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Career Profiles

Educational institutions and workforce training providers can use the profiles to align their training, career advising, and job placement activities to the demands of the labor market. Jobseekers can use them to better understand occupations in these fields, determine whether their interests and aptitudes match up with these occupations, and plan their careers.

Profiles typically include information on wages and employment trends, job characteristics, employee characteristics and qualifications (including required education, training and/or licensing), the abilities and skills necessary to succeed, and other relevant details. Below, profiles are organized by theme (e.g., tech, green, health care, etc.). A subset of these profiles focus on labor market demand using real-time LMI and another series examines the world of work from the industry perspective.
 

Explore profiles by theme


Health Care


Health Information

 

Tech

 

Professional & Technical

 

 
 

Transportation & Logistics


Buildings & Maintenance


 

Green

 


Leisure & Hospitality


Retail

 

Creative

 

Education


Icons made by Madebyoliver from www.flaticon.com is licensed by CC 3.0 BY
 

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Specialized sets of profiles

 


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Property Manager

(Released July 2016)

 
 

A property manager is a person or firm hired by the owner of a real estate property to help run its day-to-day operations. They keep the property functional, well-maintained and in compliance with applicable rules and regulations. Much of this work is hands-on and can be time-consuming, which is why owners often rely on others to carry it out.

Because all properties are not the same, property manager roles and responsibilities will vary. Accordingly, education and training needs are as diverse as the role of the property manager. Click here to learn more about, pay, prospects, qualifications, pathways to advancement and other important attributes. This profile was made possible with support from Kingsborough Community College.

 

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Tech Support Professional

(Released July 2016)

 
 

Tech support is a service that offers help and advice to people who use computers and related devices. People working in tech support install hardware, software or peripheral equipment such as printers, fax machines or copiers, and perform minor repairs when necessary. They also monitor the performance of computer systems. Their functions may also vary by the setting in which the work and the level of responsibility they have.

With virtually every business and organization requiring some degree of technical support, demand for these jobs continues to rise. And, unlike many other "tech-oriented" jobs, people may enter the field without a bachelor's degree, although one is generally required in order to advance.

Click here to learn more about, pay, prospects, qualifications, pathways to advancement and other important attributes. This profile was made possible with support from Kingsborough Community College.

 

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Dental Assisting

(Released July 2016)

 
 

Dental assistants perform many tasks, ranging from patient care and taking x-rays to record keeping and scheduling appointments. They work under the supervision of a dentist and work closely with dental hygienists. To do this job well, dental assistants must possess a combination of technical and interpersonal skills. Dental assistants must be comfortable taking direction, being a team player and following set procedures and routines. They also prefer practical, hands-on work. Click here to learn more about, pay, prospects, qualifications, pathways to advancement and other important attributes. This profile was made possible with support from Kingsborough Community College.

 

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Production Assistant

(Released July 2016)

 
 

The Production Assistant (PA) position is the main point of entry into the television and film industries, as well as sound recording. PAs perform a wide range of tasks, which can vary day by day. They are expected to maintain a clean work area, drive people and equipment to and from shooting locations, gather and create graphics and other needed audiovisual elements, maintain cast and crew schedules – also known as “call sheets” – and keep track of project information, including budgets and spending. At times, production assistants may be asked to operate a camera or fill in a more professional capacity on set. Click here to learn more about, pay, prospects, qualifications, pathways to advancement and other important attributes. This profile was made possible with support from Kingsborough Community College.

 

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New York City's Traveler Accommodation Industry: A Guide for Education and Workforce Professionals

(Released March 2013)

 
 

What kinds of jobs exist within the Traveler Accommodation industry? What do the jobs pay? What type of education and experience is needed to land a job?  and How do hoteliers recruit and hire their workforce?

To answer these questions, NYCLMIS prepared "spotlights" (or profiles) on seven of the most common jobs in the industry:


These profiles accompany the March 2013 report on Traveler Accommodation in NYC

 

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Green Occupational Spotlights

h2>(Released November 2011)

 

 
 

In collaboration with the New York State Department of Labor, the NYCLMIS prepared profiles of 10 of occupations found in the state's green economy. The profiles were produced as part of the larger Statewide Green Jobs Study. The occupations are (in separate [PDF] files):

 

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Detailed Occupation Profiles of 10 Transportation Occupations

(Released September 2008)

 
 

The following occupational profiles are excerpted from our 2008 report on the Transportation Sector:

   

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Industry Group Profiles

(Released May 2009)

 

 

In our report, Gauging Employment Prospects in New York City, 2009, NYCLMIS profiled nine industry groups of great interest to New York City's labor market and public workforce system. The profiles contain information about job and wage trends, largest local employers, employment retention during previous recessions, occupational opportunities, and workforce facts. The information can be used by workforce development professionals for business development, job placement, career counseling, and curriculum planning. Jobseekers can also use the information contained in the profiles to help make career decisions.

 

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Occupational Profiles in Real Time

 
 

As part of our work with CUNY CareerPATH, NYCLMIS prepared quarterly real time labor market information reports that helps the program managers, job developers, career counselors, and the students themselves to:

 
  • Identify which employers are searching for candidates;
  • Understand overall and seasonal hiring trends;
  • Locate where in the Metro area are the job openings;
  • Identify the skills, tools, and technologies in demand; and
  • See actual job ads.
 

Scroll below to explore and download these reports.

Accommodation Subsector

Food Service Subsector

Education


Health Care


Manufacturing

 

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Direct Support Careers in the
Developmental Disabilities Field

(Released October 2015)

 
 


With support from the U.S. Department of Labor's Employment and Training Administration, in October 2015, NYCLMIS released a white paper on Direct Support Careers in the Developmental Disabilities Field. This brief is based on an analysis of labor market data and discussions with industry experts and employers, explores jobs and career paths for people who provide direct support to individuals with developmental disabilities. In this white paper, we profiled the top jobs in the field, which are Direct Support Professional and Job Coach.
 


The New York City
Labor Market Information Service