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Career Maps

Explore Career Progressions in

Bookkeeping & Accounting

Tech Support

Cooks and Chefs

     

Home Health Aide

Medical Assistants

Methodology


Understanding how people actually progress in their careers can help you plan your future. To offer a more accurate depiction of common career paths that exist in and around the NYC metro area, we analyzed online work histories collected by PayScale, Inc. and secured by Monster Government Solutions to map actual career progressions. Brooklyn-based graphic design team, Coen Projekts, developed the design concept for each map. Our findings from each data set are presented in the Career Maps posted below.

Professionally printed versions of these Career Maps may be available upon request. For professional prints, please email either Ronnie Kauder or Pam Hoberman.

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Bookkeeping and Accounting

(Released October 2016)
 

 

More than 100,000 people in New York City work in the bookkeeping and accounting field, and these jobs are growing faster than the average for all jobs in the City. The New York City Labor Market Information Service is pleased to announce its latest Career Map: Bookkeeping and Accounting. Written and designed with support from Kingsborough Community College, this map shows the typical experiences of real people who started off as accounting clerks and bookkeepers in the New York City metropolitan area. There are two clear paths. On the first path, most people remain accounting clerks and bookkeepers or become supervisors, office managers or business managers. On the other path, about a quarter of those who had been accounting clerks and bookkeepers complete their bachelor’s degrees and become professional accountants, where pay is significantly higher. They may then move into different branches of accounting or specialty areas related to accounting.

  • Click here to view the 11" x 17" career progression diagram 
  • Click here to view the single-sided 8.5" x 11" version of the map
  • Click here to request professional prints of the map
 

NYCLMIS  thanks Babette Audant, Executive Director of the Kingsborough Community College Center for Economic and Workforce Development, and Edgar Troudt, formerly Assistant Professor in Tourism and Hospitality and Kingsborough Community College.

 


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Tech Support and Beyond

(Released July 2016)
 

 

Technology is everywhere and so are tech jobs. With virtually everyone using computers, smartphones, tablets and other devices, demand continues to rise for people who can answer user questions and make sure that everything is operating smoothly. This Career Map for Tech Support and Beyond explores actual career progressions of people 5 to 10 years and 10 to 15 years after starting out as an IT Support Specialist/Technician, Desktop Support Technician, Help Desk Analyst, or in any other general entry level tech support position.

  • Click here to view the 11" x 17" career progression diagram 
  • Click here to view the single-sided 8.5" x 11" version of the map
  • Click here to request professional prints of the map
 

NYCLMIS  thanks Babette Audant, Executive Director of the Kingsborough Community College Center for Economic and Workforce Development, and Edgar Troudt, Assistant Professor in Tourism and Hospitality and Kingsborough Community College.

 

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Cooks and Chefs

(Released December 2014)
 

 

New York City is a culinary capital with large numbers of restaurants, hotels, cafeterias and gourmet food markets. Cooks and chefs work in all of these places. This Career Map for Cooks and Chefs explores actual career progressions of people 5 to 10 years and 10 to 15 years after getting their start in professional cooking.
 

  • Click here to view the 11" x 17" career progression diagram (coming soon)
  • Click here to view the single-sided 8.5" x 11" version of the map
  • Click here to view the double-sided 8.5" x 11" version of the map
  • Click here to view the companion piece
 

NYCLMIS  thanks Babette Audant, Assistant Professor, former chef, and Executive Director of the Kingsborough Community College Center for Economic and Workforce Development, and Sara Anderson, Restaurant Programs Manager, National Restaurant Association. This brochure was made possible with support from CUNY CareerPATH.

 

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Home Health Aides

(Released December 2014)
 

 

NYCLMIS is pleased to release a brand new Home Health Aide Career Map, prepared for the CUNY CareerPATH initiative.  This career map is based on the real-life experiences of people who have worked as home health aides in the New York metropolitan area. It shows actual career progressions 5 to 10 years and 10 to 15 years after starting work as a home health aide.
 

  • Click here to view the 11" x 17" career progression diagram
  • Click here to view the single-sided 8.5" x 11" version of the map
  • Click here to view the double-sided 8.5" x 11" version of the map
  • Click here to view the companion piece
 

NYCLMIS thanks Carol Rodat and Steven Dawson of PHI for helping to ground the data in practice. This brochure was made possible with support from CUNY CareerPATH.
 

 

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Medical Assisting

(Released February 2014)
 

 

This career map was the first that was based on the real-life experiences of people who have worked as Medical Assistants in New York State. The data shows that, while many Medical Assistants remain in the same type of work for at least five years, those who move into related careers can move in several different directions, including clinical health, health administration, technical health and clinical research.

This brochure was made possible with support from CUNY CareerPATH.

  • Click here to view the poster-size version of the map
  • Click here to view the companion piece
 

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Methodology

(Released October 2015)
 

 

Many career maps are based on long-held assumptions or the aspirations of the people who develop them, so the career trajectories they portray may not be those experienced in the workforce. The New York City Labor Market Information Service (NYCLMIS) and its colleagues at Kingsborough Community College and the City University of New York (CUNY) Office of Continuing Education and Workforce Development wanted to understand the way careers develop in the real world with the belief that this information could be used to improve the effectiveness of programs and services at CUNY.

NYCLMIS prepared A New Career Map Methodology Using Data from Online Work Histories to address frequently asked questions about the maps, report findings of the career mapping analysis that have not been published previously, and help labor market analysts in the public- and private sectors replicate this approach in other locations with other occupations.

 

The New York City
Labor Market Information Service