof. David T. Humphries

What should form the topic of an introductory graduate course?  Investigating that question together and reflecting on our own goals will form the initial groundwork for our course. Our responses will be informed, in part, by a comment that Leonard Cassuto includes near the end of his recent book on graduate school, when it is suggested that “the subject of the graduate core should be the history of higher education.” In order to get some insights into that history, we will examine a few foundational texts and figures, including The Emergence of the American University and the peculiar career of its author Laurence R. Veysey.  Once we establish some historical and institutional context for the course, we will move thorough clusters of readings that introduce foundational critical texts and methodologies largely drawn from recent debates in American Studies, allowing for a number of disciplinary perspectives.  For example, we will have a unit on technology and community which will include Walter Benjamin’s “Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction,” Benedict Anderson’s Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism, and Tim Wu’s The Master Switch:  The Rise and Fall of Information Empires.  Other units will focus on questions of periodization and spatial imagination and are likely to include a consideration of Willa Cather’s novel A Lost Lady in terms of the way that it performs history and gender and a consideration of Paul Gilroy’s The Black Atlantic and Lisa Lowe’s The Intimacies of Four Continents as entry points into questions of national and transnational identities and representations.  There will space for students to propose their own readings, and there will be regular short writing pieces throughout the term, covering a number of academic genres and involving some shared workshopping.

MALS 70100 - Narratives of New York: Antiquity in Gotham, CRN # 35163
R, 4:15 - 6:15 PM, Rm. 8202, Prof. Elizabeth Macaulay Lewis [Crosslisted with ASCP 82000)

As the quintessentially modern metropolis, New York City is often defined by the skyscrapers that dominate its skyline. Towering office buildings in Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Queens–offer an easy metaphor for the city’s self-conscious striving, technological progress, and financial power. Yet underneath and, in a sense, undergirding the imposing high-rises are many older, usually squatter, more classically inspired buildings and public monuments. This interdisciplinary course explores how antiquity—primarily the art, archaeology, and architecture of Classical Antiquity, Ancient Egypt, and the Ancient Near East—influenced the architecture of New York City, from the city’s inception to the present day. Specifically, this course considers why American patrons, architects, and city planners re-interpreted, modified, and deployed ancient forms in the construction of major buildings and monuments in New York City by examining the built environment, as well as architectural texts, literature, and art.  The course introduces students to reception studies, its theoretical framework and methodologies. This course uses New York City as a classroom to explore and understand the influence that ancient civilizations exerted on New York’s architecture and which resulted in the creation of many of New York City’s iconic buildings, such as Grand Central Terminal and the New York Stock Exchange, to the forgotten masterpieces, such as the Gould Library. The course is composed of a series of seminars that will meet at the Graduate Center and walking seminars where the class will visit specific monuments and buildings.

MALS 70500 - Classical Culture, CRN # 35164
R, 6:30 - 8:30 PM, Rm. 3212, Prof. Marie C. Marianetti

The course will be a survey of selected pieces of ancient literature and legend  that have subsequently influenced Western civilization.  The chosen literary works will be analyzed from an interdisciplinary perspective, combining literature, history, archaeology, religion, culture, politics and philosophy. Certain  universal issues will be considered as they are conveyed through the literary genres. The class will concentrate upon a thorough examination and discussion of the following primary sources: The Epic of Gilgamesh, Hesiod's Theogony, Homer's Odyssey, Aeschylus' Oresteia, Sophocles' Oedipus Cycle (the Theban plays), Euripides'  Iphigeneia in Aulis,  Aristophanes' The Clouds, Plato's Apology and Symposium and Virgil's Aeneid.

MALS 70900 - Approaches to Life Writing, CRN # 35276
W, 6:30 - 8:30 PM, Rm. 3207, Prof. Annalyn Swan

Ever since Plutarch brought Alexander the Great blazingly to life in his seminal Lives (2nd century CE), people have loved to read—and write—biographies. Approaches to Life Writing will be an exploration of the art and craft of the genre. What do great biographies and autobiographies have in common—and how do they differ? How are scenes set, facts organized, context provided? How novelistic can a biography be? And is there, finally, such a thing as “truth” in biography or autobiography, or a “definitive” account?  From biography as gossipy inside edition (Boswell’s The Life of Samuel Johnson), to biography as irreverent debunking (Lytton Strachey’s Eminent Victorians), to biography as detective story (A.J.A. Symons’ Quest for Corvo), to life-writing at its most personal and poetic (Annie Dillard’s An American Childhood), we will explore the many ways a writer can tease out the “figure in the carpet,” as Leon Edel, the great biographer of Henry James, put it. But this is also a course about practicing the art ourselves. For the final paper, everyone will have the opportunity either to write an autobiographical chapter, or else research and write a chapter of a biography.  
 
MALS 71500 - Critical Issues in International Studies, CRN # 35172
T, 6:30 - 8:30 PM, Rm. 3212, Prof. Cyril Obi

This course explores diverse perspectives to contemporary developments in world affairs. It critically examines the evolving global order and seeks explanations for emerging trends, complex changes and continuities. The seminars in this course will question and seek answers to some of the challenges, threats and opportunities facing people, countries and regions across the world. This will include how institutions, norms, theories and practices have been deployed both to make sense of global processes and change, and the extent to which global actors can channel these towards addressing common concerns. The course will also engage with the diverse ways of understanding the “international”, “local-global” and “transnational” in critical perspective. It also covers ways of explaining the evolving landscape of world affairs since the end of the Cold War, and includes topics ranging from globalization and development, transnational terrorism and security, conflict and peacebuilding, human rights and social justice, to global environmental change. The course is designed to equip students with a grounded knowledge of the theoretical and knowledge-based tools for engaging with critical issues in global affairs. 


MALS 72100 - Feminist Texts and Contexts, CRN # 35835
W, 6:30 - 8:30 PM, Rm. 5382, Prof. Linda Grasso

One hundred years before Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie proclaimed “We should all be feminists” and Beyoncé popularized that decree, the word feminist was first being used in the United States. In the 1910s, feminism as idea, lived practice, and social movement was so novel, it prompted much discussion and a new vocabulary. “The evolved feminist does not find all of life in a love affair,” Marie Jenney Howe, the founder of Heterodoxy, a club for “unorthodox women,” explained in “A Feminist Symposium” in 1914.  “She does not adjust her life according to the masculine standard of what is womanly . . . She thinks for herself. She lives according to her own convictions.” This course explores the historical, political, and cultural emergence of feminism in the U.S. by studying how a selected group of women expressed feminist activism through written and visual artistic forms. In addition to reading short stories, novels, and essays by writers and theorists such as Kate Chopin, Jessie Fauset, Sui Sin Far, Emma Goldman, Mary Church Terrell, and Margaret Sanger, we will look at art work by Georgia O’Keeffe (Georgia O’Keeffe: Living Modern at the Brooklyn Museum), Marguerite Zorach, and Florine Stettheimer (Florine Stettheimer: Painting Poetry at the Jewish Museum) as well as cartoons by Nina E. Allender that appeared in National Woman’s Party newspapers The Suffragist and Equal Rights (1914-1927).  We will also study primary sources in their original contexts by utilizing newly digitized periodicals such as Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s journal The Forerunner (1909-1916) and the visually-rich radical magazine The Masses (1911-1917), which took a “stand for Feminism.” Students will design and create research projects based on their aesthetic, political, and scholarly interests.


MALS 72200 - Contemporary Feminist Theories, CRN # 35165
R, 6:30 - 8:30 PM, Rm. 3309, Prof. Jean Halley

This course explores Contemporary Feminist Theories through feminist work regarding “bodies with gender.”  We investigate what it means to “have gender,” and to for example “be female,” with a focus on the United States.  We consider central contemporary feminist theories on differences and similarities in the experiences of women and other gendered bodies across lines of race, class, sexuality and ability.  We examine how gender defines human experiences and how feminists resist these definitions.  Our focus emulates what Sigmund Freud once called the central arenas of human life, love and work.  We explore contemporary feminist theories on what it means to be a gendered body at work, and to have gender in love, as well as violence in the lives of gendered bodies, particularly queer bodies and those gendered female.  We also investigate the representation of women and gender in the larger culture.  In Contemporary Feminist Theories, we make use of a variety of texts in exploring seminal feminist thinking on: the “nature” of gender, race, class, sexuality and ability; love, sexuality and violence; so-called women’s work; the expectations “experts” have of diversely gendered bodies; and the representation of gender in the mass media.

MALS 72500 - Narratives of Science and Technology: Literature and The Visual Arts, CRN # 35277
M, 4:15 - 6:15 PM, Rm. 6495, Prof. Robert Singer

From Dr. Jekyll’s hidden laboratory, to Dr. Strangelove’s doomsday scenario, images of the scientist, science, and technology, as they are represented in film and literature, argue as signifying spectacles. This three credit interdisciplinary course will examine representations of science and technology in multiple film and literary narratives. Students will evaluate how these narratives reinforce or question modern and contemporary paradigms of science and technology, as each strategizes the concept of progress. The films and literature studied in this course are drawn from various genre, and not just science fiction. Students will be introduced to critical film and literary theory and related criticism, as well as engage in close study of primary, interdisciplinary texts. In particular, the course will discuss the role of the scientific and technological as spectacle, and the way in which notions of progress are both “real” and “reel” spaces of twentieth and twenty first century life. Reading assignments are given for every class, and students may present an in-class report for credit. There is a final research paper (approximately 15--18 pages) due at the end of the semester.

MALS 72800  Ecological and Social Theories of Human Behavior, CRN # 35753
T, 2:00 - 4:00 PM, Rm. 3306, Prof. Susan Saegert [Crosslisted with PSYC 79102]

The overall objective of the course is for each student to develop a reasoned and reasonably satisfying answer to the following question: How is the psychologically experienced self related to the social and physical context?

 
Achieving this objective requires answering another question: What is the unit of analysis of psychology? Some of the positions prominent in psychology assume the answer would be either particular psychological processes or the biological substrate/determinants of experience and behavior.  This course introduces an alternative approach in which we see selves as socially and materially contingent and knowledge of selves as contingent.  In the latter approach a student must develop an answer to the question “Contingent in what way?”
 
The second learning objective is to come to an understanding for yourself of the goals of psychological knowledge.   There are many contenders for this crown in psychology including: prediction and control, valid description, consciousness raising, mental and physical health improvement, resolution of social problems, and social justice to name a few.  This course explores the contingency of goals of psychology as well as of psychological processes.
 
A third learning objective is for you to build on the knowledge you are developing in your methods and ethics course to understand how these goals are best achieved.

 

A final learning objective is to help you develop your scholarly craft.  The steps in this involve learning the following:

  1. How to read theoretical material (somewhat quickly)
  2. How to paraphrase an argument in a non-distorting way
  3. How to critique an argument
  4. How to make an argument
  5. How to improve your writing

MALS 73100 American Culture and Values, CRN # 35888 [CANCELLED]
"The Civil War in Documents"
T, 2:00 4:00 PM, Rm. TBA, Prof. James Oakes

Students will study the American Civil War through documents.  Students need have no background in the history of the period, but for those needing a general overview of the period can find it in James McPherson, Battle Cry of Freedom. Over the course of the semester we will read through the four-volume documentary history of the Civil War published by the Library of America, under the general editorship of Brooks Simpson. In addition to the assigned readings, students will come to class each week prepared to introduce and discuss one document they have selected from that week’s readings. 

MALS 73200 - American Social Institutions, CRN # 35166
"The Rise and Fall of Prison in the United States"
R, 4:15 - 6:15 PM, Rm. 3212, Prof. Lucia Trimbur [Crosslisted with ASCP 81000]

Today in the United States, seven million adults are under custodial supervision–in prisons and jails or on probation and parole. More African American adults are under this system of control than were enslaved in 1850. In some postindustrial cities, young black men are more likely to be in prison than are able to access wage labor or enroll in high school and higher education. And the US currently incarcerates more people than any country in the world. Though many argue that crime, or what Nils Christie called, “unwanted social acts,” is responsible for this expansion of imprisonment, crime rates fell as incarceration rose. How do we explain this dramatic shift?
The expansion of prisoners is often referred to as the “prison industrial complex,” and increasingly scholars locate its roots in the long-standing anti-black racism of slavery that continued through Jim Crow and urban segregation. This course examines the prison industrial complex from its beginnings in slavery through to our contemporary moment of mass incarceration. We will consider the relationship of the prison industrial complex to other US institutions as well as whether or not our current patterns of imprisonment and punishment are a new expression of older systems of racial capitalism or something different. We start by examining the role of punishment during plantation slavery and move to other serious penalties, such as convict leasing and the penitentiary. Then we move to the rise of the carceral state in the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, paying special attention to the role of political change and economic transformation in driving prison expansion. We conclude by alternatives to the prison.

MALS 73500 - African Diaspora, CRN # 35275
W, 6:30 - 8:30 PM, Rm. 4419,  Prof. Herman L. Bennett [Crosslisted with HIST 76000 and AFCP 73100]

By employing the heuristic concept of diaspora—and specifically the African diaspora—this course focuses on the analytical work generated by studying cultures of movement.  As scholars, we might begin by asking whether diaspora complicates our understanding of disciplinary formations—including the normative assumptions that inform the study of society and culture.  How does diaspora, for instance, enhance our perspectives on imperial, colonial, national and post-colonial formations and the ways in which they have been historically represented?  In utilizing the prism of diaspora, we confront the politics of representation through which scholars render meaning out of the past and present.  For this reason, diaspora like other categories of analysis engages the vexed terrain of representation whereby scholars frame the subject of their inquiries.
Diaspora brings into relief many of the principle categories and themes informing the social and human sciences.  It de-naturalizes many of the foundational assumptions on which contemporary social theory rests.  For this reason, we will route our conversations and readings through some of the central concepts defining social theory (state, nation, society, sovereignty, difference, stratification, race, ethnicity, religion, and culture) so as to discern how diaspora might trouble existing forms of knowledge bequeathed to us by the Renaissance, Enlightenment and Liberalism.
On a practical professional level, the course serves as a graduate-level introduction to diasporas in general but the African diaspora in particular.  Scholarship on this subject along with its development over time and in distinct settings (the United States, Latin America and the Caribbean, Sub-Saharan Africa, England and Continental Europe) introduces us to the historical profession and professionalism.  For this reason, we will devote significant time focusing and discussing how various scholars have framed and approached their scholarly projects.  Since the African diaspora as a field of study constitutes a relatively novel endeavor, most of the readings draw on works from the last few years.  While this conveys a sense of where the field is presently at it also serves to delineate how the African diaspora draws and builds on early forms of inquiry (the history of colonial expansion, the history of slavery and freedom, the history of racial formation, etc.)  Over the semester we will constantly need to ask what defines an inquiry, an approach or a perspective as diasporic in scope.  In doing so, we will necessarily focus on an earlier body of scholarship that was associated with different fields of inquiry (slavery, race relations, African Studies, Brazilian history, the study of religion, English Cultural Studies).

MALS 74400 - From Alexander to Mohammed: Introduction to the Culture of the Ancient Mediterranean, CRN # 35167
T, 4:15 - 6:15 PM, Rm. 6114, Prof. Anna A. Akasoy [Crosslisted with MES 73900]


Classical Greek culture is often seen as an exclusively Western European heritage. This course, taught in English translation, offers an introduction to the profound impact of Greek civilization in the Middle East and Asia and the cultural, political and economic dynamics behind this development, focusing on Alexander the Great as a historical figure and as a legend. We will begin with the conquests of Alexander the Great and his successor states and the Graeco-Buddhist art of Gandhara as an early example. We will then focus on examples from the medieval Middle East such as Greek art in the Umayyad desert castles, the translation of Greek philosophy and science into Arabic and subsequent developments in both areas, the Alexander legend in the Qur’an and in Arabic and Persian biographies.
 

MALS 75500 - Digital Humanities: Methods and Practices, CRN # 35168
W, 4:15 - 6:15 PM, Rm. 3212, Prof. Lisa Rhody


During the Fall 2016 semester, students explored the landscape of the digital humanities, examining a range of ways to approach DH work and proposing potential DH projects. In the spring, we will put that thinking into action. In this praxis-oriented course, we will split into teams and then develop and launch functional versions of projects first imagined in the fall. Students will complete the class having gained hands-on experience in the collaborative planning, production, and dissemination of a digital humanities project, and having picked up a variety of technical, project management, and rhetorical skills along the way. A goal is to produce projects that will have a trajectory and a timeline of their own that extends beyond the Spring 2017 semester. Students will be supported by a range of advisors matched to the needs of the individual projects, and successful completion of the class will require a rigorous commitment to meeting target delivery dates we will establish together at the outset.

The class will hold a public launch event at the end of the semester where students will present their proofs-of-concept, and receive feedback from the broader community.


MALS 77500 - Global Cities, CRN # 35170
M, 6:30 - 8:30 PM, Rm. C196.03, Prof. David Halle

Global Cities seeks to understand the politics, economics, social, and cultural  life of  today’s urban-mega centers.  We will study innovation and job creation, neighborhood life including integration and segregation, housing including the “affordable housing” and “homeless” crises; the rise and decline of  urban “ghettos”,  the waxing and waning of the suburbs, education, political incorporation, crime and police-community relations, architecture and “starchitects”, ethnic and racial relations, immigration including Europe’s current refugee crisis, religious diversity, inequality, finance and banking, cultural institutions such as museums and art galleries, environmental issues including threats such as global warming and flooding as well as opportunities to make cities “greener”, urban riots, and terrorism.  We will focus especially on New York, Los Angeles, and London, but draw examples from many other global cities. The course complements International Migration (MALS 77400) by seeking to understand the global urban context to which so many international migrants are drawn.

MALS 78500 - Latin American Studies, CRN # 35169
R, 6:30 - 8:30 PM, Rm. 4419, Prof. Patricia Tovar

This seminar surveys five centuries of Latin American history, culture and politics from an interdisciplinary perspective, and introduces students to some of the most important issues, problems and debates in the region at large and the sub-regions within it. The course explores the rich diversity of peoples, geographies and histories that distinguish the region, and the experiences that have shaped it. By looking at the symbolic and political configurations of the region through a wide spectrum of materials (film, music, art, fiction, essays, and photography), students will think critically about major landmarks in the field of Latin American studies including the legacy of European colonialism, national fictions, modernity, social movements, conflict, memory, gender politics, religious beliefs, and the ways race, class, and gender intersect.

At the same time, students will examine various theoretical frameworks to approach the study of Latin America, including literary studies, linguistics, history, political science, sociology and anthropology. A chronological and thematic approach will give attention to the enduring legacies and challenges from the pre-Columbian era, the Spanish colonies, the nineteenth-century processes of independence, the emergence of the new nation-states, and the overall development of modern Latin American societies in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

MALS 78900 - Childhood and Youth Studies: Approaches and Methods, CRN # 35171
R, 4:15 - 6:15 PM, Rm. 5383, Prof. Colette Daiute [Crosslisted with PSYC 80103]

This course in Childhood and Youth Studies allows for an in-depth focus on the interaction of problem, theory and method, with sustained attention to the ways in which researchers in the field frame research investigations, develop research questions, design, implement, and report their studies. Students engage with the history and contemporary study of children, childhood and adolescence as defined and supported in organizations and collectives of human development (education, family, social welfare, community organizations, children’s rights), public media (children’s literature, broadcast, digital media), and research settings.  The course encompasses sociocultural approaches to childhood/youth, field-based studies with young people encountering various kinds of challenges, opportunities, interventions (educational, community, civic, etc.), and policies. Methods and measures addressed include ethnography/participant observation, narrative, interactive digital storytelling, conversations with and among children, participatory-action research, play- and arts-based approaches, and archival research across a variety of global settings.  Course activities involve reading research articles, discussing the articles with a focus on method, and applying practices and insights to students’ research projects and interests. Each week, the readings introduce a challenge to childhood/youth development, opportunity, intervention approach, research model, and methods for consideration. Weekly guiding questions integrate the readings toward scholarly and activist research. Several guest speakers who are experts in specific areas of child/youth research will present their work and join us to discuss readings, ideas, and issues.  

FALL 2016 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
 

MALS 70000 - Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies CRN# 32249
Dividing Lines: Borders in the American Landscape
T, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 3212, 3 credits, Prof. Libby Garland


How has the demarcation of spatial boundaries both reflected and shaped the social divisions that have defined the United States? How do different kinds of borders—the formal and informal lines between nations, regions, states, jurisdictions, electoral districts, neighborhoods, and properties, for example—delimit economic and political possibilities? How have these different kinds of spatial borders produced racial, class, and ethnic divides in new ways over time? When and how have people challenged the boundary lines designed to contain them? In this course, students will explore these questions by engaging with the work of historians, sociologists, geographers, anthropologists, urban planners, and artists. Students will present on and lead discussion regarding a text in class. They will also design, workshop and complete a final research project, which may be a traditional article-length piece of writing or a digital project of comparable sophistication. 

 

MALS 70000 - Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies CRN# 32250
What is "Asia"?
W, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 4419, 3 credits, Prof. Qiulei Hu

This course introduces students to critical thinking and techniques of academic reading and writing related to cross-cultural and international studies through a critical evaluation of the concept of Asia in the Euro-American intellectual discourse. Asia is much more than a geographic location. The understanding we generally have of Asia and things Asian has evolved from a continuing re-assessment of this designation within a Euro-American intellectual framework.  Where did this framework come from, under what circumstances was it created?  What is its appeal? A multi-cultural and interdisciplinary approach is employed to help answer these questions. Central to this course is an exploration of the representation of Asian cultures and “Eastern traditions” in the intellectual discourse of Europe and America.
 
This interdisciplinary course is designed for students interested in history, literature, religion, gender studies, postcolonial studies and international studies. It is divided into three parts. In the first part we will explore the history, evolution and current nature of the Asian Studies as academic field. In the second part we will cover the nuts and bolts of conducting research and writing an academic paper. In the third part we will engage with key theoretical issues and methodological approaches current in the humanities and social sciences that pertain to the focus of the course yet have much broader applications, including ideology, culture, modernity, feminism, the construction of national identity, the proliferation of “post-“studies. 

MALS 70000 - Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies CRN# 32251
R, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 4419, 3 credits, Prof. Karen Miller


Is the United States an empire? If so, what might that mean? If not, what other metaphors can we use to explain U.S. global relations? We will examine transformations of U.S. global power and international relations from the middle of the nineteenth century to the present. Clearly, the United States does not hold political sovereignty over a broad range of colonies. Aside from the 50 United States, the U.S. holds Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands of the United States, the Northern Marianas, and American Samoa. But, the U.S. has the largest military in the world, sustains the world’s biggest economy, and has unparalleled political power. That power is constantly shifting, under continuous challenge, and never as complete as U.S. leaders would like. Our task in this class is to interrogate that power, to understand how it emerged and changed over time, to explore its relationship to other forms of global power and other colonial projects, to examine the dynamics and contradictions that animate it, to consider its limits, and to understand its challengers. We will also explore how global engagements have transformed the United States’ domestic terrain: just as the U.S. helps shape the world, the world also changes the United States, through immigration, culture, commerce, and other connections. Our interdisciplinary study of these questions will be organized both chronologically and thematically. Students will be asked to write frequently and to produce a final paper. 

 

MALS 70000 - Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies CRN# 32252
M, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 4419, 3 credits, Prof. Aránzazu Borrachero
Inspired by Foucault’s theories of discursive formation, we will examine the gender discourses that 20th century Spanish, Italian and German fascist dictatorships developed, and their important role within the nation-building plans of those regimes. What can we learn by looking at these discourses from a gender-studies perspective? What comparisons can we make with contemporary gender discourses in the Western world? We will read current scholarship from various disciplines on women, gender and fascism and we will interpret related art, political propaganda, commercial advertising and film. We will begin studying Francoist Spain (1936-1975) and its National Catholicism ideology, a repressive system that predicated the natural subordination of women to men, and pervaded all aspects of women’s lives: education, sexuality, marriage, labor, and citizenship. We will analyze textual, visual and audio-visual representations of Spanish women created by social agents such as the Catholic Church, fascist women organizations, and economic interests. The class methodology will include independent reading, class discussions, short written reflections, presentations, and a final project. The analysis of gender practices in Spain will prepare students to conduct their own intellectual inquiry of the Italian and German fascist gender agendas. Each student’s research will contribute to the whole group’s compilation of a bibliography for the study of gender discourses and representations under the Italian and German dictatorships. Class readings will be in English, but students will be encouraged to conduct research in Spanish, German and Italian if they know any of those languages.
 

MALS 70200 – Metropolis: A Political, Historical, and Sociological Profile of New York CRN# 32253
W, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 5417, 3 credits, Prof. Cindy Lobel, [22089]


This interdisciplinary course will explore New York City’s rise and role as the nation’s metropolis, examining several key themes in the city’s development.  In particular, we will look at Gotham as a center of work, culture and residency as well as at the diverse populations that have called the city home through its four-century history.  We will examine New York City from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, including history, sociology, anthropology, economics, and political science.

 

MALS 70600 - The Enlightenment and Critique CRN# 32254
Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 3207, 3 credits, Prof. Martin Burke

The course will examine a number of seminal texts produced in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries within the contexts of current debates over the contours, and the consequences, of the Enlightenment in America. The interpretive and analytic approaches taken will be ones from cultural and intellectual history, the history of political thought, religious studies and the history of science. Among the sources to be read are: Benjamin Franklin’s Autobiography; St. John de Crèvecoeur’s Letters from an American Farmer; Thomas Paine’s Common Sense; the “Declaration of Independence”; Thomas Jefferson’s Notes on the State of Virginia; the “Federalist” and the “Letters of Brutus”; Charles Brocken Brown’s Alcuin; Sarah Wentworth Morton’s Ouabi; Meriwether Lewis and William Clark’s Journals; and letters and essays by Benjamin Banneker, Mercy Otis Warren, Benjamin Rush and Judith Sargent Murray. Among the contemporary scholarly works are monographs by John Fea, Susan Parrish, Darren Staloff and Leigh Eric Schmidt, as well as a number of articles and historiographic reviews. The course welcome masters-level students from the Liberal Studies Program (especially, but not exclusively, the Western Intellectual Traditions and the American Studies tracks) and doctoral students from the Ph.D. Programs in History and English, and the American Studies Certificate Program.

MALS 70800 – Transformations of Modernity, 1914 - Present CRN# 32255
W, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 3207, 3 credits, Prof. Sarah Danielsson


Modernism, and modernity can be discussed in terms of bureaucracy, rationalization, secularization, alienation, commodification, individualism, subjectivism, objectivism, universalism, chaos, mass society, homogenization, diversification, hybridization, democratization, centralization, mechanization, totalitarianism, and many, many more. The meanings of “Modernity” and “Modernism” have been debated to a great extent in scholarship and are often applied differently in history, prose, philosophy, art, music, theater or poetry. Its counterpart “Postmodernism” also provides important juxtaposition and meaning to the terms.  There are a myriad of ways in which one can discuss the transformations of modernity in the twentieth century: this course will look through the lens of intellectual history. Starting with the viewpoint of Marshall Berman’s seminal discussion of modernity, “All that is Solid Mets into Air,” this course will look at the challenges of modernity in the intellectual history of the twentieth century: The modernity and postmodernity of: Totalitarianism; Existentialism; anti-Colonialism and the challenge of Human Rights; etc. Among others, we will read authors such as Hannah Arendt, Michael Foucault, Edward Said, Walter Benjamin, Franz Fanon, Joseph Conrad, etc.


MALS 71000 – Forms of Life Writing CRN# 32628
M, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 5383, 3 credits, Prof. Brenda Wineapple
"To live over people's lives," wrote Henry James, "is nothing unless we live over their perceptions, live over the growth, the change, the varying intensity of the same-- since it was by these things they themselves lived."
This course will interrogate various forms of so-called "life writing" (biography/fictional biography/memoir) to investigate the meaning, aims, ethics, pitfalls, and possibilities of the genre as practiced in literature.  We will therefore examine a wide range of topics that various forms of life-writing encounter: the relation between fact and fiction; the significance of politics and historical context; the impact of individual psychology; point of view in narration; the function of imagination; the use or exploitation of marginal figures.  And to the extent that life-writing depends on the creation of character, this course looks closely at how such characters are created from real people: how a living, breathing person seems to arise out of a mass of sometimes contradictory “facts”; how characters are made to change, that is, if they do; how characters can make a story move; and of course how or if traditional forms of life-writing might be liberated from its brick-like borders.
 Writers/books will likely include Lytton Strachey, Natalie Zemon Davis (The Return of Martin Guerre), Virginia Woolf (Orlando), Richard Holmes (Footsteps), Janet Malcolm (on Sylvia Plath biographies), Henry James, The Aspern Papers, Gertrude Stein, Adam Phillips on Freud and biography, Julia Blackburn and her biographical inventions about Daisy Bates, Robert A. Caro on Lyndon Johnson, W. G. Sebald, Hilton Als.


MALS 71200 – The Culture of Fashion/The Fabric of Cultures CRN# 32257
W, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 3309, 3 credits, Prof. Eugenia Paulicelli
Cross-listed with IDS 81660


The course will take the form of an interdisciplinary study of fashion and fabric and their bearing on a heterogeneous cultural identity. Fashion and identity – personal, collective, transnational—are the results of the multilayered fabric of cultures. They are also the manifestation of a dynamic process, a dialogue between self and other. Self and identity are not defined on the basis of closure and homologous relations, but in terms of interplay between similarities, differences, reuses and translations. Identity is a process of negotiation and understanding, a journey of becoming.
This process, although expressed with different aesthetic results, is very much at work in the textiles and clothing we will examine in the course.
The course will draw on writings from history, fashion studies, material culture, literature, and objects that are part of a digital archive project designed to highlight and embrace the rich multicultural composition of New York and its boroughs and the central role of clothing in our lives. The digital archive is a further development of an earlier project and exhibition: “The Fabric of Cultures. Fashion, Identity, Globalization” held at Queens College in 2006. In addition, the course will feature guest speakers and a research lab component that require students to carry out a creative project.

 

MALS 71400 - Introduction to International Studies CRN# 32258
M, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 3207, 3 credits, Prof. Tomohisa Hattori


The two main purposes of this course are to introduce you to theoretically informed historical analyses of international relations (IR) and to help you apply one of the theories of IR to an international subject of your choice.  While the historical contexts and theories of IR will help you engage in further studies in IR, your paper will enhance your understanding of how you may gain social scientific knowledge by reviewing relevant theoretical literature, conceptualizing your subject matter, developing research questions, figuring out how to answer them, gathering information about them, organizing the research result as evidence for your answer to the research question, and developing your answer as an argument about a particular phenomenon or relationship on the chosen topic in the context of existing theoretical arguments. 

 

MALS 71800 - Cross-Cultural & Multi-Disciplinary Perspectives on Work & Family Issues CRN# 32566
M, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 5417, 3 credits, Prof. Caryn Medved


Cross-Cultural & Multi-Disciplinary Perspectives on Work & Family Issues, is designed to broaden and deepen your perspective by addressing more complex issues, and taking a cross-national perspective to these topics. The course will emphasize the importance of context for understanding individual work and family experiences, as well as broader policies and practices that vary across countries. In addition, we will learn about how work and family issues are approached by several social science disciplines, each of which offers a unique perspective and different insights.

MALS 72300 – Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies CRN# 32260
T, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 6417, 3 credits, Prof. James Wilson


In Gender Outlaw: On Men, Women, and the Rest of Us Kate Bornstein writes, “The first question we usually ask new parents is: ‘Is it a boy or a girl?’” Bornstein recommends the response, “We don’t know; it hasn’t told us yet.” This course explores the ways in which gender and sexuality are pronounced, embodied, and negotiated within specific historical and cultural contexts. Through a close reading of interdisciplinary, foundational, and recent scholarship the class will examine and theorize the ways in which categories of gender and sexuality inform and shape our understanding of the world. Investigating the intersections and collisions of gender and sexuality with race, class, ability, nationality, ethnicity, and age, the class will consider societal and institutional systems of power, privilege, oppression, and marginalization. Course requirements include an oral presentation, two 4-6 page response papers, and a 15-20 page, staged researched essay.

MALS 73100 - American Culture and Values
T, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 4419, 3 credits, Prof. Justin Rogers-Cooper

The Object(s) of American Studies: History, Method, & Praxis
 
Russ Castronovo and Susan Gillman begin the introduction to their recent collection States of Emergency: The Object of American Studies (2009), with a deceptively straightforward question: “What is the object of American studies?” They continue by unpacking the ramifications of that question, in particular by noting its imbrication in two corollary questions: “What does ‘American studies’ study, and what does it want?” For all of its centrality, after all, American studies remains an anomaly in the academy - as a program and not a department it resides somewhere between (or, perhaps, outside) normative disciplinary boundaries. The object of this course is to explore these questions by considering the histories, theories, and practices of American studies from its inception as an academic discipline to the present. In other words, we will consider how in the span of about sixty-five years – using the first publication of American Quarterly in 1949 as a marker of discernable communal birth – American studies transformed from a movement into an institution (an institution marked by one of the largest annual academic conferences in the United States). As we undertake these questions, we will also address the present state “American” studies and whether it’s best understood in tension with such concepts as “the Circum-Atlantic," as a vocabulary or concepts and keywords, or perhaps even as a constellation of emerging or converging set of inter-disciplinary sub-fields or orientations, with the drive of “minoritarian criticism” in the 2014 text Unsettled States edited by Ivy G. Wilson and Dana Luciano acting as a spur for reflection. As such, our assignments will attempt to take stock of its current position in the academy and in our own work.

MALS 73400 - Introduction to Africana Studies: Black Intellectual Thought CRN# 32262
Tuesdays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, Room 6114, 3 credits, Prof. R. L’Heureux Lewis-McCoy– RLEWISMCCOY@CCNY.CUNY.EDU
Cross-listed with AFCP 72000 & SOC 82301
 
This course explores the development and evolution of the Black intellectual tradition in the United States in the 20th and 21st centuries. In particular, the course explores two distinct areas: 1) conceptualizing and interrogating the diversity of scholarly approaches to the African-American condition and 2) what role(s) can/should intellectuals play in the Black freedom struggle. The course surveys ideological traditions that include, but are not limited to, Black nationalism, Black conservatism, Black feminism, Black Marxism, etc. These traditions are presented to raise greater consideration of the influence of ideology, diversity within the tradition, and the weight of ontological claims on programs of racial uplift and social change. Through an exploration of critical voices from inside and outside of academia, the course seeks to locate sites for potential intellectual intervention, pragmatic struggle, and redefinitions of the boundaries of Blackness. Readings from authors such as WEB Du Bois, Harold Cruse, Audre Lorde, Jared Sexton, Joy James, and Patricia Hill Collins are designed to survey existing approaches to social and intellectual problems facing Black peoples. Requirements for the class include: 1) thorough reading and discussion of the assigned course materials, 2) weekly response papers submitted digitally to the instructor, and 3) an in-depth term research paper on Black Intellectual Tradition.


MALS 74500 - Great Digs: important sites of the Classical, Late Antique and Islamic Worlds CRN# 32263
Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 3309, 3 credits, Prof. Elizabeth Macaulay-Lewis
Cross-listed with CLAS 74400 & ART 82000


This course introduces students to archaeological methods and important archaeological sites from the Classical, Late Antique and Islamic worlds. The course assumes no previous knowledge of archaeology. The two primary methods of archaeological inquiry—excavation and survey—are first introduced, discussed and problematized in this course. We will then consider specific sites – cities, towns and, in certain cases, residences – to understand how archaeology has contributed to our knowledge of these sites. Sites, such as Athens, Alexandria, Rome, Jerusalem and others, will each be the focus of a lecture or seminar. By the end of the course students will gain a knowledge of the principles of archaeological excavation and survey; an understanding of major classes of archaeological evidence and key archaeological theories; some of the important issues and challenges, such as war and cultural destruction, confronting archaeologists today; and a knowledge of important archaeological sites from the Classical, Late Antique and Islamic worlds.
Course Requirements:
The course is composed of lectures and seminars. In addition to completion of all required readings and active participation in class discussion, there are two major assignments in this course. First, a seven to ten page (2,500- 3,000 words) paper that discusses an archaeological theory, methodology, or type of evidence. This paper may be revised and resubmitted, as this course aims to help students develop their academic writing. Second, students will create a digital site report (effectively a website) about a site of their choice from the Classical, Late Antique or Islamic worlds that has not been discussed in class; this site can be a city or a smaller, specific site. This project aims to teach students how to interpret a site from an archaeological and historical perspective. It should also enable a student to understand and interpret archaeological data and publications, demonstrate the significance of the selected site, and to designed website on a specific site. Students will be supported in creating their website reports through two seminars where the digital skills required to create these site reports will be discussed and demonstrated.


MALS 75400 - Introduction to Digital Humanities   CRN# 32264
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 6496, 3 credits, Profs. Stephen Brier/Lisa Rhody
Cross-listed with IDS 81610
The dramatic growth of the Digital Humanities (DH) over the past half dozen years has helped scholars re-imagine the very nature and forms of academic research and teaching across a range of scholarly disciplines, encompassing the arts, the interpretive social sciences, and traditional humanities subject areas. This course will explore the history of the digital humanities, focusing especially on the diverse pioneering projects and core texts that ground this innovative methodological and conceptual approach to scholarly inquiry and teaching.  It will also emphasize ongoing debates in the digital humanities, such as the problem of defining the digital humanities, the question of whether DH has (or needs) theoretical grounding, controversies over new models of peer review for digital scholarship, issues related to collaborative labor on digital projects, and the problematic questions surrounding research involving “big data.” The course will also emphasize the ways in which DH has helped transform the nature of academic teaching and pedagogy in the contemporary university with its emphasis on collaborative, student-centered and digital learning environments and approaches. Along the way, we will discuss broad social, legal and ethical questions and concerns surrounding digital media and contemporary culture, including privacy, intellectual property, and open/public access to knowledge and scholarship. Students will be expected to participate actively in class discussions and online postings (including on blogs and wikis) and to research and write a final multimedia presentation on a key topic in the digital humanities. Students completing the course will gain broad knowledge about and understanding of the emerging role of the digital humanities across several academic disciplines and will begin to learn some of the fundamental skills used often in digital humanities projects.
 
Note: this course is part of an innovative "Digital Praxis Seminar," a two-semester long introduction to digital tools and methods that will be open to all students in the Graduate Center. The goal of the course is to introduce graduate students to various ways in which they can incorporate digital research into their work.


MALS 77200 - History of Cinema I: 1895-1930 CRN# 32265
Tuesdays, 4:15-8:15 p.m., Rm. C-419, 3 credits, Prof. Anupama Kapse
Cross-listed with THEA 71500, ART 79500 & FSCP 81000


This class will survey the emergence of cinema from inter-related perspectives that situate early experiments with moving images alongside older moving image technologies and theatrical practices that often coexisted with the new medium. The course will not only focus on cinema’s so-called progress but its ability to radically enhance viewing possibilities, alter public culture, change perceptions of modernity, picture new women, mobilize race-gender politics and effect social transformation. We will situate these topics within the larger context of international film movements, the development of national cinemas worldwide, and broader questions of film archaeology and historiography.  Although our primary examples will be drawn from American silent cinema, we will also consider British, Indian, Chinese, Russian, Swedish and German examples to better understand the global spread and varied applications of the medium. Finally, we will examine the initial impact of sound on cinema though, as we will see, silent cinema often included some sort of aural accompaniment.
Students will be encouraged to think of film history as a practice that extends beyond silent cinema into a host of related areas: these include not only ‘discarded’ media and film formats but medium crossings between theater, literature and local performance traditions such as shadow puppetry, and the various incarnations of opera. To that end, this class will ask students to explore the different methods available for producing film history and ask how film continues to proliferate after the ‘death’ of celluloid.
Screenings will include selections and/or whole features, as well as additional viewing, to be completed outside class: The Movies Begin:  A Treasury of Early Cinema, 1894-1913, Edison: The Invention of the Movies: 1891-1918, Landmarks of Early Film, Vol. 1, George Méliès: First Wizard of Cinema, More Treasures from American Film Archives 1894-1931, Griffith Masterworks, extracts from American, British, and French serials, The Birth of Krishna (1919), shorts by Chaplin and Keaton, The Thief of Baghdad (1924), The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920), Ingeborg Holm (1913), Man with a Movie Camera (1929), The Goddess (1934), Pandora’s Box (1929), Falling Leaves (1912), and Where are my Children? (1916).
Requirements:  Readings must be completed before the day for which they are slotted. Please come to class on time. Full attendance, engaged viewing, and active classroom participation are vital for your success. Discussion--20%. Reading responses and discussion questions-10 %. A research paper with original content (20-25 pages) on a topic of your choice will fulfill a major requirement for this course—70%. Your topic must be chosen in consultation with me. A one page proposal will be due five weeks before the final paper is due, after which we will meet to discuss your topic.


MALS 77400 - International Migration  CRN# 32266
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 6421, 3 credits, Prof. Pyong Gap Min


We have ushered into the global migration period since the early 1990s.  Not only traditionally immigrant-accepting countries, including the U.S. and three former British colonies in the “New World” (Canada, Australia and New Zealand), but also Western European countries and Asian countries have annually received large numbers of formal immigrants or migrant workers/brides over the last two decades. In particular, the U.S. has received the largest number of immigrants annually since the late 1960s The influx of immigrants to the U.S. over the last 50 years has changed the face of the U.S., impacting neighborhoods, the economy, the school systems, cuisines, politics, healthcare, and sports. 
This course, focusing on international migration, has three main objectives.  First, it will provide an overview information about immigration patterns in three areas for students: (1) the U.S., (2) Canada, Australia and New Zealand, and (3) Europe.  Immigration patterns include immigration policies, the annual number of immigrants, their national and regional origins, and their racial, religious and socioeconomic backgrounds.  Second, it will compare two mass migration periods in the U.S. (the classical and contemporary periods) in immigration patterns and immigrants’ adaptations. Third, it will help students to learn about U.S. immigrants’ and their children’s adaptations (settlement patterns, socioeconomic adaptations and racialization) and theories of adaptations, especially regarding second-generation immigrants’ adaptations. To summarize the main objectives, this course aims to provide general information about global migration patterns, but focuses on the U.S. context in examining immigrants’ and their children’s adaptations with special attention to the differences between turn-of-the twenty-century white immigrant and contemporary immigrant groups.

 

MALS 78100 - Issues in Urban Education CRN# 32267
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 4419, 3 credits, Prof. Susan Semel

This course provides an overview of major issues and controversies in urban education in the United States. Through a historical, sociological, philosophical and political analysis of educational problems, the course explores a variety of progressive and traditional approaches to improving urban education in the 20th century. The course focuses on current neoliberal reforms to reduce educational inequality, including curriculum and common core learning standards, teacher education reform, school choice, tuition vouchers, charter schools, privatization, whole school reform, small schools, and value added models of teacher evaluation. Finally, the course examines the limits and possibilities of these reforms in improving urban education and reducing racial, ethnic and social class based educational inequalities.


MALS 78200 Public Higher Education Policy, Finance, and Leadership - CUNY (1961-Present) [32834]
Thursdays, 3 credits, 4:15 – 6:15 p.m., Rm. 3309, Professors Picciano and Goldstein
Cross-listed with UED 73200
 
This seminar will examine major policy and financial developments at the City University of New York from its inception in 1961 to the present.  Critical to this examination will be the role of chancellors and other CUNY leaders who were instrumental in promoting and implementing these policies.  This seminar will consider important developments such as the creation of the City University in 1961, the expansion of colleges in the 1960s, open admissions, the New York City fiscal crisis, the imposition of tuition, the capital rebuilding program of the 1980s and 1990s, Mayor Rudy Giuliani’s Institution Adrift Task Force Report, the end of open admissions at the senior colleges, the second major expansion of CUNY in the 2000s, and the Pathways curriculum.  The seminar will feature extensive student participation and guest speakers.

MALS 78500 Clouds  CRN# 32872
Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 4419, 3 credits, Prof. Matthew Gold 
Cross-listed with ENGL 89500
 
In Mechanisms, Matthew G. Kirschenbaum writes about the magnetic hard disk drive as an “example of what it means to consider storage media as a kind of writing machine.” Though Kirschenbaum’s work provides a “grammatology of the hard drive,” increasingly, our text is consigned to other people’s hard drives – otherwise known as “the cloud”: our prose typed into Google docs; our books downloaded from remote Kindle and iBook libraries; and our tweets, Facebook updates, and blog posts stored on remote, cloud-based servers. This is the public cloud. Behind that public cloud lies a mass of computational infrastructure and obfuscated text: our individual and collective search and purchase histories; our phone texts, email messages, and call logs; our media preferences and choices; our annotations, comments, faves, and likes -- all mined by "machine learning" algorithms, often in the service of both private corporate interests and governmental surveillance agencies. How do we make sense of the texts in and of our lives at a moment when our words are both inscribed on hard drives and consigned to the “cloud”? What new forms of control and surveillance do such cloud-based structures make possible, and what kinds of collectivities do they write into being? To what extent can we see such large-scale textual corpora as spaces for agency and for algorithmic exploration and play? Moving across histories of the book and of computational infrastructure to issues of text mining and deformance, this course will consider the problems, processes, and possibilities of the modern, text-based cloud. 
 
Authors to be read include: Matthew G. Kirschenbaum, Simone Browne, Samir Chopra, Yochai Benkler, Benjamin H. Bratton, Frank Pasquale, Trebor Scholz, Gabriella Coleman, John Durham Peters, Tung-Hui Hu, Adrian Johns, Wendy Hui Kyong Chun, William Gibson, Adrian McKenzie, Jerome McGann, Evgeny Morozov, Alex Galloway, and Nicole Starosielski, among others.

MALS 78800 Introduction to Childhood and Youth Studies, CRN# 32879 
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 3207, 3 credits, Prof. Roger Hart
Cross-listed with ESS 79903, PSYC 80103, and U ED 75100

This seminar offers an introduction to how childhood and youth is investigated across the different disciplines of the social sciences and the humanities. Beginning with the recognition that concepts of childhood and adolescence are socially constructed and vary across culture and historical periods, we will examine how our shifting conceptions of childhood both align and clash with the way children actually live. This will include childhood experiences that challenge the historically recent notions of a “protected” and “innocent” childhood and such issues as child sex, child labor, child soldiers and child criminals. We will examine how different institutions, discourses and systems shape how childhood is experienced: including family, school, the juvenile justice system, media and consumer culture.  But while attending to the force of structural inequalities in cultural and economic arrangements, we will not risk rendering children passive or invisible; we will recognize the methodological strides that have been made in recent years by researchers in working with rather than on or about children. Students will be expected to complete a paper on a theme related to their own particular interests in the study of or children or childhood. 


MALS 79600 Thesis Workshop  CRN# 32268
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 5417, 1 credit, Prof. George Fragopoulos

MALS 70000 Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies
Decoding Celebrity: Georgia O’Keeffe as Case Study
Tuesday, 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM, 3 credits, Linda Grasso

What is celebrity? How is it achieved? What purposes does it serve? In this course, we explore these questions using twentieth-century painter Georgia O’Keeffe as a focal point. Reading cultural criticism, history, autobiography, and popular culture biography, we consider the ways in which O’Keeffe’s celebrity enables an understanding of larger issues such as how celebrities are commodified and consumed by a variety of constituencies for a multitude of reasons. Viewing works of art, photographs, advertisements, documentaries, and You Tube videos, we also consider the complex ways in which celebrity images are created and circulated in multiple public domains. Conducted as a research seminar, the course requires students to study texts intensively, design and execute a research project, and share findings with peers.                         
 
MALS 70000 Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies
Becoming Lewis Mumford: Studying, analyzing and writing about the architecture of New York City
Wednesday, 4:15 PM - 6:15 PM, 3 credits, Elizabeth Macaulay-Lewis

This course will introduce students to critical thinking and techniques of academic reading and writing with a specific focus on the urban form, history and architecture of New York City. This introductory course is designed for students interested in history, urbanism, architecture and the politics of space. This course takes an interdisciplinary approach drawing upon anthropology, history, archaeology, geography, architectural history and other disciplines to demonstrate how scholars study, research and write about the built environment and urban space, as well as how people experience and use space and architecture in New York City. We will look at various theories of architecture and space. This course will also emphasize fieldwork and visits to various monuments, buildings and institutions in New York City so that students can learn the process of researching in New York City. Students will develop critical thinking, writing and researching skills in this class. Students will write weekly papers about architecture, critique scholarship, assemble an annotated bibliography, and write an abstract for their final research paper that will be presented to the class in an informal workshop setting.
 
MALS 70000 Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies
Journalism and Science                                    
Monday, 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM, 3 credits, Christopher Anderson

How do journalists report on important scientific controversies, scientific discoveries, and the increasingly common intersections between science and public life? Should journalism try to be more like science? Should science try to be more like journalism? As children of the Enlightenment desire to understand, control, and legislate the world around us, what does comparing science and journalism teach us about the ways we human beings try to come to grips with and act upon an uncertain universe? And how are recent changes in technology—from “blogging” to big data”-- affecting the boundary lines that used to clearly separate journalism and science from both each other and from other knowledge-based disciplines?
Students in this course will grapple with these issues through a combination of targeted readings, student discussions, lectures, films, and field trips to news organizations in the city, culminating in a 25-30 page paper that ties this class into the students’ larger long-term thesis plans. The class itself is divided into three sections. The first section examines the different ways that journalists have struggled to cover science accurately as well as the larger issues that get foregrounded by this struggle. The second section examines the various ways that journalism itself has struggled with its’ desire to be both scientific and “narratival,” and current journalism reform movements (from precision journalism to computational reporting) that adopt aspects of science in order to try to be more “objective.” The final section looks at the rise of the public relations profession, the emergence of open science, the growth of digital technologies, and the way these professions and technologies are changing the way science itself is communicating with the larger world.
 
MALS 70000 Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies
Thursday, 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM, 3 credits, Christopher Schmidt     

 
MALS 70100 Narratives of New York: Literature and the Visual Arts
Monday, 4:15 PM - 6:15 PM, 3 credits, Robert Singer

This course will explore critically significant representations of New York City—its people, places, history, and complex identity formations—as it is revealed, or rather manufactured, in varieties of narrative forms, from Walt Whitman and Stephen Crane to Diane Arbus and Spike Lee. Particular attention will be given to evaluating the manner in which literature interrelates with film and other visual media and how each venue reflects cultural and historical ideologies. For example, what makes a text a “New York” narrative? Do literary and visual narratives mirror the city’s psyche, or serve to analyze it in penetrating ways?
Course requirements include active participation in discussions, one oral presentation, and an end term paper (15—20 pages), which critically interprets the assignments or interrelated material.
 
MALS 70400 Cultural Studies and the Law
Thursday, 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM, 3 credits, Michael Yarbrough

 
MALS 70500 Classical Culture: Philosophical Methods in Late Plato
Tuesday, 6:30 PM - 08:30 PM, 3 credits, Nickolas Pappas
Cross-listed with Phil 76100

The Socratic method is a familiar sight in Plato’s dialogues.  Socrates cross-examines an interlocutor, discovers contradictions in what had been that interlocutor’s deeply held beliefs, and often leads the person he’s talking to into a fuller understanding of a philosophical concept and a definition of its terms.
But as he continued to write, Plato made philosophy do more than it had ever dreamt of.  Instead of whittling down the scope of philosophy in his later works, or defending positions he’d developed long before, he explored the new things that philosophy could say and do. The Phaedrus and Menexenus picture philosophers composing rhetoric, while the Sophist and Statesman lay out a new system for defining terms (division and collection) and test how widely it can be applied. We find etymology in Plato’s Cratylus, science in the Timaeus, and history in the Critias (as well as in Menexenus and Timaeus).
This survey of the dialogues that are thought to be among Plato’s later works will foreground the picture implicit in them of philosophy as methodologically unformed, ready to become more academic in one respect, more popular in another, more empirical in another way. As far as Plato was concerned, What philosophy is had not yet found its final answer.
 
MALS 71000 Forms of Life Writing         
Monday, 6:30 PM – 8:30 PM, 3 credits, Annalyn Swan

As literary genres go, life-writing has always been something of a stepchild—dismissed, and often deservedly so, as an uninspired, nuts-and-bolts recitation of a person’s life. But the best biography, autobiography and memoir is as different from this pedestrian approach as Jane Austen is to pulp fiction. It tells the tale with panache, while never straying from scrupulous research.
We will begin with excerpts from Telling Lives, a collection of foundational essays about the biographer’s craft. Readings will range from Boswell’s seminal The Life of Samuel Johnson to Frank McCourt’s searing memoir Angela’s Ashes. But this is also a course about practicing the art ourselves. In addition to writing an extended book review/analysis of one of the semester’s readings, everyone will have the opportunity at the end of the course either to write a biographical introduction to a subject of his/her choice or a chapter in a memoir.
 
MALS 71400 Introduction to International Studies            
Wednesday, 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM, 3 credits, Tomohisa Hattori

The two main purposes of this course are to introduce you to theoretically informed historical analyses of international relations (IR) and to help you apply one of the theories of IR to an international subject of your choice.  While the historical contexts and theories of IR will help you engage in further studies in IR, your paper will enhance your understanding of how you may gain social scientific knowledge by reviewing relevant theoretical literature, conceptualizing your subject matter, developing research questions, figuring out how to approach these questions, and gathering relevant data to answer them.  Because MALS 71500 in the fall of 2015 focused on human rights and international law, this course will focus more on the issues of wars and political economy. 
 
MALS 72100 Feminist Texts and Contexts
Wednesday, 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM, 3 credits, Jean Halley

Office hours: Wednesdays 5 to 6:30 pm
jean.halley@csi.cuny.edu
jeanomalleyhalley@gmail.com

Feminist Texts and Contexts examines the diverse ways human beings think about and experience sexuality, sex and gender roles, intimacy and love, marriage and other forms of intimate human relationship, parenting, and domestic and sexual labor through the lens of feminist thought.  The course explores how both the experience and the ideological meanings of human sexuality and gender have varied in different social and historical contexts, and how sexuality permeates the social division of labor.  Grounded in feminist analysis and historical responses to feminist thought, Feminist Texts and Contexts investigates the ways humans think about and organize gender and sexuality, and how these are related to the material realities of the political economy and people’s everyday lives and work.


 
MALS 72200 Contemporary Feminist Theories 
Tuesday, 4:15 PM - 6:15 PM, 3 credits, Patricia Clough

 
MALS 72700 The Political Ecology of Social and Environmental Justice: Political Economy of the Environment
Thursday, 11:45 AM - 1:45 PM, 3 credits, Kenneth Gould
Cross-listed with EES 79903 and SOC 84510

This course explores the complex, dynamic interactions between social systems and ecosystems. Environmental political-economy challenges social science’s human exemptionalist paradigm by incorporating the natural environment as a variable. The course will examine the social origins of the major environmental stresses facing contemporary social systems, the social conflicts that these stresses have produced, and a range of approaches to resolving social system-ecosystem disjuncture at local, regional, national, and transnational levels. Major theoretical frameworks and debates in environmental political-economy will be addressed. Special attention will be paid to the roles of science and technology in generating and responding to socio-environmental disorganization, the role of socio-economic inequality in environmental conflicts, the emergence of environmental social movement coalitions, the fusion of the politics of place, production, and identity in ecological resistance movements, and linkages between transnational economic processes and efforts to achieve ecologically and socially sustainable development trajectories.
 
MALS 72800 Ecological and Social Theories of Social Behavior
Tuesday, 2 PM - 4 PM, 3 credits, Susan Saegert

 
MALS 73200 American Social Institutions
Tuesday, 4:15 PM - 6:15 PM, 3 credits, Hildegard Hoeller

 
MALS 73500 Africana Studies: Global Perspectives
Mondays 6:30 – 8:30 PM, 3 credits, Dave Brotherton
Cross-listed with SOC 85000/AFCP 72000 Youth Marginalization and Subculture of Resistance

 
MALS 75300 Data Visualization Methods
Monday, 11:45 AM - 1:45 PM, 3 credits, Lev Manovich                                                                                           
Cross-listed with CSC 87100

 
MALS 75500 Digital Humanities Methods and Practices
Tuesday, 4:15 PM - 6:15 PM, 3 credits, Matthew Gold

 
MALS 75700 Field Course in Island Long Term Human Ecodynamics
Wednesday, 4:15 PM - 6:15 PM, 3 credits, Sophia Perdikaris

This course is the second required course for the MALS concentration on Sustainability Science and Education. After the theory course that students complete in the fall semester, this field course will look at some of the challenges of applying sustainability in an urban island environment along with a hands on approach to the tools, equipment and methodologies for the collection of original data.  The course will include multiple place-based learning locations, including visits to projects that apply sustainable practices, museums, a visit with the Shinnecock nation, The Brooklyn College aquaponics facility and small urban farms.
 
MALS 77100 Aesthetics of Film
Tuesday, 4:15 PM – 8:15 PM, 3 credits, Edward Miller, Room C-419
Cross-listed with FSCP 81000, THEA 71400, and ART 79400

This course argues that a crucial aspect of the cinematic enterprise is the depiction of the filmmaking environment itself through the "meta-film." Using this emphasis as an entry into aesthetics, the course involves students in graduate-level film discourse by providing a thorough understanding of the concepts that are needed to perform a detailed formal analysis. The course's primary text is the tenth edition of Bordwell and Thompson's Film Art (2012) and the book is used to examine such key topics as narrative and nonnarrative forms, mise-en-scene, composition, cinematography, camera movement, set design/location, color, duration, editing, and genre. As sound is a particular focus in this course—and arguably especially important to the meta-film--we supplement Film Art with readings by Michel Chion, Amy Herzog, and Rick Altman. In order to understand the meta-film and its aesthetics we read key sections of Robert Stam's Reflexivity in Film and Literature: From Don Quixote to Jean-Luc Godard (1992), Christopher Ames' Movies about Movies: Hollywood Revisited (1997), Nöth & Bishara's Self-Reference in the Media (2007), John Thornton Caldwell's Production Culture: Industrial Reflexivity and Critical Practice in Film & Television (2008), and Craig Hight’s Television Mockumentary: Reflexivity, Satire and a Call to Play (2011). We also read “classic” essays on metafiction by Patricia Waugh and Linda Hutcheon and reflexivity in video art by Rosalind Krauss in order to make distinctions between self-referentiality and reflexivity in film. We make full use of a database of media that depicts the production terrain itself. We watch Thanhouser and Marston's Evidence of the Film (1913), Charlie Chaplin's The Masquerader (1914), Max Fleisher’s The Tantalizing Fly (1919), Dziga Vertov's Man with a Movie Camera (1929), Billy Wilder's Sunset Boulevard (1950), Donen and Kelly's Singing in the Rain (1952), Chuck Jones’s Duck Amok (1953), Michael Powell's Peeping Tom (1960), Federico Fellini's  (1963), Jean-Luc Godard's Contempt (1963), François Truffaut's Day for Night (1973), Richard Serra and Nancy Holt’s Boomerang (1974), Robert Altman's The Player (1991), David Lynch's Mulholland Drive (2001), Farah Khan’s Om Shanti Om (2007), Michel Gondry's Be Kind Rewind (2008), Pedro Aldomovar’s Broken Embraces (2009), and David Cronenberg’s Map to the Stars (2015).  In the final sessions we examine the aesthetics of recent comedic meta-television in series such as The Comeback (2005 and 2014) and Extras (2005-07); we also make an attempt at tracing a genealogy by viewing The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show (1950-58) and Mary Hartman Mary Hartman (1976).
 
Course Requirements:
1. Weekly response paper: student responds to the film and the ideas presented in the reading and session.
2. Presentation of a week’ reading.
3. Paper proposal, due 10th week: written like an abstract for a conference paper, 500 words. Also presented in class. Sending out this abstract to a conference is strongly recommended.
4. Research paper: Due one week after final day of class, at least 12 pages. This paper is theoretically informed and reflects the content of the course, involving a close formal reading of a meta-film.
 
MALS 77500 Global Cities     
Monday, 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM, 3 credits, David Halle
Cross listed with SOC 82800

Global Cities seeks to understand the politics, economics, social, and cultural life of today’s urban-mega centers.  We will study innovation and job creation, neighborhood life including integration and segregation, housing including the “affordable housing” and “homeless” crises; the rise and decline of  urban “ghettos”,  the waxing and waning of the suburbs, education, political incorporation, crime and police-community relations, architecture and “starchitects”, ethnic and racial relations, immigration including Europe’s current refugee crisis, religious diversity, inequality, finance and banking, cultural institutions such as museums and art galleries, environmental issues including threats such as global warming and flooding as well as opportunities to make cities “greener”, urban riots, and terrorism.  We will focus especially on New York, Los Angeles, and London, but draw examples from many other global cities. The course complements International Migration (MALS 77400) by seeking to understand the global urban context to which so many international migrants are drawn.
 
MALS     78200 The Politics of Contemporary Urban Education
Monday, 4:15 PM - 6:15 PM, 3 credits, Joel Spring
Cross-listed with U ED 75200,
 American Education: Historical, Political, Social and Legal Foundations
This course will focus on the history, politics, social and legal aspects of American education. Topics will include: history and political goals of public schooling; social goals of schooling; equality of opportunity; economic goals of education; equality of educational opportunity; student diversity; local control, choice, charter schools, and home schooling; power and control at state and national levels and the profession of teaching.
The course will require an essay exploring a topic of interest in American education. Also, students will be required to participate in a discussion forum for each class.
 
MALS 78500       Arabian Nights
Monday, 4:15 PM - 6:15 PM, 3 credits, Anna Akasoy

This course offers an introduction to methods and problems of liberal studies and the humanities, focusing on the example of the Arabian Nights, its history, literary features and literary and visual adaptations. For the purposes of this course, the Arabian Nights will be treated as an open corpus which continues to expand and transform in a variety of cultural contexts and formats. We will be reading stories from the Arabian Nights in different English translations and discuss a variety of academic publications, but also take into consideration modern artistic interpretations, including examples from literature, the visual arts, film and theater. These comparative exercises will shed light on the continuing appeal of the Arabian Nights and assist us in contextualizing specific developments of the Nights within their respective historical environments.
We will begin by tracking the development of the text and its visual adaptations, beginning with the earliest stories and compilations in India and Persia, continuing with the first Arabic compilation in Iraq and expansions in Syria in the medieval period, proceeding with the introduction to western Europe by way of Galland’s early eighteenth-century French translation, and concluding with the Arabian Nights as a global phenomenon. We will discuss the institutional, intellectual and cultural circumstances which allowed for this transmission as well as account for different interpretations and adaptations. After exploring formal elements of the Arabian Nights (such as the story within a story, the significance of poetry, the classification as fairy tales, and the element of performance and story-telling), we will focus on major themes in the Arabian Nights and their adaptations in modern literature (morality, religion, magic, and power). We will discuss the appeal of the character of Shahrazad, paying attention to psychoanalytical and feminist interpretations and conclude with a discussion of the Arabian Nights in film and on stage and the impact of different media on the manner the stories are told.
 
 
MALS     78900 Childhood and Youth Studies: Approaches and Methods
Thursday, 4:15 PM - 6:15 PM, 3 credits, Colette Daiute
Cross-listed with PSYC

 
MALS     79600 Thesis Workshop
Tuesday, 4:15 PM - 6:15 PM, 1 credit, Tim McCormack

FALL15 MALS Course Schedule


In some cases, MALS core courses will be cross-listed with other programs. Students who would like to have these courses satisfy the core course requirement for their chosen tracks must register for the MALS course number. Please keep this in mind as you register.


 
MALS 70000 Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies [28838]
Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 PM, Professor Rachel Brownstein, 3 credits, Room 3209

Graduate students write papers: response papers, seminar papers, term papers, research papers, and eventually a thesis/capstone project.  This course will prepare students to imagine and to write the kinds of papers they want to write, first of all by reading essays, articles, and other pieces of prose, secondly by analyzing and discussing them, and finally--most importantly--by writing and rewriting their own work.  Students registering for this section of Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies should purchase and bring to class Phillip Lopate's bulky but rich anthology, "The Art of the Essay," which will be the text for the first portion of the semester.  In the second part, each student will locate, photocopy, and introduce to other students an exemplary article by a scholar in a chosen field or discipline.  The final section of the semester will be devoted to conceiving of, outlining, drafting, editing, and revising a ten-page paper. 
 
MALS 70000 Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies [28839]  
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 PM, Professor Eugenia Paulicelli, 3 credits, Room C419

Starting with Dziga Vertov’s The Man with the Movie Camera (1929) and continuing with directors such as Fritz Lang, Luchino Visconti, Michelangelo Antonioni, Jean Luc Godard, Federico Fellini, Wim Wenders, Woody Allen, Ridley Scott, Wong Kar Wai, and Paolo Sorrentino, the course will focus on the relationship between cinema and the city. In particular, the course will pose a series of critical and research questions on how the city is mediated through film and is cast as the protagonist in film. How is a city represented? How are the continuous transformations of urban space documented in fiction films? How does film tell a story of contested space in urban settings? How and why are certain cities cinematically significant and chosen by directors? What are the cultural, political and economic reasons that create a city as a “film capital”? Rome (Cinecittà) and New York, both case studies of cities that have become film capitals, will be examined in depth. The course will also include field trips to the Museum of the Moving Image, Museum of Modern Art and elsewhere. 
 
MALS 70000 Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies: Women, Gender and Fascism in 20th Century Europe [28840]
Mondays, 6:30-8:30 PM, Professor Aránzazu Borrachero, 3 credits, Room 4419
 
Inspired by Foucault’s theories of discursive formation, we will examine the gender discourses that 20th century Spanish, Italian and German fascist dictatorships developed, and their important role within the nation-building plans of those regimes. What can we learn by looking at these discourses from a gender-studies perspective? What comparisons can we make with contemporary gender discourses in the Western world? We will read current scholarship from various disciplines on women, gender and fascism and we will interpret related art, political propaganda, commercial advertising and film. We will begin studying Francoist Spain (1936-1975) and its National Catholicism ideology, a repressive system that predicated the natural subordination of women to men, and pervaded all aspects of women’s lives: education, sexuality, marriage, labor, and citizenship. We will analyze textual, visual and audio-visual representations of Spanish women created by social agents such as the Catholic Church, fascist women organizations, and economic interests. The analysis of gender practices in Spain will prepare students to conduct their own intellectual inquiry of the Italian and German fascist gender agendas. This will be done through independent reading, class discussions, short presentations, journal writing, and a final project. Each student’s research will contribute to the whole group’s compilation of a bibliography for the study of gender discourses and representations under the Italian and German dictatorships. Class readings will be in English, but students will be encouraged to conduct research in Spanish, German and Italian if they know any of those languages.
 
 
MALS 70000 Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies: Demystifying Technological Environments [28841]
Tuesdays, 6:30-8:30 PM, Professor Joan Greenbaum, 3 credits, Room 3212

Why does the media make it seem like technology drives change?  In particular, social media and social justice are often linked as if new forms of media create social justice. Can big data solve unequal distribution of resources?  This course critically examines technologies in their environmental context including social and political frameworks.  Who uses what, for which purposes and why?   In reflecting on historical interactions of technology and social/political contexts we will draw on a mix of readings, images and methods, including:  environmental psychology; social history; and sociological and economic studies of technologies.  We will look at examples of corporate and governmental surveillance; actions for social justice; issues around environmental justice, immigrant and workplace struggles, racial injustices, and, of course, the central issue of economic inequality. 
 
Technologies don't drop from the sky, or get invented out of thin air.  We will look at their origin stories and how they get created and what actions people really take in shaping their own lives.

 [Photo: Matt Herring, as appearing in "The Truly Personal Computer", in The Economist, Feb. 28, 2015.]

 


MALS 70000 Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies: Studies of the US in the World, 1898 to the Present [29361]
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 PM, Professor Karen Miller, 3 credits, Room 4419

Is the United States an empire? If so, what might that mean? If not, what other metaphors can we use to explain U.S. global relations? This course examines transformations of U.S. global power and international relations from the end of the nineteenth century to the present.

Clearly, the United States does not hold political sovereignty over a broad range of colonies. Aside from the 50 United States, the U.S. holds Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands of the United States, the Northern Marianas, and American Samoa. But, the U.S. has the largest military in the world, sustains the world*s biggest economy, and has unparalleled political power. That power is constantly shifting, under continuous challenge, and never as complete as U.S. leaders would like. Our task in this class is to interrogate that power, to understand how it emerged and changed over time, to explore the dynamics and contradictions that animate it, to examine limits, and to consider its challengers. We will also explore how global engagements have transformed the United
States* domestic terrain: just as the U.S. helps shape the world, the world also changes the United States. Our interdisciplinary study of these questions will be organized both chronologically and thematically.
Students will be asked to write frequently and to produce a final paper.
 
MALS 70600 Enlightenment and Critique: The Morality of Inequality [28842]
Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 PM, Professor Stefan Baumrin, 3 credits, Room 3309
Cross-listed with PHIL 77700
 
The principal aim of Enlightenment theory was to establish human equality as the goal of civilisation, for examples universal suffrage, universal education.
The principal route to economic success, individual and collective, is to amass capital through savings; so the economic theories of Adam Smith and Thomas Malthus focus on saving and the elimination of waste.
A legacy of the Enlightenment passed on to us is the clash between the morality of equality and the morality of inequality. That is what this seminar will be about.
 
MALS 70700 The Shaping of Modernity [28843]
Mondays, 6:30-8:30 PM, Professor David Gordon, 3 credits, Room 6494

In 1800 the rhythm of Western life had barely changed since ancient days.  Then, suddenly a new world began to be born. Industrialization and urbanization transformed the lives of millions. A transportation revolution promised to annihilate distance. Traditional beliefs were exploded by the work of Darwin, Einstein and others. Democratic, revolutionary ideologies began to turn the world upside down. Whole populations were suddenly faced with the need to adjust to unprecedented and terrifying economic, political and social change. How they were able to do this is largely the story of the nineteenth century, and a salutary (and necessary) tale for our own time. It is a lesson that can be learned in MALS 70700 The Shaping of Modernity, 1789-1914. 


MALS 70900 Approaches to Life Writing: The Biographical Narrative [29277]
Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 PM, Professor Brenda Wineapple, 3 credits, Room 8203

"Biography first convinces us of the fleeing of the Biographied," Emily Dickinson once wrote.  But biography and the biographical narrative are all around us, whether in books as dense as bricks or in the few, quick sentences of a daily obit.

What makes a good biography?  Character, among other things, and to the extent that biography depends on character, this course looks closely at how such characters are created from real people: how a living, breathing person seems to arise out of a mass of sometimes contradictory “facts”; how characters are made to change, that is, if they do; how characters can make a story move; and of course how or if traditional biography can be liberated from its brick-like borders.  These are a few of the topics we'll investigate by investigating various biographical narratives, especially those that raise questions about the meaning, aims, ethics, pitfalls, and possibilities of the genre.  Writers/books may include Plutarch, Suetonius, Lytton Strachey, Natalie Zemon Davis (The Return of Martin Guerre), Virginia Woolf (Orlando), Richard Holmes (Footsteps), Janet Malcolm (on Sylvia Plath biographies), Candace Millard on the assassination of James Garfield (Destiny of the Republic), Henry James, The Aspern Papers, Adam Phillips on Freud and biography, Julia Blackburn and her biographical inventions about Daiy Bates, Rebecca Solnit on Eadward Muybridge (River of Shadows), and/or Stephan Zweig on Magellan. 
 
 
MALS 71300 The Business of Fashion: Culture, Technology, Design [28844]

Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 PM, Professor Veronica Manlow, 3 credits, Room 6421

The Business of Fashion course explores the complexity of the global fashion industry in a world of rapidly advancing technology, reduced lead times, and increasing availability and dissemination both of fashion products and discourse about fashion.  Fashion occupies a pivotal role in consumer society, as an economic force and a system through which identities are formulated in response to individual and collective considerations.  Brands themselves have become signifiers of certain aesthetics and lifestyles, and skillfully use a variety of means to communicate their distinctive merits.  Referring to classical and contemporary theoretical readings and applied research, as well as to data relating to fashion in practice (from blogs to catwalks, to films, and in stores, etc.) we will consider the full scope of the industry from concept to marketing and communication.  Topics covered include sourcing of fibers/textiles, research, design, manufacturing, labor, distribution, retail, merchandising, marketing, and consumer behavior. From disposable fast fashion to luxury, with many intersections along the way, this course will analyze the structure and the implications of fashion design, branding, merchandising, retailing, marketing and consumer behavior, and will address issues of technology, sustainability and ethics.
 
MALS 71700 Psychology of Work & Family: An Introduction [28845]
Mondays, 6:30-8:30 PM, Professor Kristen Shockley, 3 credits, Room 3209

This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the intersection of work and family from a primarily psychological perspective.  The course will introduce the student to concepts that are central to understanding gender and work-family relations, prominent theories and models in the literature, and the consequences of work-family management for the individual and organization. 

MALS 734000 Africana Studies: Introduction [29374]
Tuesdays, 11:45-1:45 PM, Professor Christopher Bonastia, 3 credits, Room 6421
Cross-listed with AFCP 70200 and SOC 82901

In the last two decades, research on Black Freedom Struggles has expanded in several intriguing directions. Central to this expansion is the claim that the conventional narrative of the civil rights movement is reductionist and historically inaccurate. At its core, this conventional narrative is a regional morality tale that goes something like this: In the South, peaceful Blacks defeated the violent white enforcers of Jim Crow; when the movement traveled North (around 1965), unreasonable Black demands and violent outbursts led to white backlash and the collapse of the movement. Among other shortcomings, this North/South binary ignores the common roots of American racism that fueled Black activism and white resistance throughout the nation. In response to the limits of the conventional narrative, scholars have attempted to broaden and deepen our thinking about Black Freedom Struggles in various ways.   Some have produced detailed case studies of local battles outside the Deep South. Some have argued that, in a number of locales, Black nationalist movements did not supplant integrationist movements, but co-existed alongside them for extended periods. Others have turned greater attention to grassroots activists and foot soldiers, many of them women, rather than focusing primarily on iconic figures and mainstream national civil rights organizations (such as the NAACP and SCLC). Still others have accorded closer scrutiny to the various manifestations of white resistance to social change. Relatively few sociologists have joined this conversation. In this course, we will critically analyze research on Black Freedom Struggles and white resistance by scholars inside and outside of sociology. In addition to our attempts to gain a broader and deeper, historical and sociological understanding of our topic, we will spend some time thinking about how the conventions of various disciplines shape the way that authors understand and narrate history. What does sociology do well? Where does it fall short? What might sociologists contribute to this area of study? Click here to see a preliminary list of readings.
 
MALS 74400 From Alexander to Mohammed: Introduction to the Cultures of the Ancient Mediterranean. Early Islamic Art and Architecture (ca. 632-1250) [28846]
Tuesdays, 6:30-8:30 PM, Professor Elizabeth Macaulay-Lewis, 3 credits, Room 6496
Cross-listed with MES 78000 and ART 74000
 
Since the emergence of Islam in seventh-century Arabia, the world of Islam, which spans continents and centuries, has produced art and architecture that is as remarkable as it is diverse. How to define Islamic art, however, is more complex. Unlike Christian, Jewish or Buddhist art, the art produced in the lands where Islam was a dominant religious, political or cultural force is commonly referred to as “Islamic Art”. This course aims to introduce students to the Islamic art and architecture by framing the emergence of Islamic visual and material culture in Late Antiquity to better understand the monuments, art and architecture produced during first centuries of Islam. The course also introduces the major theoretical and methodological issues involved in the study of Islamic art and architecture, while also focusing on the development of critical visual skills. This course will present an overview of a specific period, dynasty, or region in Islamic art and then focus on an extended discussion of a monument or object in each class. Visits to the MET and other museums may also be planned.
 
MALS 75400 Introduction to the Digital Humanities [28847]
Mondays, 4:15-6:15 PM, Professors Matthew Gold & Kevin Ferguson, 3 credits, Room 6496
Cross-listed with IDS 81620

The dramatic growth of the Digital Humanities (DH) over the past half dozen years has helped scholars re-imagine the very nature and forms of academic research and teaching across a range of scholarly disciplines, encompassing the arts, the interpretive social sciences, and traditional humanities subject areas. This course will explore the history of the digital humanities, focusing especially on the diverse pioneering projects and core texts that ground this innovative methodological and conceptual approach to scholarly inquiry and teaching.  It will also emphasize ongoing debates in the digital humanities, such as the problem of defining the digital humanities, the question of whether DH has (or needs) theoretical grounding, controversies over new models of peer review for digital scholarship, issues related to collaborative labor on digital projects, and the problematic questions surrounding research involving “big data.” The course will also emphasize the ways in which DH has helped transform the nature of academic teaching and pedagogy in the contemporary university with its emphasis on collaborative, student-centered and digital learning environments and approaches. Along the way, we will discuss broad social, legal and ethical questions and concerns surrounding digital media and contemporary culture, including privacy, intellectual property, and open/public access to knowledge and scholarship. Students will be expected to participate actively in class discussions and online postings (including on blogs and wikis) and to research and write a final multimedia presentation on a key topic in the digital humanities. Students completing the course will gain broad knowledge about and understanding of the emerging role of the digital humanities across several academic disciplines and will begin to learn some of the fundamental skills used often in digital humanities projects.
Note: this course is part of an innovative "Digital Praxis Seminar," a two-semester long introduction to digital tools and methods that will be open to all students in the Graduate Center. The goal of the course is to introduce graduate students to various ways in which they can incorporate digital research into their work. 

MALS 75600 Sustainability and Human Ecodynamics [29362]
Thursdays, 4:15-6:15, Professor Sophia Perdikaris, 3 credits, Room 3309

Sustainability for environments, economies, and societies (the triple bottom line) has become a central objective that unites disciplines in sciences, arts, and humanities; engages educators, activists, policy makers, NGO’s and indigenous rights organizations; and is prioritized by multiple international organizations. However, the term and concept have acquired a range of interpretations and understandings–some mutually incompatible–and there is an ongoing need to provide a common knowledge base and vocabulary, and to effectively connect education and activism for sustainability with cutting-edge method and theory in resilience, robustness, vulnerability. This course will provide a grounding in the basic literature and vocabulary of sustainability science and education, expose students to a range of interdisciplinary case studies, and engage them directly with cutting edge resilience and sustainability scholars and ongoing field research and cross-disciplinary integration.
 
The intensive course will provide students with multi-disciplinary perspective on sustainability (on a variety of temporal and spatial scales), tools for assessing resilience and vulnerabilities in linked social-ecological systems (SES), an extensive set of readings/on-line resources on different aspects of sustainability research and introduce them to scholars and organizations engaged in sustainability science and education. The course will present case studies in interdisciplinary human ecodynamics research as focal points for readings and discussion, and will include interactions (live or virtual) with scholars directly involved in the case studies, NGO representatives, and active field researchers. This course establishes a common vocabulary and knowledge base, bibliography, and scholarly contacts for further work and specialization by students intending to pursue studies focusing on sustainability approaches in biosciences, geosciences, social sciences, environmental history, policy and development studies, environmental activism, and education for sustainability.
 
 
MALS 77200 History of Cinema I [28848]
Thursdays, 11:45 AM – 1:45 PM, Professor Marc Dolan, 3 credits, Room C419
Cross-listed with FSCP 81000
This is a course in the history and historiography of the silent cinema, from the zoopraxiscope experiments of Eadweard Muybridge to the reluctant conversion of industries, artists, and audiences to fully synchronized sound.  Much of the course will explore how the foundations of modern filmmaking evolved out of the rudimentary work of the earliest filmmakers--how the Edison and Lumiere “actuality” films led to the explicitly labeled “documentary,” the cinematic tricks of Georges Melies to the fantastic action/adventure film, the early melodramas of Porter, Guy-Blache, and Griffith to the so-called “classical” narrative style, etc.   However, the course will not employ an exclusively auteurist approach.  We will also consider the developments of specific national film industries, particular genres, and the points of intersection between those two sets of developments (e.g., American slapstick, Italian historical epics, Swedish naturalism, German expressionism, Soviet montage).  Moreover, the play between identifiable national cinemas and the syncretic medium of international cinema will be a central theme of the course, especially since the idea of film as a potentially universal language was one of the most powerful dreams of the silent era. Students will view on reserve and in class individual examples of all these types of films. Three classes during the term will be devoted to reconstructed programs (including short subjects, newsreels, cartoons, etc.) of what a typical audience might have seen when they went to the movies in 1907, 1912, and 1927. Readings will primarily be drawn from David Bordwell and Kristin Thompson’s Film History: An Introduction and Leo Braudy and Marshall Cohen’s anthology Film Theory and Criticism, but other readings will be put on reserve to reflect the specific interests of registered students.
 
MALS 77400 International Migration [28855]
Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 PM, Professor Pyong Gap Min, 3 credits, Room 6417
Cross-listed with SOC 82800

We have ushered into the global migration period since the early 1990s.  Not only traditionally immigrant-accepting countries, including the U.S. and three former British colonies in the “New World” (Canada, Australia and New Zealand), but also Western European countries and Asian countries have annually received large numbers of formal immigrants or migrant workers/brides over the last two decades. In particular, the U.S. has received the largest number of immigrants annually since the late 1960s, more immigrants than all European countries have received. The influx of immigrants to the U.S. over the last 50 years has changed the face of the U.S., impacting neighborhoods, the economy, the school systems, cuisines, politics, healthcare, and sports. 
This course, focusing on international migration, has three main objectives.  First, it will provide an overview information about immigration patterns in three areas for students: (1) the U.S., (2) Canada, Australia and New Zealand, and (3) Europe.  Immigration patterns include immigration policies, the annual number of immigrants, their national and regional origins, and religious and socioeconomic background.  Second, it will compare two mass migration periods in the U.S. (the classical and contemporary periods) in immigration patterns and immigrants’ adaptations. Third, it will help students to learn about U.S. immigrants’ and their children’s adaptations (settlement patterns, socioeconomic adaptations and racialization) and theories of adaptations, especially regarding second-generation immigrants’ adaptations. To summarize the main objectives, this course aims to provide general information about global migration patterns, but focuses on the U.S. context in examining immigrants’ and their children’s adaptations with special attention the differences between turn-of-the-century white immigrant and contemporary immigrant groups.
Click here to find a detailed course description.

MALS 78100 Issues in Urban Education [28849]
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 PM, Professor Susan Semel, 3 credits, Room 6494
 
MALS 78800 Introduction to Childhood and Youth Studies [28850]
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 PM, Professor Roger Hart, 3 credits, Room 4419
Cross-listed with PSYC 80103
 
MALS 71500 Critical Issues in International Studies [28851]
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 PM, Professor Chiseche Mibenge, 3 credits, Room 3309
 
This course examines the origin of contemporary human rights standards and more specifically, how this impacts the interpretation and enforcement of norms at an international, regional and domestic level. This inquiry will raise questions about the universality of human rights and how particular traditions interpret the adoption and implementation of instruments. The inquiry will be guided by the major critiques of the human rights movement(s) and will be framed by political, justice and security preoccupations of the day, including: counter-terrorism measures post 9/11; the criminal justice processes of international tribunals;  and the ‘mainstreaming’ of ‘marginal’ subjects, for example transgender, indigenous and disabled populations.

MALS 73100 American Culture and Values [28852]
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 PM, Professor David Humphries, 3 credits, Room 3207
Cross-listed with ASCP 81000

Drawing on the interdisciplinary methodologies of American Studies, this course will look at diverse groupings of texts that enact, represent, and interrogate American cultures and values and how they are formulated, understood, and contested. Among the authors that enact or address these issues directly, we will consider Crèvecoeur, Jefferson, de Tocqueville, Emerson, Douglass, Adams, and other more recent commentators, such as Janice Radway; among authors that represent American culture and values, we will look at works by Hawthorne, Cather, Hurston, Mailer, and Alice Walker; among texts that reflect on how culture and values are assessed, we will look at seminal works, such as those by Charles Beard, Leo Marx, and F.O Matthiessen, as well as more recent studies, such as Susan Hegeman’s Patterns for America:  Modernism and the Concept of Culture and The Cultural Return and Siobhan B. Somerville’s Queering the Color Line: Race and the Invention of Homosexuality in American Culture. In defining culture and how the term is “valued” in American studies today, we also consider its appeal and limits.  One way to do this – and to incorporate more popular culture and multimedia texts – is to focus on the idea of “an American Icon,” an individual who is said to encapsulate a certain era or set of values, and we will have short units on such figures as Billy the Kid, Annie Oakley, Lucille Ball, and Jimi Hendrix. 
 
MALS 78500 Practical Criticism [28853]
Mondays, 4:15-6:15 PM, Professor Greil Marcus, 3 credits, Room 3307
Cross-listed with ASCP 82000

With a grounding in critical classics (Herman Melville, D. H. Lawrence, Constance Rourke), this seminar focuses on criticism actually practiced by people writing regularly about popular or everyday culture—movies, music, restaurants, books, political speech, the media (including Pauline Kael, Manny Farber, Dave Hickey, A. O. Scott, Sarah Vowell, Edmund Wilson, Lester Bangs)—and moves into imaginative, even fictional criticism, where the limits of what criticism might be are tested if not torn up altogether (Geoff Dyer, David Thomson). 
 
The course will take up criticism as a vocation—with the premise that intellectual engagement with culture constitutes a form of discourse that leads people to achieve both a sense of history and a sense of the peculiarity of their own time and place.  At the same time, practical criticism—most often addressing cultural artifacts or events that people actually care about, but which are presumed even by their enthusiasts to be of transitory significance at best and, much of the time, no significance at all—raises questions of inventing a language, creating a career, identifying an audience, and discovering the possibilities and limits of a shared sensibility as intensely as anything else in the domain of contemporary writing.  “Criticism is exciting just because there is no formula to apply—just because you must use everything you are and everything you know,” Pauline Kael wrote in 1963.  That is a manifesto about democratic speech, and it can contain both Melville’s 1850 call for a national literature in “Hawthorne and His Mosses” and serial killer Patrick Bateman’s schizophrenic but pitch-perfect critical monologues on the most banal varieties of 1980s rock in the 2000 film version of American Psycho.
 
Extensive reading with short papers at least every other class.  With class visits by writers whose work is part of the course.   
 
MALS 78500 Music and Democratic Speech [28854]
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 PM, Professor Greil Marcus, 3 credits, Room 3491
Cross-listed with MUS 82600
 
“Poor boy, long way from home” . . . “The cuckoo, she’s a pretty bird, she warbles, as she flies/ And she never, hollers cuckoo, til the fourth day, of July” . . . “Sun gonna shine in my back door, someday/ Wind gonna rise up, blow my blues away”—those lyric fragments and thousands like them are part of a pool of floating lines and verses, melodies and cadences, that form the raw material of the commonplace, commonly-held American song.
 
Throughout American history people excluded from or ignored by the story the country teaches itself have seized on music to make money, escape work, attract women or men, and to make symbolic statements about the nature of the singer, the country, and life itself.  These are big words for ordinary, anonymous songs like “The Cuckoo Bird” or “John Henry”—but it is in songs that seem to have emerged out of nowhere, and in songs that are self-consciously made to reclaim that nowhere, where much of the American story resides.
 
This course examines commonplace, authorless songs as elemental, founding documents of American identity.  These songs can be heard as a form of speech that, with a deep foundation, is always in flux—especially in the work of Bob Dylan across the last fifty years.  In that work, a single performer can be seen to have taken the whole of this tradition and translated it into a language of his own.
 
Extensive reading, with Dylan’s memoir Chronicles, Michael Lesy’s photo-history Wisconsin Death Trip, critical essays from the anthology The Rose & the Briar: Death, Love and Liberty in the American Ballad, and, read in full, novels including Colson Whitehead’s John Henry Days, Lee Smith’s The Devil’s Dream, and Percival Everett’s Erasure, with short papers at least every other week.

MALS 78800 Introduction to Childhood Studies [28850]
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 PM, Professor Roger Hart, 3 credits, Room 4419

This seminar offers an introduction to how childhood and youth is explored and investigated across the different disciplines of the social sciences and the humanities. Beginning with the recognition that concepts of childhood and adolescence are socially constructed and vary across culture and historical periods, we will examine how our shifting conceptions of childhood both align and clash with the way children actually live. This will include childhood experiences that challenge the historically recent notion of a “protected” and “innocent” childhood: child sex, child labor, child soldiers and child criminals. We will examine how different institutions, discourses and systems shape how childhood is experienced: including family, school, the juvenile (in)justice system, media and consumer culture.  But while attending to the force of structural inequalities in cultural and economic arrangements, we will not risk rendering children passive or invisible; we will recognize the methodological strides that have been made in recent years by researchers in working with rather than on or about children. 

MALS 78800 Research with Children and Youth: Cross Disciplinary Perspectives [29381]
Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15 PM, Professor Roger Hart, 3 credits, Room 6114

This seminar is designed for students who have identified a research question involving children, childhood or youth and who wish to critically explore alternative ways of conceptualizing it and investigating it. It is designed in line with the growing interdisciplinary field of child, childhood and youth studies. Students from psychology, the social sciences, education and the humanities are invited to participate. We will rotate discussion around each participant’s developing conceptualization of their research and work collectively to interogate it from the perspective of different disciplines. Even when we believe that we have clarity about a research question there is value in thinking about it from across disciplines. This may result in enriching the research by combining different disciplinary perspectives within a single study or even transcending disciplinary knowledge through a new integration of theory. Either way, it is likely to deepen our research endeavor. An additional component of the seminar will be to ask how our research might be differently conceptualized given different possible audiences and end goals, including research that is primarily focused on theory-building, on influencing policy or on action and more immediate change. Again, this is based in the belief that a research project need not be limited to only one of these orientations. Throughout the course the seminar participants will share written commentaries with one another as they explore alternative perspectives on their research question and what this might mean for the design of their research. 

MALS 79600 Thesis [29391]
Tuesdays, 6:30-8:30 PM, Professor Mark McBeth, 1 credit, Room 6421

In this thesis writing workshop you will practice strategies of composing, drafting, and crafting that will help you complete an extensive piece of academic research project.  Prior to enrolling in this class, you have taken courses where you have gathered information and ideas about your subject of interest. You’ve learned different knowledge sets, rehearsed various methodologies of research, and practiced techniques to compose your ideas; now you will show that you can analyze and synthesize your know-how so that you can identify a scholarly topic and express that new knowledge in logically framed and rhetorically convincing graduate-level prose.  Not an easy task, but a doable one.

As a means of achieving this end goal, we will:

  1. ·       read about and explore varying composing and research strategies,
  2. ·       produce a number of drafts for your projects,
  3. ·       consider the best organizational form to use,
  4. ·       hone the appropriate tone and voice for the project topic and the perceived audience,
  5. ·       participate in peer review (inside and outside of class), and
  6. ·       self-reflect upon our individual research/writing practices.


While this class demands intellectual labor and focused attention upon your expressive abilities, it can also induce pleasure if you allow yourself to engage in the sometimes challenging/sometimes magical process of pursuing an intellectual project. 

In some cases, MALS core courses will be cross-listed with other programs. Students who would like to have these courses satisfy the core course requirement for their chosen tracks must register for the MALS course number. Please keep this in mind as you register.
 


MALS 70000 Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies    [27452]
New Media: Historical Reflections and Current Practices
Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 pm, Professor Joan Greenbaum, 3 credits, Room 3207

Analyzing and engaging with new media is a great jumping off place to get acquainted with liberal studies.   We will reflect on historical examples of 'new media' including printing, radio, and television and examine the arguments and concepts that surrounded the introduction of these media.   Currently popular media envelopes us in hype, particularly about social media.  Using a critical eye and an interdisciplinary analytical lens, we will dissect popular media slants around current issues in new media. Popular ideas and practices will be filtered through concepts from philosophy, literature, science, art, and their socio-economic underpinnings. In studying (and using) new media this seminar's focus is on material culture--the artifacts that we as socio-economic societies shape and that, in turn, inform our lived experience. 
While this seminar relies heavily on the traditions of graduate education (reading, writing, discussion, citations, critical sources), we are also interested in expanding our understanding of learning by engaging with many forms of media including images, websites, tweets, clips, films, etc.   Issues such as educational practices, surveillance, jobs, inequality, identities, public spaces and social justice will be explored.   Course processes and products include: independent research; active analysis and discussion of syllabus materials; a collective (or individual) short empirical project; two short essays reflecting on course materials; one research paper; and a presentation (individually or collectively).   A course website will supplement class discussion.
jgreenbaum@gc.cuny.edu
http://joansplace.commons.gc.cuny.edu/
 
MALS 70000 Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies    [27456]
Zombies!
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 pm, Professor Sylvia Tomasch, 3 credits
Room 5382

Why zombies?  And why zombies now?  Not only do audiences seem unable to resist the onslaught of the undead in fiction, film, television, video games, comics, and graphic novels, but the term has also spread, seemingly unstoppably, to other areas of modern life so that there are now zombie computers, zombie insects, zombie missiles, and zombie 5K runs.  In fact, google “zombie” and you’ll get well over 80 million hits.  So why the current epidemic of zombies?  To address this question, we’ll consider zombies historically (from before the term entered English in the late nineteenth century), cross culturally (including African and Caribbean instances), and from a variety of disciplinary perspectives (such as philosophy and biology).  Using elements of cultural, monster, and zombie theory, students will have opportunities to chew on the zombie-area they feel least resistible, most digestible.
Texts include films, such as White Zombie (1932), Night of the Living Dead (1968), and Warm Bodies (2013); fiction, such as Matheson’s I Am Legend (1954), Brooks’s World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War (2006), and Whitehead’s Zone One (2011); radio/television episodes, such as The Shadow (1940), The Walking Dead (current), and In the Flesh (current); and critical, historical, and theoretical materials.  Requirements include regular blog posts, an oral presentation, an end-of-term group video, and a research essay that will be built over the course of the semester.  Lively – or is that undeadly? – class participation is, of course, expected.
 
MALS 70000 Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies    [27457]
Rights
Mondays, 6:30-8:30 pm, Professor Alex Lesman, 3 credits, Room 7395

What are rights? What is their origin? Are they universal? Do they expand and contract with changing times? This course tackles the theoretical arguments behind these questions, drawing on natural rights theory, legal positivism, and the works of Ronald Dworkin, among others. It also places these questions in historical and cultural contexts with a survey of the development of rights over time and in different parts of the world. We explore the question of universality in part by comparing Euro-American and East Asian conceptions of rights. We explore the question of expansion and contraction in part by considering what institutions enforce rights and how such institutions operate. Students are required to write frequent short papers, as well as a final paper based on the study of a feature film that deals with a contemporary rights controversy.
 
MALS 70000 Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies    [27458]
Interpretation and Meaning
Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 pm, Professor Miryam Segal, 3 credits, Room 3212

This course takes as its foci meaning and the relationship between meaning and interpretation. How do people find or create meaning, and how do they understand that process? We will read theories of linguistic meaning, religious meaning, literary interpretation, legal interpretation, as well as literary works, religious texts, law. In reading these as ways of getting at more productive ideas about meaning, we will also be interested in similarities, analogies, and the way that these theories—and assumptions—are cross-disciplinary.
Beginning with a sociological theory of knowledge, we will examine its ramifications for religious meaning. We will find that this theory has a wider application than religion, and will examine its appropriation by the field of law and narrative, and the creation of legal meaning in and through narrative. From there we will turn to theories of legal interpretation by jurists (ancient and modern) in an attempt to tease out the implications for the role of law of one or another means of deriving of meaning from a legal text. We will close with a turn to the detective story, thinking about how that popular literary genre presupposes or proposes its own theory of interpretation and of meaning.
 
MALS 70000 Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies     [27453]
Inventing the Self
Tuesdays, 6:30-8:30 pm, Professor Jason Tougaw, 3 credits, Room 7395

In his novel The Echo Maker, Richard Powers writes that the self is “not one, continuous, indivisible whole, but instead, hundreds of separate subsystems, with changes in any one sufficient to disperse the provisional confederation into unrecognizable new countries.” Contemporary thinkers working in diverse disciplines and genres have invented theories of selfhood that address a common question: Why does the self feel whole and real if we can’t locate it? Neurologist Antonio Damasio argues the self is the product of “distributed” brain processes that create a feeling of wholeness; philosopher Daniel Dennett has proposed a “multiple drafts” theory to suggest that the self a continuously revised composition; literary critic Nancy K. Miller proposes that the autobiography is the story of the self’s fundamental relation to other people and other texts. Though these theories are diverse, they share the premise that the self is anything but static. Many contemporary thinkers share the belief that the self is a dynamic invention—a continuously evolving product physiology, social relations, artistic practice, and technological innovation. In this course, we will investigate the methods various thinkers and writers use to explore this proposition and the many questions it raises.
Course readings are divided into three units: 1.  Mind, Body, Brain, & Self, 2. Narrative Selves, and 3. Social Selves. Each unit combines a variety of disciplinary methods and genres of writing. Class discussion will focus on the how particular methods or genres allow us to ask certain questions and produce particular kinds of knowledge or understanding. Students will contribute to our course blog on a weekly basis and develop research projects that allow them pursue questions about selfhood from the perspectives of their particular disciplinary interests. In most cases, these projects will engage more than a single discipline, giving students the opportunity to practice the methodologies of particular disciplines and the synthesis required to create productive dialogue among disciplines.
 

MALS 70000 Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies     [27849]
"Oversharing"
T, 6:30-8:30 pm, Professor Carrie Hintz, 3 credits, Room 6494
Social media and internet culture have opened up new venues to share personal experiences and life events.  But when and how does personal revelation become  "too much information?"  We will consider the issue of "oversharing" from an interdisciplinary perspective, drawing on media and film studies, life writing, art historical criticism,  Digital Humanities, political philosophy, ethics, and privacy law.  How is "oversharing" rooted in the rhetorics and practices of the confessional? What is the role of technology in facilitating--and sometimes, alas, in shaming--the oversharer? Are there generational differences in "oversharing," and different standards of revelation?   What is the role of discretion, modesty, and privacy in contemporary society, and how does privacy law function to keep personal information out of the public sphere?  How much of the adverse reaction to "oversharing" is prudery or class snobbery, and how much is a genuine concern for the erosion of cherished standards of discretion, reticence, and circumspection?  What are some of the rewards and pleasures of "oversharing," and what motivates people to "overshare?" What are some religious and spiritual perspectives on "oversharing"?  Our point of departure for this course will be work of William Godwin (1756-1836),  in particular his emphasis on candor and honesty as a precondition for political justice, and his own searingly frank memoir of his recently-deceased wife Mary Wollstonecraft.  We will move on to look at Virginia Woolf and her Memoir Club, whose members prided themselves on frank, unstinting revelation (and plenty of it).  We will then look at some contemporary "tell-all" memoirs, most notably Julie Powell's Cleaving: A Story of Marriage, Meat and Obsession (2009), a book that chronicles both her extramarital affair and her mastery of the craft of butchery--in graphic detail.  The blogosphere will provide us with a great deal of material for our study, as will social media platforms like Twitter and Facebook, and Reality Television.  We will end with the books, film and television work of Lena Dunham.  All student will participate in a course blog, complete a class presentation, and produce a 20-page research paper.  


MALS 70100 New York Narratives: Literature and Visual Art   [27459]
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 pm, Professor Michele Wallace, 3 credits, Room 7395

New York Stories
This course emerges from an intense and detailed reading of the spirit of Toni Morrison's novel, Jazz, which is the quintessential New York story to my mind, weaving the disparate strands of life and creativity that intrigue me: the pursuit of love, in all its rich variety, in the city of cities, and among the descendants of persecutions near and far away.
Proposed Reading List; Field Trips, Lectures, etc:
Leslie Harris, In The Shadow of Slavery: African Americans in New York City, 1626-1863, University of Chicago Press 2004; Slavery in New York edited by Ira Berlin and Leslie Harris; Published in conjunction with New York Historical Society, 2005;
New York Historical Society Website on Slavery in New York; African Burial Grounds Memorial Site; Whitney Battle-Baptiste, “Constructing a Black Feminist Framework,” Excerpt from Black Feminist Archeology. Left Coast Press 2011.
Alexis De Veaux, Jabo (novel), Redbone Press (Washington D.C.), 2014.
Kara Walker’s “A Subtlety” at the Domino Sugar Factory; Review Essay by Brendon Costello, Jr. “Giddy Discomfort,” Open Letters Monthly: An Arts and Literature Review 2014. http://openlettersmonthly.com/review-of-kara-walker-a-subtlety
Bert Willliams, “A Lime Kiln Field Day 1913” Unfinished Film, Museum of Modern Art Archive; Cara Caddoo, Envisioning Freedom: Cinema and the Building of Modern Black Life. Harvard University Press 2014.
Toni Morrison, Jazz (novel).
Michele Wallace, American People, Black Light: Faith RInggold’s Paintings of the 1960s, The Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase New York, 2010; Unpublished Photo Essay on Ringgold’s work the 1970s. Michele Wallace, Unpublished Interview/manuscript on James Baldwin (1978); Michele Wallace, New Introduction to Black Macho: “The Myth of the Superwoman Revisited”
Art Spiegelman, In The Shadow of No Towers, Viking Press 2004.
Meredith Tax, Double Bind: The Muslim Right, the Anglo-American Life, and Universal Human Rights. Centre for Secular Space 2012.
 
MALS 70500 Classical Culture    [27461]
Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 pm, Professor Marie Marianetti, 3 credits, Room 6417

Classical culture is an intense survey of selected pieces of ancient literature and legend that have subsequently influenced Western civilization. The chosen literary works are analyzed from an interdisciplinary perspective, combining literature, history, archaeology, religion, culture, politics and philosophy. Certain universal issues are considered as they are conveyed through the literary genres. The class mainly concentrates upon a thorough examination and discussion of the following primary sources: The Epic of Gilgamesh, Hesiod’s Theogony, Homer’s Odyssey, Aeschylus’ Oresteia, Sophocles’ Oedipus Cycle (the Theban plays), Euripides’ Iphigeneia in Aulis, Aristophanes’ The Clouds, Plato’s Apology and Symposium and Virgil’s Aeneid.

MALS 71000 Forms of Life Writing: Memoir/Illness/Graphic/Grief   [27463]
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, Professor Nancy K. Miller, 3 credits, Room 3309
Cross-listed with ENGL 80600 & WSCP 81000
“Considering how common illness is, how tremendous the spiritual change that it brings, how astonishing, when the lights of health go down, the undiscovered countries that are then disclosed…it becomes strange indeed that illness has not taken its place with love and battle and jealousy among the prime themes of literature.” Virginia Woolf’s On Being Ill is the first literary work we will read, even if contemporary nonfiction and fiction have long since belied Woolf’s lament. Illness occupies a prominent place in postwar culture, and the seminar will explore the stories of what happens when “the lights of health go down” through a wide range of literary and visual representations of bodily and mental suffering, including AIDS, cancer, depression, and mourning. Among the writers and artists: Roland Barthes, Simone de Beauvoir, Lucy Grealy, Audre Lorde, Paul Monette, Oliver Sacks, Eve Sedgwick, and Susan Sontag; graphic narratives by Bobby Baker, David B., Miriam Engelberg, David Small, and Nicola Streeten. The work of the course: weekly responses, one oral presentation, a final paper.
 
MALS 71200 The Culture of Fashion: New York, Fashion Capital    [27464]
Mondays, 6:30-8:30 pm, Professor Eugenia Paulicelli, 3 credits, Room 5383
Cross-listed with IDS 82300 & WSCP 81000

The course studies fashion in New York. Its power and intersections with art and design, the museum, retailing, fashion week, media, tourism and the cultural economy. Fashion as an industry, an economic force, a complex technology of bodies and identities has a profound impact in the creative economy of a global city such as New York. This relationship, however, has a long history. In the course, we will examine crucial moments and junctures in which fashion helped to shape the culture, identity and economy of the city.
We will begin with New York and the birth of American fashion, from the gilded age to the present. We will examine the contribution of women who have worked in the fashion industry as designers, stylists, journalists (such as the New York-based Claire McCardell, Elizabeth Hawes, Diana Vreeland, Jo Copeland and others) and the debate aimed at creating a New York/American fashion that could compete with the Parisian model. The course will investigate the socio-cultural context out of which these women emerged and how they contributed to shape New York as a global fashion capital. We will focus on the transformation of retailing and the department store, consumption, labor, Immigration and political activism.
Particular attention will be given to periods of great transformation and change in the history of New York when fashion plays its full role in shaping the city’s culture and identity. The course will cover a time-span from the sweatshops of the second half of the nineteenth century where Jewish and Italian immigrants worked to the emergence of the “American Look” in the 1930s and 1940s, on to the subsequent shifts that occurred in the 1960s, up until the present of the New York Fashion week, Save the Garment District and Made in New York campaigns and other contemporary issues connected with producing and consuming fashion.
 
MALS 71400 Introduction to International Studies     [27465]
Mondays, 6:30-8:30 pm, Professor Tomohisa Hattori, 3 credits, Room 3212

The two main purposes of this course are to introduce you to theoretically informed historical analyses of international relations (IR) and to help you apply one of the theories of IR to an international subject of your choice.  While the historical contexts and theories of IR will help you engage in further studies in IR, your paper will enhance your understanding of how you may gain social scientific knowledge by reviewing relevant theoretical literature, conceptualizing your subject matter, developing research questions, figuring out how to answer them, gathering information about them, organizing the research result as evidence for your answer to the research question, and developing your answer as an argument about a particular phenomenon or relationship on the chosen topic in the context of existing theoretical arguments.
 
MALS 71500 Critical Issues in International Studies    [27466]
War & Its Afterlife: Anthropological Perspectives
Tuesdays, 11:45 am-1:45 pm, Professor Glenn Petersen, 3 credits, Room 8203
Cross-listed with ANTH 71700

War isn't going away, and seems in fact to consistently occupy more of the space around us. Veterans returning from combat carry the war with them, and it impacts on everything they do and everyone they come into contact with. Our leaders attempt to manage us with continual threats of attacks. Refugees remind us of the overwhelming scale of these events. This course seeks to dig at the realities of continuous war by examining aspects of social life—especially American social life—that drive and/or draw young people into war; some of the cultural contexts of contemporary warfare; and the veterans who bring their wars home with them. Glenn Petersen has concluded that much of his career in anthropology, most of which has been devoted to working with the people of  the Micronesian islands to end American rule over them, has been in response to his experiences fighting in America’s colonial war in Southeast Asia. He went on to represent Micronesia at the UN, and will draw in part on his experiences there and in combat. The course will also highlight current CUNY anthropology students’ dissertation research on veterans and postwar trauma, and draw on psychologists currently working with veterans in NYC. 
 
MALS 72100 Feminist Texts and Contexts     [27468]
Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, Professor Patricia Clough, 3 credits, Room 5383

Along with considering primary texts of feminist scholars, we will explore the meaning of ‘text’ and ‘context’ given the transformations of both terms over the last two centuries.  How do texts of feminist scholars show feminist thought to be responding to changes not only in women’s lives but also in the political, economic and cultural situation of ‘the question of the woman?’ How has feminist scholarship contributed to change in the ways we think and live the nation, the body, work, sexuality, race, psyche, sensuality and more.  
 
MALS 73200 American Social Institutions     [27470]
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 pm, Professor David Humphries, 3 credits, Room 4433
Cross-listed with ASCP 81000

Russ Castronovo and Susan Gillman begin the introduction to their collection States of Emergency: The Object of American Studies (2009), with a seemingly straightforward question: “What is the object of American studies?” For Castronovo and Gilman, this question leads directly to two others: “What does ‘American studies’ study, and what does it want?” The object of this course is to explore these questions by considering the histories, theories, and practices of the interdisciplinary field of American studies, from its inception as an academic discipline to its present “state of emergency,” within the context of other “American institutions.”  While any period in American history can be described as a time of transition, there are certain moments in which various threads of social, cultural, and political life coalesce in a way that lends interpretative clarity for what has come before and sets the tone and the terms for what follows.  Using the Progressive Era, broadly defined, as such a touchstone, this course will look at the American Institutions of (modern) journalism, (celebrity) politics, and (professionalized) institutions of higher learning, to better understand both the current way in which American Studies is situated and the ways in which objects of study have changed over time.  Considering both seminal texts from writers like Leo Marx, Gloria Anzaldua, and Paul Gilroy, and current responses to them, this course will also include topical readings, such as The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism by Doris Kearns Goodwin, Machine Made: Tammany Hall and the Creation of Modern American Politics by Terry Golway, The Origins of American Literature Studies: An Institutional History by Elizabeth Renker, The Reorder of Things: The University and Its Pedagogies of Minority Difference by Roderick A. Ferguson, and On The Wire (Spin Offs) by Linda Williams, as well as sustained selections from recent editions of American Quarterly.  In considering the different meanings and institutional settings of American Studies, we will attempt to understand its current position in the academy as a way to better inform our own work.

 
MALS 73500 Africana Studies: Global Perspectives    [27471]
Tuesdays, 11:45 am-1:45 pm, Professor Pamela Bennett, 3 credits, Room 6421
Cross-listed with AFCP 70200 & SOC 75800 Race, Segregation & Social Inequality

This course provides an in-depth study of racial and ethnic residential segregation and its relationship to social inequality. Through various theoretical perspectives, students will explore the historical and contemporary patterns of residential segregation in the United States. In doing so, students will become familiar with the entities and social phenomena that contribute to neighborhood segregation (such as federal and local governments, homeowner associations, financial institutions, group inequalities, group preferences, and racial and ethnic discrimination), as well as segregation’s social, economic, and demographic consequences. This course provides an in-depth study of racial and ethnic residential segregation and its relationship to social inequality. Through various theoretical perspectives, students will explore the historical and contemporary patterns of residential segregation in the United States. In doing so, students will become familiar with the entities and social phenomena that contribute to neighborhood segregation (such as federal and local governments, homeowner associations, financial institutions, group inequalities, group preferences, and racial and ethnic discrimination), as well as segregation’s social, economic, and demographic consequences. 


MALS 74400 From Alexander to Mohammed: Introduction to the Cultures of the Ancient Mediterranean - Special Topic Roman Architecture    [27472]
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, Professor Elizabeth Macaulay-Lewis, 3 credits

Room 5382
In the Roman world, buildings functioned as loci of social discourse and were often imbued with complex political meanings. The architecture produced during the Roman Republic and Empire was also exceptional and innovative for its use of technology and design. This seminar course introduces students to the major types of Roman architecture, as well as to the important theoretical and scholarly debates in the field. The built environment, including gardens, was also integral to the conception and experience of Roman architecture and will also be examined in this course. There will be an emphasis on relationship between provincial examples of Roman architecture and architecture in the city of Rome. Lastly, the course will consider reception theory and appropriation of Roman architectural forms in the architecture of New York City in order to understand the lasting influence of Roman buildings and their reinterpretation in contemporary times.
 
MALS 75500 Digital Humanities: Methods and Practices    [27473]
Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, Professors Lucas Waltzer and Amanda Hickman, 3 credits
Room 6495
Cross-listed with IDS
 81640
Digital Praxis Seminar II, Spring 2015
During the Fall 2014 semester, students explored the landscape of the digital humanities, examining a range of ways to approach DH work and proposing potential DH projects. In the spring, we will put that thinking into action. In this praxis-oriented course, we will split into teams and then develop and launch functional versions of projects first imagined in the fall. Students will complete the class having gained hands-on experience in the collaborative planning, production, and dissemination of a digital humanities project, and having picked up a variety of technical, project management, and rhetorical skills along the way. A goal is to produce projects that will have a trajectory and a timeline of their own that extends beyond the Spring 2015 semester. Students will be supported by a range of advisors matched to the needs of the individual projects, and successful completion of the class will require a rigorous commitment to meeting target delivery dates we will establish together at the outset.
The class will hold a public launch event at the end of the semester where students will present their proofs-of-concept, and receive feedback from the broader community.

MALS 75700 Field Course in Long Term Human Ecodynamics  [27474]
Wednesday, 6:30-8:30 pm, Professor Rebecca Boger, 3 credits, Room 8202
 This course is designed to introduce graduate students and educators to geospatial technology skill sets that have a wide variety of natural and social science applications. Spatial tools are extremely useful to monitor, analyze and interpret landscape-scale changes. Because climate change is large contributor to the changes we see on the Earth’s surface, we are going to use the applications in this course to understand the impacts of a changing climate, with an emphasis on sustainability, particularly with reference to water and food. By the end of the course you will have a solid understanding of the impacts of a changing climate on the Earth’s surface, the tools that scientists use to understand and interpret change, and insight into how these changes, and especially changes related to changes in the Earth’s climate, will impact human societies. We will be employing ArcGIS online, an intuitive, easy to use web-based GIS platform with a short learning curve. You will be gaining field mapping techniques extensively used in the environmental and archaeological sciences such as GPS, smart phones, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) air photography, and surveying techniques using real time kinematic (RTK) GPS and total stations. Field data will be brought into GIS for analysis and visualization.

MALS 77500 Global Cities     [27476]
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 pm, Professor David Halle, 3 credits, Room 6494
Cross-listed with SOC 82800

Global Cities seeks to understand the politics, economics, social, and cultural life of today’s urban-mega centers.  We will study the strengths and weaknesses of these cities by looking at innovation and job creation, housing and neighborhood life including integration and segregation, the rise and decline of  urban “ghettos”,  the waxing and waning of the suburbs, education, political incorporation, crime, architecture and “starchitects”, ethnic and racial relations, religious diversity, inequality, finance and banking, cultural institutions such as museums and art galleries, environmental issues including threats such as global warming and flooding as well as opportunities to make cities “greener”, urban riots, and terrorism.  We will focus especially on New York, Los Angeles, London, and Hong Kong.  The course complements International Migration (MALS 77400) by seeking to understand the global urban context to which so many international migrants are drawn.

MALS 78200 The Politics of Contemporary Urban Education    [27477]
Thursdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, Professor Joseph Viteritti, 3 credits, Room 3212
Cross-listed with UED 75200

This course is concerned with how politics shapes policy in American cities. It will start with a consideration of some original thinking about the purposes of education in the writings of Thomas Jefferson and Horace Mann. It will then look at the institutions that shape policy at various levels of government and consider particular issues, such as: desegregation, school finance, standards, school choice, and mayoral control. Finally, it will examine the political dynamics of particular cities -- about seven or eight in all, with some focus on New York. The course will be somewhat historic in approach and ask how or whether policy at various levels has become more or less responsive to students most in need over time. The class will be run as a seminar designed to maximize student discussion. The goal is to dissect and analyze issues from as many perspectives imaginable. There will be three essay assignments and a final essay exam. Attendance and class participation are expected.

MALS 78500 Analyzing Cultural Data    [27936]
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, Professor Lev Manovich, 3 credits, Room 3310A
Cross-listed with IDS 81650
The explosive growth of social media and digitization of cultural artifacts by libraries and museums opened up exiting new possibilities for the study of cultural life. The “big data turn” already affected many fields in humanities (history, literary studies, art history, film studies, archeology, etc.), social sciences (e.g., computational sociology), and professional fields such as journalism and arts administration. This course explores the possibilities, the methods, and the tools for working with cultural data sets. We will cover both small and big humanistic data and different data sources (images, video, texts, library collections, social networks, sensors, etc.) Students will learn the practical techniques for organizing, analyzing and visualizing cultural datasets using leading open source tools. We also discuss relevant readings and projects from a number of fields including digital humanities, digital art, artistic visualization, media theory, social computing, and science and technology studies. The course is open to all students, and does not require any previous technical knowledge. The practical tutorials and homework will be adjusted to fit students backgrounds and interests.

MALS 78500 Violence in Islamic History: Case Studies and Comparisons [27478]
Thursdays, 2:00-4:00 pm, Professors Anna Akasoy and Chase Robinson, 3 credits, Room 8201.06
Cross-listed with HIST 78100 and MES 73900

This course offers an introduction to practices and discourses of violence, mainly in the public sphere and as directed against non-Muslim actors, that took place in the pre-modern Islamic world.
Amongst the topics to be explored are the circumstances that lead to violence, patterns and forms of violence, rituals connected with the display of violence, and theories and modes of legitimating violence. Much of the course follows a chronological order, but we will be posing more or less consistently the thematic question of the relationship between religion and violence, especially the putative connection between monotheism and violence. We will be working with primary as well as secondary sources, focusing on textual traditions, but exploring visual culture as well.
We will begin by situating practices and views of violence in the Late Antiquity, especially but not exclusively as practiced by Christians, before examining the tribal violence of pre-Islamic Arabia. We will then focus on violence in the Qur’an and its early Christian reception, the early Islamic conquests (including a comparison with other conquest movements), and the emergence of the doctrines of Jihad and martyrdom during the 8th and 9th centuries. Against the background of this ‘classical’ history and doctrines, we shall explore selected topics such as the Crusades (including their Muslim responses), the rise of the Ottoman empire through conquest, warfare between the Ottomans and the Safavids, and recent cases of Islamist violence.

MALS 78500 The Ancient World through Modern Eyes    [27478]
W, 2:00-4:00 pm, Professor Rhonda Garelick, 3 credits, Room 3309
Cross-listed with IDS 81630 and CLAS 86500

The Ancient World Through Modern Eyes looks at ancient myth in drama and philosophy and its interpretations by modernist and some contemporary artists. The course treats textual works as well as dance, costume, fashion, and stage lighting and design.
We shall look at works and productions by Plato, Sophocles, Aeschylus, Euripides, Isadora Duncan, Martha Graham, the Ballets Russes, Eugene O'Neill, Sarah Ruhl, Caridad Svich, Rita Dove, Oscar Wilde, the Bible, Loie Fuller, Jean Cocteau, Jean Anouilh and more.
 
MALS 78900 Childhood and Youth Studies: Approaches and Methods [27833]
W, 9:30-11:30 am, Professor Roger Hart, 3 credits, Room 6493
Cross-listed with PSYC 80103 Understanding Children and Youth

This course offers an overview of research methods for understanding the experiences and perspectives of children and youth. Together with the assistance of guest faculty members from the interdisciplinary field of childhood and youth studies it offers a broad introduction to qualitative social science approaches to research with children: ethnography or participant observation, interviewing, narrative analysis and participatory approaches to research with children. It also includes a general introduction to methods used in the humanities for understanding children and childhood. Consideration is given to ethical principles and to alternative styles of communicating research findings to others. The structure of these classes is designed around a common set of readings and occasional small exercises, designed to enable the participants to apply the readings to their own research interests. The readings for each week will be prepared by individual students or by pairs of students who share a focus. Two written products will be required: A critical review of one research study of the student’s own choice from the broad multi-disciplinary field of childhood and youth studies, and a methodological proposal for a possible original study by the student. This final essay is designed to be directly useful to the development of the student’s own research agenda.

In some cases, MALS core courses will be cross-listed with other programs. Students who would like to have these courses satisfy the core course requirement for their chosen tracks must register for the MALS course number. Please keep this in mind as you register.

 


MALS 70000 Intro to Grad Liberal Studies [26107]
Studies of the US in the World, 1898 to the Present

W, 6:30-8:30, Rm. 5383, Professor Karen Miller, 3 credits

Is the United States an empire? If so, what might that mean? If not, what other metaphors can we use to explain U.S. global relations? This course examines the transformations of U.S. global power and international relations – from the end of the nineteenth century to the present – as a way to engage these questions. The United States does not hold political sovereignty over a broad range of colonies. Aside from the 50 United States, the U.S. holds Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands of the United States, the Northern Marianas, and American Samoa. But, the U.S. has the largest military in the world, sustains the world’s largest economy, and has unparalleled power throughout the globe. Our task in this class is to interrogate that power, to understand how it emerged and changed over time, and to explore the dynamics and contradictions that animate it. We will also examine how global engagements have transformed the United States’ domestic terrain: just as the U.S. helps shape the world, the world also changes the United States. Our interdisciplinary study of these questions will be organized both chronologically and thematically. Students will be asked to write frequently and to produce a final paper.  


MALS 70000 Intro to Grad Liberal Studies [26108]
The Politics of Excess, Ambiguity, and Laughter in 20th Century Culture
W, 4:15-6:15 pm, Rm. 3212, Professor Annette Saddik, 3 credits

The Politics of Excess, Ambiguity, and Laughter in 20th Century Culture
Laughter can serve as powerful social commentary, particularly the kind of ambivalent laughter associated with grotesque, tragicomic, or black humor--what Frances K. Barasch has called “ludicrous-horror"--which breaks through imposed social limitations, destabilizes fixed boundaries, and juxtaposes contradictions in order to challenge what is considered stable or acceptable. In this course we will be studying works that embrace a subversive politics of excess and laughter in order to celebrate the irrational and the undefinable, often employing exaggeration, distortion of reality, and irony for the purpose of social resistance. These works highlight the ambiguities and inconsistencies of living in the world--the excesses that leak out of closed systems of meaning, that seep through the cracks of the rational, the stable, the complete, and point toward the essence of the real. Objects of study include literature, painting, film, philosophical texts, and subversive performance culture such as circus aesthetics, “freak shows,” burlesque, and cabaret.


MALS 70000 Intro to Grad Liberal Studies [25962]
Decoding Celebrity: Georgia O'Keefe as a Case Study

M, 6:30-8:30, Rm. 3212, Professor Linda M. Grasso, 3 credits

What is celebrity? How is it achieved? What purposes does it serve? In this course, we explore these questions using twentieth-century painter Georgia O’Keeffe as a focal point. Reading art history, cultural criticism, film studies, women’s history, autobiography, and popular culture biography, we consider the ways in which O’Keeffe’s celebrity enables an understanding of larger issues such as how celebrities are commodified and consumed by a variety of constituencies for a multitude of reasons. Viewing works of art, photographs, advertisements, documentaries, and YouTube videos, we also consider the complex ways in which celebrity images are created and circulated in multiple public domains. Conducted as a research seminar, the course requires students to study texts intensively, design and execute a research project, and share findings with peers.

MALS 70000 Intro to Grad Liberal Studies [25677]
W, 6:30-8:30, Rm. 5382, Professor Rachel M. Brownstein, 3 credits

We will spend the first four weeks of the term reading and discussing the four life stories in Michael Hulse’s translation of The Emigrants (1996), a book by W.G. Sebald originally published as Die Ausgewanderten in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, in 1992.  (We will also read some reviews and essays about the book; students will do some reports and writing.)  During this time, we will list, discuss, and develop possible subjects for research papers, which will be due at the end of the term.  (Areas in which subjects might occur include: translation; exile; butterflies; Manchester Jews; candlewick bedspreads; photographs as evidence; mountain climbing; charcoal as a medium.  The trick of course is to find and choose your own particular subject, argument, and voice.)  The next three weeks will be devoted to working on the research paper: in class we will discuss methods, databases, and bibliographies; outlines, paragraphs, sentences, punctuation, etc.  In the last segment of the course, students will share and discuss one another’s papers, preparatory to rewriting the final draft.     
 

MALS 70000 Intro to Grad Liberal Studies [26134]
Technology and Political Mobilization
W, 2:00-4:00 pm, Rm. 3209, Professor Anca Pusca, 3 credits


This course seeks to situate recent discussions on the relationship between technology and political mobilization in the context of the Arab Spring and the Occupy Movement within the much broader context of the philosophy of technology, the shifting understanding of the concept of technology itself and its relationship to reality and ethics. By contrasting 19th century discussions on technology with discussions on technology in the 21st century, the course points to the importance of looking beyond the material infrastructure of technology towards its wider effects on politics and society. Following Heidegger’s idea that ‘the essence of technology is nothing technological’ the course seeks to assess recent claims that new technologies of communication – social media in particular – are revolutionizing the way in which we mobilize politically and leading to an increased democratization of the social sphere.
 

MALS 70200 Metropolis: A Political, Historical, and Sociological Profile of New York [25679]
W, 6:30-8:30, Rm. 3309, Professor Cindy R. Lobel, 3 credits

 
This interdisciplinary course will explore New York City’s rise and role as the nation’s metropolis, examining several key themes in the city’s development.  In particular, we will look at Gotham as a center of work, culture and residency as well as at the diverse populations that have called the city home through its four-century history.  We will examine New York City from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, including history, sociology, anthropology, economics, and political science.

MALS 70300  Law, Politics and Policy [25939]
W, 2:00-4:00, Rm. 6421, Prof. Leslie Paik, 3 credits

Cross-listed with SOC 84505
 
This seminar examines the relationship between law and society, considering how the law shapes social life and how social change affects law and legal institutions. The seminar takes a “law in action” approach to studying law that focuses on the social, political, economic, and cultural contexts of law. We first will discuss readings about classic sociological theories of law; peoples’ perceptions and experiences of the law (e.g., legal consciousness, procedural justice) and the limits and power to “rights” discourses to lead to social change. We then will turn to consider how the law has defined and evolved from our experiences and understandings of race, immigration, gender and family in the US. This seminar will provide a broad socio-legal foundation for students working on those substantive topics, as well as for those interested in social control, social movements and social change. 

MALS 70600 The Enlightenment and Critique [25680]
R, 4:15-6:15, Rm. 8203, Professor Helena Rosenblatt, 3 credits
Cross-listed with HIST 71000

Since the mid 20th century, the Enlightenment has been under attack for a variety of purported sins, including Eurocentrism, imperialism, racism, sexism, and proto-totalitarianism. In fact, Enlightenment-bashing has become such a popular sport that many intellectuals are now feeling the need to “rescue,” “reclaim” and “redeem” it for the progressive goals they say were at its core.  In this course, we will read texts by some of the most important political writers of the Enlightenment (Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Ferguson, Jefferson and Wollstonecraft) with a focus on the following themes: the social contract and the role of government, property and commerce, race and slavery, women and religion. We will also read recent critiques and defenses of the Enlightenment, with a view to deciding for ourselves whether it is worth “reclaiming”.

MALS 70700 The Shaping of Modernity, 1789-1914 [25681]
W, 6:30-8:30, Rm. 9116, Professor David Gordon, 3 credits

Passion, Power and Politics in Nineteenth Century Europe

Most of the great and terrible movements that shape our world today were born in the nineteenth century.  That was when most of the first great discoveries of modern science were made.  Modern utopian movements, among them Marxism, were born in the same period.  The promise of endless rational and scientific progress seemed to suggest the perfectibility of human existence.  Yet what seemed (and seems) so hopeful and beneficial soon also turned monstrous.  Madness was born out of genius, as Darwinian theory led to Social Darwinism, and belief in perfectibility led to a commitment to boundless slaughter to achieve it.  This course will examine the relationship between modern science, industrialization, urbanization and politics that produced the passionate political and social movements that consumed so much of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and which continue to inform our lives today.

MALS 70900 Approaches to Life Writing [25682]
W, 6:30-8:30, Rm. 3308, Professor Annalyn Swan, 3 credits

“Approaches to Life-Writing” will be a sustained look at what makes biography/autobiography, at its best, a genre that combines the strengths of both non-fiction and fiction. Great life-writing tells the tale with panache, in short, wedding the precision of scrupulous scholarship with the insight and narrative thrust of a good novel. The course will explore the art of life-writing through a range of subjects, styles and periods—from Boswell’s seminal Life of Johnson to Frank McCourt’s evocative Angela’s Ashes, from group portraits to individual memoir. Writing assignments will mix close critical analysis with a chance for some life-writing of one’s own.

MALS 71500 Critical Issues in International Studies: Human Rights and the Rule of Law [25683]
T, 6:30-8:30, Rm. 5383, Professor Chiseche Mibenge, 3 credits

This course examines the origin of contemporary human rights standards and more specifically, how this impacts the interpretation and enforcement of human rights at an international, regional and domestic level. This inquiry will raise questions about the universality of human rights and how particular traditions interpret the adoption and/or enforcement of rights. The inquiry will be guided by the major critiques of human rights discourse and will be framed by political, justice and security preoccupations of the day, such as  counter-terrorism measures post 9/11, and processes of international criminal justice before ad hoc tribunals and the International Criminal Court.

MALS 71700 Psychology of Work and Family: An Introduction [25684]
M, 6:30-8:30, Rm. 6494, Professor Kristen Shockley, 3 credits

Cross-listed with PSYC 80103

An Introduction emphasizes the psychological aspects of work and family issues as they are experienced by the individual, such as conflicts between work and family roles, and will introduce the student to major work-family (or work-life) theories and research primarily in the psychology literature. In addition, the course will cover organizational policies and programs that are designed to help employees manage work and family responsibilities. 

MALS 72200 Contemporary Feminist Theories [25685]
T, 4:15-6:15, Rm. 6417, Professor Linda Alcoff, 3 credits
Cross-listed with WSCP 81001


This course provides a broad overview of the issues and critical texts of feminist theory. The instructor will use an interdisciplinary approach to consider some of the major questions, methodologies, and findings of Women’s Studies Scholarship. The course will cover a selection of theoretical texts from multiple disciplines, both classic and contemporary. In addition, students will explore the ways in which the field of women’s studies has raised new questions and brought new perspectives to those areas where the humanities and social and behavioral sciences intersect, with material which is interdisciplinary in nature and frequently poses a challenge to conventional disciplinary boundaries.

MALS 72600 Social Impacts of Science and Technology [25897]
T, 4:15-6:15, Rm. 6493, Professor Joseph W. Dauben, 3 credits

This course will study some of the great discoveries of science and inventions of technology that have changed the course of human history, with a view to assessing their origins, impact, and eventual consequences, both foreseen and unintended. Through individual case studies, from the invention of the wheel or the arch to atomic energy and space technology, using selected case studies across time and in particular parts of the world, or the contributions of individuals like Newton or Darwin, or by genres including film and fiction, this course will survey major scientific discoveries and technological

inventions that have changed human history in significant ways. Reading assignments are given for every class, and students will make weekly seminar reports. There will be a series of short essays during the course and a final research paper (approximately 15–20 pages) due at the end of the semester.

This course will expose students to major examples across time of different technologies and scientific discoveries that have in turn changed the course of human history, often with unintended consequences. In the spirit of the Graduate Center’s recently-established Committee for Interdisciplinary Science Studies, this course will also introduce students to one in-depth case study of a particular culture and its response to science and technology, namely China, which has a long history of science and technology, but one that interacted with western science in ways that have also changed and reshaped its destiny, as well as the rest of the world with which China co-exists. This course—Social

Impacts of Science and Technology: Case Studies—will draw upon the full resources of science studies to the analysis of how science and technology have shaped the modern world.

Learning Goals and Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this course, students will possess a basic understanding of the methods, concepts, and theories employed by scholars concerned with science and technology studies, who approach their subjects from diverse perspectives. Student progress will be measured on the basis of their class participation, oral presentations, and written essay assignments.


MALS 73100 American Culture and Values [25687]
R, 6:30-8:30, Rm. 8203, Professor Martin Burke, 3 credits  
Cross-listed with ASCP. 81000 

This course examines the intellectual and institutional histories of scholarship in American Studies, and the American Studies movement, from the middle decades of the twentieth century to the present. We will read and discuss classic and contemporary texts, with an emphasis on interdisciplinary works in cultural history, literary studies, and the social sciences. In particular, we will consider such models and metaphors as “culture,” “civilization,” “mind,” “myth,” and “national character,” and how they have been employed by academics and social critics.
 

MALS 73400 Africana Studies: An Introduction [25688]
Performing Blackness from Stage to Screen
T, 2:00-6:00pm, Room C-419, 3 credits, Professor Racquel Gates
Cross listed with FSCP 81000, ART 89600, THEA 81500 & AFCP 80000 

Since its inception, film has been fascinated with the aesthetic and performative dimensions of blackness. Whether it is the spectacle of white soapsuds against black skin in A Morning Bath (Edison, 1896) or the numerous screen adaptations of the novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin that dominate early narrative film, cinema has always been inextricably entwined with blackness. Given early cinema’s connection to stage performance, it should come as little surprise that many of the tropes and representational strategies that the cinema adopted to portray blackness bore, and continue to bear, close relation to minstrelsy.

 

This seminar will trace the development of such representational strategies over the course of cinema from its inception to the current day. More specifically, the course will examine the ways that “performing blackness” has played a crucial role in the evolution of the medium, whether from the perspective of Jewish artists trying to establish their racial identities in early Hollywood, or African American artists attempting to subvert dominant representational modes. While the course will focus heavily on Hollywood cinema and mainstream media, it will also incorporate discourses from performance studies, critical race studies, and gender studies.

 

Screenings will cover a large range of genres and historical periods, from Edison’s early shorts to more recent releases like Spike Lee’s Bamboozled (2000). Course assignments will consist of in-class presentations, an ongoing reading/screening journal (3-4 pages per week), as well as a final seminar paper (20 pages). Students will choose a specific week where they will present the reading/s to the class and assist the professor in leading discussion. The journal will consist of the students’ responses to the readings and the screenings, which they will update weekly. Students will choose their final paper topic based on their own academic interests and the focus of the course. 

 

Reading/screening list available in Certificate Programs Office (Room 5110)

 

MALS 74500 Great Digs: Important Sites of the Ancient, Late Antique and Islamic Worlds [25689]
W, 4:15-6:15, Rm. 7395, Professor Elizabeth Macaulay Lewis, 3 credits

Cross listed with MES 78000 & ART 72000

This course introduces students to archaeological methods and important archaeological sites from the Classical, Late Antique and Islamic worlds. The course assumes no previous knowledge of archaeology. It aims to demonstrate how interconnected these worlds were. The two primary methods of archaeological inquiry – excavation and survey – are first introduced, discussed and problematized in this course. We will then consider specific sites – cities, towns and, in certain cases, residences – to understand how archaeology has contributed to our knowledge of these sites. Sites such as Athens, Alexandria, Rome, Jerusalem and others, will each be the focus of a lecture or seminar. Following the hour of lecture, each seminar will focus on the discussion of a particular archaeological question, technique, or a site. By the end of the course students will gain a knowledge of the principles of archaeological excavation and survey; an understanding of major classes of archaeological evidence; some of the key issues and challenges confronting archaeologists today; and a knowledge of important archaeological sites from the Classical, Late Antique and Islamic worlds.

Course Requirements:

The course is composed of lectures and seminars at which attendance is mandatory. In addition to completion of all required readings and active participation in class discussion, there are two major assignments in this course. First, a seven to ten page (2,500- 3,000 words) paper that discusses an archaeological theory, methodology, or type of evidence; for example, a student could discuss dendrochronology and how archaeologists use this technique for dating. This paper maybe be revised and resubmitted, as this course aims to help students develop their academic writing. Second, students create a digital site report (effectively a website) about a site of their choice from the Classical, Late Antique or Islamic worlds that has not been discussed in class; this site can be a city or a smaller, specific site. This project aims to teach students how to interpret a site from an archaeological and historical perspective. It should also enable a student to understand and interpret archaeological data and publications, demonstrate the significance of the selected site, and to designed website on a specific site. Students will be supported in creating their website reports through two seminars where the digital skills required to create these site reports will be discussed and demonstrated.

Provisional Course Outline (Subject to revision)

Week 1: Introduction to the course and the discipline of Archaeology
Week 2: Introduction to the nature of archaeological evidence and theory
Week 3: Introduction to archaeological survey
Week 4: Athens: from Acropolis to the Elgin Marbles
Week 5: Alexandria: maritime archaeology and trade
Week 6: Rome and virtual archaeology
Week 7: Pompeii, Fishbourne and advent of garden archaeology
Week 8: Dura Europos: identity and archaeology
Week 9: The art and archaeology of early Christianity: the catacombs, iconography and churches
Week 10: Digital Seminar
Week 11: The archaeology of Early Islam: Jerusalem and numismatics
Week 12: Selected Sites from the Islamic world: Qusayr ‘Amra and Samarra
Week 13: War Zones, Cultural Heritage and Archaeology
Week 14: Digital Seminar


MALS 75400 Introduction to the Digital Humanities [25690]
R, 4:15-6:15, Rm. C-415A, Professor Matthew K. Gold and Professor Stephen Brier, 3 credits
Cross-listed with IDS 81640

The dramatic growth of the Digital Humanities (DH) over the past half dozen years has helped scholars re-imagine the very nature and forms of academic research and teaching across a range of scholarly disciplines, encompassing the arts, the interpretive social sciences, and traditional humanities subject areas. This course will explore the history of the digital humanities, focusing especially on the diverse pioneering projects and core texts that ground this innovative methodological and conceptual approach to scholarly inquiry and teaching.  It will also emphasize ongoing debates in the digital humanities, such as the problem of defining the digital humanities, the question of whether DH has (or needs) theoretical grounding, controversies over new models of peer review for digital scholarship, issues related to collaborative labor on digital projects, and the problematic questions surrounding research involving “big data.” The course will also emphasize the ways in which DH has helped transform the nature of academic teaching and pedagogy in the contemporary university with its emphasis on collaborative, student-centered and digital learning environments and approaches. Along the way, we will discuss broad social, legal and ethical questions and concerns surrounding digital media and contemporary culture, including privacy, intellectual property, and open/public access to knowledge and scholarship. Students will be expected to participate actively in class discussions and online postings (including on blogs and wikis) and to research and write a final multimedia presentation on a key topic in the digital humanities. Students completing the course will gain broad knowledge about and understanding of the emerging role of the digital humanities across several academic disciplines and will begin to learn some of the fundamental skills used often in digital humanities projects.

Note: this course is part of an innovative "Digital Praxis Seminar," a two-semester long introduction to digital tools and methods that will be open to all students in the Graduate Center. The goal of the course is to introduce graduate students to various ways in which they can incorporate digital research into their work. 


MALS 75600 Sustainability Science and Education [25691]
R, 4:15-6:15, Rm. 3209, Professor Sophia P. Perdikaris, 3 credits


Sustainability for environments, economies, and societies (the triple bottom line) has become a central objective that unites disciplines in sciences, arts, and humanities;  engages educators, activists, policy makers, NGO's and indigenous rights organizations; and is prioritized by multiple international organizations. However, the term and concept have acquired a range of interpretations and understandings--some mutually incompatible--and there is an ongoing need to provide a common knowledge base and vocabulary, and to effectively connect education and activism for sustainability with cutting-edge method and theory in resilience,  robustness, vulnerability.  This course will provide a grounding in the basic literature and vocabulary of sustainability science and education, expose students to a range of interdisciplinary case studies, and engage them directly with cutting edge resilience and sustainability scholars and ongoing field research and cross-disciplinary integration.

MALS 77100 Aesthetics of Film [25898]
M, 4:15-7:15, Room C-419, Professor Robert Singer,  3 credits  
Cross listed with  THEA 71400, ART 79400, FSCP 81000

Film Aesthetics provides the student with the basic skills necessary to read a film. This course concentrates on formal analysis of the aesthetic and ideological elements that comprise historical and contemporary cinema. This course introduces the student to various genre of narrative cinema and different categories of cinema such as experimental, documentary, animation and hybrid forms produced in the United States and internationally. Particular emphasis is placed on the analysis of the film’s artistic/ideological contents.  We will learn to recognize the techniques and conventions that structure our experience of cinema – narrative systems, mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, sound, genre – in order to understand how these various components combine to yield film form, as we focus on the work of important film theorists. Learning goals for students in this course include the ability to apply effective research tools and techniques from print and digital resources, the development of competence in the presentation of research knowledge in written communication (an approved final paper, approximately 20 pages, based on the course material) and oral communication (an in-class report). All films are screened in advance, or in-class, in select shot sequences. The required text is Timothy Corrigan and Patricia White’s The Film Experience: An Introduction. 3rd ed. (Bedford/St. Martin’s 2012), and additional reading selections will be placed on a course CD.

MALS 77300 – Film History II [25928]
Professor Marc Dolan, Thursday, 11:45am-2:45pm, Room C-419, 3 credits
Cross listed with THEA 71500, ART 79500 & FSCP 81000


This is a course in the history of international film in the golden age of mass culture, from a time of global depression to the dawn of the age of globalization.  In the early weeks of the course, we will consider how the shock of synchronization made the global film industry more centrifugal than it had been for at least a decade, and threw filmmakers back to a much more concentrated focus on their intranational studio systems, most famously in the US but also in most European countries.  Special attention will be given in our meetings to how the most advanced techniques in film were harnessed to the cause of national propaganda, not only in Nazi Germany but also in the US.

The extent to which individual artifice could succeed and even thrive within an industrial/national system of film production will be a major theme in the early part of the course, as we weigh the triumphs of both the individual artistic achievements of this period (Le Regle de Jeu) as well as collective ones (The Wizard of Oz).

The later part of the course will focus on post-WWII international trade in film, which turned the commodification and cachet of “art cinema” into a method for exhibiting national difference.  Italian Neo-Realism, the French New Wave, and the rebirth of Swedish naturalism will be examined in this context, as will the varied circulation beyond Indian borders of the works of Satyajit Ray and Raj Kapoor.

The internalization of film capitalization and production in the 1960s will then be considered, not only the ways in which American Westerns were made in Spain and Burt Lancaster became an Italian film star, but also the ways in which such Eastern European directors as Roman Polanski and Milos Forman could become mainstays of US commercial films.  In the 1960s, film once again became what it had been before synchronization—a so-called “international language.”  After the preceding three decades, however, the national “dialects” of that language were now much more manifest than they had been during the late silent period, and more generally accepted than they had been four decades before.

In our final weeks, we will give consideration to the mass culture equivalent of the 1960s high culture explosion of cinephilia:  the explosion of exploitation cinema during the 1970s.  The globalization of grindhouses and driveins during the 1970s (including the significant spread throughout the US and Europe of films from Hong Kong’s Shaw Brothers Pictures) paved the way for a later VCR-enabled generation of independent filmmakers.  Readings will primarily be drawn from David Bordwell and Kristin Thompson’s Film History: An Introduction and Leo Braudy and Marshall Cohen’s anthology Film Theory and Criticism, but other readings will be put on reserve to reflect the specific interests of registered students.

MALS 77400 International Migration [25693]
W, 6:30-8:30, Rm. 7395, Professor Mehdi Bozorgmehr, 3 credits
Cross listed with SOC 82800

This course offers an interdisciplinary overview of the key current topics and issues in the burgeoning field of international migration. The field is unique in its interdisciplinary nature, stretching from history, anthropology, demography and economics, through political science, geography and sociology. Methodologically, it is also very eclectic, ranging from the use of quantitative data to ethnography and oral history of migrants. While the course will aspire to incorporate the experiences of major immigrant receiving countries around the world, the main comparative focus will be on Europe and North America, where the major theories and key concepts are most fully developed. The emphasis is on exploring both the theoretical debates in the field and the empirical data and case studies on which these debates hinge. Attention will be paid to detailed discussions of “classic” issues of immigration, such as assimilation, incorporation/integration, the labor market, race and ethnic relations, gender and the family, transnationalism, the second generation, the undocumented, and citizenship. Throughout, the course will take into account the way in which global cities, as contexts of reception, affect the immigrant experience, and in turn, are transformed by immigrants.

MALS 78100 Issues in Urban Education: Introduction to Children, Childhood, and Youth Studies [25694]
T, 4:15-6:15, Rm. 6494, Professor Roger Hart, 3 credits
 

MALS 78100 Issues in Urban Education: Introduction to Children, Childhood, and Youth Studies [26091]
T, 4:15-6:15, Rm. 4433, Professor Wendy Luttrell, 3 credits


MALS 78500 Social and Cultural Computing [25944]
T, 2:00-4:00, Rm. 5382, Professor Lev Manovich, 3 credits
Cross listed with CSc 87100

The syllabus for the course is available online:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1G-dBS0WAnV3PGY7_XdbRRHuaJjbIEWi8sbqnBoTlYwk/

MALS 78500 Transnational Latin American and Carribean Communities in the US [25899]
R, 4:15-6:15, Rm. 5383, Professor Ana Ramos-Zayas, 3 credits


This seminar approaches Latino Studies as an interdisciplinary theoretical and methodological field that has in fact influenced classic and contemporary social and cultural theory in significan ways.  Situating Latina/o Studies within a genealogy and intellectual tradition of critical race theory and comparative ethnic studies, students will be asked to analyze seminal scholarly works in the humanities and social sciences, particularly History, Sociology and Anthropology.  In the course, we will adopt a thematic focus that considers, among others, questions of Latino Studies and knowledge production, migration and transnationalism, perspectives on “(il)legality” and criminalization, labor and class identities, gender and sexuality, and the politics of race, space, and community building.  The course may serve as an intellectual roadmap for students doing graduate work in various disciplines in the social sciences and humanities, and who are interested in pursuing research topics in Latina/o, Latin American, and Caribbean Studies.  

MALS 70000 – Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies
Monday, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Shifra Sharlin [23847] Room 8405


Is Who You Are Where You Are?
 
This is a course about place and identity.  Is who you are where you are in nature, in the city, and in time?  The course will begin with readings from anthologies that address these three different types of location: Uncommon Ground: Toward Reinventing Nature, The City Reader, and Histories of the Future. Another book, Detroit City is the Place to Be, will be an opportunity to explore these questions in greater depth.  I am hoping that the author will speak to our class.  The final project for the course will be an archive project.  An advantage of our location in New York City is access to an enormous number and variety of archives. Sharing and workshopping writing are essential parts of the course. 
 
 
MALS 70000 – Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies
Tuesday, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. David Munn
s [23336] Room 4419

How to Know, … About Knowing:
Introduction to the History, Sociology, and Philosophy of Science, Medicine, and Technology


This course serves as an introduction to Liberal Studies, and offers the basic tools of a graduate education. Through this course, you will amass a varied toolkit of fundamental readings and intellectual questions and approaches to become acquainted with critical thinking and critiquing skills necessary to approach any intellectual, policy, governance, or social decision. The topic around which you will learn valuable skills is, broadly, the history and philosophy of science. As a domain of knowledge that makes very specific claims to somehow knowing about the world, “science” is a useful lens to look at how we conceptualize and understand the making of knowledge. The history, philosophy, and sociology of science deals with not what we know, but how we know what we know. This course considers this issue by comparing differing types of types of scientific knowledge, and asking how is their knowledge derived and legitimated? Along the way, we shall consider the role of materials, practices, and institutions in the processes of making knowledge, as well as role of skepticism, criticism, and community.

 
MALS 70100 – Narratives of New York: Literature and the Visual Arts
Monday, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Robert Singer [23337] Room 7395


Stephen Crane, Edith Wharton, Weegee, Diane Arbus, Spike Lee, and Tony Kushner… this course will explore the work of these artists, among others, as each envisions critically significant representations of New York City–its people, places, and history–in various narrative forms. Particular attention will be given to evaluating the manner in which literature interrelates with film and other visual media and how each venue reflects cultural and historical ideologies. For example, what makes a text a “New York” narrative? Do literary and visual narratives mirror the city’s psyche, or serve to analyze it in penetrating ways?

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to reading texts and works of art critically, from a variety of perspectives, as well as to relevant theoretical discourses.
 

MALS 70300 -- Law, Politics, and Policy, 3 credits
Mondays, 2:00-4:00 pm, Monica Varsanyi [23985] Room 8203
Cross listed with EES 79903 -- 
Geography, Law, and Social Control
Permission of the instructor required

In this course, we will be reading at the intersection of the Law and Society literature and critical legal and political geography.  As such, we will be reading foundational texts in both fields, with special attention to sociolegal scholars who either explicitly or implicitly approach their scholarship from a geographical perspective, as well as geographers who engage critically with the promises and pitfalls of the law as a force for social and political transformation.  Readings will include work by law and society scholars such as Michael McCann, Charles Epp, Sally Engle Merry, Kitty Calavita, Boaventura de Sousa Santos, Patricia Ewick and Susan Sibley, Austin Sarat, Ian Haney-López, Kal Raustiala, and Laura Beth Nielsen; as well as geographers such as Nick Blomley, David Delaney, Don Mitchell, Deborah Martin, Steve Herbert, and Lynn Staeheli.  While the class focuses most specifically on the US context, international examples will also be discussed and comparative papers are welcome.



 
MALS 70500 – Renaissance Culture
Monday, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Anna Akasoy [23338] Room 3309

Cross listed with MES 78000

Political, social, religious and cultural communities form and display their identities in opposition against others. ‘What we are not’ often tells us just as much about a group as ‘what we are’. In this course, we will discuss the theory that Europe or the West, more broadly speaking, emerged and formed a distinct identity in opposition to the East, in particular the Muslim world. We will focus on ‘European’ responses to the Turks, especially the Ottoman Sultan Mehmed II in the aftermath of the conquest of Constantinople in 1453. We will consider these reactions against the backdrop of political and cultural relations between Italy and the Ottoman Empire. Furthermore, we will identify and analyze elements in these responses which are characteristic of Renaissance writing about the East and then explore classical and medieval paradigms such as the conflict between Greeks and Persians or between Christians and Muslims. For theoretical approaches to the subject we will discuss Edward Said’s Orientalism (1978) and more recent responses to this classic of postcolonial studies.

 
MALS 70800 – Transformations of Modernity, 1914-present
Monday, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Sandi Cooper [23339] Room 7395


“Modernism” is one of those fluid terms whose definition is elusive, used differently when applied to poetry, prose, history, creative arts, music, theater and the philosophical underpinnings of societies.  Its sources have been traced to the intellectual revolutions of the 17-19th centuries; to the revolutionary upheavals of the 18-20th centuries and certainly to the post World War I decades.  Modernism,  often associated with the disjunctive,  sometimes stream of consciousness modes in literature, art, music, theatre, philosophy, political movements (especially Fascism) appearing in the early 20th century, reified by the violence of World War I, has shaped the 20th century.   It has been difficult to sustain the promise of enlightenment and rationality that emerged from 18th century thought and politics.

This class will only be able to glance at the surface of such complexity.

This being the centennial of the outbreak of World War I it is appropriate to examine the ways in which that war diverted western (European and American) histories and cultures to explore Modernism.   We are fortunate this semester that the New York Historical Society has assembled a portion of the famous Armory Show of 1913 which shocked Americans with its graphic rejection of Victorian verities.
 


MALS 71000 – Forms of Life Writing: Notebooks and Other Irregular Accountings
Tuesday, 2:00-4:00 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Wayne Koestenbaum [23341] Room 5382


In this seminar, we will read autobiographical texts that work irregularly, spasmodically, haphazardly, with interruptions, in fragments, in abject states of disassembly, obeying the periodicities of the day, the commute, the mental lapse, the aside, the list, the epistle-without-addressee.  These literary adventures—or accidents—go by many names:  notebookjournal, pillow book, essay, treatise, poem, letter.  We might hesitate to call them anything in particular;  we might, instead, apologize for their existence, and wish they would shape up.  Or we might feel loyalty toward these wayward creatures;  without wishing to corral them into a category, we might believe that they deserve congregation, that they have chartable and treasurable resemblances, and that they are inspiring models for contemporary composition.
 
Our readings may include The Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon, Emily Dickinson’s “Master Letters,” Henry David Thoreau’s Journals (online transcripts of his manuscripts), Franz Kafka’s The Blue Octavo Notebooks, Ludwig Wittgenstein’s Culture and Value, Francis Ponge’s Soap, Georges Perec’s La Boutique Obscure:  124 Dreams, Susan Sontag’s Reborn:  Journals & Notebooks, 1947-1963, Toi Derricotte’s The Black Notebooks, Hervé Guibert’s Mausoleum of Lovers:  Journals 1976-1991, Hilton Als’s The Women, Aaron Kunin’s Grace Period:  Notebooks, 1998-2007, Matias Viegener’s 2500 Random Things About Me Too, Claudia Rankine’s Don’t Let Me Be Lonely, Maggie Nelson’s Bluets, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick’s A Dialogue on Love, Marie Chaix’s The Summer of the Elder Tree, and Beatriz Preciado’s Testo Junkie:  Sex, Drugs, and Biopolitics in the Pharmacopornographic Era.
 
In lieu of a final paper, students will write each week a two-page essay in response to specific assignments.  These essays may exercise the freedom to be autobiographical and to engage in irregular accounting.

 
MALS 71200 Fashion Film: The Cultures of Fashion
Thursday, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof.  Eugenia Paulicelli [23342] Room 3207
Cross-listed with IDS 81610, WSCP 81000, & FSCP 81000


As industries and cultural manifestations, fashion and film share many qualities and have always influenced each other in a number of ways. Both are spectacle and performance; both are bound up with emotions, with desire, with modernity and processes of modernization. At the level of representation, film and fashion share the creation of a culture and a discourse, the practice of desire and an endless process of emulation, imitation, and consumption choices. Or as a critic has put it: “Film, in this guise of dress, of appearance and artifice, is an extension of the fashion industry.”


In the course, while focusing on the present and particularly on the new phenomenon of the “Fashion Film,” my aim is also to offer historical and critical frameworks with which to think such experiments and investigate new ways of understanding the relationship between art/commerce; industry/culture; body/identity; time/space; image/imagining and, in Buck-Morss’s words, the aesthetic/anaesthetic.

One of the most striking changes resulting from the shift towards the digital has been the ubiquity of fashion-as-a moving image. The course will explore how this “new” form of fashion film, which has recently exploded thanks to the advancements in digital technology, has a long history that can be traced back to the emergence of cinema in the late 19th century. The course will explore not only this new cinematic form in multiple contexts and frameworks, which connect it to photography, the fashion show, movement, time, and branding, but will also explore the politics of experimental forms of communication, aesthetics, cultures and identity.

Authors and filmmakers to be studied include:  Walter Benjamin, Gilles Deleuze, Michelangelo Antonioni, Laura Mulvey, Lev Manovich, Wong Kar-wai, Mary Ann Doane, Jonathan Crary, Lucrecia Martel, Federico Fellini, Jessica Mitrani, Luca Guadagnino, William Klein, Caroline Evans, Tom Gunning, Thomas Elsaesser, and scholars who have written on the new genre of the Fashion Film such as Marketa Uhlirova, Natalie Khan, Nick Reese-Roberts and others.

Students in the class will be asked to collect data on fashion films and create a platform to be used in the classroom, but also made available to other students and scholars interested in fashion, film and the arts both within and outside the GC.
Students who have an interest in developing their own fashion film are also very welcome.

 
MALS 71800 – Cross-Cultural and Multi-Disciplinary Perspectives on Work and Family Issues
Tuesday, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Karen Lyness [23344] Room 7395


Cross-Cultural and Multi-Disciplinary Perspectives on Work-Family Issues is one of two core courses in the Psychology of Work and Family MALS track, and both are cross-listed as doctoral psychology courses. (The first course focuses on the Psychology of Work and Family, i.e., understanding work and family issues for individuals, couples, and families, as well as employers’ programs and U.S. laws that are relevant to these issues.)  This second course is designed to broaden students’ perspectives and understanding of contemporary work and family issues from a global perspective. Please note that the two courses may be taken in either order.

This course, Cross-Cultural and Multi-Disciplinary Perspectives on Work-Family Issues, will cover important aspects of national context – such as cultural values, policies, demography, and socioeconomic characteristics – that are critical for understanding work and family issues, and how individual experiences might differ across countries or cultures. In addition, the course is designed to introduce students to multi-disciplinary approaches to work and family issues, such as psychology, family studies, sociology, anthropology, political science, law, and economics, each of which offers a unique perspective. The course will include examples of relevant theories, research findings, and research methodologies associated with each discipline, as well as cross-national research, to equip students to pursue their individual interests related to work and family.

 
MALS 73200 – American Social Institutions
Tuesday, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Duncan Faherty [23346] Room 3212
Cross listed with ASCP 81000


Russ Castronovo and Susan Gillman begin the introduction to their recent collection States of Emergency: The Object of American Studies (2009), with a deceptively straightforward question: “What is the object of American studies?” They continue by unpacking the ramifications of that question, in particular by noting its imbrication in two corollary questions: “What does ‘American studies’ study, and what does it want?” The object of this course is to explore these questions by considering the histories, theories, genealogies, and practices of American studies from its inception as an academic discipline to the present. In other words, we will consider how in the span of about sixty years – using the first publication of American Quarterly in 1949 as a marker of discernable communal birth – American studies transformed from a movement into an institution (an institution marked by one of the largest annual academic conferences in the United States). As we undertake these questions, we will also consider if “American” Studies remains a viable field of study. Or to put it another way, is such a designation over-privileging the idea of the nation? Is such a focus being replaced by such concepts as “the Circum-Atlantic” or “Cosmopolitanism” or “Globalization”? What are the gains and losses of such movements? The collection edited by Castronovo and Gillman is just the latest iteration of an attempt to recalibrate the field of American studies, a struggle that is almost as old as the field itself. For all of its centrality, American studies remains an anomaly in the academy - as a program and not a department it resides somewhere between (or, perhaps, outside) normative disciplinary boundaries. Across the length of the semester we will consider the complexity inherent in this hybridity, as we trace the influence of both seminal and emerging work in American studies. We will also consider the different meanings that American studies has (and has had) for different disciplines, and attempt to take stock of its current position in the academy and in our own work.

 
MALS 73500 – Africana Studies: Global Perspectives -- The Digital Carribean
Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Kelly Josephs [23942] Room 8203
Cross listed with ASCP 81500

In its rhizomatic structure and development, the internet is analogous to Caribbean culture: born out of disparate pieces and peoples; always already predicated on an elsewhere as home or authority; always already working to ignore geography and physical space as barriers to connection. This seminar probes the various epistemological, political and strategic ways in which cyberspace intersects with the formation and conceptualization of the Caribbean.

What constitutes the Caribbean is, of course, not a new question. As we explore the digital media productions that continue to reconfigure the social and geographic contours of the region, we will build on familiar debates surrounding study of the Caribbean. Issues to be addressed include: Geography: What challenge, if any, might cyberspace pose to our geo-centered conceptualization of Caribbean cultures? Community: In what ways do online spaces that claim (or are claimed by) the Caribbean struggle, together or individually, to articulate a cohesive culture? Archival history and voice: Does the ephemerality of online life and the economics of access endanger or enable what we may call the Caribbean subject?  Identity and representation:  What indeed comprises “the Caribbean subject”? How do questions of authenticity get deployed in crucial moments of tension involving diasporic subjects, particularly in the sped-up world of digital production? These questions, framed by Caribbean Studies, will be our primary focus, but they will be articulated with questions and theories from new digital media studies about knowledge production and circulation, digital boundaries and the democracy of access and usage.

In addition to examining primary digital sources, we will read articles from writers including: Stuart Hall, Kamau Brathwaite, Edouard Glissant, Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, David Scott, Annie Paul, Curwen Best, Lisa Paravisini-Gebert, Anna Everett, Karim H. Karim, Lisa Makamura, Wendy Hui Kyong Chun, Jennifer Brinkerhoff and others. Requirements: Oral presentations, blog and in-class participation, and a term paper (15-20 pages).


 
MALS 74400 – Islamic Art and Architecture
R, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Macaulay Lewis [23348] Room 3212
Cross listed with ART 74000 & MES 78000


Since the emergence of Islam in seventh century Arabia, the world of Islam, which spans continents and centuries, has produced art and architecture that is as remarkable as it is diverse. However, what is Islamic art is a more complex question. Unlike Christian, Jewish or Buddhist art, the art produced in the lands where Islam was a dominant religious, political or cultural force is commonly referred to as “Islamic art”. The goal of this course is to introduce students to the art and architecture of the Islamic world from its earliest monuments, such as the Dome of the Rock, to those of the early modern Islamic Empires: the Ottomans, Safavids and Mughals. The course introduces the major theoretical and methodological issues involved in the study of Islamic art and architecture and focuses on the development of critical visual skills. This course will present an overview of a period or dynasty in Islamic art, and then focus on an extended discussion of a monument or object in each class. Rather than write a traditional final research paper for this course, students will be required to create and complete a digital project. This digital project will be done in conjunction with the Brooklyn Museum of Art and Smarthistory.org, the art history part of the Khan Academy. The final project will focus on objects in the collection of the Brooklyn Museum of Art which are being prepared for re-installation. The class will also visit the Islamic Galleries in the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

 
MALS 75500 – Digital Humanities: Methods and Practices
Monday, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Matthew Gold [23349] Room 6495



MALS 75700 -- Field Course in Island Long Term Human Ecodynamics
Thursday, 4:15-6:15, 3 credits, Prof. Rebecca Boger [23394] Room 3209


This course explores sustainability science and education using both a local place-based approach and a global context, focusing on climate change, water resources, and food security using geospatial technologies - GIS (geographic information systems), remote sensing, and GPS (global positioning systems). Students will access and useWeb-based databases and other resources for their assignments and projects. The course will be online and include participants from rural Nebraska, urban New York City, and Barbuda, West Indies. Through online technologies, students will participate in a vibrant dialogue that explores the many dimensions of sustainability in very different contexts around the world.

 
MALS 77100 – Aesthetics of Film
Wednesday, 4:15-8:15, 3 credits, Prof. Edward Miller [23351] Room C419
Cross listed with FSCP 81000, THEA 71400, & ART 79400


This course argues that a crucial aspect of the cinematic enterprise is the depiction of the filmmaking environment itself through the "meta-film." Using this emphasis as an entry into aesthetics, the course involves students in graduate-level film discourse by providing a thorough understanding of the concepts that are needed to perform a detailed formal analysis.

The course's primary text is the ninth edition of Bordwell and Thompson's Film Art (2010) and the book is used to examine such key topics as narrative and nonnarrative forms, mise-en-scene, composition, cinematography, camera movement, set design/location, color, duration, editing, and genre. As the soundtrack is a particular focus in this course—and arguably especially important to the meta-film--we supplement Film Art with readings by Michel Chion, Amy Herzog, and Rick Altman. In order to understand the meta-film and its aesthetics we read key sections of Robert Stam's Reflexivity in Film and Literature: From Don Quixote to Jean-Luc Godard (1992), Christopher Ames' Movies about Movies: Hollywood Revisited (1997), Nöth & Bishara's Self-Reference in the Media (2007), John Thornton Caldwell's Production Culture: Industrial Reflexivity and Critical Practice in Film & Television (2008), and Craig Hight’s Television Mockumentary: Reflexivity, Satire and a Call to Play (2011). We also read “classic” essays on metafiction by Patricia Waugh and Linda Hutcheon in order to make distinctions between self-referentiality and reflexivity in film.
 
As part of the course we construct a cross-genre database of films that portray the filmmaking terrain itself. Thus we watch Thanhouser and Marston's Evidence of the Film (1913), Charlie Chaplin's The Masquerader (1914), Dziga Vertov's Man with a Movie Camera (1929), Edward F. Cline’s Never Give a Sucker an Even Break (1941) Billy Wilder's Sunset Boulevard (1950), Donen and Kelly's Singing in the Rain (1952), Jean Rouch's Chronicle of a Summer (1960), Michael Powell's Peeping Tom (1960), Federico Fellini's 8½ (1963), Jean-Luc Godard's Contempt (1963), François Truffaut's Day for Night (1973), Robert Altman's The Player (1991), David Lynch's Inland Empire (2006), Michel Gondry's Be Kind Rewind (2008), and Charlie Kaufman's Synecdoche, New York (2008).

In the final sessions we examine the distinctive aesthetics of current meta-television in shows like 30 Rock and Community in order to make connections across media.
Course Requirements: 1. Weekly response paper: student responds to the film and the ideas presented in the reading and session.  2. Presentation of a reading.  3. Paper proposal, due 10th week: written like an abstract for a conference paper, 500 words. Also presented in class. Sending out this abstract to a conference is strongly recommended. 4. Research paper: Due one week after final day of class, at least 12 pages. This paper is theoretically informed and reflects the content of the course, involving a close formal reading of a meta-film.

 
MALS 77300 – History of Cinema II – Film Noir in Context: From Expressionism to Neo-Noir Tuesday, 2:00-5:30pm, 3 credits, Prof. Morris Dickstein [23848] Rm. C419
Cross listed with THEA 81500, FSCP 81000, & ART 89600


This course will explore the style, sensibility, and historical context of film noir. After tracing its origins in German expressionism, French “poetic realism,” American crime movies, the hard-boiled fiction of Dashiell Hammett and James M. Cain, and the cinematography and narrative structure of Citizen Kane, we will examine some of the key films noirs of the period between John Huston’s The Maltese Falcon of 1941 and Welles’s Touch of Evil in 1958. These will include such works as Double Indemnity, Mildred Pierce, Out of the Past, Detour, Shadow of a Doubt, Pickup on South Street, In a Lonely Place, Gun Crazy, The Killers, DOA, Ace in the Hole, The Big Heat, and Kiss Me Deadly. We’ll explore the visual style of film noir, the different studio approaches to noir, importance of the urban setting, the portrayal of women as lure, trophy, and betrayer, and the decisive social impact or World War II and the cold war. We’ll also examine the role played by French critics in defining and revaluing this style, and touch upon its influence on French directors like Melville (Bob le Flambeur, Second Breath), Truffaut (Shoot the Piano Player), and Chabrol (La Femme Infidele, Le Boucher). Finally, we’ll look at the post-1970s noir revival in America in such films as Chinatown, Blade Runner, Body Heat, and Red Rock West. Readings will include materials on the historical background of this style, key critical and theoretical texts on film noir by Paul Schrader, Carlos Clarens, James Naremore, Eddie Muller, Alain Silver and others, and the work of some hard-boiled fiction by writers such as Dashiell Hammett, James M. Cain, David Goodis, and Patricia Highsmith.  Students will be expected to do an oral report and a 15-page term research paper, as well as to study the assigned films both in and out of class.


MALS 77500 -  Global Cities
Wednesday, 2:00-4:00pm, 3 credits, Prof. Elena Vesselinov [24036] Room 3306

Cross listed with SOC 83000 - Comparative Urbanization
 
The course aims to introduce graduate students to the complexity of urbanization in historical and comparative contexts. From Rome to Jerusalem, from Manchester to Beirut, from Mecca to Berlin, from Paris to New York, the course is a survey of historical and contemporary religious, territorial, political, economic and spatial divisions. Thus, throughout this introduction to comparative urbanization, the course will focus on urban inequality in cities around the world and is organized in five sections.

The first section, Comparative-Historical Perspectives in the Study of Cities, focuses on historical and theoretical evidence of city formation. The readings in this section examine the origins of cities and the origins of inequality, particularly in Middle Eastern and European cities. The second section then focuses on Middle Eastern cities in the context of religion and the contemporary uprisings, termed “Arab Spring.” The readings in the third section contemplate the contemporary causes and consequences of social and spatial inequality in Paris and Berlin. The fourth section will take the students to Asia, and specifically to Chinese cities, where issues of population and economic growth will be explored. The fifth section of the course will take us from the Asian financial crisis to the continuous Great Recession and its impact on global cities.

The class will operate as a seminar in which every reading is introduced by one student (responsible also for 1-2 pages of written summary to be distributed in class). There will be two take home essays assigned during the semester, corresponding to major sections of the course. In addition, each student will prepare a final paper on comparative urban research based on scholarly research published in top sociological journals (also books). The final grade will be calculated as follows: class discussion - 20 percent; essays - 25 percent each; paper - 30 percent.



MALS 78200 – The Politics of Contemporary Urban Education
Monday, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Joel Spring [23353] Room 3306

Cross listed with U ED 75200
Globalization of Education: Power, Language, and Culture

Today education is globalized with most nations sharing similar education structures and goals that link schooling to economic development. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD is now referred to as the “World Ministry of Education” because of the influence of its international tests (PISA and TIMSS) and its networking with the World Economic Forum, the World Bank, the United Nations, national governments, and global educational corporations.
 
Corporations are important players in the globalization process. Of particular importance is the global reach of publishers and test makers, such as Pearson and the Educational Testing Services, hardware and software makers, like Apple, NewsCorp, Samsung, and Microsoft, and tutoring services, such as Kumon and Kaplan. In addition, some universities are globalized with branch campuses in many countries and through the attraction of international students.
 
Educational globalization reflects two important concepts: the “economization of education” and the “audit state.” The economization of education refers to schooling being linked to economic and income growth in contrast to traditional religious and cultural goals. The value of education is analyzed through the lenses of economists. The ‘audit state’ continually monitors performance, including educational performance, by standardized assessments.
Educational globalization raises important issues to be discussed in the seminar.
Who or what organizations exert power over this globalized educational system? In this context, we will discuss the major players, including the World Economic Forum, OECD, the United Nations, the World Bank and others.
What happens to local cultures and languages in this process of globalization? Will globalization create a world culture and language at the expense of local languages and cultures?
Will English or Mandarin become the world language?
Will graduates of this globalized system struggle for social justice or be compliant workers for global corporations?
Students will choose a topic for a presentation and essay that reflects their academic interests.
 
 
MALS 79600 – Thesis Workshop
Tuesday, 6:30-8:30 pm, 1 credit, Prof. Shifra Sharlin [23355] Room 3308


This is a course for people who are seriously engaged in a thesis or other writing project, such as, conference presentations, articles, or submissions to the MALS online journal.  This course addresses the wide variety of issues that face students who are focused on taking their writing to this next, more professional, level.  There will be several weeks of discussion and readings on writing strategies both practical and conceptual.  It is possible that some class time will be dedicated to getting some writing done.  Most of the semester will be devoted to workshopping.  Enroll in the course if you expect to have writing to share during the semester and are prepared to read and discuss other students’ writing. 

Spring 2013


MALS 70000 – Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies
Becoming Lewis Mumford: Studying, Analyzing and Writing About the Architecture of New York City
Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 6494, 3 credits, Elizabeth Macaulay-Lewis

This course will introduce students to critical thinking and techniques of academic reading and writing with a specific focus on the urban form, history and architecture of New York City. This introductory course is designed for students interested in history, urbanism, architecture, and the politics of space. This course takes an interdisciplinary approach drawing upon anthropology, history, archaeology, geography and architectural history among others to teach students how scholars study, research and write about the built environment and urban space, as well as how people experience and use space and architecture in New York City. We will look at various theories of architecture and space. This course will also emphasize fieldwork and visits to various monuments, buildings, and institutions in New York City so that students can learn the process of researching in New York City. Thus students will develop critical thinking, writing and researching skills in this class.

Students will write weekly papers about architecture, critique scholarship, assemble an annotated bibliography, write an abstract for their final paper, and complete a final research paper that will be presented to the class in an informal workshop setting. Class attendance and participation is vital. This class has a strong emphasis on writing and revision of written work.

MALS 70000 – Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies
Decoding Celebrity
Mondays, 6:30-8:30 p.m. 3 credits, Linda M. Grasso

What is celebrity? How is it achieved? What purposes does it serve? In this course, we explore these questions using twentieth-century painter Georgia O’Keeffe as a focal point. Reading art history, cultural criticism, film studies, women’s history, autobiography, and popular culture biography, we consider the ways in which O’Keeffe’s celebrity enables an understanding of larger issues such as how celebrities are commodified and consumed by a variety of constituencies for a multitude of reasons. Viewing works of art, photographs, advertisements, documentaries, and YouTube videos, we also consider the complex ways in which celebrity images are created and circulated in multiple public domains. Conducted as a research seminar, the course requires students to study texts intensively, design and execute a research project, and share findings with peers.

MALS 70000 – Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies
ZOMBIES!!
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Sylvia Tomasch


MALS 70000 – Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies
Thinking With Food
Mondays, 4:15-6:15, 3 credits, Rm. TBA, Megan Elias

This course serves as an introduction to graduate level reading and writing and will help students to identify a disciplinary approach that suits their interests and personal perspectives. We will be focusing on the topic of food, which appeals to scholars from a wide range of disciplines. We will read and write about texts from a variety of academic fields to discern disciplinary differences in argument formation, methodologies, sources, and conclusions. Assignments will make use of the rich diversity of food-related experiences and archives in New York City as well as introducing students to some of the ways in which digital humanities can enhance our ability to share our research with others.

MALS 70100 – Narratives of New York: Literature and the Visual Arts
Mondays, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Robert Singer

Stephen Crane, Edith Wharton, Weegee, Diane Arbus, Spike Lee, Oliver Stone, and Tony Kushner … this course will explore the work of these artists, among others, as each envisions critically significant representations of New York City–its people, places, and history–in various narrative forms. Particular attention will be given to evaluating the manner in which literature interrelates with film and other visual media and how each venue reflects cultural and historical ideologies. For example, what makes a text a “New York” narrative? Do literary and visual narratives mirror the city’s psyche, or serve to analyze it in penetrating ways?

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to reading texts and works of art critically, from a variety of perspectives, as well as to relevant theoretical discourses. There is an end-term paper.

MALS 70400 – Cultural Studies and the Law
Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Leonard Feldman
Cross listed with P SC 72001

 

 

 

MALS 70500 – Classical Culture
Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Marie Marianetti

The course will be a survey of selected pieces of ancient literature and legend that have subsequently influenced Western civilization. The chosen literary works will be analyzed from an interdisciplinary perspective, combining literature, history, archaeology, religion, culture, politics and philosophy. Certain universal issues will be considered as they are conveyed through the literary genres. The class will concentrate upon a thorough examination and discussion of the following primary sources: The Epic of Gilgamesh, Hesiod’s Theogony, Homer’s Odyssey, Aeschylus’ Oresteia, Sophocles’ Oedipus Cycle (the Theban plays), Euripides’ Iphigeneia in Aulis, Aristophanes’ The Clouds, Plato’s Apology and Symposium and Virgil’s Aeneid.

MALS 70600 – Religion and the Enlightenment
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, David Sorkin, [20421] Cross listed with HIST

71300


This course explores the relationship between the Enlightenment and religion. Our first session will be devoted to definitions of the Enlightenment in the eighteenth and twenty-first centuries. We will then probe two related issues. First, how did the philosophes view religion? We will read such key thinkers as Locke, Pufendorf, Voltaire, Rousseau and Lessing on such critical issues as toleration, natural religion and the relationship between reason and revelation.

 

 

We will then shift to ask the less conventional question of the uses theologians or clergy made of the Enlightenment. In this connection we will read thinkers affiliated with movements of religious renewal such as the Anglican Moderate William Warburton, the Reform Catholic Lodovico Muratori and the maskil (Jewish Enlightener) Moses Mendelssohn.

The course will cross national borders (England, France, German states and Habsburg empire) and confessional boundaries (Protestantism, Catholicism, Judaism). Our focus will be Western and Central Europe.

MALS 70800 – Transformations of Modernity
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Richard Kaye

MALS 71000 – Forms of Life Writing
Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Gail Levin

This course focuses on contemporary life writing in three major genres: memoir, autobiography, and biography. We will concentrate on an analysis of form and technique, not emphasizing content, but examining how content relates to form. How, for example, is it possible to portray the interaction of the life events of a creative individual (e.g. poet, novelist, painter, photographer, film director, actor, or composer) and the resulting products of that person? What are the problems that the writer must solve? Discussion of both research and writing techniques so that students will develop both an understanding of what goes into writing modern and contemporary biography, autobiography, and memoir and a critical sense of how they both overlap and differ. Students will develop skills in narrative writing in either biography or memoir. Term papers assigned.

MALS 71200 – The Culture of Fashion: Theories and Practices
Thursdays, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Eugenia Paulicelli, [20424] Cross listed with IDS 88230, ART 80010, WSCP 81000 & ASCP 81500

The seminar will focus on New York and the birth of American fashion, covering a time span from the sweatshops of the second half of the nineteenth century where Jewish and Italian immigrants worked, to the gilded age, department stores, the emergence of the “American Look” in the 1930s and 1940s, on to the subsequent shifts that occurred in the 1960s, up until the present of the New York Fashion week and New York as a global fashion capital. We will focus on the major role played by women who have worked in the industry as designers, stylists, and journalists (such as the New York-based Claire McCardell, Elizabeth Hawes, Diana Vreeland, Jo Copeland and others). We will go on to examine the New York socio-cultural context out of which these women emerged, the relationship the city has with fashion and modernity, with fashion’s role as a creator of national and local identity, and image. Fashion in New York will be studied as an industry, an economic force, a phenomenon that creates and performs identities and fosters interplay between gender, the body and sexuality. Particular attention will be given to those periods of great transformation in the history of the city when fashion played an important role in shaping the city’s culture and identity, and had an impact on lifestyles and gender perception in the workplace and in other social and private spaces. Visits to museums and archives will be scheduled during the semester to complement the topics covered in class. Readings will be drawn from theoretical and historical texts as well as novels, magazine articles, memoirs and films.

Authors will include W. Benjamin, R. Barthes, D. Harvey, S. Buck-Morss, N. Rantisi, C. Millbank, V. Steele, N. Green, P. Stallybrass, D. Soyer, D. Gilbert, C. Breward, Rebecca Arnold, Edith Wharton, Lois Gould (a memoir about her mother, the fashion designer Jo Copeland,) short films by D.W. Griffith on fashion, consumption, modernity, documentaries on the garment district, Bill Cunningham and others. Students will be encouraged to conduct original research and use the museum and clothing archives in the city as well as the libraries for their final project.

Should you have any questions, please contact the instructor: Eugenia Paulicelli (email: epaulicelli@gc.cuny.edu)

MALS 71500 – Critical Issues in International Studies
Tuesdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Tomohisa Hattori

MALS 71800 – Cross-Cultural and Multi-Disciplinary Perspectives on Work and Family Issues
Mondays, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Karen Lyness/Kristen Shockley

 

 

 

MALS 72100 – Feminist Texts and Contexts: Madame de Staël and the Problem of the Female Intellectual
Mondays, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Helena Rosenblatt, [20426] Cross listed with FREN 74000, HIST 72100 & WSCP 81000
.

What were the Enlightenment’s notions of womanhood? How did these interact with ideas of genius and intellectual or artistic creativity? These are questions we will explore before delving into Madame de Staël’s life and work, from her great novels, Delphine and Corinne, to some of her more overtly political texts. To what extent did Madame de Staël imbibe and reflect reigning notions of gender, and to what extent did she subvert them? After reading some of the best and most recent scholarship on 18th century attitudes toward the female intellectual, we will turn to a consideration Madame de Staël’s own literary and political productions to see how she navigated the constraints and opportunities offered by the revolutionary times in which she lived. We will also consider whether contemporary approaches to Madame de Staël do justice to her stature as a female intellectual.

MALS 72200 – Contemporary Feminist Theories
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Kyoo Lee, [20823] Cross listed with WSCP

81001

This course aims to introduce students to a broad range of foundational texts and contemporary classics associated with Women’s Studies, Feminist/Gender/Queer/Transgender Theories. We will use an interdisciplinary approach to consider some of the central questions, dilemmas, methods, and findings of this evolving scholarship. We begin with the discourse of crises over the very possibility of a field demarcated as such, when the sign of woman or perhaps gender itself has been deconstructed or diversified, if not destabilized. The rest of the material is organized into three broad themes: Being/Becoming (Ontology), Knowing/Unknowing (Epistemology), and Doing/Undoing (Praxis).

 

 

MALS 73100 – American Culture & Values
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Robert Reid-Pharr, [20427] Cross listed with
 ASCP 81000

MALS 73200 – American Social Institutions: Proseminar in American Studies
Fridays, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Kandice Chuh, [20428] Cross listed with ASCP 81500

This course is designed to accomplish three goals: 1) to offer practical research training to student scholars for whom a primary field of engagement is American studies; 2) to deepen understanding of the key questions in contemporary Americanist discourses; and 3) to provide a structured forum for participants to develop and workshop essays for publication consideration in a peer reviewed journal or equivalent venue in the field.

To accomplish these goals, participants will engage in such questions as, what is a research question? What are exigency and methodology? How does one embed her- or himself into a field? What do disciplinarity and interdisciplinarity mean theoretically as well as practically? In addition to participants’ essays, the texts for the course will include examples of recently published articles and chapters; calls for papers for journals and editions; and the readings for the public seminars offered by the Revolutionizing American Studies initiative, which participants are expected to attend as part of the work of this course.

Much of the workshopping will be accomplished by using the Academic Commons resources. Participants should establish an Academic Commons account if they have not yet done so. For the first class meeting (1 Feb), students should prepare a 1-page description of their respective projects for the semester, which should include primary field(s) of engagement and target publication venue(s).

Students interested in registering in this course should contact Kandice Chuh at kchuh@gc.cuny.edu with a brief description of the specific project she or he has in hand and plans to develop during the semester.

MALS 73500 – Africana Studies: Global Perspectives
Black Postmodernism: African American Fiction Since the 1970s
Tuesdays, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Barbara Webb, [20429] Cross listed with AFCP 73100, ENGL 75600, WSCP 81000 & ASCP 82000

A study of the poetics and politics of postmodernism in the fiction of African American writers since the 1970s. Although the last three decades of the twentieth century were undoubtedly the most productive and innovative period in the development of African American literature and literary criticism, it was also a period of extreme social and cultural fragmentation in African American communities. In this course we will examine how African American writers have addressed the problems of literary representation when faced with increased commodification of culture and knowledge, the proliferation of new forms of literacy and orality, and the breakdown of traditional forms of community. Our readings will also include some selections not usually considered postmodernist but that address similar concerns about identity, culture, writing and possibilities for social change. We will read selected essays by theorists of postmodernism such as Hutcheon, Jameson, Harvey and Bhabha as well as essays by literary critics and cultural theorists who have been involved in ongoing discussions about the relevance of postmodernism for African Americans at the turn of the 21st century such as bell hooks, Cornel West, W. Lawrence Hogue, Wahneema Lubiano, and Madhu Dubey. Requirements: Oral presentations and a term paper (15-20 pages). The course will be conducted as a seminar with class discussions of assigned readings and oral presentations each week. Texts: Ishmael Reed, Mumbo Jumbo; Clarence Major, My Amputations; Toni Cade Bambara, The Salt Eaters; John Edgar Wideman, Sent for You Yesterday; Charles Johnson, Middle Passage; Toni Morrison, Jazz; Gayle Jones, The Healing; Colson Whitehead, The Intuitionist; Madhu Dubey, Signs and Cities: Black Literary Postmodernism.

MALS 74300 – Bioethics: Policies and Cases: Medical Ethics
Mondays, 6:00-8:00 p.m., 3 credits, Stefan Baumrin, Cross listed with PHIL 77900
Felt Conference Room Annenberg 5th Floor
Mount Sinai School of Medicine

The first seminar is January 28th.

MALS 74300 – Bioethics: Policies and Cases—Medicine and Social Justice
Tuesdays, 5:00-7:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Rosamond Rhodes, [20430] Cross listed with PHIL 77900
Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Justice is a major concern in theoretical ethics and political philosophy and a huge literature is devoted to trying to explain what it entails. In this course our aim will be to examine a broad spectrum of issues in medicine, medical research, and public health that raise questions about justice. In light of these critical examples, we shall review and critique an array of philosophical views on justice. Throughout the seminar we shall be engaged in two activities: (1) using clinical dilemmas and health policies as touchstones for developing a clear understanding of justice, and (2) developing an understanding of how theories of justice apply in different contexts. By going from practice to theory and from theory back again to practice we shall advance our understanding of the theoretical literature as well as the requirements of justice in medicine and other areas of the social world.

This course will begin with an examination of issues that raise questions about justice, and then move on to examining contemporary (John Rawls) work on justice and a review of some theoretical work by authors who focus their attention on justice in medicine (Norman Daniels & Paul Menzel). In the course of the seminar, we shall also develop an understanding of how the U.S. happens to have developed the mechanisms that we now have for the delivery of health care, how medical resources are actually distributed here, elsewhere, and in various contexts. Throughout we shall consider ways in which those allocations do and do not express justice. We shall consider some of the problems that become apparent when you attend to the special needs of social groups (e.g., the poor, children, women, the elderly, African-Americans) and examine dilemmas and conflicts that are raised by issues such as the treatment of premature and compromised neonates.

Text:

Medicine and Social Justice: Essays on the Distribution of Health Care, 2nd edition, Rosamond Rhodes, Margaret P. Battin & Anita Silvers, editors, 2012, Oxford University Press,

Contact information:

Rosamond Rhodes, Ph.D.
Director, Bioethics Education
Associate Professor, Medical Education
Mount Sinai School of Medicine
Box 1108
One Gustave Levy Place
New York, NY 10029
email: rosamond.rhodes@mssm.edu
phone: 212-241-3757

MALS 74400 – From Alexander to Muhammad: Introduction to the Cultures of the Ancient Mediterranean
Special Focus: The art and architecture of the Greco-Roman Near East and Egypt
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Elizabeth Macaulay Lewis, [20431] Cross listed with ART 820 & CLAS 74100

The goal of the course it to investigate the key themes, debates and issues that underline the art of the Greco-Roman Near East and to understand how art and architecture are used in the formation of cultural identities. It considers art and architecture in the Eastern Mediterranean, Egypt and Near East from the death of Alexander (323 BCE) through early Late Antiquity (ca. 600 CE). This course aims to provide students with an overview of the art produced at key sites, such as Alexandria, Jerusalem, Petra, Jerash, and Palmyra, while also considering critical issues such as Romanization, art as resistance, the distinctive nature of the art produced at these different sites. Despite the adoption of similar aspects of Greek and Roman art, such as style and subject matter, local cultural identities remain distinctive in their unique blending of local and classical elements. It should help prepare students interested in the early Islamic and Byzantine periods to understand the cultural and artistic world in which Islam came and in which the Byzantine Empire existed, and how this world shaped both of these dynamic periods. It aims not only to increase students’ understanding of the ancient world, but its relevance to contemporary society, especially in the region of the Middle East.

Seminars

This course is organized into weekly seminars.

Assignments

There are two assignments:

(1) A short 2000-2500 word analysis and critique of one of the sources from the recommended reading list or from the introductory works.

(2) Digital Project. Rather than writing a traditional research paper, students will research a site and create a website using wordpress in the CUNY Academic Commons.

General Bibliography:

Ball, Warwick. 2000. Rome in the East the transformation of an empire. London: Routledge

Bowersock, G. W. 1983. Roman Arabia. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press.

Butcher, Kevin. 2003. Roman Syria and the Near East. Los Angeles: J. Paul Getty Museum.

Capponi, Livia. 2011. Roman Egypt. London: Bristol Classical Press.

Graf, David Frank. 1997. Rome and the Arabian frontier: from the Nabataeans to the Saracens. Aldershot, Hampshire, Great Britain: Ashgate.

Isaac, Benjamin H. 1998. The Near East under Roman rule: selected papers. Leiden: Brill.

MacAdam, Henry Innes. 2002. Geography, urbanisation and settlement patterns in the Roman Near East. Aldershot, Hampshire, Great Britain: Ashgate/Variorum.

Millar, Fergus. 1993. The Roman Near East, 31 B.C.-A.D. 337. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press.

Sartre, Maurice. 2005. The Middle East under Rome. Cambridge, Mass: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press. (English translation)

Sartre, Maurice. 2001. D’Alexandre à Zénobie: histoire du Levant antique, IVe siècle avant J.-C.-IIIe siècle après J.-C. [Paris]: Fayard.

MALS 75500 – Digital Humanities: Methods and Practices
Mondays, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Arienne Dwyer, [20432]

MALS 76200 – Continuities and Discontinuities in Modern Jewish Life: Topics in American Jewish History
Tuesdays, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Thomas Kessner, [20433] Cross listed with HIST 74900 & ASCP 81500

For those who would understand the history of the United States and its diverse people the history of the Jews in the US is significant; for those who would understand Jewish history, the role of the Jewish community in the United States is crucial.

Less than one hundred years ago many would have questioned this latter statement. After all, the important centers of world Jewry were located across the Atlantic and much that was important in Jewish life transpired there. But troubles and tragedies triggered a series of migrations that brought millions of Jews to the U.S. and today the U.S. has the largest Jewish population in the world.

We will be investigating some of the uprooting forces that accounted for the waves of Jewish immigration. They came (especially in the period 1880-1920) in the millions, and confronted many of the conventional immigrant challenges; and others that were quite unique. In time this previously marginal population formed an influential minority populating America’s large cities and lending their institutions a piquant cultural tone.

It is of course too simple to speak of a single American Jewish community or culture for they came from many places with a variety of backgrounds. Is there a center that held these disparate historical elements together? Can America’s Jews legitimately be described as a community? Do they share values and outlooks? Are they defined by religion or culture or social relationships, or is there something else, perhaps external, that is even more important?

What was the process of their Americanization? What were the forces – economic, political, social, cultural and religious- that shaped their experience here? Moreover, it was far from a passive experience. Jews had a large, perhaps disproportionate, impact on the American nation and we will seek to study that impact on society, thought, culture and politics.

And what of Judaism? How did it fare in the free, largely Protestant atmosphere of the US? We will discuss the rise of Reform and Conservatism and the resurgence of a diverse American Orthodoxy. We will also look at other themes, both benign and cataclysmic: Zionism, Socialist thought, the Holocaust, Israel.

Over the past thirty years a generation of freshly conceived studies about American Jewish life have given this field a vigor and standing that it had not attained before. Historians of the American Jewish experience have fashioned a rigorous body of systematic work that is informed by theory and broad questions. They have crafted a textured complex past from the lives of immigrants, artists, political ideologues and religious thinkers; from philanthropists, workers, women, and idealists.

Many of these imaginative and at times provocative monographs have tended to isolate their topics, viewing them narrowly to create a field of brilliant fragments. Our challenge will be to bring these important segments together to shape an understanding of American Jewish history.

Course learning objectives:

Over the course of the semester students will be expected to demonstrate:

• An understanding of key texts in American Jewish History

• An understanding of the role of politics, economics, social forces, culture and technology in shaping American Jewish life

• Knowledge of the American Jewish experience and an appreciation for its complexity

• An understanding of the role of America’s Jewish population on the larger historical forces of the nation

• An understanding of the role of the American Jewish community on the larger world Jewish community.

• An ability lead a class discussion on a topic in American Jewish history.

• An ability to critically review and analyze historical studies

• Achieve a familiarity with important research resources including archives, web sources, and source collections in the field

• An ability to write a well defined, carefully researched and cogently argued research paper in the field of American Jewish history

Collateral Assignments:

The assignments in this course are designed to train students for research, writing and teaching. Reading, leading class discussions and participating in them are integral to successfully completing the work for this class. Each session will have a discussion leader who will prepare a short synopsis of the reading to be e-mailed in advance of class and lead a discussion on the reading. A second reader will offer a critique of the reading based on the review literature and the student’s own evaluation. There are several additional assignments.

In addition other assignments will include:

Review of a recent book on American Jewish history.

Brief paper on the history of a neighborhood or a community organization

Research paper or historiographic essay on an approved topic.

MALS 77100 – Aesthetics of Film
Wednesdays, 2:00-6:00 p.m., Rm. C419, 3 credits, David Gerstner, [20434] Cross listed with FSCP 81000, THEA 71400 & ART 79400.

This course introduces the properties of cinematic form by exploring film in relationship to the other arts. Since its beginnings, film was theorized—as art, as political tool, as entertainment—against the backdrop of the aesthetic properties of painting, theatre, literature, and, in some instances, magic. By studying the specific properties of cinema, the content it ultimately delivers, and its use of and break from the other arts, we will investigate (through the writings of filmmakers and theorists) film aesthetics as a dynamic and modernist negotiation of multi-mediated texts. In this way, this course will engage issues of genre, style, and narrative as they are transformed through the mode of cinematic production and address. Students will be expected to write short weekly response papers to the readings and screenings (1-2 pages), be prepared to discuss the films and readings, and complete a 7500-word final paper. Bibliography available in the Certificate Programs Office (Room 5110).

MALS 77300 – Film History II
Wednesdays, 6:30-10:00 p.m., Rm. C419, 3 credits, William Boddy, [20435] Cross listed with FSCP 81000, THEA
 71600 & ART 79500.

This course will explore major developments in US and global film culture from the introduction of sound to the advent of the “blockbuster” era in Hollywood in the mid-1970s. We will analyze works from a number of national cinemas, artistic movements, and major directors, including Fritz Lang, Jean Renoir, Howard Hawks, Roberto Rossellini, Billy Wilder, Jean-Luc Godard, and Martin Scorsese. Topics addressed include the problem of film authorship, the development of film genres and aesthetic styles, and the relationship of the classical Hollywood studio system to alternative models of film production in the United States and elsewhere. Emphasis will be placed on the historical, aesthetic, and ideological contexts of the films examined. Learning goals for students in this course include the demonstration of intellectual competency in the field, the ability to apply effective and appropriate research tools and techniques, and the development of competence in the integration and presentation of research knowledge in written and oral communication. Required Text: David Cook, A History of Narrative Film fourth edition (New York: Norton, 2004).

Some of the screenings on the class schedule involve selected extracts from the films indicated; films will be placed on reserve at the Graduate Center library and are available for viewing outside of class. Course Requirements: In addition to participation in seminar discussion, each student will prepare ten short response papers to the films and readings, write a 15 page research paper on a topic approved by the instructor, and prepare a brief oral presentation of the research project to the seminar. Written work submitted late will be penalized. Course Schedule available in the Certificate Programs Office (Room 5110).

MALS 77400 – International Migration
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Mehdi Bozorgmehr, [20685] Cross listed with
 SOC 82800

This pilot course is being offered in anticipation of a new MALS track on “Migration and Global Cities.”

This course offers a comprehensive and interdisciplinary overview of the key current topics and issues in the burgeoning field of international migration. The field is unique in its interdisciplinary nature, stretching from history, anthropology, demography and economics, through political science, geography and sociology. Methodologically, it is also very eclectic, ranging from the use of quantitative data to ethnography and oral history of migrants. While the course will aspire to incorporate the experiences of major immigrant receiving countries around the world, the main comparative focus will be on Europe and North America, where the major theories and key concepts are most fully developed. The emphasis is on exploring both the theoretical debates in the field and the empirical data and case studies on which these debates hinge. Attention will be paid to detailed discussions of “classic” issues of immigration, such as assimilation, incorporation/integration, the labor market, race and ethnic relations, gender and the family, transnationalism, and the second generation. Throughout, the course will take into account the way in which global cities, as contexts of reception, affect the immigrant experience, and in turn, are transformed by immigrants.

MALS 78100 – Issues in Urban Education: New York City Community Control Struggles over Education in the 1960s
Cross listed with U ED 71200
Thursdays, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Steve Brier

 

 

 

This research seminar focuses on the historic struggles over community control of education that wracked New York City neighborhoods and schools during the “long decade” of the 1960s. The seminar will start with the failed efforts by parents and activists to integrate the NYC public school system beginning in the late 1950s and extending through the mid-1960s, then focus closely on the epochal 1968 UFT strike against community control of the public schools that shutdown the entire school system in the fall of that year, and finally look at the battles in the City University beginning in the late 1960s to open admissions to a broader, more representative cross section of the city’s public school graduates. Seminar participants, who will hopefully be drawn from a range of social science disciplines and from the MALS program, will begin by doing close reading of extant secondary analyses of these historical events. We will then immerse ourselves in primary source materials, including contemporary reportage, oral interviews (some of which we will conduct ourselves), governmental and agency reports and data, as well as cultural and visual sources, to develop a broad understanding of what happened during the critical long decade of the 1960s and the implications for understanding the current status of NYC’s educational institutions. Students will be expected to develop single-authored or collaborative research projects on a historical subject of particular interest to them, resulting in research papers and/or multimedia presentations that can and should be publishable. Emphasis will be placed on learning how to “read,” evaluate and contextualize historical documents and sources.

MALS 78200 – The Politics of Contemporary Urban Education: The School Reform Agenda
Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Joel Spring, [20436] Cross listed with U ED
 75200.

This course will be a discussion seminar focused on major topics and documents related to the current school reform agenda. Topics such as common core standards, Race to the Top, charter schools, privatization, the future of collective bargaining, control of education, and the role of technology are among the topics/issues to be discussed. Professor Spring will be joined by Urban Education faculty including David Steiner, Anthony Picciano and Nick Michelli in presenting and leading weekly discussions. There will also be at least one meeting at the Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute at Hunter College.

MALS 78500 – Big Data, Visualization, and Digital Humanities
Mondays, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Lev Manovich, [20686] Cross listed with IDS
 81650

The explosive growth of social media on the web, combined with the digitization of cultural artifacts by libraries and museums opens up exiting new possibilities for the study of cultural processes. For the first time, we have access to massive amounts of cultural data from both the past and the present. How do we navigate these collections? How do we combine close reading of individual artifacts and “distant reading” of patterns across millions of these artifacts? What visualization and computational tools are particularly suited for working with large cultural data sets? What new theoretical concepts and models we need to deal with the new scale of born-digital culture? How do we use visualization as a research method in the humanities?

This course explores the possibilities, the methods, and the tools for working with large cultural data sets, with a particular focus on data visualization. We will also discuss cultural, social and technical developments that placed “information” and “data” in the center of contemporary social and economic life (the concepts of information society, network society, software society). We will critically examine the fundamental paradigms developed by modern societies to analyze patterns in data – statistics, visualization, data mining. This will help us to employ computational tools more reflexively. At the same time, the practical work with these tools will help us to better understand how they are used in society at large – the modes of thinking they enable, their strengths and weaknesses, the often unexamined assumptions behind their use.

The course combines readings, discussion, exercises to learn tools and techniques, and collaborative work in groups to carry out original digital humanities projects. Students will be introduced to a number of popular open source tools for data analysis and visualization including R, Processing, Mondrian, as well as the tools developed by Manovich and his students for analyzing large sets of images and video (see softwarestudies.com.)

The course is suitable for students from any area of humanities. No technical skills are required beyond the basic digital media literacy. Students will be required to complete a few practical assignments and a group project where they will use their newly learned skills to analyze a large cultural data set.

Fall 2012 Courses

 

MALS 70000 Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies
Shifra Sharlin

Mondays, 4:15-6:15  [19049] Room 3209

Learning how to read and write at the graduate level means learning how to identify, analyze, and participate in different disciplinary conversations.   The goal of this course is to introduce students to these conversations by studying the scholarship on the secretarial profession.   At the beginning of the twentieth century, becoming a secretary was the career of choice for ambitious women from rural and immigrant backgrounds. Becoming a secretary offered an opportunity to figure out how to become urban, professional, American, and middle-class woman.   We will explore the way scholars from different disciplines understand this transformation and, in the process, develop our own self-awareness as writers and intellectuals who have something to contribute.

 

MALS 70000 Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies
Shifra Sharlin
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30  [19050] Room 3209

Learning how to read and write at the graduate level means learning how to identify, analyze, and participate in different disciplinary conversations.   The goal of this course is to introduce students to these conversations by studying the scholarship on the secretarial profession.   At the beginning of the twentieth century, becoming a secretary was the career of choice for ambitious women from rural and immigrant backgrounds. Becoming a secretary offered an opportunity to figure out how to become urban, professional, American, and middle-class woman.   We will explore the way scholars from different disciplines understand this transformation and, in the process, develop our own self-awareness as writers and intellectuals who have something to contribute.

MALS 70000 Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies
Juan Battle
Mondays, 6:30-8:30 [19774] Room 6418


With a leaning toward the social sciences, this applied course will introduce students to a range of writing styles and research methodologies likely to be encountered in graduate-level courses. As a result, students will develop a sophisticated understanding of methodological issues and alternatives in intellectual inquiry.

Throughout the course, students will write brief proposals, assemble academic references, write research papers, as well as employ qualitative and quantitative methodologies. Class lectures will teach the skill and, while sometimes working in small groups, students will apply the technique for homework.

Late homework assignments (including the final paper) will NOT be accepted. All assignments must be submitted on time (6:30 p.m. on their due date) in hardcopy and in their entirety. Failure to do so will result in a zero (0) for that assignment. Further, NO incompletes will be given in this course. Every student WILL get a grade at the end of the semester.

Grading
1. In-class oral and written assignments (25%) 2. Homework assignments (40%) 3. Final group paper (20%) 4. Self & peer assessment for final group paper (5%) 5. Class participation, which is the sole discretion of the professor (10%).

Required Texts:
1. Hacker, Diana & Nancy Sommers. 2011. A Pocket Style Manual. 6th Edition.
2. Healey, Joseph. 2009. Statistics: A tool for social research. 8th Edition.
3. Course pack(s) compiled by instructor.

MALS 70200 Metropolis: A Political, Historical, and Sociological Profile of New York
Cindy Lobel
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30  [19051] Room 4419

This interdisciplinary course will explore New York City’s rise and role as the nation’s metropolis, examining several key themes in the city’s development.  In particular, we will look at Gotham as a center of work, culture and residency as well as at the diverse populations that have called the city home through its four-decade history.  We will examine New York City from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, including history, sociology, anthropology, economics, and political science.

 

MALS 70300 Law, Politics, and Policy
(Cross listed with P SC 71904 and ASCP 82000)

Joe Rollins
Mondays, 4:15-6:15  [19052] Room 3309

This course will introduce students to the dominant methodologies of legal analysis found in the social sciences.  Different sections of the course will examine foundational texts of the Law & Society movement, surveying, for example, major contributions from political science, sociology, criminology, psychology, and other empirically grounded disciplines.  It is designed to expose students to legal formalism (in the Langdellian sense of formalism), and to introduce them to legal institutions and reasoning, including statutes, legislation, and precedent. 

 

MALS 70500 Renaissance Culture
(Cross-listed with RSCP 72100 Introduction to Renaissance Studies: Renaissance Responses to Classical Genre Theory, CLAS 82500, ENGL 71600)
Tanya Pollard and Cristiana Sogno
Thursdays 4:15-6:15  [19053] Room 3309

This course explores Renaissance responses to Classical and Late Antique literary criticism, with an emphasis on their consequences for both theory and practice of literary genres.  We will pay particular attention to discussions of tragedy, comedy, tragicomedy, satire, and fiction, with attention both to theoretical treatises and to examples of these genres in both periods.  Readings will include selections from Plato, Aristotle, Euripides, Heliodorus, Longinus, Horace, Cicero, Plautus, Cinthio, Guarini, Scaliger, Sidney, Jonson, and Shakespeare.  All the texts for the course will be available in English translation, but PhD students in Classics will read classical and neo-Latin texts in the original languages, and others with the requisite languages are welcome to do so as well.  Requirements will include presentations and either a research paper or an English translation of, and commentary on, a relevant Latin text not available in translation.

 

MALS 70700 The Shaping of Modernity, 1789-1914
Richard Kaye
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15  [19054] Room 3306

This course will explore a wide range of significant intellectual, historical, scientific, political and creative works of the period as well recent or contemporary texts dealing with the era.  A key theme in the class will be revolutionary change. We will begin with Burke’s Reflections on the Revolution in France, De Toqueville’s Democracy in America, Mary Wollstonecraft’s Vindication of the Rights of Women, and John Stuart Mills’ On Liberty. Turning to fiction, we will examine Austen’s Mansfield Park, Dickens’ Bleak House, Flaubert’s Madame Bovary, Henry James’s The Portrait of a Lady, and Edith Wharton’s The House of Mirth. Other texts (or excerpts from texts) include Darwin’s The Origin of Species, William James’ The Varieties of Religious Experience, Henry Adams’ The Education of Henry Adams, Freud’s The Interpretation of Dreams, Hannah Arendt’s On Revolution, E.P Thompson’s The Making of the English Working Class, and  T.J. Clark’s The Painting of Modern Life: Paris and the Art of Manet and His Followers. Class presentations and a final paper.

 

MALS 70900 Approaches to Life Writing
Rachel Brownstein
Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15  [19055] Room 4433

“I should live no more than I can record, as one should not have more corn growing than one can get in,” James Boswell wrote in his journal in 1776.  While most diarists would not share this view, they probably would agree that writing it down affects a life.  Students in this course will read life writing of various kinds—diaries and letters, autobiographies and memoirs, and of course biographies—and consider the stakes and the impact of reading and writing historical and fictitious lives.  Reading texts from Boswell’s time to our own, and theorists from Roland Barthes to Sidonie Smith, we will consider differences in genre and point of view, voices and choices, and styles of memory and reflection.  Among the themes to be discussed are the relation of biography to history on the one hand and the novel on the other.  Among the writers we will read are Rousseau and Wollstonecraft, Lytton Strachey and Virginia Woolf, Mary McCarthy, Malcolm X, Richard Holmes, Vladimir Nabokov, and Tony Judt.  Students will do a class presentation and write at least one imitation and a ten- to fifteen-page paper.


MALS 71300 The Business of Fashion: Culture, Technology, Design

Elizabeth Wissinger
Thursdays, 4:15-6:15  [19056] Room 3209

 

How do  ineffable factors such as taste, mood, and social climate affect value in the aesthetic markets of fashion?   This course will consider the business of fashion not only in terms of production, but also branding, the models who promote the styles, and the consumers who buy them. Students will be exposed to readings across a range of topics including selections from among works by Pietra Rivoli, Don Slater, Sharon Zukin, Thuy Linh Nguyen Tu, Nancy Green, Ashley Mears, Joanne Entwistle, Nigel Thrift, Alison Hearn, Thorsten Veblen, and Pierre Bourdieu.  We will discuss a range of topics, including global labor flows within the garment industry; a select history of fashion production practices; a sociology of shopping; various treatments of consumers and consumption; an ethnography of the modeling industry; critical discussions of branding, design, and luxury markets; technology and innovation; fast fashion; eco fashion; and sustainability. Each student will research and write in at least one of these areas, culminating in a final project aimed at sharing this research. 

 

MALS 71400 Introduction to International Studies
Mark Ungar
Thursdays, 6:30-8:30  [19057] Room 3309

This course studies international relations by applying the field’s major theoretical frameworks to contemporary global issues.  We will examine the development and roles of international organizations, international law, and international financial institutions; evolving relationships among governments and societies; and global cooperation on issues like war, poverty, health, human rights, and the environment. 

 

MALS 71700 Psychology of Work and Family: An Introduction
Karen Lyness and Kristen Shockley
Mondays, 6:30-8:30  [19081] Room 6421

This course will emphasize the psychological aspects of work and family issues as they are experienced by the individual, such as conflicts between work and family roles, and will introduce the student to major work-family (or work-life) theories and research in the psychology literature. In addition, the course will cover organizational policies and programs that are designed to help employees manage work and family responsibilities. 

 

MALS 72100 Feminist Texts and Contexts
(Cross-listed with WSCP 81001)
Victoria Pitts-Taylor and Talia Schaffer
Thursdays, 11:45-1:45  [19058] Room 3207

This course provides a broad overview of the issues and texts of Women’s Studies. The instructors will use an interdisciplinary approach to consider some of the themes, questions, methodologies, and findings of Women’s Studies scholarship. The course will cover a selection of feminist texts, taken from both literary and social science sources, and also classic and contemporary theoretical works. In addition, students will explore the ways in which the field of women’s studies has raised new questions and brought new perspectives to those areas where the humanities and social and behavioral sciences intersect, with material which is interdisciplinary in nature and frequently poses a challenge to conventional disciplinary boundaries.


MALS 72500 Narratives of Science and Technology: Literature and the Visual Arts
Robert Singer
Mondays, 4:15-6:15  [19082] Room 3305


From Dr. Jekyll’s hidden laboratory to Dr. Strangelove’s doomsday scenario, images of the scientist, science, and technology, as they are represented in film and literature, argue as signifying spectacles. This three credit interdisciplinary course will examine representations of science and technology in multiple film, photographic, and literary narratives. Students will evaluate how these narratives reinforce or question modern and contemporary paradigms of science and technology, as each strategizes the concept of progress. The films and literature studied in this course are drawn from various genres, and not just science fiction. Students will be introduced to critical film and literary theory and related criticism, as well as engaging in close study of primary, interdisciplinary texts. In particular, the course will discuss the role of the scientific and technological as spectacle, and the way in which notions of progress are both “real” and “reel” spaces of twentieth- and twenty-first-century life. Reading assignments are given for every class, and students are requested to present an in-class report. There is a final research paper (approximately 15-20 pages) due at the end of the semester.

MALS 73100 American Culture and Values
(Cross-listed with ASCP 81000 Introduction to American Studies: History & Methods)
David Humphries
Mondays, 6:30-8:30  [19059] Room 8203


Russ Castronovo and Susan Gillman begin the introduction to their recent collection States of Emergency: The Object of American Studies (2009), with a seemingly straightforward question: “What is the object of American studies?” For Castronovo and Gilman, this question leads directly to two others: “What does ‘American studies’ study, and what does it want?” The object of this course is to explore these questions by considering the histories, theories, and practices of the interdisciplinary field of American studies, from its inception as an academic discipline to its present “state of emergency.” Using the first publication of American Quarterly in 1949 as a starting point, we will consider how American studies has been transformed from a movement into an institution represented by one of the largest and most widely recognized annual academic conferences in the United States. The collection edited by Castronovo and Gillman is one of the most recent attempts to recalibrate and redefine the field of American studies, but the impulse it represents is as old as the field itself. For all of its centrality, American studies remains an anomaly in the academy: Generally organized as a program and not a department, it resides somewhere between (or, perhaps, outside) normative disciplinary boundaries and in sometimes productive, sometimes uneasy relations to the other “studies” which have been created in part on its model. During this semester we will consider the complexity inherent in this model, as we trace the influence of both seminal and emerging work in American studies. We will also consider the different meanings that American studies has (and has had) for different disciplines, and attempt to take stock of its current position in the academy and in our own work.

 

MALS 73400 Africana Studies: An Introduction
(Cross-listed with AFCP 70100 and ENGL 85500)
Jerry Watts
Tuesdays, 6:30-8:30  [19078] Room 3207


This seminar offers an intensive investigation of the life and writings of W.E.B. DuBois.  Through discussions of his major and minor writings, we will be able to chart dominant as well as oppositional currents in American/Afro-American thought.  DuBois emerged as a distinct intellectual presence during the last decade of the 19th century and would continue to publish until his death in 1963. Moreover, throughout his entire adult life, DuBois was a political activist in behalf of the freedom struggle of Afro-Americans; obtaining self-determination for colonized peoples throughout the world; and in his later life, the Soviet Union led world communist struggle against capitalism.  His political activism informed his intellectual output and vice versa.  As a writer, DuBois wore many intellectual hats during his lifetime: historian The Suppression of the African Slave Trade to the United States of America (1896) and Black Reconstruction in America; sociologist, The Philadelphia Negro (1899); essayist, The Souls of Black Folks (1903) and Darkwater: Voices From Within the Veil (1920); autobiographer, Dusk of Dawn: An Essay towards an Autobiography of a Race Concept (1940); political polemicist and agitator through his editorial writings in The Crisis, the journal of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People;  and finally, novelist (I count his novels among his minor works).   The DuBois corpus is far too large to discuss in any single semester, consequently, we will read selectively from his works.  Nevertheless, the course is reading intensive and will require participation in class discussions, several short papers and one longer research paper.


MALS 74200 The Practice of Science/Science in Context
(Cross-listed with HIST 78400)
Joseph Dauben
Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15  [19060] Room 6493


This course will use the techniques of history and sociology to study the development of modern science and its impact upon society. It will view science as an institution and as a profession, and consider such topics as science and religion; Catholic versus Protestant views of the Scientific Revolution; the role of science during and after the French Revolution; whether science contributed anything to the Industrial Revolution; American Federalism and science during the Civil War; capitalism and “big science” in America; the politics of science in the Soviet Union: the Lysenko case and modern genetics; ethical issues in biology and physics, including eugenics and the debate over recombinant DNA techniques, and atomic research (including hydrogen bomb projects) in the United States, Germany, Russia and China; computers and technological determinism.

 

MALS 74500 Great Digs: Important sites of the Classical, Late Antique and Islamic Worlds
(Cross-listed with ART 72000)
Elizabeth Macaulay-Lewis
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15  [19079] Room 3207

This course introduces students to major archaeological methods and important archaeological sites from the Classical, Late Antique and Islamic worlds. It seeks to broaden students’ awareness of archaeological methods and types of evidence, while demonstrating how interconnected the Classical, Late Antique and Islamic worlds are. The two primary methods of archaeological inquiry, excavation and survey, are first introduced, discussed and problematized in this course.  We will then survey specific sites – cities, towns and, in certain cases, residences – to understand how archaeology has contributed to our knowledge of these sites. Athens, Alexandria, Rome, Hadrian’s Villa (Tivoli), Pompeii, Dura Europos, Constantinople, Ravenna, Jerusalem, Samarra will each be the focus of a lecture.  Archaeological evidence – art, architecture and other types of material culture, such as ceramics and glass –  from each site will be discussed in detail. By the end of the course students will gain a knowledge of the principles of archaeological excavation and survey; an understanding of major classes of archaeological evidence; and knowledge of important archaeological sites from the Classical, Late Antique and Islamic worlds.

Course Requirements

The course is composed of lectures at which attendance is mandatory. The course assumes no previous knowledge of archaeology. Two papers are required. First, a 7-10 page paper that discusses a methodology or type of evidence that archaeologists use to understand a site or region; for example a student could discuss numismatic evidence, dendrochronology, or field survey and the benefits and problems that it presents to archaeologists in this paper. Students will be graded on this paper; however, it must be revised and resubmitted, as this course also aims to help students develop their academic writing. Second, students must prepare a 15-20 page report on the historical and significance of a site of their choice from the Classical, Late Antique or Islamic worlds that has not been discussed in class; this site can be a city or a specific excavation site or area.  This report should be based on the study of all published archaeological and historical sources for the site and it aims to teach students an understanding of a site’s topography and to develop an ability to describe a site in clear and precise archaeological and architectural terms. It should also enable a student to understand and interpret archaeological sites and publications and demonstrate the significance of the selected site.

All papers are double-spaced and must be properly referenced. Images should be included when appropriate.

Office Hours: Wednesday, 2-4. GC 3300.6

Preliminary Readings
Renfrew and Bahn, Archaeology, Theories, Methods and Practice (pp.9-160)
Alcock, S. Graecia Capta

Preliminary Syllabus (subject to revision)
Lecture 1: Introduction to discipline of Archaeology and the course
Lecture 2: Introduction to Excavation Techniques
Lecture 3: Introduction to Survey
Lecture 4: Classical Athens
Lecture 5: Alexandria
Lecture 6: Pergamon and the cities of the Hellenistic World
Lecture 7: Rome
Lecture 8: Pompeii and the Bay of Naples
Lecture 9: Hadrian’s Villa (Tivoli)
Lecture 10: Dura Europos
Lecture 11: Constantinople
Lecture 12: Ravenna
Lecture 13: Late Antique and early Islamic Jerusalem
Lecture 14: Samarra and Conclusions

 

MALS 75400 Introduction to the Digital Humanities: Debates in the Digital Humanities
(Cross-listed with ENGL 89020 and ASCP 81500)
Matthew Gold
Mondays, 4:15-6:15  [19080] Room 4419

The growth and popularization of the digital humanities (DH) in recent years has highlighted the many ways in which computational tools are being brought to bear upon humanities scholarship and teaching. Recent methodological experiments in the digital humanities – quantitative approaches to literary history, algorithmic methods of text analysis and visualization, public forms of peer-to-peer review, and interactive pedagogies for the open web – have helped scholars re-imagine the basic nature and forms of academic research and teaching across a range of disciplines.

But what is the digital humanities, and why should we care about it? What kinds of questions can DH make legible that other modes of academic inquiry conceal? Is the digital humanities a field unto itself, or is it simply a set of methodologies that can be applied in multiple fields? Will there be a point at which digital tools will be so pervasive that the field we now call “digital humanities” will simply be known as the “humanities”?

This course will explore these and other questions through a set of historical, theoretical, and methodological readings that trace the rise and popularization of the digital humanities over the past two decades.  Students will be introduced to emerging debates in the digital humanities and will become familiar with some of the fundamental skills necessary to develop and analyze digital humanities projects. We will examine and critique a range of such projects and begin to sketch out possible undertakings of our own.

A central aim of this course is to involve students in the rich and evolving constellation of spaces in which networked conversations are reshaping the norms of scholarly communication. These spaces include blogs and Twitter, which, as MLA Director of Scholarly Communication Kathleen Fitzpatrick has pointed out in “Networking the Field,” scholars are using “as a means of getting feedback on work in progress or as an alternative channel through which an author can reach an audience more quickly and directly.” We will analyze the benefits and drawbacks of this new conversational ecosystem that surrounds digital humanities work.

Readings will include texts and projects by Ian Bogost, Wendy Hui Kyong Chun, Dan Cohen, Cathy Davidson, Johanna Drucker, Jason Farman, Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Matthew Kirschenbaum, Peter Krapp, Alan Liu, Tara McPherson, Franco Moretti, Bethany Nowviskie, Stephen Ramsay, Geoffrey Rockwell, Tom Scheinfeldt, Michael Witmore, and Jonathan Zittrain, among others.

No technical skills are required, though a willingness to experiment (and even fail) with DH tools is crucial. Class assignments will include weekly engagements with and participation on our class blog and Twitter feed; contributions to a collaborative Zotero bibliography; an oral presentation on a DH project; and a final project in one of the following forms: a seminar paper (~20 pages), a detailed DH project proposal, or a substantive contribution to a new or existing DH project.

MALS 76100 Traditional Patterns of Jewish Behavior and Thought
(Cross-listed with HIST 79000 European Jewry, 1550-1750: Parity and Privileges)
David Sorkin
Thursdays, 6:30-8:30  [19061] Room 3306


This course, “Political History of European Jewry, 1550-1750:  Parity and Privileges,” studies the politics of European Jewry in the formative early modern period in two principal ways.  It traces the changing political status of Jews, especially the emergence of favorable charters and privileges across Eastern and Western Europe that bordered on “parity” with other groups.  It examines the political outlook and behavior of Jews as they developed new forms of engagement with the powers that be.   The course will address these issues across Europe, from East to West, and will also consider Jews in new world colonies.

MALS 77200 History of Cinema I, 1895-1930
(Cross listed with FSCP 81000, THEA 71500, and ART 79500)
Anupama Kapse
Wednesdays, 4:15-8:15  [19062] Room C-419


This class will survey the “birth” of cinema from a number of inter-related perspectives. How did the heightened realism and new storytelling impulse of the cinema alter existing modes of pictorial and theatrical display?

We will begin with early experiments with moving images and think about actualities, serials and comic shorts as-the new genres of early cinema, which then gave way to an industrial mode of production driven by a powerful star-system and large studios. The course will not only study cinema’s birth and development but also its ability to invent novel film genres, change perceptions of modernity, mobilize race-gender politics (sometimes dubiously), picture new women, and radically enhance viewing pleasures. 

We will situate these topics within the larger context of international film movements, the development of national cinemas worldwide, and broader questions of film historiography.

Although our primary examples will be drawn from American silent cinema, we will also turn to British, Indian, Russian, Swedish and German examples to better understand the rapid proliferation and varied applications of the medium. Finally, we will examine the initial impact of sound on cinema though, as we will see, silent cinema had always been an aural medium.

Screenings will include selections and/or whole features, depending on the unit we are covering: The Movies Begin: A Treasury of Early Cinema, 1894-1913, Edison: The Invention of the Movies: 1891-1918, Landmarks of Early Film, Vol. 1, George Melies: First Wizard of Cinema, More Treasures from American Film Archives 1894-1931, Griffith Masterworks, extracts from American, British, and French serials, The Birth of Krishna, shorts by Chaplin and Keaton, Little American, The Mystery of the Leaping Fish, Till the Clouds Roll By, The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, Ingeborg Holm, Queen Christina, Man with a Movie Camera, The Goddess, Pandora’s Box, and Sunrise.

Requirements: Readings must be completed before the day for which they are slotted. Please come to class on time. Full attendance, engaged viewing, and active classroom participation are vital to your success. Discussion–20%. Reading responses and discussion questions-10 %. A research paper with original content (20-25 pages) will fulfill a major requirement for this course–70%. Your topic must be chosen in consultation with me. A one page proposal will be due four weeks before the final paper is due, after which we will meet to discuss your topic.

More than one absence will make it very hard for you to pass the course. Please let me know at least a day in advance if you are going to miss class.

A reading list is available in the Certificate Programs Office (Room 5110).

MALS 78100 Issues in Urban Education
Bethany Rogers
Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15  [19063] Room 3305

 

MALS 79600 Thesis Workshop
Shifra Sharlin

Mondays, 6:30-8:30  [19064] Room 3209

The goal of this workshop is to help students at any point in the thesis-writing process by reading each others’ work and reflecting on the writing and research process.

Spring 2012 Courses


MALS 70000 – Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies
GC:   R, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 6421, 3 credits, Shifra Sharlin, [15941]

Learning how to read and write at the graduate level means learning how to identify, analyze, and participate in different disciplinary conversations.   The goal of this course is to introduce students to these conversations by studying the scholarship on the secretarial profession.   At the beginning of the twentieth century, becoming a secretary was the career of choice for ambitious women from rural and immigrant backgrounds. Becoming a secretary offered an opportunity to figure out how to become urban, professional, American, and middle-class woman.   We will explore the way scholars from different disciplines understand this transformation and, in the process, develop our own self-awareness as writers and intellectuals who have something to contribute.

 

MALS 70000 – Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies
GC:   T, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 6494, 3 credits, Rachel Brownstein, [17825]  

This course will introduce students to critical thinking and techniques of academic research and writing, as well as to the languages and methods of a variety of disciplines and kinds of interdisciplinary study.  Guest lecturers and readings by, e.g., Alan Bennett, Sven Birkerts, Natalie Zemon Davis, Evelyn Fox-Keller, Carlo Ginzburg, Michel Foucault, Virginia Woolf, and John Ruskin will introduce students to a spectrum of arguments, approaches, and prose styles. We will consider ways of reading and writing and arguments about books, the disciplines, and education. Students will become familiar with the library and data bases and genres of academic writing, such as the short summary, the more extended analysis, the conference paper, the annotated bibliography, the prospectus, and the thesis.

 

MALS 70100 – Narratives of New York:
Ancient Forms in New Worlds: The History and Archaeology of the Classical World in New York City
GC:   R, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 7395, 3 credits, Elizabeth Macaulay-Lewis, [17831] Cross listed with CLAS 74300 

This course introduces students to the critical issues and debates in the study of classical architecture and its reception through the lens of classically-inspired architecture of New York City. Specifically, this course considers major Greco-Roman building types and considers how and why American patrons, architects, and city planners re-interpreted, modified and deployed Greco-Roman forms in the construction of major buildings and monuments in New York City. The course also serves as an introduction to reception studies, its theories and methodologies. In this course, we will attempt to understand why Grand Central Station, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the New York Public Library, Grant’s Tomb, and other structures, drew upon Classical Architecture. This course uses New York City as a classroom to explore and understand Classical Architecture and the important role that Classical civilization has played in shaping New York’s architectural history. Comparative examples from other American and European cities will also be included in the discussions when appropriate.

The course is composed of a series of seminars that will meet at the Graduate Center and walking seminars where the class will visit specific monuments in order to learn how to study and look at buildings.

 

MALS 70400 – Cultural Studies and the Law:
Nonviolence and Social Movements in 20th-Century America: A Conversation
GC:   R, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Robert Wechsler/Chris Caruso/ William Kelly [17844] Cross listed with ASCP 81500

The subject of the course is the centrality of nonviolence to the success of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 1960s in the American South.   The course will focus on the Civil Rights Movement–how nonviolence, sometimes as a core philosophical tenet and sometimes with pragmatic appreciation of what would work, was employed to resist and eventually break the Jim Crow conditions of the South. The course will include primary and secondary literature on topics including the Long Civil Rights Movement, nonviolence theory, and biographies of some of the movement’s leaders; it will also include original interviews with people who were there before Montgomery and beyond, including Staughton Lynd, James Lawson, Bob Moses and many of the volunteers who went South from 1960  through 1965. The course will also consider the relevance of nonviolence as a tool for solving today’s problems and look at 21st century cases.

 

MALS 70600 – Enlightenment and Critique
GC:   W, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 7395, 3 credits, Sandi Cooper, [17827] 

Is the western world fated for decline? From Oswald Spengler in the 1920′s to the provocative Niall Ferguson, 2011, predictions of collapse of western civilization periodically grab headlines.

Is the western world the inimical enemy of Islam and do we live in a permanent battle ground of a “clash of cultures”? (Samuel Huntington)

Such assertions suggest that an exploration of what the concept of “western” means, how it evolved to assume its modern guise is in order.

This class will begin with readings describing the scientific revolution and the revolution in thinking in the 17-18th century, juxtaposed with the reality of popular culture and folk superstitions. It will move on to an exploration of the legacies that shaped “modernism” – for instance, the French Revolution legacy of liberty vs. equality; the application of the ideal of equality into socialism, especially the Marxian analysis; the demand to stretch freedom and equality to include women; the struggle to abolish warfare as a relic of an unenlightened past. Readings will come from primary documents and secondary analyses.

 

MALS 70800 – Transformations of Modernity:
Faking It: American Women Writers and the Masks of Modernism
GC:   W, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. 8203, 3 credits, Hildegard Hoeller, [17834] Cross listed with ENGL 88000, ASCP 81500 & WSCP 81000

Why did Nella Larsen–if she did–”plagiarize” a story by Sheila Kaye-Smith, and why did she also write under a pseudonym? Why did Zora Neale Hurston “plagiarize”–if she did–an article about Cudjoe Lewis from Southern writer Emma Langdon Roche and then expand the piece after? And what masks did she wear in her letters and autobiography? And why was Roche interested in representing Cudjoe’s story, the story of the last surving African slave, which Hurston and Roche has also wanted to represent? Why did, as Michael North notes in The Dialect of Modernism, editors check whether the writer of “Melanctha” was indeed Getrude Stein, a white woman, before they considered it a valuable piece of modernist writing in “black” voice? And why did now forgotten Pulitzer Prize winning author Julia Peterkin– a white Southern plantation owner who had also chased after Cudjoe’s story–write in “black” voice? Why did Edith Wharton in one of her late fictions reimagine her roots as potentially less white than always imagined? And how “real” is the immigrant voice of Anzia Yezierska’s immigrant narrative Breadwinners? In this seminar we will explore these questions in the works–essays, fiction, letters, autobiographies–of early 20th century women writers (such as Stein, Larsen, Hurston, Wharton, Faucet, Hurst, Yezierska, Peterkin, Roche), and we will pay attention to their manipulations of their texts and the reader/writer contract within the rich critical context of modernism’s use of modes and strategies such as collage, textual borrowing, translation, ethnography, folklore, masking, and primitivism.

 

MALS 71000 – Forms of Life Writing
GC:   M, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. 5382, 3 credits, Ruth O’Brien, [17828] Cross listed with P SC 71903

This seminar explores different manifestations of storytelling as political performance, especially narrative, law, and contemporary political theory, with a particular eye to what is happening in the Occupy Wall Street (OWS) now.  Life writing is often done in “real” time, such as during this type of protest movement.
 
The main form of life writing that this seminar considers is storytelling, which uses fiction to reveal how laws and the public policies behind them — such as the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 and the Civil Rights Act (CRA) of 1964 — have been interpreted by the judiciary, and how its interpretation of these laws affects people’s daily lives.
 
Reading about someone’s experience in narrative form gives us a different vantage point than what a social-science monograph or data and statistics can provide. It underscores not only the magnitude and significance of topics studied by feminists (like patriarchy or sex discrimination) on an individual scale, but also the context and subtleties associated with these issues on a societal scale. It’s local, regional, and global all at once.
 
Narrative methodology does not make claims about universal truths or assert that there is only one way of “knowing about the world.” It accepts the subjectivity of the writer and the reader.  Narratives fulfill what feminist legal scholar Kathryn Abrams calls an “experiential epistemology.”
 
This seminar studies the different genres of storytelling and also acts as a workshop for each student’s artistic and activist expression (political performance), in terms of commentary (law), narrative, or both.  It focuses on life writing of populations that are vulnerable because of class, gender, sexuality, disability, or ethnic identities.

 

MALS 71500 – Critical Issues in International Studies:
African-American Writers Confront Africa and the Diaspora
GC:   W, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 3209, 3 credits, Jerry Watts, [17830]

The course offers an in-depth overview of the ways in which twentieth-century Black American writers attempted to morally and politically engage the peoples and plight of the African Diaspora.  Some black writers confronted the African Diaspora in their roles as Christian missionaries.  Such figures included Alexander Crummell, a guiding influence on the young W.E. B. DuBois.  Crummell believed that black Americans could best help black Africa by elevating them culturally, i.e.: converting them to Christianity.  Despite his fondness for Crummell, W.E.B. DuBois believed that the drive to convert Africans to Christianity was but a handmaiden of European colonial domination.  As a consequence, DuBois became a major organizer in the struggle against European colonialization via his participation in various Pan-Africanist organizations.   Other black writers who supported an end to European colonial domination of Africa joined forces with the Garvey movement of the 1920s.  It was during the Harlem Renaissance that Countee Cullen penned his famous poem, “What is Africa to Me.”  Still others attached their names and creative products to radical anti-European colonial efforts coming out of England.  Figures such as Claude McKay, Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston allowed their work to appear in Nancy Cunard’s famous anthology, Negro.  Hurston is unique in many ways for her outreach to the African Diaspora was premised on cultural exploration and exchange not advocacy of freedom from European colonial domination.  In Tell My Horse, Hurston offers a sympathetic if not reactionary and patronizing depiction of black life in Haiti and Jamaica.  Conversely, novelist Richard Wright was a staunch supporter of third world anti-colonialism.  In Black Power and The Color Curtain, Wright presented an anti-colonial thesis but one that did not validate traditional African cultures.  After all, Wright was a Marxist and though Marxists viewed capitalism as the primary “enemy”, they also believed that industrialization was the only road to progress.  We will study these writers and others in hopes of accessing the major ways in which black American writers confronted their ties to the African continent.    

 

MALS 72300 - Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies:  
Masculinity/Modernism/Migration
GC:   W, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. 8202, 3 credits, Robert Reid-Pharr, [17835]  

In this seminar we will continue the work of those scholars intent upon placing the many aesthetic/intellectual structures grouped under the label, “Modernism,” into their social and historical contexts.  Most specifically, we will examine the ways that Modernism in the United States has been both produced—and productive of—long established, if continually changing, discourses of race, class, gender, and nationality.  With particular emphasis on the writing of African American male modernists: Chester Himes, Claude McKay, and Wallace Thurman we will examine the many ways that questions surrounding masculinity and travel (particularly migration) are shot through the “Modernist project.”  Finally we will address the ways that the black female novelist, Nella Larsen, responded to and resisted the masculinist modes she encountered.  Students will be required to write three short (ten page) essays addressing three of the four authors whom we will examine.

Week I: Introduction

Week II: Mark Morrisson, “Nationalism and the Modern American Canon, “in Walter Kalaidjian, ed. The Cambridge Companion to American Modernism, (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005), pp. 12 – 35; Mark A. Sanders, “American Modernism and the New Negro Renaissance,” in Walter Kalaidjian, ed. The Cambridge Companion to American Modernism, (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005), pp. 129 – 156; Jed Rasula, “Jazz and American Modernism,” in Walter Kalaidjian, ed. The Cambridge Companion to American Modernism, (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005), pp. 157 – 176; Janet Lyon, “Gender and Sexuality,” in Walter Kalaidjian, ed. The Cambridge Companion to American Modernism, (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005), pp. 221 – 241.

Week III:  James Smethurst, The African American Roots of Modernism (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2011).

 Chester Himes

Week IV: Chester Himes, The Quality of Hurt: The Autobiography of Chester Himes, the Early Years (New York: Thunder’s Mouth Press, 1971).

Week V: Chester Himes, My Life of Absurdity: The Autobiography of Chester Himes, the Later Years (New York: Thunder’s Mouth Press, 1976).

Claude McKay

Week VI: Claude McKay, Home to Harlem (Boston: Northeastern University Press, 1987).

Week VII: Claude McKay, Banjo (New York: Mariner Books, 1970).

Week VIII: Claude McKay,  A Long Way from Home (New York: Mariner Books, 1970).

 Wallace Thurman

 Week IX: Wallace Thurman, The Blacker the Berry, (New York: Dover, 2008).

Week: X: Wallace Thurman, Infants of the Spring (Boston: Northeastern University Press, 1992).

Nella Larsen

Week XI: Thadious Davis, Nella Larsen, Novelist of the Harlem Renaissance: A Woman’s Life Unveiled (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1994).

Week XII: Nella Larsen, Passing in The Complete Fiction of Nella Larsen, Passing, Quicksand and the Stories (New York: Anchor, 2001).

Week XIII: Nella Larsen, Quicksand in The Complete Fiction of Nella Larsen, Passing, Quicksand, and the Stories.  (New York: Anchor, 2001).

 

 

 

MALS 73100- American Culture and Values:
Introduction to American Studies: Histories and Methods
GC:  W, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. 4422, 3 credits, Kandice Chuh, [17255] Cross listed with ASCP 81000

This course is designed to provide entry to American studies, understood as an interdisciplinary academic field with attendant histories and methods. By collectively articulating its genealogies, students will work toward locating their individual critical interests and investments in relation to American studies.

What are the questions and issues animating American studies discourses? In what new directions should the field move? In what ways is interdisciplinarity central to both its major questions and its methods of pursuit? What does interdisciplinarity come to mean in and for American studies?

Anchoring texts for the course include Margo Canaday’s The Straight State; Alicia Camacho’s Migrant Imaginaries; Bethany Moreton’s To Serve God and Walmart; Ussama Makdisi’s Artillery of Heaven; Monique Truong’s Book of Salt; and Bruce Burgett and Glenn Hendler’s edited Keywords for American Cultural Studies. Other readings for the course will be made available on blackboard.

Students will be expected to write about 25-30 pages in total, distributed across two shorter and one longer assignment.

 

MALS 73200 – American Social Institutions
GC:   T, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 3306, 3 credits, Martin Burke, [17833]

The purposes of this interdisciplinary course are three. First, it will examine a wide range of original source materials which have featured prominently in classic and contemporary analyses of American society and culture. Second, it will introduce class members to recent scholarship on selected topics in American history and related social sciences (anthropology, political science, sociology) from the late eighteenth to the late twentieth centuries. Finally, it will encourage class members to become familiar with emerging online and interactive new media resources for doing advanced research in American cultural studies. Among the authors to be read are Thomas Jefferson, Alexis de Tocqueville, Edward Bellamy, W. E. B. DuBois, Jane Addams, Helen Lynd, C. Wright Mills, Michael Harrington, and Betty Friedan.

 

MALS 74300 – Bioethics: Policies and Cases
Autonomy and Liberty in Medicine
Sinai: T, 5:15-7:15 p.m., January 31 – May 22, 2011
3 credits, Rosamond Rhodes and Ian Holzman, [17843]  
Mount Sinai School of Medicine
1176 Fifth Avenue, 3rd Floor, Newborn Medicine Conference Room

The concepts of “autonomy” and “liberty” have a significant place in medical and research ethics.  In the clinical realm, autonomy is the central concept in our appreciation of informed consent for treatment and in the assessment of decisional capacity.  In the context of research, many people see informed consent as the central factor in determining the ethical acceptability or unacceptability of research.  In public policy, liberty is at issue in legislation requiring vaccination, quarantine, or reporting of infectious disease.  Infringements on liberty are also involved in legislation that imposes limitations on abortion and reproductive choices, in our regulation of therapeutic and recreational drugs, and in the prohibition of physician-assisted suicide.  

This course will begin with discussion of the recent Abigail Alliance cases that argued in terms of liberty and autonomy for the release of Phase I trial drugs for use by people with terminal illnesses.  We will then examine how the issues of liberty and autonomy arise in the context of contemporary bioethics debates over:  personal responsibility for health, public health efforts to promote good health, public health surveillance, assessment of decisional capacity in adults and children, justified paternalism, forced treatment and forced confinement, abortion, embryo selection, life extension, physician-assisted suicide, selling transplant organs, vaccination and infectious disease containment, newborn screening, and genetic testing of children for adult onset diseases. With an appreciation of these controversies, we will go on to explore the philosophic concepts of autonomy and liberty themselves.  We shall read and discuss the work of classic (e.g., Aristotle, Kant) and contemporary authors in order to develop a clear understanding of how the terms are used and a platform for critiquing various positions.

Principle Texts:

Paul EF, Miller, FD, & Paul J, editors, Autonomy, Cambridge UP, 2003.

Christman J and Anderson J, editors, Autonomy and the Challenges to Liberalism: New Essays, Cambridge UP, 2005.

Rhodes R, Francis LP, and Silvers A, editors, The Blackwell Guide to Medical Ethics, Blackwell Publishing, 2007.

   

 

MALS 74300 – Bioethics: Policies and Cases
Medical Ethics
Sinai: M, 5:45-7:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Stefan Baumrin, [17842] Course meets at Mt. Sinai Hospital.  Cross listed with PHIL 77900

 

MALS 77100 – Aesthetics of Film
GC:   M, 4:15-8:15 p.m., Rm. C-419, 3 credits, Edward Miller, [17837] Cross listed with ART 79400, THEA 71400 & FSCP 81000

Ever since the Lumiere Brother’s train arrived at the station, film has been concerned with its own mechanics and meanings and the ways in which film not only captures the moment but transforms it, creating an impact upon its audience with distinct aesthetics.

This course highlights the self-referentiality of film and argues that a central aspect of the cinematic enterprise is the depiction of the filmmaking environment itself through the “meta-film.” Using this emphasis as an entry into aesthetics, the course involves students in graduate-level film discourse by providing them with a thorough understanding of the concepts that are needed to perform a detailed formal analysis.

The course’s main text is the ninth edition of Bordwell and Thompson’s Film Art (2009) and the book is used to examine such key topics as narrative and nonnarrative forms, mise-en-scene, composition, cinematography, camera movement, set design/location, color, duration, editing, sound/music, and genre.

In addition, we read key sections of Robert Stam’s Reflexivity in Film and Literature: From Don Quixote to Jean-Luc Godard (1992), Christopher Ames’ Movies about Movies: Hollywood Revisited (1997), Noth & Bishara’s Self-Reference in the Media (2007), John Thornton Caldwell’s Production Culture: Industrial Reflexivity and Critical Practice in Film & Television (2008), and Lisa Konrath’s Metafilms: Forms and Functions of Self-Reflexivity in Postmodern Film (2010) in order to strengthen our understanding of the connections between aesthetics and reflexivity.

As part of the course we construct a taxonomy of films that focus on the landscape of the filmmaking terrain itself. As such, we watch Thanhouser and Marston’s Evidence of the Film (1913), Charlie Chaplin’s The Masquerader (1914), Dziga Vertov’s Man with a Movie Camera (1929), Billy Wilder’s Sunset Boulevard (1950), Donen and Kelly’s Singing in the Rain (1952), Jean Rouch’s Chronicle of a Summer (1960), Michael Powell’s Peeping Tom (1960), Federico Fellini’s 8½ (1963), Jean-Luc Godard’s Contempt (1963), Francois Truffaut’s Day for Night (1973), Robert Altman’s The Player (1991), Tom DeCillo’s Living in Oblivion (1995), P.T. Anderson’s Boogie Nights (1998), David Lynch’s Mulholland Drive (2001), Michel Gondry’s Be Kind Rewind (2008), and Charlie Kaufman’s Synecdoche, New York (2008).

Students are expected to write a short weekly response to the reading and screening. The 12-15 page final paper is a formal analysis of a film that foregrounds cinematic production.

 

MALS 77200 – History of Cinema I
GC:   T, 6:30-9:30 p.m., Rm. C-419, 3 credits, Alison Griffiths, [17838] Cross listed with ART 79500, THEA 71500 & FSCP 81000

Course Description: Film History I provides students with an overview of precinema, early cinema and silent film, considering both American filmmaking and European national cinemas.

Beginning with an examination of nineteenth century philosophical toys and the serial photography of Edweard Muybridge and Etienne Jules-Marey, the course traces the development of film from 1894 through to the advent of sound in 1927.

Following an analysis of early film (pre-1907), including the work of Edison, Porter, the Lumiere Bros., Melies, Pathe, and members of the Brighton School in the UK, the course takes up the major figures of Griffith, Micheaux, Flaherty, Eisenstein, Stroheim, and Dreyer who were critical in exploring the creative (and discursive) possibilities of film form in the silent era.

Topics covered during the course include: American “race” cinema of the 1920s, early documentary film, Soviet filmmaking, Weimar cinema, and Hollywood silent comedy. The course is structured as an advanced seminar with 100% attendance expected, active and frequent student participation, and critical engagement with the readings since lecturing will be kept to a minimum.

Course Requirements: Three reading response papers (2-3pp) [15%]. Reading discussant (leading discussion of readings from a week you sign up for [10%]. Research paper (18-20pp): original research on a topic approved by me and submit an 18-20pp final paper [65%]. Oral presentation of the final research paper [10%]

Course Readings and Screenings: Required Texts: Lee Grieveson and Peter Kramer, eds., The Silent Cinema Reader (London: Routledge, 2003). [hereafter SCR]

Other required readings available on E-reserve at Mina Rees Graduate Center Library. Recommended readings are not on E-reserve unless indicated. Course code for accessing books is: Books and films owned by the Graduate Center will be placed on reserve for the duration of the course.

Film Screenings: Given the length of certain films, it is impossible to screen them in their entirely during the class meeting. I therefore recommend you try and view titles prior to the class meeting. Most of the film shown in class are either owned by the Graduate Center (where they are on reserve) or can be rented from Netflix, Kim’s Video, or even Blockbusters. You will find the excerpts from films shown in class infinitely more satisfying (and meaningful) if you are familiar with the larger work they are drawn from.

 

MALS 78100 – The Digital Humanities in Research and Teaching
GC:   W, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 7395, 3 credits, Stephen Brier/Matthew K. Gold, [17829]

The dramatic growth of the Digital Humanities (DH) over the past half dozen years has helped scholars re-imagine the very nature and forms of academic research and teaching across a range of scholarly disciplines, encompassing the arts, the interpretive social sciences, and traditional humanities subject areas. This course will explore the history of the digital humanities, focusing especially on the diverse pioneering projects and core texts that ground this innovative methodological and conceptual approach to scholarly inquiry and teaching.  It will also emphasize ongoing debates in the digital humanities, such as the problem of defining the digital humanities, the question of whether DH has (or needs) theoretical grounding, controversies over new models of peer review for digital scholarship, issues related to collaborative labor on digital projects, and the problematic questions surrounding research involving “big data.” The course will also emphasize the ways in which DH has helped transform the nature of academic teaching and pedagogy in the contemporary university with its emphasis on collaborative, student-centered and digital learning environments and approaches. Along the way, we will discuss broad social, legal and ethical questions and concerns surrounding digital media and contemporary culture, including privacy, intellectual property, and open/public access to knowledge and scholarship. Students will be expected to participate actively in class discussions and online postings (including on blogs and wikis) and to research and write a final multimedia presentation on a key topic in the digital humanities. Students completing the course will gain broad knowledge about and understanding of the emerging role of the digital humanities across several academic disciplines and will begin to learn some of the fundamental skills used often in digital humanities projects.

 

MALS 78200 – The Politics of Contemporary Urban Education
GC:   T, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 3306, 3 credits, Judith Kafka, [17836]

This class investigates the social, economic and political forces that shape contemporary urban education, focusing on school reform as a political, rather than technical, construct.  We will consider historical and contemporary efforts to reform urban public schooling, locating those efforts within a wider political arena.  The class will examine how both local and national political dynamics have helped shape and drive varying school reform strategies, including market-based choice models, state and federal accountability programs, changes to school funding mechanisms, and mayoral control.  Particular attention will be paid to issues of race and class as frames for understanding the politics of urban education.

 

MALS 79600 – Thesis Workshop
GC:   T, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 6300, 1 credit, Shifra Sharlin, [16834]

The goal of this workshop is to help students at any point in the thesis-writing process by reading each others’ work and reflecting on the writing and research process.

ALS 70000 – Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies

GC:   M, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 6421, 3 credits, Prof. Joseph, [15941]

This required course will introduce students to interdisciplinary study and study within the disciplines as pursued in the MALS program and other programs, as well as to debates within the discipline Special attention will be paid to the nuts and bolts of graduate study, e.g. the genres of academic writing such as conference papers, the prospectus and the thesis.

 

MALS 70000 – Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies

GC:   R, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 7395, 3 credits, Prof. Sharlin, [15941]

Learning how to read and write on the graduate level means learning how to identify, analyze, and participate in different disciplinary conversations.   The goal of this course is to introduce students to these conversations by studying the scholarship on the secretarial profession.   At the beginning of the twentieth century, becoming a secretary was the career of choice for ambitious women from rural and immigrant backgrounds. Becoming secretaries offered an opportunity to figure out how to become urban, professional, American, and middle-class women.   We will explore the way scholars from different disciplines understand this transformation and, in the process,  develop our own self-awareness as writers and intellectuals who have something to contribute.

 

MALS  70200 – Political/Historical/Sociological Profile of NYC

GC:   W, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 3306, 3 credits, Prof. Lobel, [15929]

This interdisciplinary course will explore New York City’s rise and role as the nation’s metropolis, examining several key themes in the city’s development.  In particular, we will look at Gotham as a center of work, culture and residency as well as at the diverse populations that have called the city home through its four-decade history.  We will examine New York City from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, including history, sociology, anthropology, economics, and political science.

 

MALS 70500 – Classical Culture

GC:   R, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 8203, 3 credits, Prof. Marianetti, [15930]  

The course will be a survey of selected pieces of ancient literature and legend that have subsequently influenced Western civilization. The chosen literary works will be analyzed from an interdisciplinary perspective, combining literature, history, archaeology, religion, culture, politics and philosophy. Certain universal issues will be considered as they are conveyed through the literary genres. The class will concentrate upon a thorough examination and discussion of the following primary sources: The Epic of Gilgamesh, Hesiod’s Theogony, Homer’s Odyssey, Aeschylus’ Oresteia, Sophocles’ Oedipus Cycle (the Theban plays), Euripides’ Iphigeneia in Aulis, Aristophanes’ The Clouds, Plato’s Apology and Symposium and Virgil’s Aeneid. Course Program: 1 September Introduction to Class Objectives and Requirements 8 September The Epic of Gilgamesh 15 September Hesiod’s Theogony 22 September Homer’s Odyssey (I-XII) 29 September NO CLASS 6 October Homer’s Odyssey (XIII-XXIV) 13 October Aischylos’ Agamemnon 20 October Aischylos’ Choephoroi and Eumenides 27 October Sophocles’ Oidipous Rex FIRST PAPER DUE 3 November Sophocles’ Antigone and Oidipous at Colonus 10 November Euripides’ Iphigeneia in Aulis 17 November Aristophanes’ The Clouds 24 November NO CLASS 1 December Plato’s Apology and Symposium 6 December Virgil’s Aeneid (I-VI); Virgil’s Aeneid (VII-XII) SECOND PAPER DUE Grading/Class Requirements: 90-100=A 80-89=B 70-79=C 60-69=D 0-59=F first paper 25% second paper 25% attendance/participation 50% All of you are responsible for having read the weekly assignment so that we can discuss its content. Each week, in addition, one or two students will present articles from secondary sources about the particular play, work and author. Although I will provide you with an extensive bibliography for each literal piece and ancient author we examine, I urge you to spend sufficient time in the library doing research on what is being the most updated information on the authors of your preference. This exercise will benefit you as it will form a preparatory stage in doing research for your Master’s thesis or your PhD dissertation. Absences are not recommended. Verbal and physical participation is required. I do not give extra credit projects. I do not accept late papers. I look forward to having an enjoyable and cooperative semester with all of you!!!!!!

Great dialogues of Plato tr. By W.H.D. Rouse (Signet Classics)

Hesiod’s Theogony  tr. By Richard Caldwell (Focus Classical Library)

Aristophanes, The Clouds: An Annotated Translation tr. By M. Marianetti (Univ. Press of America)

The Odyssey of Homer tr. by Richmond Lattimore (Perennial Classics)

Euripides IV tr. by R. Lattimore and David Green (The Univ. of Chicago Press)

Virgil’s Aeneid tr. By David West (Penguin Classics)

Sophocles The Three Theban Plays tr. By Robert Fagles (Penguin classics)

Aeschylus The Oresteia tr. By Robert Fagles (Penguin Classics)

H. D. F. Kitto, The Greeks (Penguin Classics)

D. Jackson, The Epic of Gilgamesh (Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers)

 

MALS 70700 – The Shaping of Modernity, 1789-1914

GC:   T, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 4433, 3 credits, Prof. Gordon, [15931]  

Political liberty is the most pressing demand in much of the world today.  It is not easy to achieve.   Hatred of being oppressed is not the same as hatred of oppression itself.  To hate a tyrant is not to love liberty; love of individual rights and personal freedom is also required.  Nineteenth-century Europe was a laboratory for the development of both modern democracy and dictatorship.  This course will examine the political, economic and social forces that lay the foundation for liberal democracy, fascist and communist dictatorship, two world wars and the Holocaust in the twentieth century.  It will in particular focus on the evolution of democratic process in France through two empires, two monarchies and three republics, the development of a social welfare state in authoritarian Germany, and the transformation of traditional Britain government into a genuine democracy, all against a background of unprecedented economic growth and violent social change.  Special attention will also be paid to the social and political pathologies of Tsarist Russia and Austria-Hungary, an empire that one author called “a laboratory for the destruction of the human race,” and whose sad history was a harbinger of so many murderous events in our own time.

 

MALS 70900 – Approaches to Life Writing

GC:   W, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 8202, 3 credits, Prof. Hintz, [15932]

This course will explore the narrative nature of life writing, with attention to point of view, tone and narrative structure. Throughout the course, we will try to define the main genres of life writing (biography, autobiography, letters and diaries)—with the awareness that the distinction between these forms is anything but clear. Much of the course will be devoted to experiments in life writing forms (from the modernist period forward) and the link between novels and life writing. Secondary readings will include writings by Samuel Johnson, James Olney, Georges Gusdorf, Peggy Kamuf, Carolyn Heilbrun, Sidonie Smith and Julia Watson, Carl Rollyson, and Paul John Eakin.

 

MALS 71200 – The Culture of Fashion: Clothing Culture of Early Modern Italy and England

GC:   R, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 3309, 3 credits, Profs. Paulicelli/Fisher, [15943] Cross listed with ENGL 82100 & RSCP 83100.  

This course will examine the clothing culture of early modern Italy and England. During this period, “fashion” was much broader than a simple notion of dress; it could refer to a wide variety of things like behavior and manners, and even to national character and identity.  Thus, fashion became an important institution of modernity. This course will investigate how and where fashion came to the fore, establishing itself as a threat to morality and religious belief, and serving as a vehicle for gender, class and ethnic definitions. We will draw on a broad interdisciplinary framework and discuss sources from both the English and Italian literary traditions (although all the reading will be in English). We will examine texts from many different genres, including costume books, plays, poetry, novellas, treatises, and satires. We will also be analyzing early modern visual and material culture. We will ultimately consider how dress (and other types of ornamentation that covered the body) became a cause for concern for the Church and State. These institutions sought to regulate individual vanity and any desire to transgress the accepted societal codes.

POSSIBLE TOPICS FOR DISCUSSION WILL INCLUDE:

• The sumptuary laws from the period that prescribed the types and styles of fabrics that could be worn by persons of various ranks.

•The importance of clothing and fashion in court culture, especially as discussed by Castiglione’s The Courtier.

•The significance of clothing and accessories in public space. In hierarchical environments, but also the street, rituals, parades, spectacles etc.

•The significance of costumes on the early modern stage, both symbolically and materially.

 •The role that accessories of dress like the codpiece and farthingale played in materializing masculinity and femininity, as well as the cultural context and significance of gendered crossdressing (both inside and outside the theatrical context).

•The use of cosmetics, and especially their relationship to the formation of racial ideals.

•The practice of forcing members of religious groups to wear specific forms of dress (Shylock, for example, mentions his “Jewish gabardine” in Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice).

 •The erotics of dress in love poetry, and in everyday life.

POSSIBLE READINGS WILL INCLUDE:

English texts such as William Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night; Ben Jonson’s Volpone; the poetry of Robert Herrick; polemical pamphlets about crossdressing such as Hic Mulier and Haec Vir.

Italian texts such as Baldassare Castiglione’s The Courtier; excerpts from Cesare Vecellio’s Habiti Antichi et Moderni di tutto il mondo and Giacomo’s Franco’s Habiti; Pietro Aretino’s The School of Whoredom, Arcangela Tarabotti’s, Antisatira

 

MALS 71400 – Introduction to International Studies

GC:   R, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 3305, 3 credits, Prof. Hattori, [15933]

The two main purposes of this course are to introduce you to theoretically informed historical analyses of international relations (IR) and to help you apply one of the theories of IR to an international subject of your choice.  While the historical contexts and theories of IR will help you engage in further studies in IR, your paper will enhance your understanding of how you may gain social scientific knowledge by reviewing relevant theoretical literature, conceptualizing your subject matter, developing research questions, figuring out how to answer them, gathering information about them, organizing the research result as evidence for your answer to the research question, and developing your answer as an argument about a particular phenomenon or relationship on the chosen topic in the context of existing theoretical arguments. 
 

MALS 72100 – Feminist Texts and Theories

GC:   T, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. 3212, 3 credits, Profs. Cole/Lee, [15934] Cross listed with WSCP 81001.

This course provides a broad overview of the issues and texts of Women’s Studies. The instructors will use an interdisciplinary approach to consider some of the themes, questions, methodologies, and findings of Women’s Studies scholarship. The course will cover a selection of feminist texts, taken from both literary and social science sources, and also classic and contemporary theoretical works. In addition, students will explore the ways in which the field of women’s studies has raised new questions and brought new perspectives to those areas where the humanities and social and behavioral sciences intersect, with material which is interdisciplinary in nature and frequently poses a challenge to conventional disciplinary boundaries.

 

MALS 73100 – American Culture & Values

GC:   M, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 3209, 3 credits, Prof. Singer, [15935] Cross listed with ASCP 81000.    

In this course, we will focus on a variety of literary and film titles as we explore complex eruptions and erasures of American identity as it is revealed, or rather manufactured, in varieties of narrative forms. From the early captivity narratives, to Emily Dickinson, and up to the graphic novel, this course will present perspectives on the complex issue of national identity. Particular attention will be given to evaluating the manner in which literature interrelates with other media and how each venue reflects cultural and historical ideologies. For example, what makes a text “American”? How does literature from the past comment on the present? Are literary and film narratives mirrors or x-rays into the nation’s psyche?

Course requirements include active participation in discussions, an oral presentation, and one paper (approx. 20 pages) which critically interprets the assignments/new material.

Preliminary Reading List–THIS WILL BE UPDATED IN EARLY AUGUST Riverside Editions: American Captivity Narratives Wheatley’s Complete Writings Douglass’ Narrative of the Life Jacobs’ Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl Whitman’s Leaves of Grass Poe’s Collected Stories and Poetry Dickinson’s Collected Poems Davis’ Life in the Iron Mills Plath’s Ariel Albee’s The Zoo Story/American Dream

 

MALS  74100 – The Conceptual Structure of Science

GC:   T, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 4433, 3 credits, Prof. Dauben, [15936] Cross listed with HIST 78400.

This course will survey the rise of modern science from Copernicus to Newton, the period of intellectual ferment in the 16th and 17th centuries generally referred to as the Scientific Revolution. In addition to charting the advance of astronomy and physics through the works of Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, Descartes, Boyle, Newton and Leibniz, the revolution in biology associated with Vesalius, Harvey and others will also be considered, along with related questions in the history of botany, medicine and iatrochemistry.

The emphasis in this course will be upon texts, a careful reading of the original scientific “classics,” along with diaries and letters where they survive, in order to evaluate as much as possible from primary sources the most important factors that motivated and inspired the creators of modern science. In assessing the social role the “new” science played, the disturbingly unfamiliar world in which philosophical, religious and even political principles were called into question will also be examined.

 

MALS  74300 – Research Ethics Sini: M, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Rhodes, [15942] Course meets at Mt. Sinai.  Cross listed with PHIL 77700.

Learning Objectives: By the end of this course participants should be able to: – Refer to the historical evolution of research ethics and the development of protections for human subjects. – Identify and employ the guiding principles of research ethics. – Evaluate clinical studies in terms of ethical considerations. – Review the research ethics literature and use it in addressing questions related to clinical research. – Justify decisions about the ethical conduct of research in terms of reasons that other reasonable scientists should accept.

 

MALS  77200 – Film History II

GC:   W, 2:00-6:00 p.m., Rm. C419, 3 credits, Prof. Massood, [15937] Cross listed with FSCP 81000 & THEA 71600.

This course is devoted to intensive analysis of the international development of cinema as a medium and art form from the early sound years (1930 onward) to the present. We will concentrate on major film tendencies and aesthetic and political developments through a close examination of individual film texts.

Subjects covered will include Hollywood filmmaking during the Depression years, French Poetic Realism, Italian Neorealism, melodrama and other postwar Hollywood genres, the rise of global “new waves” (including French, Latin American, and German filmmaking movements from the late-1950s through the 1970s) and modernist tendencies in international cinema.

We will also examine the rise of American independent filmmaking, recent global cinema trends, and the effects of new digital technologies on visual and narrative aesthetics.

Emphasis will be placed on the major historical currents of each period and on changes in aesthetic, political and industrial context.

Required Texts:

Required: David A. Cook. A History of Narrative Film. 3rd ed. New York: Norton, 1996. Available through the GC Virtual Bookshop. Scheduled films and supplemental readings ® are on reserve in the library.

Recommended books and additional films are listed in the syllabus, available in the Certificate Programs office (Room 5110).

Please note: Students are not required to purchase recommended texts or view all the suggested films.

Course Requirements:

Writing Assignments:
1) 8pp. essay on prearranged topic. (40%)
2) 15pp. final essay on topic of choice. (50%)

Discussion Questions:
Each week, two students will be required to prepare two questions each to initiate class discussion on the scheduled reading and screening. (10%)

Class sessions will begin promptly at 2:00pm and will last, unless otherwise noted, until 6:00pm. Please be prepared to attend the entire class.

 

MALS  78100 – Issues in Urban Education

GC:   W, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 7314, 3 credits, Prof. Rogers, [16435]

 

MALS 79000 – Thesis Research

3 credits, Faculty

MALS 79600 – Thesis Workshop

GC:   T, 4:15-6:15 p.m.,  Rm. 3305, 1 credit, Prof. Sharlin, [16834]

The goal of this workshop is to help students at any point in the thesis-writing process by reading each others’ work and reflecting on the writing and research process.

 

MALS. 70100 – Narratives of New York: Literature and the Visual Arts
GC: M, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Singer, [14280]

Stephen Crane, Edith Wharton, Weegee, Diane Arbus, Spike Lee, Oliver Stone, and Tony Kushner … this course will explore the work of these artists, among others, as each envisions critically significant representations of New York City–its people, places, and history–in various narrative forms. Particular attention will be given to evaluating the manner in which literature interrelates with film and other visual media and how each venue reflects cultural and historical ideologies. For example, what makes a text a “New York” narrative? Do literary and visual narratives mirror the city’s psyche, or serve to analyze it in penetrating ways?

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to reading texts and works of art critically, from a variety of perspectives, as well as to relevant theoretical discourses.

MALS. 70500 – Early Modern/Renaissance English Lyric Poetry
GC: T, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Majeske, [14281] Cross listed with ENGL 71100 & WSCP 81000

After a period of neglect, scholars are once again focusing upon early modern/Renaissance lyric poetry. A wide array of theoretical issues accompanies this resurgence, including, of course, whether a rigorous theoretical approach to these texts is even appropriate in light of the announcement of the “death of theory” (surely premature) and the markedly intentionalistic poetics that characterize the early modern/Renaissance English lyric. We will consider, among other things, how the lyric reacts to the movement away from a humanistic understanding of the self/world to a more Protestant one (a la Luther’s aphorism “Reason is the devil’s whore”), and how this movement is captured and advanced especially in texts such as Sidney’s “Defense of Poetry”. We will also explore how many modern interpretations have tended to read/interpret the era’s poetry in the context of the religious and political conflicts ahead of the Civil War. We will also touch upon the subtle but complex issues of gender and sexuality that arise in the sonnet sequences and elsewhere, issues which have been illuminated especially in the “feminist” re-readings of this overwhelmingly male literary canon.

MALS. 70800 – Transformations of Modernity, 1914-Present
GC: W, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Kaye, [14282]

This course explores the intellectual and cultural phenomenon of modernism and postmodernism as it considers the relation between both in Europe and America. We will begin with the brilliant outpouring of modernist work in the literary achievement of T.S. Eliot, Virginia Woolf, D.H. Lawrence, Rainer Maria Rilke, Joseph Conrad, and James Joyce, the visual innovations of Picasso and Matisse, the discordant music of Igor Stravinsky and Richard Strauss, the philosophical writings of Henri Bergson, and the psychological breakthroughs of Sigmund Freud. Suddenly “difficulty,” fragmentation, and a heightened anti-realist subjectivity are given a high premium in all of the arts. We will consider, too, the impact of the First World War not only in generating new modes of thought and expression, but in reviving older traditions, beliefs, and models (in the return to classicism in the arts, for example, and the popularity of spiritualism as a way of communicating with the dead). We will trace the avant-garde’s shift from Paris and London to New York, in the aftermath of World War II, as Abstract Expressionism becomes dominant. With a reading of Hannah Arendt’s “Eichmann in Jerusalem,” we will examine how moral and political certainties have been upturned by totalitarianism, as the “banality” of bureaucrats supplants an earlier epoch’s “radical evil.” As the class turns to the anti-humanist challenge of postmodernism to modernism’s claims of universality and radical breakthrough, we will investigate the writings of such diverse thinkers as Theodor Adorno, Walter Benjamin, Michel Foucault, and Rosalind Krauss. Finally, we will consider the recent fiction of novelists such as Don DeLillo, Alan Hollinghurst, and Susan Daitch for questioning the conventions of narrative. We will consider two films—Jean-Luc Godard’s “Contempt,” which contrasts contemporary despair, mass culture, and personal betrayal with an exalted epic Homeric past, and Bernardo Bertolucci’s “The Conformist,” which offers a psychological rationale for fascism. Among the works we will read: Eliot, “The Waste Land,” Conrad, “Heart of Darkness,” Woolf, “Jacob’s Room,” Joyce, “Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man,” Benjamin, “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction,” Meyer Schapiro, “Modern Art,” Harold Rosenberg, “The American Action Painters,” Sontag, “On Photography,” Krauss, “The Myth of the Avant-Garde,” Robert Venturi, “Learning from Los Vegas,” DeLillo, “White Noise.”

MALS. 71000 – Forms of Life Writing
GC: W, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Levin, [14283]

This course focuses on life writing in three major genres–memoir, autobiography, and biography–concentrating on work produced since the beginning of the twentieth century. We will look more closely at form and technique than content, although we will examine at how the content is related to form. How, for example, is it possible to portray the interaction of events in the life of a creative individual (e.g. painter, photographer, film director, actor, composer, poet, novelist) and the resulting production of that person? We will study each author’s method, asking what makes a work succeed and become a classic. We will also consider how biography functions in film, both documentaries and Hollywood features. Occasional visits by guest authors will contribute to the class. Students will write brief weekly response papers for most of the semester and submit a longer paper before the final class.

MALS. 71500 – Critical Issues in International Studies
GC: T, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Torpey [14674] Cross listed with SOC 81004 – Comparative Historical Sociology [14984]

This course introduces students to developments in the field of comparative historical sociology. We will focus on approaches to making sense of major social change in the areas of religion, state formation, the uses of physical violence, revolution, and economic change. Readings will be substantial and will range widely across time and place, as befits a course with these aims. We will emphasize especially major turning points and transformations in human history.

MALS. 72200 – Studies in Gender and Sexuality
GC: R, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Brim, [14285]

This is a course about theories of gender and sexuality. It will analyze what it means to be a woman, a man, or some other kind of gender in the United States and elsewhere, as well as what it means to be straight, gay, lesbian, bisexual, and queer. The class will investigate how the distinct but often problematically related categories of gender and sexuality came to be and how they have changed over time to include or exclude people on the basis of race, class, age, and ability. The course will look at women, men, and transgendered individuals in a number of contexts, paying special attention to issues of embodiment and desire, as well as to political activism and theoretical futures.

MALS. 73200 – American Social Institutions
GC: W, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Burke, [14286]

The purposes of this interdisciplinary course are three. First, it will examine a wide range of original source materials, from the late eighteenth through the late twentieth centuries, which have featured prominently in classic and contemporary analyses of American society and culture. Second, it will introduce class members to emerging online and interactive new media resources in American Studies. Finally, it will encourage students to develop and enhance their skills in doing cross-disciplinary and interdisciplinary research.

MALS. 74300 – Medical Ethics
Sinai: M, 5:45-7:45p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Baumrin, [14287] Cross listed with PHIL 77900.

MALS. 77300 – History of the Cinema II
GC: T, 11:45 a.m.-3:45 p.m., Rm. C419, 3 credits, Prof. Gerstner, [14288] Cross listed with ART 79500, THEA 71600 & FSCP 81000.

The film industry finds its beginnings through the development of late nineteenth-century technologies. As the twentieth-century industrial art, the cinema’s unique quality to record a moving image forever changed the way we perceive the world.

At the same time, the cinema—as a technological wonder—maintained close ties to the traditional arts (painting, theater, literature). While first thought of as a scientific tool, the cinema soon became popularly recognized as one of “the seven lively arts.”

We will trace these historical relationships between creativity and technology by not only exploring the “canon” of film history but also investigating the social, creative, and ideological (gender, class, race, nation) arenas in which film is/was produced.

In this course, then, we explore the creative and economic practices of world film industries from 1927-1960. We consider the structure of the dominant mode of film production (i.e. Hollywood) in relationship to other world cinemas, and the empirical “facts” that put in motion the film industry.

More importantly, you will complete your own research using archives around the city to write new histories. Used copies of the course textbook, Robert Allen and Douglas Gomery’s Film History: Theory and Practice, are available at Amazon.com). The course reader will be available for purchase online from universityreaders.com

Fall 2010 Courses

 

MALS. 70200 – The Fabric of Culture: New York Fashion
GC: T, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Paulicelli/Glick [12294] Cross listed with IDS 82300

The seminar will examine fashion as an industry, an economic force, and a mechanism that creates and performs identities and fosters the interplay between gender, the body, and sexuality. In particular, the focus of the seminar will be on New York and on American fashion from the Gilded Age till the present. Particular attention will be given to periods of great transformation when fashion plays an important role in shaping the cultures of cities, has an impact on lifestyles and gender perception in the workplace and other social and private spaces. The course will also pay attention to the various changes that had an impact on fashion in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The course will cover the span from the sweatshop of the second half of the nineteenth century where Jewish and Italian immigrants worked to the emergence of the “American Look” in the 1930s and 1940s, on to the subsequent shifts that occurred in the 1960s, up until the present with the New York Fashion week and New York as a global fashion capital. Special attention will be given to spaces of consumption and cultural mediation, department stores, magazines and the popular press, photography, film, art and design. New York fashion will be analyzed in both global and comparative perspectives. Topics will include immigration, ethnic identities, design, art and creativity, global versus local etc.
Readings will include authors such as Veblen, Simmel, Harvey, Benjamin, Hollander, Arnold, Kirkham, Zukin, Ewen, Steele, Currid, Breward. In addition we will study literary and cinematic texts.
For further information please contact the instructors at: epaulicelli@gc.cuny.edu or jglick@gc.cuny.edu

MALS. 70500 – Classical Culture
GC: M, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Marianetti [12296]

The course will be a survey of selected pieces of ancient literature and legend that have subsequently influenced Western civilization. The chosen literary works will be analyzed from an interdisciplinary perspective, combining literature, history, archaeology, religion, culture, politics and philosophy. Certain universal issues will be considered as they are conveyed through the literary genres. The class will concentrate upon a thorough examination and discussion of the following primary sources: The Epic of Gilgamesh, Hesiod’s Theogony, Homer’s Odyssey, Aeschylus’ Oresteia, Sophocles’ Oedipus Cycle (the Theban plays), Euripides’ Iphigeneia in Aulis, Aristophanes’ The Clouds, Plato’s Apology and Symposium and Virgil’s Aeneid.

MALS. 70600 – The Enlightenment
GC: W, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Rosenblatt [13160] Cross listed with HIST 71000

This course will examine the Enlightenment from both cultural and intellectual perspectives. We will begin by considering why the Enlightenment has been, and continues to be, so controversial. Why would a movement widely credited with articulating and disseminating notions such as religious toleration and human rights be so virulently criticized? Over the course of the semester, we will read a selection of “great thinkers,” such as Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, and Wollstonecraft. We will also read innovative secondary sources that show that Enlightenment ideals were disseminated not just in “great texts” but in restaurants, museums, coffee houses, novels, and even in “grub street” pornography. Main topics of discussion will be politics, religion, economics, women, race, and the notion of civilization or “progress” as viewed in the eighteenth-century. We will have a chance to ponder what the true values of the Enlightenment really were and whether these values are worth defending.

MALS. 70700 – Shaping Modernity, 1789-1914
GC: R, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Joseph [12297]

After an introductory reading of Matthew Arnold’s On the Modern Element in Literature (which considers the degree to which the modern is a historical or a trans-historical concept), this course will examine some core Western texts that contributed to the shaping of the concept of the modern between the beginning of the French Revolution (1789) and the outbreak of World War I (1914). Our readings will be selected from but will, of course, not include all the works on the following pretty comprehensive list: Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Ralph Waldo Emerson’s Self-Reliance and Nature, Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass, Karl Marx’s Communist Manifesto and John Stuart Mill’s On Liberty, Frederick Douglass’s Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Charles Darwin, The Voyage of the Beagle, Gustave Flaubert’s Madame Bovary, Charles Dickens’s Hard Times, Charles Baudelaire’s Poems, Friedrich Nietzsche’s On the Genealogy of Morals, Matthew Arnold’s Culture and Anarchy, Fyodor Dostoevski’s Notes from Underground, William James’s Varieties of Religious Experience, and Sigmund Freud’s The Interpretation of Dreams.

MALS. 70900 – Biography/Autobiography/Memoir I
GC: R, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Brownstein [12298]

What is the truth value and what are the truth claims of autobiography? What about biography? And memoir? Are the expectations we bring to them similar, or very different? In this seminar, on the basis of reading a variety of texts, old and new, and mostly—but not only—brief and literary, we will discuss these and related questions, and other people’s response to them. We will consider ways of telling the difference among kinds of literary writing (including letters, portraits, obituaries, case studies, biopics), and ways of reading them. Students will write weekly response papers, do a class presentation, and submit a paper or project that deals in some way with representing a person’s life.

MALS. 71400 – Intro to International Studies
GC: W, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Hattori [12299]

The two main purposes of this course are to introduce you to historical contexts and theories of international relations (IR) and to help you use one of the theories for your research on the historically oriented analysis of international relations. While the historical contexts and theories of IR will help you engage in further studies in IR and international studies in general, the specific historical analysis of international relations will enhance your understanding of how you may gain social scientific knowledge. After introducing you to the history of capitalism, imperialism, colonialism, and international organizations, the course turns to somewhat philosophical issues of the agency-structure problem in social theory and international relations. The reading will be light in the second half of the course to allow you to read slowly and think deeply, while giving you time to do your own research.

MALS. 72100 – Feminist Texts and Contexts
GC: W, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Lee/Cole, [12300] Cross listed with WSCP 81001

This course provides a broad overview of the issues and texts of Women’s Studies. The instructors will use an interdisciplinary approach to consider some of the themes, questions, methodologies, and findings of Women’s Studies scholarship. The course will cover a selection of feminist texts, taken from both literary and social science sources, and also classic and contemporary theoretical works. In addition, students will explore the ways in which the field of women’s studies has raised new questions and brought new perspectives to those areas where the humanities and social and behavioral sciences intersect, with material which is interdisciplinary in nature and frequently poses a challenge to conventional disciplinary boundaries.

MALS. 73100 – American Culture & Values
GC: T, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Robertson [12301]

This interdisciplinary course will examine a wide range of literary source materials which have figured importantly in defining American national identity. From the early captivity narratives to the poetry of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson this course will introduce participants to the contested issue of what makes a text “American.” We will then examine some early American Studies approaches, especially the “American character” and “myth and symbol” schools that dominated work in the field during the 1950s and 1960s.

MALS. 74200 – The Practice of Science
GC: R, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Xu [12950]

This course seeks to demonstrate as vividly as possible that science is a living process done by individuals who respond to the demands and the times in which they live. By reading the great scientific thinkers of the past (including, e.g., Aristotle, Galen, Ptolemy, Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, Vesalius, Harvey, Descartes, Newton, Leibniz, Priestley, Lavoisier, Darwin, Mendel, Freud, Einstein, Bohr, Watson, Crick and Franklin (Rosalind)), we will explore the similarities and differences between the physical and life sciences, and examine the means by which different methods and assumptions limit and encourage theories of knowledge.

MALS. 74300 – Research Ethics
SINI: M, 5:30-7:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Rhodes [12951]
Mondays, 5:30-7:00 at Mount Sinai School of Medicine (100th St & Fifth Ave), Annenberg 5 Felt Conference Room

Seminar participants will include CUNY students and MSSM medical students as well as students from the MSSM Masters programs in Genetics Counseling, Clinical Research, and Public Health.
This seminar will explore the complex issues raised by human subject research. The seminar will begin with a review of some of the landmark cases of unethical use of human subjects in research, the policies that shape our current understanding of the ethical conduct of research, and the mechanisms for research oversight that have been instituted. Then, through reading a broad selection of seminal articles and papers from the recent literature, seminar presentations and discussions, we shall engage in a conceptual analysis of a number of controversial and pressing issues. We shall be discussing the moral and public policy aspects of topics such as research design, risk-benefit assessment, informed consent, the use of “vulnerable” subjects, research without consent, confidentiality, inducements, conflicts of interests, disclosure of research findings, tissue use, vaccine development, international research. In addition to exploring the moral landscape of this rich and provocative domain, the seminar should clarify and inform participants’ understanding of basic moral concepts such as autonomy and justice. It will also serve as a model for approaching other issues in applied ethics.

MALS. 77100 – Aesthetics of Film
GC: M, 11:45 a.m.-3:45 p.m., Rm. C419, 3 credits, Prof. Weis [12303] Cross listed with FSCP 81000

This course introduces students to graduate-level film analysis by acquainting them with basic narrative film techniques, strategies, and styles.

The approach is intended to ensure that participants with other areas of expertise are able to teach film with a working knowledge of its unique language and tropes. Central topics to be studied include narrative forms, mise-en-scène, composition, camera movement, editing, sound and music, genre, and spectatorship.

In addition, students will become familiar with a variety of critical perspectives on film as well as the essential bibliographical sources and fundamentals of research in the field.

Course requirements: Students will be expected to deliver an oral report and produce a 15-20 page term paper.

Textbook: David Bordwell and Kristin Thompson, Film Art: an Introduction (McGraw-Hill, any edition #4 or later).

Enrollment is limited. No permits, non-matrics, auditors.

Reading list and syllabus available in Certificate Programs Office (Room 5109).

MALS. 77200 – History of the Cinema I
GC: T, 11:45 a.m.-3:45 p.m., Rm. C419, 3 credits, Prof. Solomon [12302] Cross listed with FSCP 81000

This course surveys film history during the so-called “silent” period—before the widespread adoption of synchronized recorded sound.

We will examine trends in international film style, the growth of international film industries, and the major national cinemas and film movements of the 1910s and 1920s.

We will study the historical relationships between the cinema and other modes of entertainment (especially popular theater).

In the course, we will consider not only film history but also film historiography, thinking about how research and archival practice have shaped writing about “silent” film—a significant misnomer given the many forms of sound practice that flourished alongside projected motion pictures.

Required Book: Grieveson, Lee, and Peter Krämer, eds. The Silent Cinema Reader. London: Routledge, 2003. Recommended Book: Altman, Rick. Silent Film Sound. New York: Columbia University Press, 2004. Additional readings will be available through the Mina Rees Library ERes system. Readings should be completed before the date for which they are assigned.

Course Requirements: Punctual attendance and active participation in all class sessions is mandatory. If you will be unable to attend class, contact the professor with as much advance notice as possible. It is unlikely that you will pass the course if you miss more than two class meetings.

Seminar Paper: A research paper of approximately 15-20 pages or more on a selected topic in silent film history is due at the end of the semester. Topics must be approved by the professor, so students should schedule a meeting to discuss possible topics and sources well in advance of the deadline.

Reading list and syllabus available in Certificate Programs Office (Room 5109).

MALS. 78200 – Politics of Contemporary Urban Education
GC: M, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Kafka [12304]

This class investigates the social, economic and political forces that shape contemporary urban education, and focuses on school reform as a political, rather than technical, construct. We will consider both historical and contemporary efforts to reform urban public schooling by locating them within a wider political arena. The class will examine how both local and national political dynamics have helped shape and drive varying school reform strategies, including market-based choice models, state and federal accountability programs, and efforts to improve teacher and principal quality. Particular attention will be paid to issues of race and class as frames for understanding the politics of urban education.

Spring 2010 Courses

 

MALS 70100  Narratives of New York: Literature and the Visual Arts

Mondays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Robert Singer [10714]

Stephen Crane, Edith Wharton, Weegee, Diane Arbus, Spike Lee, Oliver Stone, and Tony Kushner … this course will explore the work of these artists, among others, as each envisions critically significant representations of New York City–its people, places, and history–in various narrative forms. Particular attention will be given to evaluating the manner in which literature interrelates with film and other visual media and how each venue reflects cultural and historical ideologies. For example, what makes a text a “New York” narrative? Do literary and visual narratives mirror the city’s psyche, or serve to analyze it in penetrating ways?
This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to reading texts and works of art critically, from a variety of perspectives, as well as to relevant theoretical discourses.

MALS 70500  Medieval Culture

The High and Late Medieval Dream Vision

Thursdays, 11:45 am-1:45 pm, 3 credits, Glenn Burger and Steven Kruger [10715]

Cross listed with English 80700

Medieval theorists conceived the dream as potentially revealing or commenting on individual psychology, the social and the political, and cosmic truth, all at the same time. Perhaps this capacious definition of dreams helps account for the extraordinary popularity, from the twelfth century to the sixteenth, of the literary genre of dream vision. Many of the major European writers of the period – Alain de Lille, Boccaccio, Petrarch, Machaut, Chaucer, Shakespeare – produced works that are in conversation with the tradition of dream literature, and dream poetry is central to the high and late medieval English literary tradition.
In this course, we will examine a wide range of medieval dream visions, thinking about how these works engage, in complex ways, with questions about the individual psyche, sociality, and the metaphysical. We will read works selected from among the following authors and texts: Boethius, Guillaume de Lorris and Jean de Meun (The Romance of the Rose), Guillaume de Deguileville, Jean Froissart, Geoffrey Chaucer, William Langland (Piers Plowman), Pearl, John Lydgate, Robert Henryson, James I of Scotland, The Assembly of Ladies, Lancelot of the Laik, The Court of Sapience, John Skelton, and Stephen Hawes. In considering such works, we will attend to the ways in which the dream vision was used to explore the experience and ideology of courtly love; its involvements with theological and devotional discourses; its navigation of the complexities of medieval gender and sexuality, and of such social institutions as marriage, the family, the court, and pilgrimage. We will consider, throughout, how historicist approaches to medieval material might be useful, as well as what kinds of critical theoretical approach (psychoanalytic? Deleuzoguattarian? queer? postcolonial?) might be particularly fruitful in the reading of such medieval texts.
Students will be expected to prepare two oral presentations in the course of the semester, and to write a 20-page seminar paper.

MALS 70800 Transformations of Modernity, 1914 to the Present
Thursdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Sean O’Toole [10405]

In this seminar, we will examine aspects of cultural change in the twentieth century through a comparative global approach to the novel. Inspired by David Damrosch’s call to expand the literary “field” of modernism, we will surround canonical works such as Joyce’s Dubliners, Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway, and Proust’s Swann’s Way with readings in important precursors, contemporaries, and successors. We will begin by exploring some of ways that realism was dealing with issues of gender and empire in the 1890s as Joyce approached the period of writing Dubliners: first, in reading Ibsen’s A Doll’s House, which Joyce knew intimately, and then by discussing stories by two writers who were unknown to him, but who shared important common precursors in Ibsen and Zola: Rabindranath Tagore and Higuchi Ichiyō. We will also consider some important successors: fiction by Russian-Jewish Brazilian modernist Clarice Lispector, British prize-winner Pat Barker, gay American novelists James Baldwin and Michael Cunningham, Turkish cause célèbre Orhan Pamuk, and Japanese wunderkind Haruki Murakami. Social themes, formal issues, stylistic concerns, and intertextuality (the incorporation of Irish songs and Japanese street theater, for instance) will form the primary basis of our discussions. Depending on student interest, films such as John Huston’s The Dead, Tadashi Imai’s Nigorie, and Satyajit Ray’s Pather Panchali may also provide related topics for writing and discussion. Weekly one-page reader-responses, two papers, and an oral presentation are required.

Texts:
Zola, from Terese Raquin / L’assommoir (excerpts)
Ibsen, A Doll’s House
Joyce, Dubliners
Tagore, Selected Short Stories, esp. “Punishment”
Ichiyo, In the Shade of Spring Leaves (trans. Danly), esp. “Child’s Play”
Lispector, Family Ties, esp. “The Daydreams of a Drunk Woman”
Proust, Swann’s Way
Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway
Barker, Regeneration
Cunningham, The Hours
Baldwin, Another Country
Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
Pamuk, The Black Book

MALS 71000 Biography, Autobiography, and Memoir II
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Wendy Fairey [10406]

We will engage in a comparative study of biography, autobiography, autobiographical fiction, and memoir as forms of life-writing and look, too, at issues of craft that cut across these different genres of creative nonfiction: uses of memory, shaping of narrative, building of characters, uses of dialogue, and expression of viewpoint, among other concerns. Readings will be drawn primarily (though not entirely) from twentieth (and twenty-first) century works with selections from such writers as Dickens, Freud, Joyce, Virginia Woolf, Geoffrey and Tobias Wolff, Jamaica Kincaid, Eva Hoffman, Phyllis Rose, Ariel Dorfman, Marjane Satrapi, Edwige Danticat, and Mary Karr. Students will write weekly response papers for most of the semester, make a class presentation, and write one longer paper that can be either a comparative study of texts or a creative exercise in one of the genres of the course.

Although the course serves as the second part of the Biography, Autobiography, and Memoir sequence in M.A.L.S., students do not need to have taken the fall semester course in order to participate in this one.

MALS 71500 Critical Issues in International Studies: Global Political Economy
Mondays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Tomohisa Hattori [10407]

The main purpose of this course is to understand the nature of global political economy by examining and understanding the current economic crisis. While reading about events leading to the economic crisis helps students understand the context of this crisis, the course also examines various theoretical explanations of crises in capitalist political economy in general. Students will assess the plausibility and adequacy of various explanations by not only looking at theories but also applying a theory to a particular historical and geographical context. This analysis of economic crises will gradually help students understand the hidden nature of capitalist political economy.

MALS 73200  American Social Institutions
Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Joseph Entin[10408]

This course serves as an introduction to the histories, theories, and methods of American Studies as an interdisciplinary field. We will begin by examining the origins of the field and some early American Studies approaches, especially the “American character” and “myth and symbol” schools that dominated work in the field during the 1950s and 1960s. Then, and for the bulk of the semester, we will attend to more recent American Studies scholarship, which draws from a range of disciplines, including social and cultural history, literary criticism, sociology, and cultural studies. Topics will include subcultures and popular culture; working-class culture; the cultural production of race, ethnicity, sexuality, and gender; border zones and diasporas; transnationalism and empire. Our reading will be guided by several questions, including: why and for what purposes was American Studies created and institutionalized? How has the field developed and why? What are the major conceptual conflicts that drive and disrupt the field? What constitutes an American Studies approach? What are the theoretical, political, and practical stakes of such an approach?

MALS 74300  Bioethics: Policies and Cases

Medicine and Social Justice

Tuesdays, 5:00-7:00 pm, 3 credits, Rosamond Rhodes and Ian Holzman [10409]

At Mount Sinai School of Medicine

This course will begin with a review of some of the classical (Aristotle) and contemporary (John Rawls) work on justice and a review of some theoretical work by authors who focus their attention on justice in medicine (e.g., Norman Daniels, Paul Menzel). We will then examine some of the foundational issues that lie at the heart of justice in medicine: the right to health and health care, aggregation and utility, personal responsibility, and prioritarianism. We will also develop some understanding of how medical resources are actually distributed in various societies in today’s world. With that much as background, and so as to appreciate the complexity of any scheme for the just distribution of resources, we will go on to consider some of the problems that become apparent when you attend to the special needs of social groups (e.g., the poor, children, women, the elderly, African Americans). We will conclude the course with a close examination of dilemmas and conflicts that are raised by genetic testing, the treatment of premature and compromised neonates, the allocation of transplant organs, and the allocation of resources to alternative medicine.
Books:
1. The Nicomachean Ethics , Aristotle (any translator; any edition) suggested version: WD Ross translation, Oxford World’s Classics, ISBN 019283407X
2. Political Liberalism, John Rawls, 1993, New York, Columbia University Press, ISBN 0231052499
3. Medicine and Social Justice: Essays on the Distribution of Health Care, Rosamond Rhodes, Margaret P. Battin & Anita Silvers, editors, 2002, Oxford University Press, ISBN 019514354X
Course readings will be supplemented by papers for a new collection.

MALS 77300 – History of Cinema II
Thursdays, 11:45 am-3:15 pm, 3 credits, William Boddy, [10410] Cross listed with FSCP 81000

This course will explore major developments in US and global film culture from the introduction of sound to the advent of the “blockbuster” era in Hollywood in the mid-1970s.

We will analyze works from a number of national cinemas, artistic movements, and creative auteurs, including Fritz Lang, Jean Renoir, Howard Hawks, Roberto Rossellini, Abe Polonksy, Jean-Luc Godard, and Martin Scorsese.

Topics addressed include the problem of film authorship, the development of film genres and aesthetic styles, and the relationship of the classical Hollywood studio system to alternative models of film production in the United States and elsewhere. Emphasis will be placed on the historical, aesthetic, and ideological contexts of the films examined.

Required Text: David Cook, A History of Narrative Film fourth edition (New York: Norton, 2004)

Course Requirements: In addition to participation in seminar discussion, each student will prepare brief response papers to the films and readings each week, and will write a 15-18 page research paper on a topic approved by the instructor.

Topics and tentative screenings:

Early sound film: M/Blue Angel; Hollywood genre film of the 1930s: Scarface, Bringing Up Baby

Inter-War political documentary: Land Without Bread, Spanish Earth

French poetic realism: Crime of M. Lange, Rules of the Game

Neorealism: Rome, Open City

Hollywood melodrama: Written on the Wind

Hollywood Noir: Big Combo/Out of the Past/Touch of Evil/Gun Crazy/Detour/Big
Heat/Criss Cross/Force of Evil

Hollywood Western: Man from Laramie/Ranch Notorious/Johnny Guitar

French New Wave: Breathless, A Married Woman/Two or Three Things/Hiroshima Mon Amour/Night and Fog

Cinema Novo: Antonio das Mortes

European art cinema: Red Desert/Blow Up/Innocence Unprotected

New German Cinema: American Friend/Maria Braun

New Hollywood: Chinatown/Mean Streets/Badlands/Night Moves

US avant-garde film: Meshes of the Afternoon, Scorpio Rising/Riddle of Lumen

Fall 2009 Courses

 

MALS 70700 Shaping Modernity, 1789-1914
T, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Brownstein, [96970]

We will begin with works—by, e.g., Burke, Paine, Wollstonecraft, and Rousseau—written before it began, but our focus will be on the sense of the new that developed in the nineteenth century, the idea of difference from the past. We will read poems and prose by Blake, Byron, and Wordsworth, Austen’s Persuasion and Dickens’s Great Expectations, and stories by Hawthorne, Melville, and Henry James, with special attention to such themes as the growth of cities and the sense of personal freedom. In class presentations and (perhaps) their final papers, students will discuss a work by one of the writers studied that is not on the syllabus.

MALS 70900 Biography, Autobiography, and Memoir I
T, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Levin, [96971]

We will make a comparative study of biography, autobiography, and memoir, beginning with an analysis of newspaper obituaries and moving on to Profiles from The New Yorker. After a glance at early forms of life writing such as Plutarch in ancient times or Vasari in the late Renaissance, we will concentrate on work produced during the twentieth century. We will also contrast how biography works in documentaries with the process of adapting biographies for Hollywood feature films. We will also examine collective, group, or couples’ biographies. The selection of texts to be studied will stretch across many disciplines and styles from the lucid 1995 memoir by Barack Obama to, earlier in the century, the more abstract style of Gertrude Stein. We will examine each author’s method and manner, asking what makes a work succeed and become a classic. Students will write weekly response papers for most of the semester and submit a longer paper before the final class.

MALS 71400 Introduction to International Studies
R, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Ungar, [96972]

This course studies international relations by comparing the field’s major theoretical frameworks and applying them to contemporary global issues. We will examine the historical development of the modern international system, the relevance of international organizations such as the United Nations and international financial institutions, the effectiveness of international law, the different dimensions of globalization, the gap between rich and poor countries, and international cooperation on issues such as armed conflict, poverty, health, human rights, the environment, and terrorism.

MALS 72100 Introduction to Women’s Studies
W, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Cooper/O’Malley, [96973] Cross listed with WSCP 81001

This course provides a broad overview of the issues and methods of Women’s Studies. The instructors will use an interdisciplinary approach to consider some of the themes, questions, methodologies and findings of women’s studies scholarship. The course will introduce students to a selection of feminist texts, taken from both literary and social science sources, and also to classic and contemporary theoretical works. In addition, students will explore the ways in which the field of Women’s Studies has raised new questions and brought new perspectives to those areas where the humanities and social and behavioral sciences intersect, with material which is interdisciplinary in nature and frequently poses a challenge to conventional disciplinary boundaries.

MALS 73100 American Culture and Values
R, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Singer, [96974]

In this course, we will focus on a variety of literary and film titles as we explore complex eruptions and erasures of American identity as it is revealed, or rather manufactured, in varieties of narrative forms. From the early captivity narratives, to Emily Dickinson, and up to Kathy Acker, this course will present perspectives on the complex issue of national identity. Particular attention will be given to evaluating the manner in which literature interrelates with other media and how each venue reflects cultural and historical ideologies. For example, what makes a text “American”? How does literature from the past comment on the present? Are literary and film narratives mirrors or x-rays into the nation’s psyche?

Course requirements include active participation in discussions, an oral presentation, and two papers (8 -10 pages) which critically interpret the assignments.

MALS 74300 Research Ethics
M, 5:30-7:00 p.m., Mount Sinai School of Medicine (100th St. and Fifth Ave.), Annenberg 5 Felt Conference Room, 3 credits, Prof. Rhodes, [96975] Course meets 9/8 through 12/15

Seminar participants will include CUNY students and MSSM medical students as well as students from Masters programs in Genetics Counseling, Clinical Research, and Public Health.

This seminar will explore the complex issues raised by human subject research. The seminar will begin with a review of some of the landmark cases of unethical use of human subjects in research, the policies that shape our current understanding of the ethical conduct of research, and the mechanisms for research oversight that have been instituted. Then, through reading a broad selection of seminal articles and papers from the recent literature, seminar presentations and discussions, we shall engage in a conceptual analysis of a number of controversial and pressing issues. We shall be discussing the moral and public policy aspects of topics such as research design, risk-benefit assessment, informed consent, the use of “vulnerable” subjects, research without consent, confidentiality, inducements, conflicts of interests, disclosure of research findings, tissue use, vaccine development, international research. In addition to exploring the moral landscape of this rich and provocative domain, the seminar should clarify and inform participants’ understanding of basic moral concepts such as autonomy and justice. It will also serve as a model for approaching other issues in applied ethics.

MALS 77100 Aesthetics of Film
M, 4:15-8:15 p.m., Rm. C419, 3 credits, Prof. Chris, [96976] Cross listed with ART 79400, THEA 71400 & FSCP 81000

This course introduces students to the art of cinema, through examination of the qualities, history, and analysis of cinematic form. Approaching aspects of film aesthetics in a variety of genres and forms (for example, melodrama, film noir, the Western, and the musical, as well as documentary, animated, and experimental films), the course will provide students with opportunities to master the fundamental vocabulary of film analysis, including mise-en-scène, shot composition, montage, continuity editing, and camera movement, and other concepts.

The course will consider relationships among the aesthetics of film, television, and new digital and interactive media, as well as aesthetic adaptations to changing technologies and industrial formations, from the Kinetoscope to the nickelodeon to the movie palace and multiplex; and from theater to television screens, home theaters, and small format mobile devices. Interrogating relationships between sound and image, style and meaning, production and reception, we will seek to understand the sensory and narrative pleasures of film art: aesthetics is, after all, the philosophy of beauty.

Required Text: Film Art: An Introduction by David Bordwell and Kristin Thompson

Excerpts from: Film as Art by Rudolf Arnheim, What Is Cinema? by Andre Bazin, Film Form and/or Film Sense by Sergei Eisenstein, Film Language: A Semiotics of Cinema by Christian Metz, The Society of the Spectacle by Guy DeBord, Window Shopping: Cinema and the Postmodern by Anne Friedberg, Silent Cinema and/or The Death of Cinema: History, Cultural Memory and the Digital Dark Age by Paolo Cherchi Usai, Death 24x a Second: Stillness and the Moving Image by Laura Mulvey, The Skin of the Film by Laura U. Marks, The Cinema of Attractions Reloaded by Wanda Strauven (editor), Film Sound by Rick Altman, Visible Fictions by John Ellis, “Video: The Distinct Features of the Medium” by David Antin, Beyond the Multiplex by Barbara Klinger, Convergence Culture by Henry Jenkins

Screenings (full-length films and clips): Workers Leaving the Lumière Factory and The Arrival of a Train at La Ciotat Station (both Auguste and Louis Lumière, 1895), Life of an American Fireman and The Great Train Robbery (both Edwin S. Porter, 1903), Where Are My Children? (Lois Weber, 1916), Salomé (Charles Bryant, 1923), Man With a Movie Camera (Dziga Vertov, 1929), M (Fritz Lang, 1931), Bambi (David Hand, 1942), Double Indemnity (Billy Wilder, 1944), Rear Window (Alfred Hitchcock, 1954), Marty (Delbert Mann, television and film versions, 1953/1955) Umbrellas of Cherbourg (Jacques Demy, 1964), Wavelength (Michael Snow, 1967), Sympathy for the Devil (Jean-Luc Godard, 1968), McCabe and Mrs. Miller (Robert Altman, 1971), Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles (Chantal Akerman, 1975), She’s Gotta Have It (Spike Lee, 1986), Blue (Derek Jarman, 1989), Chunking Express (Wong Kar Wai, 1994), The Matrix (Andy and Larry Wachowski, 1999), Run Lola Run (Tom Twyker, 1999), Wall-E (Andrew Stanton, 2008)

Assignments: Students will produce weekly “response papers” to readings; participate in class discussions of the readings and screenings; take turns leading discussions on assigned texts; propose a research paper topic in a short essay; and write a final research paper (approximately 15 pages) on some aspect of film aesthetics that demonstrates their capacity to apply course concepts to an original analysis of a film of their own choosing

Enrollment is limited. No permits, non-matrics, auditors.

MALS 77200 History of Cinema I
M, 11:45 a.m.-3:45 p.m., Rm. C419, 3 credits, Prof. Wong, [96977] Cross listed with ART 89600, THEA 71500 & FSCP 81000

1930 seems to be a meaningful date separating early silent cinema from synchronized sound films.

The decades preceding witnessed important social and political changes that included fin-de-siècle developments, the Progressive era, World War I, the Weimar Republic, the Bolshevik Revolution, the Meiji, Taisho, and Showa eras in Japan. Cinema, the first electric mass medium, was born and forged under these exciting periods of monumental changes. Hence we can understand it best as part and parcel of the modernist movement both in art, culture and society.

This course will examine cinema not only as texts, but also as social practices. The class explores cinema of the US and Hollywood amid the variety of international cinemas, from France, Italy, Germany, the Soviet Union, and Japan, as well as the globalization of cinema at this early stage.

Topics will include pre-cinema, emergence of cinema, cinema of attraction, development of narrative cinema, changing social meanings of cinema, industrialization of cinema, national cinemas, exhibition and reception of cinema of the period.

The course will also investigate the practices and methods of the cinematic historiography.

Students will write a 15+ page seminar paper on a research topic of their choosing that has been approved by the professor and will conduct a smaller-scale historical research project making use of archival resources. In addition, students need to contribute weekly to online discussion on Blackboard.

MALS 78100 Issues in Urban Education
T, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Rogers, [96978]

This interdisciplinary course draws on both scholarship and experiential learning to analyze the roots of the “crisis” in urban education and its current forms and issues. Integrating texts and perspectives from history, sociology, urban politics and education, the course aims to create a foundation for research and practice in urban education. While the course itself is organized around several primary themes, it also means to support students in developing their own research interests and questions.

The course begins by considering the history of urban New York City and its schools, with the idea that coherent analysis of the issues in urban education requires an understanding of the complex factors that have contributed over time to contemporary challenges. The next phase of the course puts students in direct touch with schools and their neighborhoods. Assignments engage students in getting to know well one school of their choosing, through observations, research, an oral history project, and the creation of a school “portrait.” (The course supports students’ development of oral history and “portraiture” research methods). At the same time, as the third key aspect of the course, students are immersed in relevant scholarly research and readings that help them to contextualize, question, and make sense of what they are seeing in their real world observations. Readings address factors of race, ethnicity, gender, inclusion, and poverty, as well as the roles of neighborhoods, teachers and students in urban schools. Both readings and discussions will focus on New York City when possible and, supplemented by the field activities in the virtual laboratory of New York City and its schools, aim to provide a complex living example of urban schooling in the 21st century.

Spring 2009 Courses


For students in the Landmarks in Western Thought specialization, the following course will count as one of the required core courses:

RSCP 83100 Early Modern Disseminations: Encounters with European Culture East & West
Mondays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Martin Elsky, [95045] Cross listed with Comp Lit 71000 & ART 75000.

This course will focus on contact between European and non-European cultures in the Renaissance and Early Modern period, an age of exploration and expansion.

It will concentrate on the transformations that occur when cultural forms originally associated with the Italian city state move across borders via national states and empires to the New World and the eastern Mediterranean, to Tenochtitlan and the Ottoman Empire.

Readings will be drawn from literary and art history, as well as social and political history. The approach of the course will be set by beginning with cartography as an intercultural discipline used for the mapping of Europe’s own internally dynamic geographical space and its relation to geographies beyond its borders in some major cartographic projects of the period.

We will then consider intellectual theorization of contact with non-Europeans, as well as reciprocal effects of encounters between European and non-European cultures, including hybrid identities and hybrid cultural forms (literary and visual) expressing resistance, absorption, and synthesis.

Themes will include cultural forms in geographic motion, as well as issues of authenticity, imitation, appropriation, and mimicry.

Examples will be drawn from the historical, literary and visual traditions, including case histories and the theory of the state and empire; lyric, epic, travel narrative, and ethnographic description; prints, drawings, architecture, and cartography.

Emphasis will be placed on critical approaches and research problems as illustrated in readings from cultural history, literary criticism, and art history as applied so such figures as Shakespeare, Rabelais, Cervantes and others.
As an interdisciplinary course, students can work on materials related to their home discipline.

MALS 70800 Transformations of Modernity, 1914 to the Present
Mondays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, David Gordon [95942]

The global economy is now in crisis. Such times have always held the potential for political extremism. Twentieth century Europe provides a cautionary tale of how bad things can become, and also how they can best be set right. The global economic crisis of the 1930s resulted in dictatorship and world war. By 1945, Europe was in ruins. Its post-war regeneration was made possible by a new period of cooperation. This course will examine the nationalist forces that led to Europe’s downfall by 1945. It will also explore the ways in which Europeans remade their continent, from economic cooperation to the election of new political leaders committed to internationalism. Special attention will be given to the fate of minority populations and border changes from the end of the First War through mid-century. The course will also examine the evolution of European relations with the rest of the world, and the problems and opportunities provided by economic and cultural integration in an increasingly interdependent world.

MALS 71000 Biography, Autobiography, and Memoir II: Words and Images
Thursdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Suzanne Ouellette [95581]

A close and careful look at how people tell their own lives and those of others reveals individuals in all their complexity, in the many contexts in which they find themselves – internal and external contexts. Viewing, reading, and writing lives enable discoveries about individual uniqueness and the distinctive blend of consistency and change in lives; and discoveries about the communities, societies, and cultures of which individuals are part. The ability to see and develop deep understanding of one single person facilitates and requires the awareness and knowledge of the many who people their times and places, near and far. The class will consider the history and current state of the study of lives in its several forms, including written texts, painting, and film. The class will be an interdisciplinary space in which several different theoretical and methodological approaches will be engaged.

The course is intended for students seeking to make life studies a central part of their work and those for whom the biographical is only to supplement other approaches. Although it serves as the second part of the Biography, Autobiography, and Memoir sequence in M.A.L.S., student do not need to have taken that course in order to participate in this one.

MALS 71500 Critical Issues in International Studies
Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Mark Ungar [95582]

This course examines the world’s response to human rights abuse by analyzing the historical development of different rights, the effectiveness of international and regional protections, the conflict between rights and other issues such as security and democratization, the functioning of governmental and non-governmental organizations, the relationship between human rights and internal politics, and patterns of violations against different ethnic, racial, religious, gender and other groups.

MALS 72200 Contemporary Feminist Theories
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Susan Farrell [95583]
Cross-listed with WSCP 80802

This course will provide an introduction to themes, issues and conflicts in contemporary feminist theory. The course pays particular attention to the shift from the unifying themes in earlier feminist theorizing to the destabilizing influences of recent social theories (e.g. postmodernism, queer theory, and post-colonial theory) upon feminism. Readings and discussions will address a number of conflicts and developments within feminism about the category of woman, the politics of difference, the body, sexualities, performances of gender, the stability of sexed and sexual identity. Social institutions such as family, religion, the state and their impact on the social construction of gender will also be analyzed. The course takes an interdisciplinary and transnational approach to feminist thought and brings these theories to bear upon literature and media. There will be guest speakers, and students will be responsible for two reflection papers, a short oral presentation and critical book review essay on selected feminist utopian, speculative, and science fiction with an eye toward the future of feminism and gender

MALS 73200 American Social Institutions
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Andrew Robertson [95584]

This course serves as an introduction to the history, theories, and methods of American Studies as an interdisciplinary field. We will begin by taking a brief look at a few “classic” statements on the meaning and make-up of American culture from the nineteenth century, and then turn our attention to the 1930s, when American Studies as an intellectual and academic pursuit was first formally articulated. We will then examine some early American Studies approaches, especially the “American character” and “myth and symbol” schools that dominated work in the field during the 1950s and 1960s. Finally, and for the bulk of the semester, we will attend to more recent American Studies scholarship, which draws from a range of disciplines, including social and cultural history, literary criticism, sociology, and cultural studies. Topics will include subcultures and popular culture; working-class culture; the cultural production of race, ethnicity, sexuality, and gender; border zones and diasporas; transnationalism and empire. Our reading will be guided by several questions, including: why and for what purposes was American Studies created and institutionalized? How has the field developed and why? What constitutes an American Studies approach? What are the theoretical, political, and practical stakes of such an approach?

Course requirements include active participation in discussions; an oral presentation; a short paper assessing one of the week’s readings; and a longer paper surveying interdisciplinary scholarship on a particular phenomenon in American culture.

MALS 77300 – History of Cinema II
Mondays, 6:30-9:30 pm, 3 credits, Jerry Carlson, [95586] Cross listed with FSCP 81000

This course will outline and investigate main trends in world cinema from the coming of sound until the reorganization of Hollywood by the “blockbusters” of the mid-1970s.

The course will use a number of case studies in national cinemas to explore how new aesthetics, technologies, ideological perspectives, and modes of production and reception have reshaped and enriched storytelling in feature films.

Of particular interest will be the ways post-war cinemas challenge and alter the notion of classical Hollywood genres as developed and practiced by the American studios in the 1930s and 1940s.

The course will emphasize the close reading of films by such major directors as Charles Chaplin, Howard Hawks, Jean Renoir, John Ford, Orson Welles, Vittorio de Sica, Billy Wilder, Yasujiro Ozu, Stanley Donen, Jean Luc Godard, Federico Fellini, Roman Polanski, and Andrei Tarkovski.

The course is organized by a selection of films that illustrate key phenomena of the period. The topics under consideration include, among others, the cultural functions of the genre system, the development and influence of Italian Neo-Realism, the uses of self-reflexivity to investigate the impact of cinema upon the 20th century, and the rise of international art cinema with the emergence of the director as an “auteur.”

A number of recurrent questions will inform the course. What is the role of “authorship” in the cinema? Why and how do film styles change? How are films shaped by their contexts of production and reception? Why do particular film movements or national cinemas become influential? How does Hollywood respond to international challenges to its dominance? And how do cultural, social, and political forces relate to a medium that frequently claims innocence as “just entertainment?”

Students are expected to attend all screenings and lectures, to prepare the readings on time, and to hand in assignments on the designated dates. There will be a brief analytical paper and a longer research essay. Details of these assignments will be discussed in class.

Assigned Texts

Bordwell, D. & Thompson, K. Film History: An Introduction (2nd ed)
Geiger, J. & Rutsky, R. L. Film Analysis: A Norton Reader

Information: jcarlson@ccny.cuny.edu

Fall 2008 Courses

 

MALS 70500  Classical Culture
Marie Marianetti, 3 credits, Mondays, 6:30-8:30 pm

The course will be a survey of selected pieces of ancient literature and legend that have subsequently influenced Western civilization. The chosen literary works will be analyzed from an interdisciplinary perspective, combining literature, history, archaeology, religion, culture, politics and philosophy. Certain universal issues will be considered as they are conveyed through the literary genres. The class will concentrate upon a thorough examination and discussion of the following primary sources: The Epic of Gilgamesh, Hesiod’s Theogony, Homer’s Odyssey, Aeschylus’ Oresteia, Sophocles’ Oedipus Cycle (the Theban plays), Euripides’ Bacchae and Iphigeneia in Aulis, Aristophanes’ The Clouds, Plato’s Apology andSymposium, and Vergil’s Aeneid.

MALS 70700  Shaping Modernity, 1789-1914
Gerhard Joseph, 3 credits, Mondays, 6:30-8:30 pm

After an introductory reading of Matthew Arnold=s AOn the Modern Element in Literature@ (which considers the degree to which Athe modern@ is a historical or a trans-historical concept), this course will examine some core Western texts that contributed to the shaping of the concept of the modern between the beginning of the French Revolution (1789) and the outbreak of World War I (1914). Our readings will be selected from but will, of course, not include all the works on the following pretty comprehensive list: Mary Shelley=sFrankenstein, Ralph Waldo Emerson’s ASelf-Reliance@ and ANature,@ Walt Whitman=s Leaves of Grass, Karl Marx=s Communist Manifesto and John Stuart Mill=s On Liberty, Frederick Douglass=s Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Charles Darwin, The Voyage of the Beagle, Gustave Flaubert=s Madame Bovary, Charles Dickens=s Hard Times, Charles Baudelaire=s Poems, Friedrich Nietzsche=s On the Genealogy of Morals, Matthew Arnold=s Culture and Anarchy, Fyodor Dostoevski=sNotes from Underground,  William James=s Varieties of Religious Experience, and Sigmund Freud=s The Interpretation of Dreams.

MALS 70900  Biography, Autobiography, and Memoir I
Rachel Brownstein, 3 credits, Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm

We will begin near the beginning, beginning (like Plutarch) with comparisons, but comparing ways of writing them as well as lives–e.g., Vasari’s Life of Leonardo and Freud’s. From the beginning we will have the end in sight, starting with the analysis of newspaper obituaries and moving on to Profiles from The New Yorker and “The Aspern Papers” by Henry James. Its relation to memoir, autobiography, and other modes of life-writing will be a theme of our initial study of biography; fiction and some poetry will be among the various works we will read by such writers as Godwin and Wollstonecraft, Hazlitt and Woolf, Gertrude Stein and Philip Roth. Students will write weekly response papers for most of the semester and submit a longer paper before the final class.

MALS 71400 Introduction to International Studies
Tomohisa Hattori, 3 credits, Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 pm

Two main purposes of this course are to introduce you to historical and theoretical contexts of international relations and to help you develop your research on the historically oriented analysis of international relations. The first half of the course introduces you to the history of capitalism, imperialism, and colonialism as the historical contexts of actual international relations. The second half of the course turns to the impacts of capitalism, imperialism, and colonialism on how international relations theories are formulated.

MALS 72100 Major Feminist Texts
Sandi Cooper and Susan O’Malley, 3 credits, Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 pm
(Cross-listed with WSCP 80802)

We propose to restore the tradition established when women’s studies began as a concentration at the Graduate School – interdisciplinary approaches to the themes in all its courses. Usually at least two faculty from different disciplines participated in the classroom to work out new angles of analysis of traditional or canonical knowledge or to forge new visions. Our course will build on that pedagogy, using historical, literary and critical modes of analysis to explore western traditions of feminist thinking.

Text and context, that is the close reading of classic feminist texts in their historical environment, will provide our methodology. Authors as diverse as Christine de Pisan (14-15th century, C.E.) and Virginia Woolf (20th century) will be explored as significant literary innovators as well as major political voices. Students will be expected to examine their impact on the wider culture.
Two differently trained scholars functioning in each class meeting will be supplemented by invited guests.

MALS 73100  American Culture and Values
Robert Singer, 3 credits, Thursdays, 6:30-8:30pm

In this course, we will focus on a variety of literary and film titles as we explore complex eruptions and erasures of American identity as it is revealed, or rather manufactured, in varieties of narrative forms. From the early captivity narratives, to Emily Dickinson, and up to Kathy Acker, this course will present perspectives on the complex issue of national identity. Particular attention will be given to evaluating the manner in which literature interrelates with other media and how each venue reflects cultural and historical ideologies. For example, what makes a text “American”? How does literature from the past comment on the present? Are literary and film narratives mirrors or x-rays into the nation’s psyche?

Course requirements include active participation in discussions, an oral presentation, and two papers (8 -10 pages) which critically interpret the assignments.

MALS 74200 The Practice of Science/Science in Context
Joseph W. Dauben, 3 credits, Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm
(Cross-listed with HIST 78400)

This course will use the techniques of history and sociology to study the development of modern science and its impact upon society. It will view science as an institution and as a profession, and consider such topics as science and religion; Catholic versus Protestant views of the Scientific Revolution; the role of science during and after the French Revolution; whether science contributed anything to the Industrial Revolution; American Federalism and science during the Civil War; capitalism and “big science” in America; the politics of science in the Soviet Union: the Lysenko case and modern genetics; ethical issues in biology and physics, including eugenics and the debate over recombinant DNA techniques, and atomic research (including hydrogen bomb projects) in the United States, Germany, Russia and China; computers and technological determinism.

MALS 74300  Research Ethics
Rosamond Rhodes, 3 credits, Mondays, 5:00-6:30pm at Mount Sinai School of Medicine (100th Street & Fifth Avenue), Annenberg 5 Felt Conference Room

Seminar participants will include CUNY students and MSSM medical students as well as students from Masters programs in Genetics Counseling, Clinical Research, and Public Health.

This seminar will explore the complex issues raised by human subject research. The seminar will begin with a review of some of the landmark cases of unethical use of human subjects in research, the policies that shape our current understanding of the ethical conduct of research, and the mechanisms for research oversight that have been instituted. Then, through reading a broad selection of seminal articles and papers from the recent literature, seminar presentations and discussions, we shall engage in a conceptual analysis of a number of controversial and pressing issues. We shall be discussing the moral and public policy aspects of topics such as research design, risk-benefit assessment, informed consent, the use of “vulnerable” subjects, research without consent, confidentiality, inducements, conflicts of interests, disclosure of research findings, tissue use, vaccine development, international research. In addition to exploring the moral landscape of this rich and provocative domain, the seminar should clarify and inform participants’ understanding of basic moral concepts such as autonomy and justice. It will also serve as a model for approaching other issues in applied ethics.

MALS 77100 Aesthetics of Film
Edward D. Miller, 3 credits, Tuesdays, 11:45 am-3:45 pm
(Cross-listed with ART 89500, THEA 71400 and FSCP 81000)

Ever since the Lumière Brother’s train arrived at the station, film has been concerned with its own mechanics and meanings and the ways in which film not only captures the moment but transforms it, creating an impact upon its audience with distinct aesthetics.

This course highlights the self-referentiality of film and argues that a central aspect of the cinematic enterprise is the depiction of the filmmaking environment itself through the “meta-film.”

Using this emphasis as an entry into aesthetics, the course involves students in graduate-level film discourse by providing them with a thorough understanding of the concepts that are needed to perform a detailed formal analysis.

The course’s main text is the eighth edition of Bordwell and Thompson’s Film Art and the book is used to examine such key topics as narrative and nonnarrative forms, mise-en-scene, composition, cinematography, camera movement, set design/location, color, duration, editing, sound/music, and genre.

In addition, we read Walter Benjamin’s “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction” in order to develop an understanding of the relationship between aesthetics and technology. We also read brief selections from Immanuel Kant’s Critique of Aesthetic Judgment and Observations on the Feeling of the Beautiful and Sublime in order to underline the affectivity of aesthetics.

In the final section of the course, we examine the challenges that digital culture has brought to the aesthetics of the once entirely analog medium of cinema. Thus