Catch These Shows Before They Close

January 12, 2023

Museum and gallery exhibitions across New York showcase the work of Graduate Center scholars.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Photo credit: Alex Irklievski
Exhibitions at The Metropolitan Museum, the New-York Historical Society, and the United Nations feature the work of Graduate Center scholars. (Photo credit: Alex Irklievski)

Graduate Center scholars are at the center of stunning and provocative exhibitions that offer new insights into pivotal time periods, from the rise of the Black civil rights movement to the emergence of Cubism to the aftermath of World War II. Catch them this week or this month before they close.
 

Tanisha Ford and her book "Black Is Beautiful"
Professor Tanisha Ford and her book Kwame Brathwaite: Black Is Beautiful.

Professor Tanisha C. Ford (History, Biography and Memoir) first encountered the photographs of Kwame Brathwaite at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem in 2009. Riveted by provocative images of Black protestors from the 1960s, she uncovered the untold story of the photographer who helped popularize the “Black Is Beautiful” movement.

A show at the New-York Historical Society based on her book Kwame Brathwaite: Black Is Beautiful features 40 of Brathwaite’s photographs from the 1960s, including studio portraits and images of Harlem’s artistic community, and explores Brathwaite’s life and work.

The exhibition is on view through January 15 at the New-York Historical Society.
 

Blanche Wiesen Cook
Distinguished Professor Blanche Wiesen Cook on The Laura Flanders Show in 2018, episode “Women's History Makes The Future - Blanche Wiesen Cook." Screencap at 6:12.

While at the New-York Historical Society, visit the Center for Women’s History where you can watch a looping video interview with Distinguished Professor Blanche Wiesen Cook (GC/John Jay, History, Biography and Memoir, Women’s and Gender Studies), a noted women’s historian and author of an acclaimed three-volume biography of Eleanor Roosevelt.
 

Emily Braun, Photo credit: Alex Irklievski, Cubism and the Tromp l’Oeil Tradition Exhibition
Professor Emily Braun is the co-curator of Cubism and the Trompe l’Oeil Tradition at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. (Photo credit: Alex Irklievski)

Across Central Park at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, catch Cubism and the Trompe l’Oeil Tradition, co-curated by Distinguished Professor Emily Braun (GC/Hunter, Art History). The critically acclaimed show, which germinated at the Graduate Center, presents a new view of Cubism. It pairs signature works by the famously competitive Cubism founders Georges Braque, Juan Gris, and Pablo Picasso with stunning still-life paintings from the 17th and 19th centuries.

The exhibition is on view through January 22 at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
 

HI-RESOLUTION: UKRAINIAN CULTURE AND CONTEMPORARY ART NOW! photo credit: Alex Irklievski
Hi-Resolution: Ukrainian Culture and Contemporary Art Now! is on view at the James Gallery through February 18. Ukrainian artists and exhibition co-creators Tetiana Khodakivska and Oleksiy Sai stand in front of a projected image of We are the price, (2022) by Nikita Kadan, a fellow show co-creator. (Photo credit: Alex Irklievski)

You don’t need to leave the Graduate Center to be moved by remarkable art. Hi-Resolution: Ukrainian Culture and Contemporary Art Now! at the James Gallery showcases the work of 38 Ukrainian artists and spotlights the human and cultural stakes of the war in Ukraine. The exhibition, which was co-curated with Ukrainian artists, features war protest posters and projected images of Ukrainian contemporary art from before and during the war.

The exhibition is on view through February 18 at the Graduate Center’s Amie and Tony James Gallery.
 

Holocaust Exhibition
Debórah Dwork of the Center for the Study of the Holocaust, Genocide, and Crimes Against Humanity advised on a U.N. exhibition.

International Holocaust Remembrance Day is January 27, and just uptown from the Graduate Center, the United Nations is hosting After the End of the World: Displaced Persons and Displaced Persons Camps. Through photographs, newspapers, and other artifacts, the exhibition explores how Holocaust survivors navigated their new lives in displaced persons camps. The show was created with Debórah Dwork, director of the Center for the Study of the Holocaust, Genocide, and Crimes Against Humanity at the Ralph Bunche Institute, and draws on the work of the center.

The exhibition is on view through February 23 at the United Nations headquarters.

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