Course listings and room numbers subject to change. For the most up-to-date course listings, visit CUNY's course listings:

Dynamic Course Schedule

Fall 2022 Courses

 

 

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

9:30 – 11:30

 

 

 

 

Kasinitz – Soc. 82800
Migration and Popular Culture

 

11:45 – 1:45

 

 

 

 

 

2:00-4:00

Tran – Soc. 72000
QP Seminar I
(For second year students only)

Torpey – Soc. 74400
Meritocracy: Myth and Reality

Battle/Abdullah-Matta - Soc. 82901
Black America

Katz RothmanSoc. 82800
Writing for Publication

Toor Soc. 83300
Global Feminisms

Smith – Soc. 81200
Public Sociology, Ethnography, and Research Design: Fighting Inequality and Injustice

Halley – Soc. 81100
Queer and Feminist Methodologies

See Also Yin – Intro to Demography (DCP)

 

4:15-6:15

Milkman – Soc. 85913
Labor and Race in the 20th Century U.S.

Mollenkopf – Soc. 82800
Representation, and Redistricting: The Case of New York City

Gornick:  Soc. 85700
Social Welfare Policy

McCall – Soc. 71500
Statistics I

Heiland: Soc. 81900
Methods of Demographic Analysis

Lune: Soc. 84600
Social Movements

 

 

 

6:30-8:30

Porter – Soc. 81900
Quantitative Research Methods

Mooney – Soc. 85000
Gender & Violence

HammondSoc. 84510
Environmental Sociology

HalleSoc. 82301 
Computer Mapping for NY and Global Cities. Geographic Information Systems with Mapinfo: Basic and Advanced Techniques. 

PostSoc. 70100
Classical Theory

 

Prof. Van Tran - vtran@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 72000: Qualifying Paper Seminar I
Mondays, 2:00-4:00pm, 3 credits

This year-long seminar is an opportunity to conduct original research that will result in a journal article (i.e. The Qualifying Paper) that is of publishable quality in a peer-reviewed academic journal. This seminar is required of all PhD students during the second year in the program. Over the course of two semesters, you will formulate a research question, develop a theoretical argument, design a research strategy, collect and analyze your data, interpret the results, and present your argument and findings in a precise and compelling narrative form. At the end of the Fall term, you will hand in a clearly developed research proposal with a research plan. At the end of Spring term, you will hand in a complete research paper that contributes to sociological knowledge and this draft will form the basis for your first single-authored peer-reviewed article for submission. The article can be based on either an empirically-oriented or a theoretically-oriented research project, as long as it is deemed to be of publishable quality. (For second year students only.)

Prof. Ruth Milkman – rmilkman@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 85913: Labor and Race in the 20th Century U.S.
Mondays, 4:15-6:15pm, 3 credits

The rich history of labor activism among Blacks and other workers of color is well documented.  It is also beyond dispute that many white trade unionists embraced racist ideologies and/or excluded workers of color from their labor organizations, especially before 1935.  Even in that period, however, some unions did manage to build working-class unity across racial lines.  Although such cases were exceptional in the early 20th century, they began to multiply in the 1930s as the Congress of Industrial Organizations took shape.  By the end of World War II, union exclusion of workers of color was largely eliminated, although racism persisted in other forms within the labor movement.  The rise of public-sector unionism in the 1960s and 1970s introduced new dynamics thanks to the influence of the civil rights movement.

This course will explore the complex interplay of race and class in the 20th century U.S. labor movement through a series of exemplary historical case studies and selected theoretical texts.  The goal is to address the question:  under what conditions has class solidarity prevailed over white supremacy in the U.S. labor movement? 

Prof. John Mollenkopf/Keena Lipsitz - jmollenkopf@gc.cuny.edu; keena.lipsitz@qc.cuny.edu
Soc. 82800: Representation, and Redistricting: The Case of New York City
Mondays, 4:15-6:15pm, 3 credits

Focusing on the case of New York City, this course investigates how the single-member district, winner-take-all electoral system of the U.S. mediates the relationships between the spatial distribution of different kinds of racial, ethnic, and other communities and their ability to achieve political representation and empowerment.  In particular, it will examine whether the current round of redistricting reflects or dampens the political impact of the tremendous demographic changes that the city has undergone in the last decade, including not only the emergence of new immigrant communities but the movement of young progressives into the corona of blue collar minority neighborhoods around the job centers of Manhattan, the decline of old, white ethnic Catholic and Jewish neighborhoods, and the emergence of new forms of movement activism. At the outset, the course will review theories of political representation, the history of racial exclusion and voting rights legislation, the conflicts over creating “majority minority” districts, and the quality and content of the Census and other data used for redistricting. It then proceeds to a hands-on examination of the forces at play in the current process of redistricting City Council seats. Students will be introduced to the nuts and bolts of redistricting technology, the practical delineation of “communities of interest,” and the proper design city-wide districting plans. In addition to thoroughly digesting and discussing the assigned readings in the first part of the seminar, participants will undertake field research in the latter part of the seminar on how their choice of a social group (whether racial, ethnic, religious, political, national origin, lifestyle, sexual preference, etc.) or set of neighborhoods has organized itself to affect the redistricting process. This may include testimony to the Districting Commission about their findings. The seminar is co-taught by one expert in political communications, campaigns, and elections and another in political demography. Admission is by permission of instructors and reference will be given to applicants with data analysis and mapping and/or community ethnography skills.

Prof. Jeremy Porter- jporter@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 81900: Quantitative Research Methods
Mondays, 6:30-8:30pm, 3 credits

This course will cover issues pertaining to the applied research process in the collection, management, and analysis of quantitative data. Methods covered are intended to give students experience with a broad array of specific quantitative methods and a directed focus on the perspectives that underlie the application of such methods. The explicit goal of the course is to give students the foundational tools necessary to do high quality quantitative research in applied and academic settings. A sample of topics covered include; the science of science, the politics and ethics of research, developing novel research ideas, item measurement, instrumentation, sampling, understanding statistical inference, and a wide variety of topics associated with the collection, management, and analysis of quantitative data.​

Prof. John Torpey - jtorpey@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 74400: Meritocracy: Myth and Reality
Tuesdays, 2:00-4:00pm, 3 credits

The Supreme Court has announced that it will hear two cases bearing on affirmative action – and hence on “merit” in higher education, one emanating from Harvard and the other from the University of North Carolina. Meanwhile, Harvard political philosopher Michael Sandel, author of a recent critique of “the tyranny of merit,” advised German Social Democratic chancellor candidate Olaf Scholz to use the campaign theme of “respect” that helped him get elected.  Prominent controversies have arisen over the criteria for admission into several selective public high schools around the country.  What is “meritocracy” and where did it come from?  Is it good or bad as a principle for organizing society?  What does its future look like? We will explore the meaning of “merit” and “meritocracy” comparatively and historically in an effort to answer these questions.

Profs. Juan Battle/Allia Abdullah-Matta - jbattle@gc.cuny.edu; amatta@lagcc.cuny.edu
Soc. 82901: Black America
Tuesdays, 2:00-4:00pm, 3 credits

This course will serve as a broad survey of the Black experience (mainly) within the United States. Because students will be exposed to (and contribute from) a wide variety of perspectives on the subject, this course is appropriate for students in the traditional social sciences (e.g. sociology, anthropology, psychology, urban education, and history) as well as more contemporary ones (e.g. women’s studies, race studies, American studies, cultural studies, lesbian and gay studies).

Prof. Janet Gornick - jgornick@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 85700: Social Welfare Policy
Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15pm, 3 credits

This course will examine social welfare policy in the United States, in historical and cross‐national perspective. We will begin with an overview of the development of social welfare policy in the United States. We will focus on crucial historical periods – including the Civil War years, the Progressive Era, the New Deal, the Great Society, and the “welfare reform” of the 1990s and early 2000s. Second, we will assess “the big picture” of the American welfare state, through the lens of its underlying institutional framework. Third, we will analyze a set of contemporary challenges that call for active policy responses, such as severe poverty, low‐wage work, homelessness, and the care deficit. Finally, we will survey selected social policy lessons from other high‐income countries, especially in Europe, where social provisions are typically more extensive than they are in the United States.

Students will complete weekly reaction papers, and a semester-long research project which will culminate in a paper.

Prof. Leslie McCall - lmccall@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 71500: Statistics I
Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15pm, 3 credits

This course provides an overview of introductory statistics as applied to sociological and other social scientific research. Topics covered include single-variable data description (measures of central tendency, measures of variability, and graphing), fundamentals of inferential statistics (probability and the normal curve, samples and populations, hypothesis testing), and associations between two variables (ANOVA, Chi-square, correlation, and bivariate linear regression analysis). The course will also introduce students to the software package R for the analysis of social science data. No prior knowledge of statistics or R is necessary.

Prof. Jayne Mooney - jmooney@jjay.cuny.edu
Soc. 85000: Gender & Violence
Tuesdays, 6:30-8:30pm, 3 credits

This course explores the relationship between gender, crime and the criminal justice system. It focuses on feminist historical, sociological and socio-legal scholarship to examine the ways in which gender affects patterns of offending, victimization, and imprisonment. It critically engages with the intersections between gender, race, class and sexuality and analyzes how these impact on the treatment of women, as victims, survivors and offenders. It provides an overview of the historical neglect of women’s contributions to sociological and criminological theory.

Cultural representations of masculinity and femininity are considered throughout. Debates are explored on the construction of masculinit(ies) in contemporary society, and recent work on transfeminism and non-binary gender identities. Specific topics to be covered include: violence against women, fear of crime, sex work, war, gangs, serial killing, imprisonment, immigration and feminist research methods

Prof. Barbara Katz Rothman - bkatzrothman@gc.cuny.edu 
Soc. 82800: Writing for Publication
Wednesdays, 2:00-4:00pm, 3 credits

This course will have two components: one is a scholarly sociological study of publishing itself: an examination of the worlds and institutions of knowledge-production and dissemination.  We will consider book publishing, following and more recent changes in the world of book publishing.  Similarly, we will explore the contemporary issues in journal publication, including issues of copyright and new technologies, current debates and concerns about journal costs and distribution, and ongoing discussions of ethical concerns in academic publishing in an increasingly commercialized world.

The second component is more pragmatic, in which students take their own work thru the appropriate and necessary steps for publication in a variety of media.  Topics we will cover include how to do book reviews, how to prepare a paper for presentation and then for publication, how to participate in anthology writing, how to prepare a book proposal, and how to construct a book out of a dissertation.  Each student will (at minimum) and with the support of the instructor and class, write and publish two book reviews; submit papers to three academic meetings; prepare one journal article for submission; prepare and submit one article to a non-academic publication such as an op-ed article; and prepare a (draft) book proposal based on dissertation work.

Prof. Saadia Toor - saadia.toor@csi.cuny.edu
Soc. 83300: Global Feminisms
Wednesdays, 2:00-4:00pm, 3 credits

With the rise of authoritarian regimes around the world, what insights do feminist movements and theorizing offer? What are the fault lines between different forms of feminisms? How do liberal feminist ideals and principles intertwine with an imperial agenda? What are the links and divergences between Islamaphobia and racism? Who should be the arbiter of “equality,” “fairness,” and “human rights”? What ethical questions shape the practices of feminism and feminist politics both domestically and internationally? What is the relationship between modes of production, political economy, and gender politics? What are the possibilities and limits of a transnational feminist politics?  What are the material conditions/structural factors which enable and/or undermine transnational feminist solidarity? This course grapples with some of these questions in the wake of rapid world altering changes.

We will explore the gender dynamics of racial, ethnic, and economic relations of power in domestic, international, and transnational settings. We will examine feminist scholarship produced by and about American women of color, women from the global south, and other social and political actors whose experiences and thinking have shaped contemporary ideas about gender, power, and international political economies. We will explore how both self-identified feminists and people who do not consider themselves feminists write about and understand gender, justice, human rights, tolerance, agency, imperialism, and other relevant topics. We will also examine how women and self-identified feminists practice solidarity across and within national boundaries, paying attention to the possibilities and constraints that shape transnational feminist activism. We will look at both empirical and theoretical texts from a range of academic disciplines

Students will have a chance to engage with feminist activists from different parts of the world through guest lectures whenever possible, and will be encouraged to connect with local/transnational feminist groups.

Prof. Robert Smith - robert.smith@baruch.cuny.edu
Soc. 81200: Public Sociology, Ethnography, and Research Design: Fighting Inequality and Injustice
Wednesdays, 2:00-4:00pm, 3 credits

This course focuses on publicly engaged sociology (or public sociology) that seeks to fight inequality and injustice. The course tries to address a key problem in graduate school and sociological careers: most of us go into sociology because it helps illuminate problems in the world, but we are taught much less about how to address those problems and make change with our research. The class will do readings from three types of publicly engaged sociology – Reframing, Debunking, or Alarm Sounding; Institutionally Engaged; and Community Engaged – which differ in their goals and the implications for graduate school and early sociological careers.  A key case study will be the Stories and Numbers Project in Texas (advocating for and protecting transgender children, especially, in Texas). We will do deep dives into both substantive professional sociological work produced publicly engaged sociologists – including analyzing their research design, questions, methods, and final written analysis – and into their publicly oriented products – including websites, expert witness work, public testimonies, and other disseminations. We will discuss cultivating and navigating research relationships with research participants, community-based organizations, institutions, government, or other entities. For class papers, students can use their own fieldwork or other publicly engaged research for their class papers, dissertation proposals, or other work product that helps move their work forward. 

Prof. Frank Heiland - frank.heiland@baruch.cuny.edu
Soc. 81900/DCP 70200: Methods of Demographic Analysis
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15pm, 3 credits

This course gives students an overview of some of the major demographic methods used in the study of population, and includes the standard procedures for the measurement of fertility, mortality, natural increase, migration, and nuptiality. Students will learn how to construct demographic rates, life tables, and population projections, and how to carry out standardization, decomposition of differences, analysis of fertility and nuptiality patterns, analysis invoking model life tables and stable population theory, and analysis of nonstable populations.

Prof. Howard Lune - hlune@hunter.cuny.edu
Soc. 84600: Social Movements
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15pm, 3 credits

This class on Social Movements will address power, inequality, and politics. We will consider forms privilege in society, the means by which subdominant groups organize to improve their situations, the ways in which dominant groups organize to stop them, and how others adopt social movement methods to work for change on their own behalf. Topics will include organizing, mobilization, recruitment, collective action, collective identities, strategies, tactics, measuring outcomes, and long term impacts.

Prof. Jack Hammond - jhammond@hunter.cuny.edu
Soc. 84510: Environmental Sociology
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30pm, 3 credits

This course will cover the relation between human communities and the biophysical environment. We will examine that interaction and its benefits and burdens for human communities and for other species. We will consider the political-economic base of these interactions and the meanings attributed to them in different cultures. Theories in environmental sociology: ecocentrism, ecofeminism, deep ecology, social construction, ecomodernism, ecological Marxism, world systems theory, degrowth. Environmental justice within and between nations. The effect of production processes, energy use, technology, and consumption patterns on the environment. Environmental harm as a byproduct of everyday interaction processes. Methods of ecological analysis.

We will study the environmental crisis, though that will not be the main focus of the course. We will examine recognition and denial of human-made climate change and the reception and rejection of science in politics and in the public. Movements to protect the environment; movements for environmental justice to hold perpetrators accountable and to secure environmental equity for marginalized groups.

Prof. David Halle - dhalle10@gmail.com
Soc. 82301: Computer Mapping for NY, and Global Cities. Geographic Information Systems with Mapinfo: Basic and Advanced Techniques
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30pm, 3 credits

An introduction to computer mapping (Geographic Information Systems), using the software Mapinfo. We will learn the techniques of computer mapping to analyze the latest developments in New York and Los Angeles, both the cities and regions, and other global cities. We will analyze the most recently available census data, and the decennial census data for 2020, 2010, 2000, 1990, 1980 and 1970 for New York and Los Angeles. We will map such topics as the distribution of income, occupations, racial and ethnic groups, and foreign-born. We will also map crime at the level of the police precinct, political data including Presidential, mayoral and congressional elections, city and county boundaries, world cities, environmental data, the Corona virus, transportation, housing, schools and education data, and zoning matters including historic districts.  We will map, and discuss, such key topics as the decline of the classic “ghetto” and the Latinization of inner city neighborhoods, the movement of ethnic groups to the suburbs, gentrification, the 2007- financial crisis including the housing bubble, the affordable housing crisis, the ecology and “green” movement, flooding including Hurricane Sandy,  attempts to reform the school systems, arts and cultural institutions, restaurants,   de Blasio’s mayoralty, the 2021 NY Mayoral election and Mayor Adams’s impact, police killings and related protests. Students are encouraged to bring to class, and develop during the semester, any ongoing research they are doing.

Prof. Philip Kasinitz - pkasinitz@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 82800: Migration and Popular Culture
Thursdays, 9:30-11:30am, 3 credits

International migration and the ethnic diversity created in its wake are often studied as matters of demography or economics. However, diversity also has enormous implications for the culture and everyday life experiences of people in both sending and receiving societies. In this experimental course, run jointly with the Migration Studies Master’s Program at the University of Liege Belgium, we will examine the debates over ethnic diversity and national identity and compare how diversity is experienced in Europe and the United States.  We will look specifically at popular culture—music, visual art, drama and sports as well as well as everyday interaction in the public spaces and shopping streets of diverse cities on both sides of the Atlantic. We will then turn to the broader questions of cultural identity (is there a “leading culture” in multi-ethnic societies and what does that mean?), language policy and the politics of cultural production and national identity in various societies.

Prof. Jean Halley - jean.halley@csi.cuny.edu
Soc. 81000: Queer and Feminist Methodologies
Thursdays, 2:00-4:00pm, 3 credits

What does it mean to “know” something? And how do we come to know what we know? This course examines feminist and queer critiques of knowledge, disciplinary boundaries and research methods. We focus on how queer and feminist scholars challenge conventional theories of knowledge, propose feminist and queer theories and employ queer and feminist methodologies in their interdisciplinary research. We ask how feminist and queer theory, politics and social movements shape the kind of research questions queer and feminist scholars ask and the types of evidence they use. This course examines three core categories of research methodology – multivariate/quantitative, historical, and interpretative/qualitative. We consider how queer and feminist scholars use these various methodologies – and politicize them (queer them) – to develop their research and make theoretical claims.

This course provides students with the opportunity to explore the integration of theoretical knowledge with practical research skills. Ideally, by the end of this course, you will have gained a better sense of how the knowledge you have learned in formal instruction can be applied (and modified) through engagement with research to queer and feminist ends. The most important elements of the course will be class participation, a presentation, one short paper and a final research paper.

Prof. Charles Post - cpost@bmcc.cuny.edu
Soc. 70100: The Development of Sociological Theory I: Classical Theory
Thursdays, 6:30-8:30pm, 3 credits

This course will involve a close reading of the central works of classical sociological theory--Smith, Marx, Weber and Durkheim. The course will focus on how these different sociological theorists understood the origins and specificity of the modern world. Among the themes to be discussed will include social class and work, the dynamics of the modern economy and society, and the construction of the modern state. Readings will be substantial.

Past Courses

Prof. Leslie McCall - lmccall@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 82800: Intersectionality in the Social Sciences
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15pm, 3 credits
This course will begin with an overview of key original texts by intersectionality scholars in and connected to the social sciences in the United States, such as texts by Patricia Hill Collins, Kimberle Crenshaw, and Evelyn Nakano Glenn. This will be followed by readings of key later texts that introduced and amplified on the concept within different social science disciplines (e.g., Ange-Marie Hancock in political science; Elizabeth Cole in psychology), and also raised questions over the definition and scope of the term (e.g., Jennifer Nash). For the remainder of the course, we will examine intersectional research on a wide range of topics, including intersectional inequalities in political representation, income, education, family, health, and criminal justice. We will also consider different approaches to the topic across the globe, and I will welcome suggestions for readings on other aspects of intersectionality related to students’ areas of interest and expertise.

Prof. John Torpey - jtorpey@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 85913: Anti-Racism in Comparative-Historical Perspective
Tuesdays, 2:00-4:00pm, 3 credits
This course addresses the changing meaning of “antiracism” from the founding of the United States to the present day.  We will explore the varying meanings of the idea of antiracism in the context of the times in which they were set.  Readings will range from commentary on the American Constitution to the arguments of today’s “neo-universalists” and may include the writings of Nikole Hannah-Jones, Frederick Douglass, W. E. B. Dubois, Ida Wells, James Baldwin, Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, the Report of the Kerner Commission, Bob Blauner, George Fredrickson, Kimberle’ Crenshaw, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Ibram X. Kendi, Robin DiAngelo, Adolph Reed, Toure’ Reed, Randall Kennedy, Rogers Brubaker, John McWhorter, Ian Haney-Lopez, Wesley Yang, Ruy Teixeira, and John Halpin.  Class discussion will be the heart of the course; students will be expected to do all the readings and be prepared to discuss them.

Profs. Greg Smithsimon/Van Tran - gsmithsimon@brooklyn.cuny.edu; vtran@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 72100: Qualifying Paper Seminar II
Thursdays, 2:00-4:00pm, 3 credits

This year-long seminar is an opportunity to conduct original research that will result in a journal article (i.e. The Qualifying Paper) that is of publishable quality in a peer-reviewed academic journal. This seminar is required of all PhD students during the second year in the program. Over the course of two semesters, you will formulate a research question, develop a theoretical argument, design a research strategy, collect and analyze your data, interpret the results, and present your argument and findings in a precise and compelling narrative form. At the end of the Fall term, you will hand in a clearly developed research proposal with a research plan. At the end of Spring term, you will hand in a complete research paper that contributes to sociological knowledge and this draft will form the basis for your first single-authored peer-reviewed article for submission. The article can be based on either an empirically-oriented or a theoretically-oriented research project, as long as it is deemed to be of publishable quality. (For second year students only.)

Prof. Jeremy Porter - jporter@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 81900: Spatial Data Analysis
Mondays, 6:30-8:30pm, 3 credits

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has emerged as an essential tool for public health researchers and practitioners. The GIS for Public Health course will offer students an opportunity to gain skills in using GIS software to apply spatial analysis techniques to public health research questions. The laboratory section of the course will give students the opportunity for hands-on learning in how to use GIS systems to analyze data and produce maps and reports. These laboratory exercises will be designed to increasingly challenge the students to incorporate the analytic skills and techniques they have learned in other courses with the geospatial and spatial statistics techniques commonly used in GIS.​

Prof. Barbara Katz Rothman - bkatzrothman@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 83100: Sociology of Health and Illness
Wednesdays, 2:00-4:00pm, 3 credits

This course offers an introduction to the field classically known as medical sociology, with an emphasis on newer qualitative, critical and theoretical work. Key themes in Medical Sociology have included the social construction of illness and its ongoing expansion into more areas of life; the medical gaze and the processes of medicalization; how the medicalized body is framed; representations of the body in medicine; cultural images, ethnographies and narratives of disease and illness; and cultural understandings of medical subjects. When we take seriously the call to do a truly global sociology, we can see Biomedicine operating at a level and in a way in which national boundaries are but minor obstacles in organizing access – access of providers of services to their customers or to their research material, and access of customers to services. In that sense, the ‘social construction’ idea is too passive, and too limited in boundaries. Illnesses are being constructed not only ‘socially,’ in each society according to its own ideas about the body, but in the pursuit of industrial profit. While Foucault spoke of the state uses of bio power,  we will also consider how biopower, as it is institutionalized in the Biomedical Empire, uses states.

Prof. David Halle 
Soc. 86800: Sociology of Culture
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30pm, 3 credits

We will study the main theoretical approaches (classical and contemporary) to understanding the cultural dimension of social life, and will do so by seeing how far they can illuminate a range of case studies of cultural areas. The theoretical perspectives include: Veblen and status theory, Marxism, the Frankfurt school, Durkheim, the mass culture school, “creative culture” approaches; consumption theorists, the British school of cultural studies (e.g. Raymond Williams, Stuart Hall), Modernism and post-Modernism, the “popular culture” versus “high culture” debate, cultural capital theory, the sociology of boundaries and cultural identity theory, Richard Florida and “creative class”/creative production approaches, Internet and Social Media theorists, debates over public policy towards the arts including theories of cultural controversy, and students will be encouraged to develop new theories. We will see how far these theories can illuminate a range of case studies of cultural areas that include film/movies; music; political views/attitudes;  museums/concert halls/theme parks; theater/Broadway; fashion; art; religion; sports; night life, clubs, bars-restaurants;  architecture; the internet/online entertainment/social media; television; literature, food; the Coronavirus.

Prof. John Mollenkopf
Soc. 81100: Data Analysis for Urban Politics and Public Policy
Mondays, 4:15-6:15pm, 3 credits

This course will take students through all of the key data sources relevant to the study of urban politics and introduce the analytic techniques used to combine and interpret them. Census data sources will include the American Community Survey (both the geographic files and the microdata), the decennial Census (block level data used for redistricting), and the Current Population Survey voting and civic engagement supplements. Administrative electoral data sources will include the voter registration file, the voter history file, and augmented sources such as L2 and VAN. Survey data sources linked with geographic identifiers will include the CUNY Civic and Electoral Engagement surveys, the Cooperative Congressional Election Study, the American National Election Study, and related large scale surveys of minority and immigrant voting behavior and political attitudes. Analytic techniques will include basic descriptive statistics, cluster analysis and taxonomy, multiple regression, HLM, ecological inference, and spatial statistics (with GIS). The goals of the course include achieving facility with these data sources and working towards defining the political-electoral ecology of New York City (or other places of particular interest to seminar participants). Competence in at least one statistical software program, such as SPSS, STATA, or R, is required. Introductory familiarity with a GIS program would also be valuable preparation, but is not required.

Prof. Janet Gornick
Soc. 84700: Women, Work, and Public Policy
Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15pm, 3 credits
This course provides an overview of key issues affecting women in the workplace in the United States and in other high-income countries. We will begin with an overview of basic economic principles of labor markets, specifically as they concern gender inequality. We will examine both theory and empirical research, taking a multidimensional approach to understanding gender inequality at work – covering gender gaps in employment rates, in working time, in occupation, and in earnings. We then turn to a series of book-length studies of women’s experiences in paid work, both historically and in the contemporary United States. Throughout this section, we will take an intersectional approach – considering how women’s employment experiences have been shaped by race, class, nativity, sexuality, and place. In the final section of the course, we will turn our attention to policies and institutions that shape women’s experiences in paid work, and gender inequality in the labor market more generally. We will assess the institutional landscape in the United States and compare that to policy configurations operating in other affluent countries. Students will complete weekly reaction papers, and a semester-long research project which will culminate in a paper. 
*All Master's students must obtain permission from Professor Gornick before registering

Prof. Lynn Chancer/Lucia Trimbur
Soc. 70200: Contemporary Theory
Mondays, 2:00-4:00pm, 3 credits
This graduate seminar is the second course in a two-course series examining important social theorists and their contributions to the development of American sociology. We focus on the projects that most contribute to an analysis of the contemporary world, especially Marxism, critical race theory, psychoanalysis, post-structuralism, feminist theory, queer theory, and postcolonial theory. Our overarching goal is to understand how theoretical arguments are made: their logics, underlying assumptions, contradictions, and use of evidence. To do this, we will (1) look closely at contemporary theorists’ ideas, (2) historically situate the authors of these ideas, and (3) consider how their ideas relate to past and current social circumstances. We also spend time connecting contemporary theories to those we studied in Classical Social Theory.

Prof. Frank Heiland
Soc. 81900/DCP 70200: Methods of Demographic Analysis 
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15pm, 3 credits
This course gives students an overview of some of the major demographic methods used in the study of population, and includes the standard procedures for the measurement of fertility, mortality, natural increase, migration, and nuptiality. Students will learn how to construct demographic rates, life tables, and population projections, and how to carry out standardization, decomposition of differences, analysis of fertility and nuptiality patterns, analysis invoking model life tables and stable population theory, and analysis of nonstable populations.

Prof. David Brotherton
Soc. 81500: Deportation & Ethnographic Immigration
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30pm, 3 credits

This course is an overview of the fields of sociology and criminology that link deportation to processes of migration, social control, state formation, global political economy and social processes of inclusion and exclusion. The deportation of non-citizens has become a major issue in the United States as well as internationally. Literally millions of legal and "illegal" non-citizens have been removed from the U.S. during the past two decades in what is the largest and most enduring process of human expulsion from a Western country since the holocaust. A dramatic hardening of the U.S. immigration laws was enacted in 1996 and since then policies governing citizenship and residency have become increasingly punitive, tied to the moral crusades on drugs, terrorism, gangs and the immigrant and the economic paradigms of neo-liberalism. The erection of borders, both internal and external, symbolic and substantive, has been a key characteristic of these processes. Paradoxically, the United States has been "traditionally" viewed as a nation of immigrants, albeit a colonial settler one in which the indigenous populations were violently and systematically expelled from their ancestral lands only to be subsequently reincorporated and 'assimilated" as "minority" subpopulations. In this course we take a critical-ethnographic lens to the dynamics, practices and sociological contexts of the deportation regimes in the U.S. and beyond, focusing on both epistemological and methodological issues that are highlighted in the research literature. Students are also encouraged to experience the terrain of deportation first-hand with guidance from the instructor.

Prof. Charles Post
Soc 82901: The "New Capitalism"

Tuesdays, 6:30 - 8:30 pm, 3 credits
Over the past forty years, capitalist societies in the global North have experienced profound changes. In what is often referred to as the era of neo-liberalism, many analysts have argued that the most profound structural and institutional features of capitalism have been permanently altered. These attempts to analyze the “new capitalism” focus on three transformations: 1) “de-industrialization”—the decline of manufacturing employment in the global North; 2) “precarity”—the growth of part-time, temporary and unstable employment; and 3) “financialization”—the financial sectors’ displacement of industry as the driving force of the modern economy. This course will seek to critically interrogate these three trends, both conceptually and empirically. Has manufacturing actually disappeared in the global North? How do we account for the declining percentage of manufacturing workers in the total labor forces? What is the actual extent of “precarious” employment? Does the distribution of stable and precarious employment vary from sector to sector? To what extent has financial profitability become independent of profitability in the ‘real economy’? What is the relationship between the growth of finance and the radical reorganization of productive activity over the past forty years? Readings will be substantial, varied and historical in perspective.

Prof. Philips Kasinitz
Soc 82800: Global Immigrant Cities
Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15pm, 3 credits
This course asks the question of how various migrant-receiving global cities experience, respond to, and are transformed by the changing composition of their ethnic populations. Looking at several European, North American, Latin American, and Asian cities, it will explore their histories of ethnic and racial difference; the ways in which their ideologies about diversity, pluralism, and multiculturalism have evolved and changed over time; the extent to which they incorporate (or do not incorporate) their migrants; and the different economic, cultural, and political impacts that migration has had on these global immigrant cities. The main focus will be on international comparison, and students will be trained in the use of comparative perspectives to illustrate similarities and differences between cities. Global immigrant cities are crucial research sites for exploring the possibility of going “beyond” the nation-state-society focus of most mainstream American research. Also, while opening the door to a crucial dimension of globalization, the comparative study of migration opens up a fresh comparative and international perspective on the urban experience. Taking advantage of our location and extensive local knowledge, the course will use New York as the basis of comparison with other major global cities, such as Los Angeles, Paris, London, Berlin, Amsterdam, Toronto, Shanghai, and Buenos Aires.

Prof. Jeremy Porter
Soc. 71600: Sociological Statistics II
Thursdays, 6:30-8:30pm, 3 credits

The broad focus of this course will be on applications of multivariate analysis in social science research, including Multiple Regression, Multivariate Analysis of Variance/Covariance, Factor Analysis, Categorical Data Analysis, among other relevant topics. The goals of this course are to provide students with an understanding of the principles underlying commonly used multivariate analysis approaches within the field of Sociology. Specifically, students will 1) acquire an understanding of some fundamental concepts in multivariate statistics, 2) become proficient in the performance of corresponding statistical procedures, and 3) be able to appropriately communicate these statistical concepts and skills to academic and lay audiences.

Prof. Amy Adamczyk
Soc. 82800: Publishing
Thursdays, 4:15-6:15pm, 3 credits

This course focuses on publishing. Students who take this course will improve their writing skills, practice critiquing academic research, and learn about the publication process, strategies for improving the impact of their work, and the importance of publishing for obtaining grants and advancing their careers. A major goal for the course is to develop an academic article for submission to a peer reviewed journal. Students should come to class with a completed study (possibly one that they wrote in another class or for other purposes) that they can spend time developing into a submission for a peer reviewed journal article.  Students will develop multiple drafts of their manuscript for submission, review and edit peers' papers, and review papers submitted to academic journals. The course will cover different types of publishing, for both academic and non-academic audiences, including refereed journals, books and monographs, textbooks, edited volumes, and in non-academic outlets such as blogs, opinion pieces, and social media.

Prof. Carla Shedd
Soc. 81000: Methods and Methodologies
Mondays, 4:15-6:15pm, 3 credits

This course broadly considers ‘methods and methodologies’ to include developing research ideas and data into more advanced stages of analysis, supplementary data collection, writing, conceptualization, publication, dissemination, and application. In terms of topic areas, this course will focus on race, place, inequality, and social institutions, again broadly interpreted. Students who have initiated research on these topics are especially encouraged to register.

Prof. Yung-Yi Diana Pan - ypan@brooklyn.cuny.edu
Soc. 74100:
 Diversity in Professions 
Mondays, 4:15-6:15, 3 credits
The professions is often considered an elite space, and once one secures entry, there are few concerns. This course will interrogate those notions by exploring how diversity – gender, race, immigrant background, class – is understood and practiced within the professions. We will engage with both classical and contemporary work on sociology of the professions, from Rosabeth Moss Kanter’s Men and Women of the Corporation(1977), to CUNY’s own Margaret Chin’s STUCK: Why Asian Americans Don’t Reach the Top of the Corporate Ladder(2020). We will consider the processes of professional socialization, the cultural structures of professions, and whether diversity is a part of professional agenda. 
Students are required to critically engage with readings and actively participate in seminar discussions.

Prof. Liza G. Steele - lsteele@jjay.cuny.edu
Soc. 74400: 
Global Social Stratification 
Mondays, 11:45-1:45, 3 credits
This course explores economic inequality and social stratification in global perspective. Students analyze economic and social inclusion and exclusion, with a particular focus on cases from the Global South. Sample topics include human rights, development, race in Brazil and South Africa, gender and Islam, the welfare state, and basic income.

Prof. Leslie McCall - lmccall@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 71500: Sociological Statistic I

Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15, 3 credits
This course provides an overview of introductory statistics as applied to sociological and other social scientific research. Topics covered include single-variable data description (measures of central tendency, measures of variability, and graphing), fundamentals of inferential statistics (probability and the normal curve, samples and populations, hypothesis testing), and associations between two variables (ANOVA, Chi-square, correlation, and bivariate linear regression analysis). The course will also introduce students to the software package R for the analysis of social science data. No prior knowledge of statistics or R is necessary.
 
Prof. Richard Ocejo - rocejo@jjay.cuny.edu
Soc. 72500: Urban Sociology 
Thursdys, 2:00-4:00, 3 credits
This course will introduce students to a variety of sociological theories and approaches for studying cities and urban life. The aim is to cover as much of the canon as possible and expose students to current explanations and debates. We will start with early theorizing and empirical research on the relationship between modernity and urbanism and proceed to discuss some of today’s most important discourses and studies for understanding space, inequality, segregation, and growth in an era of extreme globalization. The course will look at such topics as urban political economy, race and space, racial capitalism, gentrification, cities and climate change, culture and placemaking, housing, and global urban sociology. It will also consider sociology’s contribution to the larger field of urban studies.
Finally, since City & Community, the official journal of the Community and Urban Sociology Section of the American Sociological Association, is now based at the Graduate Center, it will serve as key source for many of our readings and discussions. Students will also gain meaningful insight into the backstage workings of an academic journal, learn how to frame their work as an article, and engage in some journal-related activities.  

Prof. Susan Opotow - sopotow@jjay.cuny.edu
Soc. 85000: Using Archives in Social Justice Research

Tuesdays, 9:30-11:30, 3 credits
Archives offer rich textual and material data that can deepen our understanding of societal issues. They can place individual and collective social justice efforts within particular socio-political and historical contexts. The graduate course is designed to foster students’ knowledge, skills, and strategies for using physical, digital, or hybrid archives to study research questions of interest to them. The course, grounded in the social science and humanities literatures on archival theory and practice, will deepen students’ knowledge of archive as a construct, a societal resource, and a repository vulnerable to politicization. To learn how social science and humanities scholars use archives to advance social justice, we read, for example, about community-based archives; archives documenting oppression and human rights; and archival ethics. Alongside our attention to theory and method, this is also structured as a studio course in its attention to the empirical development of students’ ideas and research. By the course's end, students will have begun and progressed on their own archival projects.

Prof. John Torpey - jtorpey@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 82200: Comparing Pandemics: A Social and Historical Examination 

Wednesdays, 2:00-4:00, 3 credits
This course examines epidemic diseases and their social consequences across historical time and geographic space.  We will focus primarily on the Black Death of the mid-fourteenth century, smallpox and its role in the conquest of the Americas, the “Spanish” flu pandemic of 1918-1919, and the coronavirus pandemic of 2020-2021(?). We will seek to understand how different societies were affected by these plagues, how they responded to them, and the consequences of these public health and social crises for the societies in question.

Prof. Pyong Gap Min - pyonggap.min@qc.cuny.edu
Soc. 85800: Asian Americans

Thursdays, 6:30-8:30, 3 credits *Online
This course intends to examine several important aspects of Asian American experiences. They include (1) Asians’ immigration to the U.S. and their settlement patterns, (2) their socioeconomic attainments, (3) their family and marital patterns, (4) second-generation Asians’ ethnic identity formation, (4) their religious affiliations and practices, and (5) their transnational linkages to the homeland. Major Asian ethnic groups include Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Indian, Filipino, and Vietnamese groups. Reading materials will cover these six major Asian groups. Teaching will be conducted virtually in the 2021 fall semester. In a virtual class, students can learn most from reading assigned materials. So, I will put emphasis on students’ reading of assigned materials for each class in evaluating their performances.

Prof. Sharon Zukin - szukin@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 82800/EES 79903: Urban Research Seminar: Space and Power
Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15, 3 credits *Hybrid

Today’s intertwined crises of economy, public health, and climate change challenge us to develop new research models to interpret and enact multiple forms of diversity, equity, and empowerment.  How are social barriers being reshaped by new discourses, organizations, and geographies?  Will agglomerations like New York City survive in their current form or break apart into disparate communities and metropolitan colonies?
Unpacking the social construction of space and power in distinctive urban forms, this workshop will introduce two New York-based projects—one on rezoning in SoHo and Gowanus and the other on the city’s tech ecosystem—and invite students to collaborate in developing their own research.  We will read a small number of case studies and follow media coverage and social media accounts, make ethnographic observations of meetings (on Zoom or in person, according to public health restrictions), analyze specific questions by constructing large databases, and, if possible, carry out interviews.  The final product will be the write up of an individual case study or a part of a larger research project that can lead to a dissertation, journal article, video, or podcast.
Students who want to ask about a specific research project should email Sharon Zukin (szukin@gc.cuny.edu) in advance.

Prof. Roslyn​ Bologh - roslyn.bologh@csi.cuny.edu
Soc 74600: Capitalism, Culture and Crisis 

Tuesdays, 6:30-8:30, 3 credits *Online
This course will focus on the relationship between capitalism, culture and crisis.  We will examine the current historical moment -- focusing on political economy, ideology and other aspects of social life and culture. How are different individuals, groups and  communities as well as nation states and regions affected and how are they reacting; what kinds of changes are occurring; what kinds of developments are taking place?  How can we understand these changes?  What are the current debates and theories?  How are they related to capitalism, culture and crisis?  How can a background in critical theory and political economy provide a basis for critically addressing the issues of today? 

Profs. Gregory Smithsimon and Van Tran - gsmithsimon@brooklyn.cuny.edu; vtran@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 72100: Qualifying Paper Seminar I
Mondays, 2:00-4:00pm, 3 credits

This year-long seminar is an opportunity to conduct original research that will result in a journal article (i.e. The Qualifying Paper) that is of publishable quality in a peer-reviewed academic journal. This seminar is required of all PhD students during the second year in the program. Over the course of two semesters, you will formulate a research question, develop a theoretical argument, design a research strategy, collect and analyze your data, interpret the results, and present your argument and findings in a precise and compelling narrative form. At the end of the Fall term, you will hand in a clearly developed research proposal with a research plan. At the end of Spring term, you will hand in a complete research paper that contributes to sociological knowledge and this draft will form the basis for your first single-authored peer-reviewed article for submission. The article can be based on either an empirically-oriented or a theoretically-oriented research project, as long as it is deemed to be of publishable quality. (For second year students only.)

Prof. David Halle - dhalle10@gmail.com
Soc. 82301:Computer Mapping for LA & NY, and Global Cities GIS with Mapinfo: Basic and Advanced Techniques
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30, 3 credits

An introduction to computer mapping (Geographic Information Systems), using the software Mapinfo. We will learn the techniques of computer mapping to analyze the latest developments in New York and Los Angeles, both the cities and regions, and other global cities. We will analyze the most recently available census data, and the decennial census data for 2020, 2010, 2000, 1990, 1980 and 1970 for New York and Los Angeles. We will map such topics as the distribution of income, occupations, racial and ethnic groups, and foreign-born. We will also map crime at the level of the police precinct, political data including Presidential, mayoral and congressional elections, city and county boundaries, world cities, environmental data, the Corona virus, transportation, housing, schools and education data, restaurants, and zoning matters including historic districts. We will map, and discuss, such key topics as ethnic and demographic changes in the inner city, various waves of suburbanization including the latest Covid related, gentrification, the 2007- financial crisis including the housing bubble, the affordable housing crisis, the ecology and “green” movement, flooding including Hurricane Sandy, attempts to reform the school systems, arts and cultural institutions, protest movements including Black Lives Matter, and de Blasio’s impact and policies. Students are encouraged to bring to class, and develop during the semester, any ongoing research they are doing. 

Prof. Jeremy Porter- jporter@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 81900: Quantitative Research Methods 
Mondays, 6:30-8:30pm, 3 credits

This course will cover issues pertaining to the applied research process in the collection, management, and analysis of quantitative data. Methods covered are intended to give students experience with a broad array of specific quantitative methods and a directed focus on the perspectives that underlie the application of such methods. The explicit goal of the course is to give students the foundational tools necessary to do high quality quantitative research in applied and academic settings. A sample of topics covered include; the science of science, the politics and ethics of research, developing novel research ideas, item measurement, instrumentation, sampling, understanding statistical inference, and a wide variety of topics associated with the collection, management, and analysis of quantitative data.​

Prof. Jack Hammond - jhammond@hunter.cuny.edu
Soc. 84510: Environmental sociology
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15pm, 3 credits

This course will cover the relation between human communities and the biophysical environment. We will examine that interaction and its benefits and burdens for human communities and for other species.  We will consider the political-economic base of these interactions and the meanings attributed to them in different cultures. Theories in environmental sociology: ecocentrism, political economy, ecomodernism, degrowth. Environmental justice within and between nations. The effect of production processes, energy use, technology, and consumption patterns on the environment. Environmental harm as a byproduct of everyday interaction processes. Methods of ecological analysis.
We will study the environmental crisis, though that will not be the main focus of the course. We will examine recognition and denial of human-made climate change and the reception and rejection of science in politics and in the public. Movements to protect the environment; movements for environmental justice to hold perpetrators accountable and to secure environmental equity for marginalized groups.

Prof. Branko Milanovic - bmilanovic@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 84600: Global inequality: Measurement, analysis and political implications
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30, 3 credits

The focus of the class is on global inequality which is defined as inequality between citizens of the world (as if they were members of a same nation). We will review the evolution of global inequality from the Industrial Revolution until today, and see how the changing composition and magnitude of global inequality affects politics, economics, and migration. Two types of inequalities, within-national (inequality among individuals within a single nation) and cross-national (inequality in mean incomes across nations) combine to determine global inequality. We shall thus also review the changes in within- and between-national inequalities. The class ends with an overview of positions of various political philosophers (e.g., Rawls, Pogge, Sen, Nagel) regarding global inequality and migration.
The course will be fairly empirical but does not require any prior specific knowledge of the issues nor techniques. It is recommended for students of economics, political science, and sociology. This class is a follow-up of the one on “The theories of income distribution: from Pareto to Piketty” but can be taken independently.  

Prof. Lucia Trimbur - ltrimbur@jjay.cuny.edu
Soc. 70100: Development of Sociological Theory (Theory I)
Tuesdays, 2:00-4:00
, 3 credits
This graduate seminar is an introduction to the work of Marx, Weber, Durkheim, DuBois, and Freud, five major historical figures in the development of US sociology. Its overarching goal is to understand how theoretical arguments are made: their logics, underlying assumptions, contradictions, and use of evidence. To do this, we will (1) look closely at these classical theorists’ ideas, (2) examine how ideas emerge from various historical moments, and (3) consider how these ideas relate to current social circumstances and other theorists’ views. As these texts constitute common knowledge within our field, they will help you learn to theorize.

Prof. Philip Kasinitz - pkasinitz@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 82800: International Migration 

Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15, 3 credits
This course offers an overview of the key current topics and issues in the burgeoning field of international migration. The course will aspire to incorporate the experiences of major immigrant-receiving countries around the world, but the main comparative focus will be on Europe and North America, where the major theories and key concepts are most fully developed. The course emphasis is on exploring both the theoretical debates in the field and the empirical data and case studies on which these debates hinge. Attention will be paid to detailed discussions of “classic” issues of immigration, such as assimilation, incorporation/integration, the labor market, race and ethnic relations, gender and the family, transnationalism, the second generation, and nativism/host hostility. Throughout, the course will take into account the way in which migrant-receiving cities, as contexts of reception, affect the immigrant experience, and in turn, are transformed by immigrants.

Profs. Lynn ​Chancer and Michael Jacobson - lchancer@gc.cuny.edu; Michael.Jacobson@islg.cuny.edu
Soc. 85000: Criminology and Critical Criminology in Theory and Practice
Thursdays, 4:15-6:15, 3 credits

In the first half of this doctoral seminar, we provide an overview of theories of criminology as they have unfolded through the present including recent developments in critical criminology and cultural criminology; we will read about and discuss developments in older as well as newer theorizations.  In the second half of the course, we turn to applied issues in criminal justice practice spanning a range of topics from domestic violence policy through gun control policies, police and bail reform through efforts to reduce mass incarceration.  An emphasis will be replaced on how theories and practices interrelate and can inform each other.


Prof. Janet Gornick - jgornick@gc.cuny.edu
SOC 85902: Social Policy and Socio-Economic Outcomes in Industrialized Countries
Tuesdays, 4:15pm–6:15pm, 3 credits


This course provides an introduction to cross-national comparative research, with a focus on socio-economic outcomes and on the policies and institutions that shape those outcomes. The course is organized around two databases available through LIS, a data archive located in Luxembourg, with a satellite office here at the Graduate Center.

LIS contains two main micro-databases. The Luxembourg Income Study (LIS) Database includes 300+ micro-datasets from over 50 high- and middle-income countries. These datasets contain comprehensive measures of income, employment, and household characteristics. A smaller, companion dataset – the Luxembourg Wealth Study (LWS) Database – provides microdata on assets and debt. Since the mid-1980s, the LIS data have been used by more than 8000 researchers – mostly sociologists, economists, and political scientists – to analyze cross-country and over-time variation in diverse outcomes such as poverty, income inequality, employment status, wage patterns, gender inequality and family structure.

Many researchers have combined LIS’ microdata with various macro-datasets to study, for example, the effects of national social or labor market policies on socio-economic outcomes, or to link socio-economic variation to national-level outcomes such as child well-being, health status, political attitudes and voting behavior. (The LIS and LWS data are accessed through an internet-based “remote-execution system”. All students are permitted to use the LIS microdata at no cost and without limit.)

The course has two main components:
1) Students will read and assess a selection of published studies based on the data.
2) Students will carry out an original piece of empirical research using the LIS or LWS microdata. That work will culminate in a term paper.

While there are no formal prerequisites, students must have a working knowledge of basic statistics, and beginner-to-intermediate capacity in one of these programming languages: SAS, SPSS, Stata, or R.
Neither statistics nor programming will be part of the course's curriculum. Extensive documentation about the data, self-teaching materials, and instructional videos are available on the LIS website.

Note:  All MA students must receive clearance from the professor before registering.

Prof. Jessi Daniels - jdaniels@hunter.cuny.edu
Soc. 82800, writing for publication
Tuesdays 2:00 - 4:00pm, 3 credits, *Hybrid

This course will have two components: one is a scholarly sociological study of publishing itself: an examination of the worlds and institutions of knowledge-production and dissemination.  We will consider book publishing, following and more recent changes in the world of book publishing.  Similarly, we will explore the contemporary issues in journal publication, including issues of copyright and new technologies, current debates and concerns about journal costs and distribution, and ongoing discussions of ethical concerns in academic publishing in an increasingly commercialized world.

The second component is more pragmatic, in which students take their own work thru the appropriate and necessary steps for publication in a variety of media.  Topics we will cover include how to do book reviews, how to prepare a paper for presentation and then for publication, how to participate in anthology writing, how to prepare a book proposal, and how to construct a book out of a dissertation.  Each student will (at minimum) and with the support of the instructor and class, write and publish two book reviews; submit papers to three academic meetings; prepare one journal article for submission; prepare and submit one article to a non-academic publication such as an op-ed article; and prepare a (draft) book proposal based on dissertation work.

Soc. 80000: Producing sociological theory:  The Role of Gendered Colonialism, Culture and Revolution in Bourdieu’s theory

Prof. Marnia Lazreg
Mondays 4:15-6:15pm, 3 credits

In recent years scholars have called for a “decolonization” of knowledge or advocated a “decolonial” approach to academic disciplines. They argue for greater awareness of the imperial context within which the social sciences emerged, and attempt to identify the conscious and unconscious ways in which this context shaped theoretical concepts. 

Pierre Bourdieu’s reflexive sociology provides an opportunity to assess these claims conceptually as well as empirically.  Bourdieu formulated his key sociological concepts (such as symbolic violence, habitus, or masculine domination) and developed a “scientific” method during his fieldwork in villages in Eastern Algeria.  His formative years as a sociologist were spent in colonial Algeria during the war of decolonization as a draftee as well as a researcher, and references to his fieldwork recur in many of his books until the end of his life.  Besides, there were times when he perceived himself as a surrogate native.

This course examines Bourdieu’s struggles with colonialism as a political and cultural system of domination, and traces the process through which colonial fieldwork becomes productive of concepts applicable to a non-colonial (but colonizing) society.  Relatedly, the course explores Bourdieu’s conceptualization of revolution in light of his misgivings about Frantz Fanon’s theory.  Of special interest will be the differences between two empirical observers, a trained sociologist and a trained psychiatrist turned revolutionary.  Finally, the course will probe Bourdieu’s construction of culture in a non-Western milieu in view of his attempt to bridge the gap between anthropology and sociology.  Throughout, discussions will be guided by a concern for the complex relationship between Bourdieu’s interest in a scientific method, his recurring references to his biography, and his unresolved attitude toward the colonial situation.

The course will be run as a seminar open to the unfettered exploration of significant facets of Bourdieu’s work.

Readings will include, in addition to sections of Outline of a Theory of PracticePascalian Meditations, The Bachelors’ Ball, In Other Words, Sociology in QuestionSketch of Self-Analysis, and a selection of secondary literature.

Requirements: Active class participation and a substantive term paper.

Open to all students

Soc. 81004: Sociology Meets History

Prof. John Torpey
Tuesdays 2-4pm, 3 credits

This course examines the historical roots of contemporary patterns of social inequality at a variety of spatial levels -- global, national, and regional. It seeks to make sense of the historical origins of patterns of inequality in state-building, slavery, colonialism, and capitalism. The course will explore diverse times and places in order to understand the background to contemporary patterns of inequality as well as efforts to overcome historical injustices.

Soc. 84700: Questioning Power and Reimagining Societies: Conducting Research on Organizations, Markets, and the State

Prof. Katherine Chen
Wednesday 11:45 - 1:45 pm, 3 credits

Various institutions, including universities, think tanks, corporations, and governments, collect data on certain kinds of phenomena and disseminate knowledge for particular ends.  However, much of the produced knowledge – in part due to how data is collected and interpreted and what phenomena and sites are deemed worthy of study – homogenizes our sense of possibilities and reproduces the status quo.  This is particularly evident in conventional research which focuses on individual persons as the unit of analysis.  Even when research is conducted on organizations, markets, and the state, such research offers critique, but few recommendations of possible paths to take.  How can researchers and intellectual communities increase substantive opportunities for reimagining societies?

With this overarching question in mind, this course tackles research phenomena that can be studied regarding organizations, markets, and the state.  For example, what happens when we question taken-for-granted research practices and more closely examine institutions and their associated practices, such as tech firms that gather big data on individual persons?  How can we reconceptualize how to conduct research, in ways that incorporate more interests, including underrepresented individuals?   This course draws on multi-disciplinary perspectives, including critical race theory, feminist studies, and information science, to expand possibilities for conducting and disseminating research.  Course readings and topics will incorporate students’ areas of interest. 

Soc. 81005: Applied Qualitative Research

Prof. Juan Battle
Thursdays 6:30-8:30, 3 credits

This course is part of a larger research project collecting and examining the life histories of mature (around 50 years old and older) Black and Latinx LGBTQ+ changemakers from throughout the United States. In addition to learning about a variety of interviewing techniques, students will actually conduct some interviews for the project as well as begin to ask questions of the data. Because students will be exposed to (and contribute from) a wide variety of perspectives on the subject, this course is appropriate for students in the traditional social sciences (e.g. sociology, anthropology, psychology, urban education, and history) as well as more contemporary ones (e.g. women’s studies, race studies, American studies, cultural studies, lesbian and gay studies).

Soc. 86800: Culture and Politics: Subjects, Identities, and Characters

Prof James M. Jasper
Thursdays 11:45-1:45, 3 credits

This course will examine meaning in the construction of political subjects, actions, and institutions, taking culture (including morality, emotions, and cognition) as an aspect of all social life. Its purpose is to encourage publishable research, and for that reason it focuses more narrowly on the construction of subjects, stigma, reputations, and public characters.

Soc. 82301: Sociology of New York City

Prof. David Halle
Mondays, 6:30-8:30pm, 3 credits

We will explore key social, economic, political and cultural issues in the country’s largest city, including the inter-relationships between these issues. Topics include: the Corona crisis and its impact; urban economic development especially the new Hudson Yards Project; the development of a high tech corridor in Manhattan stretching from Google’s East Coast headquarters on 15-16st and 8th-9th Avenues to the new Cornell-Technion engineering school on Roosevelt Island; attempts to “Green” New York including how to protect against future Hurricane Sandys; suburbanization including the latest wave; education--the successes and failures of the  gigantic N.Y. Public school system; immigration; housing, including affordable housing and the homeless crisis; urban politics including NYC’s "strong mayor" political structure; historic preservation and debates between a liberal wing that wishes to save only distinguished buildings and a fundamentalist wing that wants to freeze almost everything; crime, police departments and police misbehavior, urban terrorism and cyber security; urban protests and riots, including Black Lives Matter; culture; museums; private-public partnerships that support and promote the arts; the growth of Chelsea as  the largest Contemporary Art gallery district in the world; the world of newspapers, television journalism, and publishing; the structure of the film industry in New York; Broadway and contemporary theater; food and restaurants; fashion; and the architectural industry.

Soc. 83100: Intersectionality in the Social Sciences

Prof. Leslie McCall
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15, 3 credits

This course will begin with an overview of key original texts by intersectionality scholars in and connected to the social sciences in the United States, such as texts by Patricia Hill Collins, Kimberle Crenshaw, and Evelyn Nakano Glenn. This will be followed by readings of key later texts that introduced and amplified on the concept within different social science disciplines (e.g., Ange-Marie Hancock in political science; Elizabeth Cole in psychology), and also raised questions over the definition and scope of the term (e.g., Jennifer Nash). For the remainder of the course, we will examine intersectional research on a wide range of topics, including intersectional inequalities in political representation, income, education, family, health, and criminal justice. We will also consider different approaches to the topic across the globe, and I will welcome suggestions for readings on other aspects of intersectionality related to students’ areas of interest and expertise.

Soc.83300: Birth and Parenting

Prof. Barbara Katz Rothman- BKatzRothman@gc.cuny.edu, www.BarbaraKatzRothman.com
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30, 3 credits

Birth marks the transitional moment in the universal human relationship: every person begins life embodied within the maternal body; and up until the last few decades, that relationship defined the placement, or the citizenship, of the new being. New technologies, but even more, new marketing, calls the obviousness of parenthood and specifically motherhood into question, as relationships are fragmented and commodified. This course will offer a sociological and feminist analysis of birth and parenting, with a focus will be on the United States and its particular racial, class and gender politics and eugenic history.

Sociology 85800: Race and Ethnicity

Prof. Philip Kasinitz- pkasinitz@gc.cuny.edu
Mondays, 4:15-6:15, 3 credits

In 1903 Dubois predicted that the problem of the Twentieth Century would be “the problem of the color-line.” It now appears that race may be the problem of the 21st century as well. Race and ethnicity they remain among the most persistent and virulent forms of structured social inequality in the US and around the globe. Yet, ironically, race and ethnicity do not figure prominently in much of classical social theory. Focusing on the United States, but with reference to other multi-ethnic societies, we will examine the evolution of the concept of “race” and its relationship to racism; the heritage of slavery and segregation and their impacts contemporary life; the origins of modern racism and anti-Semitism, why and how the salience of ethnic identity increases and decreases at particular historical moments and the relationship of race and ethnicity to migration, nationalism, colonialism and class. We will look at how racial boundaries change and how “racialized” minorities are (or are not) incorporated into different societies. Readings will include works by W.E.B. Dubois, George Fredrickson, Michelle Alexander, Ibram V. Kendi, Patricia Hill Collins, Douglas Massey, William Julius Wilson, Franz Fanon, Jean Paul Sartre, Min Zhou, Eddie Telles, Isabel Wilkerson, Alejandro Portes and Richard Alba.

Soc. 81500 – Deportation & Ethnographic Immigration

Prof. David Brotherton – davebro54@icloud.com
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30pm, 3 credits

This course is an overview of the fields of sociology and criminology that link deportation to processes of migration, social control, state formation, global political economy and social processes of inclusion and exclusion. The deportation of non-citizens has become a major issue in the United States as well as internationally. Literally millions of legal and "illegal" non-citizens have been removed from the U.S. during the past two decades in what is the largest and most enduring process of human expulsion from a Western country since the holocaust. A dramatic hardening of the U.S. immigration laws was enacted in 1996 and since then policies governing citizenship and residency have become increasingly punitive, tied to the moral crusades on drugs, terrorism, gangs and the immigrant and the economic paradigms of neo-liberalism. The erection of borders, both internal and external, symbolic and substantive, has been a key characteristic of these processes. Paradoxically, the United States has been "traditionally" viewed as a nation of immigrants, albeit a colonial settler one in which the indigenous populations were violently and systematically expelled from their ancestral lands only to be subsequently reincorporated and 'assimilated" as "minority" subpopulations. In this course we take a critical-ethnographic lens to the dynamics, practices and sociological contexts of the deportation regimes in the U.S. and beyond, focusing on both epistemological and methodological issues that are highlighted in the research literature. Students are also encouraged to experience the terrain of deportation first-hand with guidance from the instructor.

Soc. 72100: Qualifying Paper Seminar II

Profs. Lynn Chancer/Van Tran--lchancer@gc.cuny.edu; vtran@gc.cuny.edu
Thursdays, 2:00-4:00pm, 3 credits

This year-long seminar is an opportunity to conduct original research that will result in a journal article (i.e. The Qualifying Paper) that is of publishable quality in a peer-reviewed academic journal. This seminar is required of all PhD students during the second year in the program. Over the course of two semesters, you will formulate a research question, develop a theoretical argument, design a research strategy, collect and analyze your data, interpret the results, and present your argument and findings in a precise and compelling narrative form. At the end of the Fall term, you will hand in a clearly developed research proposal with a research plan. At the end of Spring term, you will hand in a complete research paper that contributes to sociological knowledge and this draft will form the basis for your first single-authored peer-reviewed article for submission. The article can be based on either an empirically-oriented or a theoretically-oriented research project, as long as it is deemed to be of publishable quality. (For second year students only.)

Soc. 81900: Applied Spatial Econometrics

Prof. Jeremy Porter
Thursdays, 6:30-8:30pm, 3 credits

This course builds upon foundational GIS and spatial analysis concepts and skills built in introductory GIS courses through the application of advanced spatial statistical modeling procedures. Students in the course will learn how it integrate GIS with statistical programming tools as a way to extend the utility of the GIS beyond a tool for mapping. Topics covered include 1) Graphical and quantitative description of spatial data, 2) Kriging, block kriging and cokriging, 3) Common variogram models, 4) Spatial autoregressive models, estimation and testing, 5) Spatial non-stationarity and associated modeling procedures and 6) Spatial sampling procedures. Students will complete a series of in-class labs and develop a final research project from these labs or an independent project. (Pre-requisite: Introduction to GIS)

Soc. 70200: Contemporary Theory

Prof. Lucia Trimbur
Mondays, 2:00-4:00pm, 3 credits

This graduate seminar is the second course in a two-course series examining important social theorists and their contributions to the development of American sociology. We focus on the projects that most contribute to an analysis of the contemporary world, especially Marxism, critical race theory, psychoanalysis, post-structuralism, feminist theory, queer theory, and postcolonial theory. Our overarching goal is to understand how theoretical arguments are made: their logics, underlying assumptions, contradictions, and use of evidence. To do this, we will (1) look closely at contemporary theorists’ ideas, (2) historically situate the authors of these ideas, and (3) consider how their ideas relate to past and current social circumstances. We also spend time connecting contemporary theories to those we studied in Classical Social Theory.

Soc. 74100: Sociology of Work and Inequality

Prof. Ruth Milkman
Mondays, 4:15-6:15, 3 credits

Designed as an introduction to sociological debates on work and inequality, this seminar engages recent sociological texts on that topic. The readings focus on the changing landscape of work, with an emphasis on the situation of non-college educated workers. They include studies of how workers are hired and paid; to case studies of the changing structure of particular industries — from trucking to health care to firefighting to home care; to the growth of the gig economy and the broader social consequences of economic restructuring.   We will explore the causes and consequences of growing precarity and labor market polarization since the mid-1970s, and the accompanying widening of inequalities by class, race and gender. 

This is a reading course with a seminar format.  Requirements include: faithful class attendance and active participation in discussion; weekly written reactions to the assigned texts; an oral presentation; and a final research paper.

Soc. 85700:  Social Welfare Policy 

(Crosslist: PSC 73101  & WSCP 81000)
Prof. Janet Gornick
Tuesdays 4:15pm–6:15pm, 3 credits

This course will examine social welfare policy in the United States, in historical and cross‐national perspective. We will begin with an overview of the development of social welfare policy in the United States. We will focus on crucial historical periods – including the Civil War years, the Progressive Era, the New Deal, the Great Society, and the “welfare reform” of the 1990s and early 2000s. Second, we will assess “the big picture” of the American welfare state, through the lens of its underlying institutional framework. Third, we will analyze a set of contemporary challenges that call for active policy responses, such as severe poverty, low‐wage work, homelessness, and the care deficit. Finally, we will survey selected social policy lessons from other high‐income countries, especially in Europe, where social provisions are typically more extensive than they are in the United States.

Soc. 84600 – Within-National Inequalities: From Pareto to Piketty

Prof. Branko Milanovic – bmilanovic@gc.cuny.edu
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30pm, 3 credits

The objective of the course is be to review, analyze, and allow students to develop a much better understanding of the theories and empirics of personal income distribution within a single policy-making unit (that is, normally within a nation-state). The first such theory was developed by Vilfredo Pareto more than 100 years ago. Pareto believes that income distribution does not change regardless of a social system and level of development. Simon Kuznets, in the 1950s, posited, on the contrary, a theory where income inequality evolves as societies get richer. Jan Tinbergen, in the 1970s, argued that the level of inequality is determined by the two opposing forces of education (increasing the supply of highly skilled workers) and technological change (increasing the demand for them). Most recently, Thomas Piketty argues that low growth combined with high returns to capital predisposes advanced economies to high levels of inequality. These theories will be considered on the real-world examples of movements of inequality in Brazil, China, “transition countries” and the United States and other advanced economies.  We shall focus especially on the recent evolution of income and wealth inequality in the United States and Piketty’s analytical contributions. The class will be fairly empirical but does not require any prior specific knowledge of the issues nor techniques. It is recommended for students of economics, political science, and sociology.

Soc. 81900/ DCP 70200: Methods of Demographic Analysis 

Prof. Frank Heiland
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15pm, 3 Credits

This course gives students an overview of some of the major demographic methods used in the study of population, and includes the standard procedures for the measurement of fertility, mortality, natural increase, migration, and nuptiality. Students will learn how to construct demographic rates, life tables, and population projections, and how to carry out standardization, decomposition of differences, analysis of fertility and nuptiality patterns, analysis invoking model life tables and stable population theory, and analysis of nonstable populations.

Soc. 72200 / DCP 80300: Population Dynamics and Climate Change

Prof. Deborah Balk
Mondays, 4:15-6:15pm, 3 credits

This course will examine two hallmark characteristics of the 21st century: demographic change and climate change. We will examine demographic behavior and population dynamics (urbanization, migration, fertility, mortality, age and aging, and household size and formation) in the context of climate change. Further, we will explore the role that population dynamics play in climate models and scenarios, as well as in climate adaptation and mitigation strategies. We will consider policies and programs that address these issues. The course will be global in nature, although many examples will be drawn from a developing-country context as well as from the United States. Students will learn to examine theory and evidence (data and methods) at the local, national, and international levels to understand populations at risk in the short and long run, internal and international migration flows, city growth and urban dynamism, and fertility and mortality responses tin the context of short- and long-term climate change and related hazards (e.g., increased storms and associated flooding, sea-level rise, drought, and changes in disease vectors). Prerequisites: None.

Soc. 85600: Social Movements in Latin America 

Prof. Jack Hammond- jhammond@hunter.cuny.edu
Thursdays, 2:00-4:00pm, 3 credits

This course will examine social movements in Latin America since the wave of democratization following the authoritarian period of the 1970s and 1980s. We will highlight the period of democratization, neoliberalism and austerity and the following period a return to developmental populism the 21st century, emphasizing the Pink Tide, horizontalism, resistance movements, digital organizing, globalization and transnational movements. In studying these movements, we will examine the applicability of North- based theories of social movements and the alternatives which have been proposed or may be needed. 

Soc. 82301: Computer Mapping for LA & NY, and Global Cities GIS with Mapinfo: Basic and Advanced Techniques

Prof. David Halle- dhalle@ucla.edu
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30pm, 3 credits

An introduction to computer mapping (Geographic Information Systems), using the software Mapinfo.  We will learn the techniques of computer mapping to analyze the latest developments in New York and Los Angeles, both the cities and regions, and other global cities. We will analyze the most recently available census data, and the decennial census data for 2020, 2010, 2000, 1990, 1980 and 1970 for New York and Los Angeles. We will map such topics as  the distribution of income, occupations, racial and ethnic groups, and foreign-born. We will also map crime at the level of the police precinct, political data including Presidential, mayoral and congressional elections, city and county boundaries, world cities, environmental data, the Corona virus, transportation, housing, schools and education data, and zoning matters including historic districts.  We will map, and discuss, such key topics as the decline of the classic “ghetto” and the Latinization of inner city neighborhoods, the movement of ethnic groups to the suburbs, gentrification, the 2007- financial crisis including the housing bubble, the affordable housing crisis, the ecology and “green” movement, flooding including Hurricane Sandy,  attempts to reform the school systems, arts and cultural institutions, and de Blasio’s impact and policies.  Students are encouraged to bring to class, and develop during the semester, any ongoing research they are doing.

Soc. 85000: Gender and Crime

Prof. Jayne Mooney- jmooney@jjay.cuny.edu
Mondays, 6:30-8:30pm, 3 credits 

This course explores the relationship between gender, crime and the criminal justice system. It focuses on feminist historical, sociological and socio-legal scholarship to examine the ways in which gender affects patterns of offending, victimization, and imprisonment. It critically engages with the intersections between gender, race, class and sexuality and analyzes how these impact on the treatment of women, as victims, survivors and offenders. It provides an overview of the historical neglect of women’s contributions to sociological and criminological theory.

Cultural representations of masculinity and femininity are considered throughout. Debates are explored on the construction of masculinit(ies) in contemporary society, and recent work on transfeminism and non-binary gender identities. Specific topics to be covered include: violence against women, fear of crime, sex work, war, gangs, serial killing, imprisonment, immigration and feminist research methods.

Soc. 72000: Qualifying Paper Seminar I

Profs. Lynn Chancer/Van Tran--lchancer@gc.cuny.edu; vtran@gc.cuny.edu
Thursdays, 2:00-4:00pm, 3 credits

This year-long seminar is an opportunity to conduct original research that will result in a journal article (i.e. The Qualifying Paper) that is of publishable quality in a peer-reviewed academic journal. This seminar is required of all PhD students during the second year in the program. Over the course of two semesters, you will formulate a research question, develop a theoretical argument, design a research strategy, collect and analyze your data, interpret the results, and present your argument and findings in a precise and compelling narrative form. At the end of the Fall term, you will hand in a clearly developed research proposal with a research plan. At the end of Spring term, you will hand in a complete research paper that contributes to sociological knowledge and this draft will form the basis for your first single-authored peer-reviewed article for submission. The article can be based on  either an empirically-oriented or a theoretically-oriented research project, as long as it is deemed to be of publishable quality. (For second year students only.)

Soc. 72500: Urban Sociology

Prof. Philip Kasinitz- pkasinitz@gc.cuny.edu
Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15, 3 credits

This course will examine the city, both as a spatial location and a social institution. We will look at both the micro level interactions that create communities in the city, as well as larger structural forces such as racial segregation, migration and public policy which shape how urban communities are created, change and how they are sometimes destroyed. We will discuss the relationship of urbanism and modernity, debates over the role of “community” in urban life, ghettos, ethnic enclaves, gentrification, LGBT communities, the sociology of the built environment, the role of public space, the role of gender in urban life, the importance of culture and consumption in shaping the urban experience and the impact of globalization on contemporary cities. We will conclude by examining how the withdrawal from public space during the Covid 19 crisis, has impacted social life in New York. Readings will include works by Georg Simmel, Walter Benjamin, W.E.B. Dubois, Jane Jacobs, Marshall Berman, Herbert Gans, Richard Sennett, Mike Davis, Loic Wacquant, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Mitchell Duneier, Elijah Anderson, Min Zhou, Alejandro Portes, David Harvey, Suzanne Hall and Sharon Zukin, among others.

Soc. 81900: Quantitative Research Methods 

Prof. Jeremy Porter- jporter@gc.cuny.edu
Mondays, 6:30-8:30pm, 3 credits

This course will cover issues pertaining to the applied research process in the collection, management, and analysis of quantitative data. Methods covered are intended to give students experience with a broad array of specific quantitative methods and a directed focus on the perspectives that underlie the application of such methods. The explicit goal of the course is to give students the foundational tools necessary to do high quality quantitative research in applied and academic settings. A sample of topics covered include; the science of science, the politics and ethics of research, developing novel research ideas, item measurement, instrumentation, sampling, understanding statistical inference, and a wide variety of topics associated with the collection, management, and analysis of quantitative data.

Soc. 84600: Within-National Inequalities: From Pareto to Piketty 

Prof. Branko Milanovic-bmilanovic@gc.cuny.edu
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30pm, 3 credits

The objective of the course is to review and analyze different theories about the forces that influence inter-personal income distribution within a single policy-making unit (that is, within a nation-state). 

The first such theory was developed by Vilfredo Pareto more than 100 years ago. Pareto believes that income distribution does not change regardless of a social system and level of development. Simon Kuznets, in the 1950s, posited, on the contrary, a theory where income inequality evolves as societies get richer. Jan Tinbergen, in the 1970s, argued that the level of inequality is determined by the two opposing forces of education and technological change. More recently, Thomas Piketty argued that low growth combined with high returns to capital predisposes advanced economies to high levels of inequality. In 2016, Milanovic introduced “Kuznets waves” claiming that structural transformations (from agriculture to manufacturing, and more recently from manufacturing to services) are associated with increases in inter-personal inequality.

These theories will be considered on the real-world examples of inequality changes in the United States and other rich OECD countries, China and  Brazil. The class shall focus especially on the recent evolution of income and wealth inequality in the United States and Piketty’s analytical contributions. 

The class is empirical, and at times mathematical, but does not require any prior specific knowledge of the issues nor techniques. It is recommended for students of economics, political science, and sociology.

Soc. 81100: Comparative Sociological Methods 

Prof. John Torpey- jtorpey@gc.cuny.edu 
Tuesdays, 2:00-4:00pm, 3 credits

This course explores patterns of difference and inequality at the global, national, and regional levels.  It seeks to make sense of the historical roots of these patterns in political, economic, ethnoracial, religious, and demographic systems.  The course will explore diverse times and places in order to make sense of contemporary patterns of inequality in comparative and historical perspective.  The emphasis throughout is on comparison across time and place as a distinctive method in the social sciences.  Students will gain an appreciation for the centrality of comparison to all sociological understanding.

Soc. 82800 - International Migration

Profs. Richard Alba and Nancy Foner - ​ralba@gc.cuny.edu,  nfoner@hunter.cuny.edu
Thursdays, 4:15- 6:15pm, Room TBA,  3 credits 

This course offers a comprehensive overview of key current topics and issues in the field of international migration. While the course will aspire to incorporate the experiences of major immigrant receiving countries around the world, the main focus will be on Europe and North America, where the major theories and key concepts are most fully developed. The emphasis is on examining both the theoretical debates in the field and the empirical data and case studies that address and, in some cases, have stimulated the debates.  Among the issues in migration studies that will be explored:  theories about the causes of international migration;  theories of assimilation;  the construction of ethnic and racial identities and group boundaries; and comparative integration of immigrants and their children in Europe and North America. As the field of international migration is inherently interdisciplinary and methodologically eclectic we will be looking at a wide variety of studies, including those that use various kinds of quantitative data and qualitative techniques as well as some that draw on historical analyses. 

Soc. 74600: Capitalism and Crisis

Prof. Roslyn Bologh-Roslyn.Bologh@csi.cuny.edu 
Tuesdays, 6:30-8:30pm, 3 credits

This course will focus on the relationship between capitalism, culture and crisis.  We will examine the current historical moment -- focusing on political economy, ideology and other aspects of social life and culture.

How does this crisis affect particular communities?  What kinds of changes are we seeing?  Is the crisis merely hastening changes that were already underway?  Will the crisis radically change our world?  How do critical political economic analyses address the contemporary crisis?  What accounts for the different trajectories of the U.S. (F.D.R. and the New Deal) and Germany (Hitler and the Nazis) during the Great Depression? How does that relate to today's crisis?  

These are some of the questions I hope we can address as events unfold.  How is capitalism directly implicated in this health crisis and the responses to it.  Public Health specialists knew what needed to be done to be prepared for a pandemic. How were economic interests related to the failure to be prepared?  What had been happening to our economy before this crisis?  What was causing the huge inequalities within particular societies and within the global economy?  What was causing the socio-cultural changes like the decline of marriage in the U.S. among the middle classes as well as middle aged people returning to live with their parents?  Why were Central Banks foreseeing even before this crisis a global recession that they said Central Banks could not handle. Why are publications like the Wall Street Journal and Forbes publishing articles about the possibility of "populist backlash?" Why do they connect public backlash to the Government providing billions to corporations that had been using their profits for "buybacks?" What are corporate "buy backs?" How is the Federal Reserve implicated in all of this? 

What will be the outcome of this global crisis?  In sum, I hope to provide students with a background in critical theory and political economy in order to address the question: how does the current crisis relate to radical social change?  

Soc. 82800: Capitalism and Crisis

Prof. Pyong Gap Min-pyonggap.min@qc.cuny.edu
Tuesdays, 6:30-8:30pm, 3 credits

The vast majority of post-1965 immigrants have originated from Latin America, Asia, the Middle East, and the Caribbean Islands. Asian and Middle Eastern immigrants have transplanted Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, and other “Oriental” religions to the United States.  Latino, Caribbean, and some Asian immigrant groups have brought with them Third World versions of Catholicism that put more stress on syncretic family and small-group rituals combining Catholic beliefs and local folk culture than on worship in a congregation.  Many Caribbean and Asian immigrants have also transplanted new versions of Protestantism.  After more than 50 years of enforcement of the Immigration Act of 1965, many second-generation Americans of post-1965 immigrants have grown up, participating in the labor market and establishing their own families.

This course takes an overview of a growing body of the social science literature on the religious experiences of the new immigrant groups and their children. It will examine not only immigrants’ and children’s participation in religious institutions, but also their practices of religious rituals at home.  As a sociology course, it will pay special attention to the relationships between immigrants’ religious practices and ethnicity, gender, race, class, globalization, and transnationalism. It will also look at the intergenerational transmission of religion to their 1.5- and second-generation adults and the transmission of ethnicity through religion. 

We will discuss 2-3 articles/book chapters for each class. Students need to read in advance the articles, books chapters, and/or a book assigned for each class and to participate in discussions. I will provide lectures whenever necessary to help students better understand particular pieces of assigned reading materials related to concepts, theories and new development in research. Attendance and classroom discussions are very important for this course. Since I give no final test, I put a great weight on attendance and classroom discussion in evaluating students’ performance. Good writing skills are also important for this course, as well as for any other graduate courses. Students need to complete 4 writing assignments and a term paper (that can be sent to me by the end of the year as an e-mail attachment). 

Soc. 82907 - Black America 

Prof. Juan Battle - jbattle@gc.cuny.edu
Mondays, 2:00- 4:00 pm, 3 credits 

“One ever feels his two-ness – an American, a Negro; two souls, two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings; two warring ideals in one dark body.” So wrote WEB Du Bois in 1897. Black history, Du Bois maintained, was the history of this double-consciousness. Black people have always been part of the American nation that they helped to build. But they have also been a nation unto themselves, with their own experiences, culture, and aspirations. Black-American history cannot be understood except in the broader context of American history. Likewise, American history cannot be understood without Black-American history.
--- excerpt from Hines, et al.’s (2014) preface\

This course will serve as a broad, historical survey of the Black experience (mainly) within the United States. Because students will be exposed to (and contribute from) a wide variety of perspectives on the subject, this course is appropriate for students in the traditional social sciences (e.g. sociology, anthropology, psychology, urban education, and history) as well as more contemporary ones (e.g. women’s studies, race studies, American studies, cultural studies, lesbian and gay studies).

Soc.82800 Ethnography of Public Policy

Profs. John Mollenkopf and Robert Smith- jmollenkopf@gc.cuny.edu, robert.smith@baruch.cuny.edu
Mondays, 4:15pm–6:15pm, 3 credits

Most approaches to the study of public policy use statistical analysis to address questions of efficiency and effectiveness and/or institutional analysis to understand how actors form coalitions to advance their policy agendas (or block someone else’s). This course takes a different approach: using the tools of ethnography and qualitative analysis (participant observation, in-depth interviewing) to investigate how the participants in a given policy domain formulate, adopt, and most importantly carry out public policies. This approach begins with a focus on the “front line workers” who actually do the work of delivering public policies through their every-day interactions with clients. We will learn how to apply tools of ethnography to study and understand how front line workers “socially construct” clients in the process of co-producing public services and how the clients react to being processed.

From this focus, we will widen our focus to using these tools to examine how managers, policy decision-makers, and the broader environment try to shape or reshape the public service production process. Actors within this larger environment include agency managers and leaders, mayors and their administration, legislative elected officials, and the broader civic realm of press, policy scholars, advocacy organizations, lawyers, consultants, and the concerned public. We will begin with a close reading of Michael Lipsky’s classic Street Level Bureaucracy, then move through a series of policy case studies. Seminar participants will learn how to design and carry out a policy ethnography by constructing and developing case comparisons, tracing actors and processes, and articulating the empirical, analytical, and policy stories behind their research. If the seminar takes place on line, it will focus on readings and exercises. If personal meetings and field work are possible, they will also be included.

Soc. 71500: Sociological Statistics I

Prof. Paul Attewell- pattewell@gc.cuny.edu
Mondays, 4:15-6:15pm, 3 credits

This is a first course about quantitative methods for social scientists. It presumes no previous coursework, so it is suitable for beginners. However, since most QMSS Masters students do have some background already, the course will move fairly quickly from basic to more advanced topics and go as far into the latter as time and the semester permit. The main focus will be on quantitative methods as tools for interrogating data, rather than on the mathematical or statistical underpinnings. Considerable emphasis will be placed on understanding what statistical tools to use in what contexts, and how to interpret results and how to reconfirm/test findings.

The software we will use is STATA. The class’ format, held in a computer classroom, will be a mix of lecture, demonstrations and student in-class exercises, so that students will have hands-on use of each statistical procedure as well as a theoretical understanding. Students will develop fluency in basic data management as well as in methods of analysis, using STATA.​

Soc. 84600: Women, Work & Public Policy 

Prof. Janet Gornick-jgornick@gc.cuny.edu
Tuesdays 4:15pm–6:15pm

This course will provide an overview of key issues affecting women in the contemporary workplace in the United States and other high-income countries. We will begin with an overview of women’s position in the labor market. Here we will take a multidimensional approach to capturing gender inequality at work, covering gender gaps in employment rates, in working time, in occupation, and in earnings. We will assess growing class inequalities among women, which have led to polarization in the labor market, especially between women with more and less education. We will consider divisions by, e.g., race, ethnicity, nativity, and sexuality. We will analyze the ways in which public policies have addressed these concerns, and evaluate their impacts.

The course also examines the effects on women workers of persistent inequalities in divisions of labor within households. Despite the enormous increase in women’s employment rates during the past half century, women continue to carry out the bulk of unpaid work in their homes. Altering these inequalities has proven even more challenging than transforming the structures that shape paid work. We will consider recent research on the effects of “work-family reconciliation policies”– that is, public policies aimed at supporting women (and men) as they balance the responsibilities of paid work and family care. The key question now under consideration is whether some of these policies – e.g., paid family leave, rights to part-time work, and flexible scheduling – create new forms of gender inequality. Students will complete weekly reaction papers and a semester-long research project.

Soc. 86800 - Writing for Publication 

Prof. Barbara Katz Rothman-bkatzrothman@gc.cuny.edu
Wednesdays 2:00 - 4:00pm, 3 credits

This course will have two components: one is a scholarly sociological study of publishing itself: an examination of the worlds and institutions of knowledge-production and dissemination.  We will consider book publishing, following and more recent changes in the world of book publishing.  Similarly, we will explore the contemporary issues in journal publication, including issues of copyright and new technologies, current debates and concerns about journal costs and distribution, and ongoing discussions of ethical concerns in academic publishing in an increasingly commercialized world.

The second component is more pragmatic, in which students take their own work thru the appropriate and necessary steps for publication in a variety of media.  Topics we will cover include how to do book reviews, how to prepare a paper for presentation and then for publication, how to participate in anthology writing, how to prepare a book proposal, and how to construct a book out of a dissertation.  Each student will (at minimum) and with the support of the instructor and class, write and publish two book reviews; submit papers to three academic meetings; prepare one journal article for submission; prepare and submit one article to a non-academic publication such as an op-ed article; and prepare a (draft) book proposal based on dissertation work.

Soc. 86800 Food, Culture, and Society

Prof. Barbara Katz Rothman– bkatzrothman@gc.cuny.edu
Wednesdays, 6:30 – 8:30pm, 3 credits

This course explores major issues in foodways—food habits from production through consumption—through readings and discussions as well as through primary research in food and society.  The scholarly study of food invokes issues of gender, class, labor, and cultural identities and demands an interdisciplinary approach.  Theoretical frameworks include the food voice (Hauck-Lawson), cultural studies, political economy, and symbolic interactionism.

The key focus in the course is going to be the application of theory and methods from the disciplines represented by students, faculty and invited guests in the course, to Food Studies.

Rather than a standard paper, each student will, in consultation with the professor and the other students, develop a project that best fits in with her/his own work –for example,  a food-focused dissertation chapter, an internship, a series of published book reviews, or a paper presentation at a professional conference in the student’s home discipline.

Soc. 81900: Spatial Analysis of Social Data

Prof. Jeremy Porter- jporter@gc.cuny.edu
Thursdays, 6:30-8:30pm, 3 credits

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has emerged as an essential tool for public health researchers and practitioners. The GIS for Public Health course will offer students an opportunity to gain skills in using GIS software to apply spatial analysis techniques to public health research questions. The laboratory section of the course will give students the opportunity for hands-on learning in how to use GIS systems to analyze data and produce maps and reports. These laboratory exercises will be designed to increasingly challenge the students to incorporate the analytic skills and techniques they have learned in other courses with the geospatial and spatial statistics techniques commonly used in GIS.​

Soc.82800: Refugees & Forced Migration

Prof. Juan Battle - jbattle@gc.cuny.edu
Mondays, 4:15-6:15 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

Over the past decade, the global population of forcibly displaced people – as a result of persecution, conflict, violence, or human rights violations – grew substantially from 43.3 million in 2009 to 70.8 million in 2018, reaching a record high. This course is designed to give students an understanding of the major causes of contemporary migration and population displacement. Global, regional, and national processes contributing to and driving refugee and migration flows will be examined. Students will consider a range of critical issues and factors contributing to displacement, particularly under conditions of poverty, uneven development, competition for resources, political instability, weak governance, violence, environmental degradation, and natural disasters. International challenges including human rights, human trafficking, citizenship, and statelessness will be addressed as well.

Soc. 84700: Organizations, Markets, & the State

Prof. Katherine K. Chen – kchen@ccny.cuny.edu
Wednesday 11:45-1:45, Room TBA, 3 credits

How can people coordinate action across growing groups in creative versus conventional ways?
How can people organize in ways that widen versus reduce power differentials among members?  
How do people and organizations hoard advantages for a select few versus ensuring more equal access to all?
How do organizations fend off versus embrace market ideology, and how do organizations encourage members to adopt these perspectives?

Organizations are crucial actors in contemporary society, and they are also sites where many of us expend significant efforts connecting with or coordinating collective action. Despite their central role in shaping our experiences from education to the workplace to governance, organizations are often overlooked or taken-for-granted among researchers and laypersons. When researchers do study organizations, they typically pay little critical attention to power dynamics and organizing possibilities.

Building upon more critical perspectives, participants will learn why organizations form, how they develop, and how they can exacerbate or alleviate inequalities. We will also discuss organizations’ relations with the state and markets, and how these relations affect action. We will cover a variety of organizational forms, from conventional bureaucracies to networked firms to democratic organizations, with a focus on participants’ organizational fields of interest. Theories studied incorporate the classics, as well as cutting edge synthetic work like Strategic Action Fields (SAFs), racialized organizations, and relational inequality theory (RIT)'s inequality-generating mechanisms. Methodological approaches covered include ethnography, interviews, and other qualitative methods, and quantitative analyses.

This course supports deepening participants’ substantive knowledge, including preparing for comprehensives, extending cross-over expertise in a substantive area (i.e. social movements, urban sociology, stratification, education, cultural sociology, etc.), and designing and carrying out research.  In addition, this course aims to both promote professional development and forming a community of supportive scholars for emerging research.

Soc. 83300: The Ties that Bind: Family Demography in a Global Context

Prof. Jessica Halliday Hardie- jh1389@hunter.cuny.edu
Monday, 2:00-4:00pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

Family demographers study the composition of families and patterns of movement into and out of family structures, as well as what drives these patterns. We seek to understand how and why families change over time in response to economic, social, and cultural forces. This seminar offers the opportunity to learn about prevailing theories of family change, trends in family behavior, and analytic techniques common in family demography. Throughout the semester, we will seek to explain the role of family in individuals’ lives, the precursors and consequences of family change, and how the family intersects with other social institutions both in the United States and abroad. The course materials draw on a variety of theoretical, historical, cultural, and methodological perspectives to examine topics such as romantic relationship formation and dissolution, family relationships, childbearing and fertility, intergenerational exchanges, and family health.

Soc. 82301:  Sociology of New York City

Prof. William Helmreich- helmreichwilliam@gmail.com
Thursdays, 4:15- 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

This is an ethnographic fieldwork course on the neighborhoods of New York, for it is here that the intricate and crucial features of social and cultural life are played out. Capturing this reality requires an understanding of the social, racial, ethnic, religious, and other groups in the city, its spatial and geographical characteristics, and their architectural attributes. We will also be examining issues like gentrification, community life, immigration, homelessness, etc.  A neighborhood’s social life cannot be fully grasped and appreciated through readings and photographs. Thus, there will be five full-day walking/riding trips on mutually-agreed upon days through each of the five boroughs with a strong focus on its unknown aspects, followed by a free dinner at an ethnic restaurant. For more info about whether or not this course is what you’re looking for, please contact me at helmreichw@gmail.com. The course is limited to 8 students.

Soc. 85403:  Japanese Military Sexual Slavery and the Global Responses to the Redress Movement for the Victims

Prof. Pyong Gap Min – (347)287-5961, pyonggap.min@qc.cuny.edu
Monday, 2:00- 4:00pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

Approximately 50,000-200,000 Asian women suffered sexual slavery at Japanese military brothels during the Asian-Pacific War (1931-1945). The majority of them died or were killed, unable to endure the ordeal.  Those survivors who came back home after the end of the war kept silent in their home country due to strong stigma attached to sexual victims.  However, Korean women’s leaders started the redress movement for these victims in the late 1980s.  The emergence of many victims in South Korea and other Asian countries for testimonies and the discovery of Japanese historical documents demonstrating the Japanese military government’s involvement in establishing and managing comfort stations in the early 1990s accelerated the redress movement. The redress movement has received positive responses not only from Asian countries, but also, and more importantly from the UN human rights bodies, international human rights organizations, and the United States.  However, the Japanese government has not acknowledged the crime (military sexual slavery) committed by its predecessor yet, made no sincere apology and compensation to the victims, and has not taken other necessary measures to bring justice and honor to the victims.

This course focuses on the comfort women issue and the global redress movement for the victims of Japanese military sexual slavery, using lectures, readings and documentary films/movies. It covers not only Japanese military sexual slavery, but also other forms of sexual violence in military camps and at war, such as prostitutions in European and U.S. military camps, the rape of Nanjing, ethnic cleansings in Bosnia, and rapes in the Pakistani-Bangladeshi War.  It will also cover important historical issues, such as Japan’s colonization and occupation of Asian countries during the Asian-Pacific War, the 1945-1948 Tokyo War Crimes Trial, and the 2000 Women’s International War Crimes Tribunal on Japanese military Sexual Slavery.  It will also cover the redress movement for the victims of Japanese military sexual slavery in South Korea, Japan, and the U.S. in detail, which used the strategies of comfort women’s testimonies, getting resolutions, urging the Japanese government to take responsible actions, passed by the U.S. House of Representatives and state and city legislative branches, and building comfort women memorials.

Students’ three take-home essays based on reading assignments (30%), a term paper (30%), and attendance/class discussions (40%) will determine their grades.   If any students have questions about this course, they can call Professor Pyong Gap Min at 347/287-5961.

Soc. 85200: Transnational Social Movements

Prof. Carolina Bank Muñoz - cbmunoz@brooklyn.cuny.edu
Thursdays, 2:00- 4:00pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

In this course, we will explore the global response to the rise of neoliberalism and austerity politics. While social movements in the U.S. are significantly weaker than they were in the 1960s and 1970s, there has been an explosion in global and transnational movements.  We will largely focus on labor, human rights, climate change and anti-globalization movements.  In analyzing transnational social movements, we will consider such questions as: How did these movements arise?  Are transnational social movements effective responses to globalization and neoliberalism? What are the limitations of transnational social movements? How do transnational social movements negotiate race, class and gender ?And how have the rise of South-South movements challenged the power imbalances in transnational organizing?

Soc. 82800: Capitalism, Race and Class

Prof. Charles Post- cpost@bmcc.cuny.edu
Mondays, 6:30-8:30 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

The dominant “common sense” in the United States holds that this country, unique among all industrialized capitalist countries, has no fixed and permanent social classes and affords equal opportunity for social advancement to all its citizens. However, the reality is quite different. Social class divisions and racial inequality have marked US society from its birth in the 17th century, and these divisions grow sharper today. The problem of the relationship between these two fundamental forms of social inequality and power in the US has long been the subject of theoretical and historical controversy. In this seminar, we will assess some of the extensive literature on race and class in the US. Among the questions we will grapple with over the course of the year will be: What is the theoretical status of “race”? How do different sociologists understand social class? How were the racial categories “black” and “white” socially constructed alongside plantation slavery during the 17th and 18th centuries? How were these racial categories preserved and transformed as slavery was abolished, new immigrants arrived in the US and new forms of class inequality evolved over the course of the 19th century? How have racial categories been transformed as African-Americans have become an overwhelmingly urban people who compete as legal equals for jobs, education and housing with European-Americans? What is the current relationship of race and class in the US? Readings will be substantial, varied and historical in perspective.

Soc.8000: Foucault, Bourdieu and Baudrillard:  Culture, Power, and Sexuality in the Global Era

Prof. Marnia Lazreg
Mondays, 4:15-6:15 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

Bourdieu as well as Baudrillard expressed reticent admiration for, and skepticism about Foucault’s critical theoretical insights.  They both struggled with the same issues that are central to Foucault’s work: power, changing cultural practices as well as sexuality.    By the same token, they sought to distinguish themselves from Foucault’s approach.  Have they, as sociologists, transformed or extended Foucault’s analyses in grappling with the global contemporary challenges of culturalism, identity politics, social and racial strife, and sexual diversity?

Using methods borrowed from the history of ideas as well as the sociology of knowledge, this course examines Bourdieu’s and Baudrillard’s efforts to build a critical sociology with practical applications for social change as they struggled with Foucault’s conceptual innovations. Special attention will be given to the meanings and articulations of key concepts and issues, including structure and event/history; language, rules and discourse; power and subjectivation; body, sex/sexuality and gender; biopolitics and racial supremacy; (non-Western) revolutions and political spirituality; security/war and self-defense.  The course will further examine the degree to which the concrete socio-political activities in which each author engaged informed his theoretical commitment.

The class will be conducted as a seminar that encourages an in-depth exploration of the multifaceted relationship between culture, power, and sexuality in various settings.  It will emphasize reading primary sources as much as possible, and thinking critically and boldly.  Students are expected to immerse themselves in the works of these authors, and write a paper focusing on two critical issues with which one of them engaged. Selecting current socio-political events or issues as testing ground for the three theorists’ ideas is strongly encouraged. The paper will be elaborated in stages to be discussed in class until its completion.

Main Texts:  

  • Foucault, excerpts from a selection of Lectures at the College de France, “Security, Territory and Population,” (1977-78); Birth of Biopolitics (1978-79); “On the Government of the Living” (1979- 1980);  History of Sexuality, II and II; Herculine Barbin.
  • Bourdieu, Outline of a Theory of Practice; Masculine Domination; Acts of Resistance; The Bachelors’ Ball; excerpts from On the State: Lectures at the Collège de France, 1989-1992.
  • Baudrillard, Seduction; Symbolic Exchange and Death; Simulacra and Simulation.

Soc. 72200: Immigration and Health

Prof. Anahi Viladrich - anahi.viladrich@qc.cuny.edu
Wednesday, 4:15- 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

This course offers a comprehensive overview of the intertwining fields of immigration and global health with a particular focus on the United States. During the semester, we will discuss theoretical concepts of sociological significance to be applied to health-based case studies involving immigrants and refugees in contemporary societies. We will also critically examine the epidemiological literature on immigrants’ health risk factors by addressing the root causes of disease, health disparities and the social determinants of health. Health outcomes will be explored along the intersections of class, race/ethnicity, legal status, region and country of origin, age, and gender, among other key dimensions. The course will also analyze health policy issues and programs by studying the impact of U.S. federal and state law on immigrants’ health coverage, health interventions targeting vulnerable populations (including refugees and their children) and community organizing around work-related injuries. For their final projects, students will choose a conceptual issue of empirical significance, such as the impact of structural violence on post-traumatic stress among border crossers; social determinants of chronic disease (e.g., the obesity epidemic) among second-generation immigrant children; or cultural explanatory models of immigrants’ folk healing practices.

Course Structure: The course will primarily be conducted as a seminar. The instructor’s presentations will be followed by students’ questions and group discussion. For each class, students will read journal articles, evaluations of public health interventions and other research pieces based on sociological theory and methods that critically examine public health issues.

Assessment: Students’ understanding of the course material will be evaluated through class participation, group work, short reflection papers, and a term paper. This paper (a draft and a final version) will be based on case studies on a specific health issue involving a particular immigrant or refugee population.

Soc. 81100: Comparative Sociological Methods 

Prof. John Torpey - jtorpey@gc.cuny.edu
Tuesday, 2:00- 4:00pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

This course explores comparative methods in sociology by analyzing patterns of difference and inequality at the global, national, and regional levels.  It will seek to make sense of the historical roots of these patterns in political, economic, ethnoracial, religious, and demographic arrangements.  The course will explore diverse times and places in order to understand contemporary patterns of difference and inequality in comparative and historical perspective.

Soc. 82800: Immigrant Communities & Politics in New York City

Prof. John Mollenkopf
Mondays, 4:15- 6:15 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

The vast flow of immigrants into New York City (and the surrounding metro area) since 1965 has reshaped the composition of its population and potential electorate, altered neighborhood dynamics, and created new ethnic political constituencies over the last several decades.  Caribbean, Latin American, East and South Asian, European, and African immigrants and their native-born children are making our already cosmopolitan mix of racial and ethnic groups even more varied, posing new challenges for inter-group relations and the fair and vigorous political representation of all groups.  The emerging new immigrant communities are now contending for power not just against older native-born white political elites, but also against native-born minority groups.  They are redefining what it means to be a New Yorker, and, ultimately, to be American.  Such a profound transformation raises many major research questions for social scientists.

This seminar uses New York City as a laboratory to analyze the political changes brought about by the new immigration.  It will cover the existing theoretical and empirical literatures on racial and immigrant ethnic political incorporation and will enable you to do a “hands on” research project for the immigrant-origin constituency of your choice.

Students will use quantitative data provided by the instructor (Census data, election results), secondary sources (such as the immigrant and neighborhood press), and their own interviews to describe and analyze the civic and political engagement of an immigrant ethnic group in the process, students will study the patterns of political activism within the group (in terms of developing political goals and strategies and tactics to realize them) and how they interact with other racial/ethnic groups in their environment (with attention to patterns of conflict and/or cooperation.

The goal of this research is to understand how leadership is developing within your study group, how those leaders seek to promote group identity and activism, and how they become elected or appointed office holders as the larger civic and political culture gradually integrates them.

Class members will pursue these goals by: 1) reviewing key studies on the overall process of immigrant political incorporation in New York and other cities, 2) reading studies about political participation within the major immigrant groups, 3) analyzing Census data, election results, and voter history, and available public opinion polls regarding the political engagement and leanings of your chosen group, and 4) undertaking interviews of political elites from your group, focused on the coming 2020 and 2021 state and local elections.  (We will hold a workshop for students who lack basic quantitative skills and may also substitute further qualitative work for the quantitative analysis).

Soc. 84001: Social Policy and Socio-Economic Outcomes in Industrialized Countries

Prof. Janet Gornick
Tuesdays, 4:15- 6:15 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

This course provides an introduction to cross-national comparative research, with a focus on socio-economic outcomes and on the policies and institutions that shape those outcomes. The course will draw heavily on research based on data available through LIS, a data archive located in Luxembourg, with a satellite office here at the Graduate Center. (See https://www.lisdatacenter.org for details).
LIS contains two main micro-databases. The Luxembourg Income Study (LIS) Database includes 300+ micro-datasets from over 50 high- and middle-income countries. These datasets contain comprehensive measures of income, employment, and household characteristics. A smaller, companion dataset – the Luxembourg Wealth Study (LWS) Database – provides microdata on assets and debt. Since the mid-1980s, the LIS data have been used by more than 5000 researchers – mostly sociologists, economists, and political scientists – to analyze cross-country and over-time variation in diverse outcomes such as poverty, income inequality, employment status, wage patterns, gender inequality and family structure. Many researchers have combined LIS’ microdata with various macro-datasets to study, for example, the effects of national social or labor market policies on socio-economic outcomes, or to link socio-economic variation to national-level outcomes such as immigration, child well-being, health status, political attitudes and voting behavior.

The course has two goals: (1) to review and synthesize 30+ years of research results based on the LIS data; and (2) to enable students with programming skills (in SAS, SPSS, Stata, or R) to carry out and complete an original piece of empirical research. (The LIS and LWS data are accessed through an internet-based “remote-execution system”. All students are permitted to use the LIS microdata at no cost and without limit.)

The course will require a semester-long research project. Students with programming skills (which will not be taught in the course) will be encouraged to complete an empirical analysis, reported in a term paper. Ideally, these term papers will be circulated as LIS/LWS Working Papers – and ultimately in published venues. Students without programming skills will have the option to write a synthetic research paper. A minimum requirement is the capacity to read articles that present quantitative research results.

Soc. 85000: Foundations of Legal Thought: Theory & Practice of Justice

Prof. Leslie Paik
Tuesdays, 4:15- 6:15 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

This course introduces students to the basic methods of legal and social science analysis/research to study law and the legal system. It focuses on specific substantive topics (e.g., access to justice and reform in the civil, criminal and juvenile justice systems). As part of the course, we will do site visits to justice institutions, policy agencies and innovative programs; we also would have speakers present their work and agencies’ missions during class. The goal of the course is to provide students with the legal knowledge and real-world encounters to support their pursuit of jobs and careers in justice reform, in government agencies, nonprofit organizations, and firms.

Soc. 82800: Global Immigrant Cities

Prof. David Halle-dhalle10@gmail.com
Mondays, 6:30 - 8:30 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

This course asks the question of how various migrant-receiving global cities experience, respond to, and are transformed by the changing composition of their ethnic populations. Looking at several European, North American, Latin American, and Asian cities, it will explore their histories of ethnic and racial difference; the ways in which their ideologies about diversity, pluralism, and multiculturalism have evolved and changed over time; the extent to which they incorporate (or do not incorporate) their migrants; and the different economic, cultural, and political impacts that migration has had on these global immigrant cities. The main focus will be on international comparison, and students will be trained in the use of comparative perspectives to illustrate similarities and differences between cities. Global immigrant cities are crucial research sites for exploring the possibility of going “beyond” the nation-state-society focus of most mainstream American research. Also, while opening the door to a crucial dimension of globalization, the comparative study of migration opens up a fresh comparative and international perspective on the urban experience. Taking advantage of our location and extensive local knowledge, the course will use New York as the basis of comparison with other major global cities, such as Los Angeles, Paris, London, Berlin, Amsterdam, Toronto, Shanghai, and Buenos Aires.

Soc. 76900: Media and Popular Culture Analysis

Prof. Erica Chito Childs – echitoch@hunter.cuny.edu
Thursdays, 11:45-1:45 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

This course will explore the myriad of theoretical approaches and methods used to analyze the content, structure, and contexts of media and popular culture in society.  In particular we will explore how cultural meanings convey specific ideologies of gender, race, class, sexuality, nation, and other ideological dimensions.  We will focus on three inter-related dimensions of cultural analysis including the production and political economy of culture, the reading of cultural texts (film, TV, video games, news coverage music, social media, etc.), and the audience reception of those texts (including social media responses).   Students will produce an original research paper employing one of the theoretical frameworks and methodologies of cultural analysis for publication.

Soc. 82901: Urban Poverty and the City

Prof. Van C. Tran – vtran@gc.cuny.edu
Wednesdays, 2:00-4:00pm, Room TBA, 3 credits  
 

The study of neighborhoods, urban poverty and the city holds a distinctive place in the birth and development of American sociology as a discipline, tracing back to the heyday of the Chicago School of Sociology. This course engages with some of the most central debates within the field. We will focus on both structural and cultural approaches to understanding urban inequality.

The course will proceed in two parts. In the first part, we will look at how sociologists have approached the study of urban communities and neighborhoods. In the second part, we will pay attention to the experiences of living in a highly disadvantaged neighborhood, the consequences of growing up in them, and the social and spatial context that shapes individuals’ life chances.

There are no prerequisites to the course. Preference for enrollment will be given to PhD students in Sociology and related disciplines from the Graduate Center or other doctoral programs within the Interuniversity Doctoral Consortium, followed by students from the IMS or QMSS programs.

Soc. 84511-The Sociology of Labor and Labor Movements

Prof. Ruth Milkman – rmilkman@gc.cuny.edu
Tuesdays, 6:30-8:30 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

This course offers an overview of key debates about the U.S. labor movement, with an emphasis on historical and comparative perspectives.  It is a reading course with a seminar format, devoted to intensive study and discussion of key texts on the topic.  The primary focus is on the causes and consequences of the rise of union power in the mid-20th century, and of its decline in the neoliberal period that began in the 1970s.  We will also examine labor market transformations and their impact on the labor movement, and the dynamics of the political-economic context in which labor struggles are situated.  Requirements include short weekly papers on the assigned texts and a research paper on a topic related to the course content.

Soc. 84600: Politics of Inequality, Opportunity, and Redistribution: Theory, Empirics, Methods, and Analysis

Prof. Leslie McCall – lmccall@gc.cuny.edu
Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

This course will cover substantive developments, measurement issues, and analytic approaches in the political study of economic inequality across the social sciences.  The main objective is to become familiar with (1) the multiple levels of analysis involved in the political study of inequality, opportunity, and redistribution, namely, the role of political institutions (i.e., parties, electoral systems, policy regimes, etc.) on the one hand, and behavioral dynamics (e.g., individual and group beliefs, policy preferences, and political participation) on the other hand, in shaping political and economic outcomes, and (2) the strengths and weaknesses of various methodological approaches to analyzing institutional and behavioral processes, such as political economy, public opinion and survey research, experimental research, ethnography, and discourse/textual analysis. Readings will be interdisciplinary and include mostly empirically-based, substantive studies employing quantitative (including experimental) and qualitative data and methods, though the balance will tilt toward quantitative studies. While we will focus substantively on trends in class inequality in the U.S., we will also examine other dimensions of inequality, such as racial/ethnic and gender inequality, as well as inequality outside of the U.S.

Soc. 71600: Sociological Statistics II

Prof. Paul Attewell – pattewell@gc.cuny.edu
Mondays, 4:15-6:15 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

This course is the second part of a two-semester sequence aimed mainly at QMSS students. It will begin by reviewing earlier lectures on ordinary least squares regression and logistic regression, including the use of margins and margins plots to interpret complex interactions from such models. It will next cover several specialized forms of regression modeling, including negative binomial regression for count data, and methods for predicting rates or fractional dependent variables.

We will then move to several more recent computationally-intensive approaches to predictive modeling (i.e., data mining) including classification and regression trees (CART), neural networks, Kernel regularized least squares (KRLS), clustering methods, partial least squares regression (PLS regression), and latent class regression.

The class will consists of a mix of lectures, demonstrations of software, and in-class computer exercises. The main software will be Stata and JMP Pro. These are installed on lab PCs and other machines at GC. The goal of the course is to familiarize students with some of the more recent quantitative methods, when they should be used, and how to interpret their output. The emphasis is on developing hands-on skills.

Soc. 73200: Sociology of Gender

Prof. Hester Eisenstein- hester1@prodigy.net
Tuesdays, 2-4pm, Room TBA, 3Credits  
  

In this course we look a range of issues in the sociology of gender.  To define this field briefly, the sociology of gender looks at the beliefs, interests and structures that tend to preserve the traditional relations between the sexes, and those which contest them.  Among other areas, the field considers the process of socialization into masculine and feminine roles in childhood, through education, and into the public worlds of work and politics.

In recent years sociological inquiry has moved beyond the original concept of “sex roles” to look at gendered structures in institutions, the significance of gender in politics, economics, and social movements, nationally and internationally, and the complex relationships among gender, race, and class.  What was seen as a “natural” and biologically based dichotomy of male/female has been questioned through the study of gender as performance, and the critical challenge to traditional femininity and masculinity from “queer” and transgendered folk.

My own research has focused on what we can term the political economy of gender, in relation to the changes within capitalism with the rise of neoliberalism over the past few decades. The topics covered in this course are a selection reflecting my interests, and should by no means be considered comprehensive. Therefore I include a list of alternative topics in this syllabus that students can pursue on their own, for their final research papers, and for future study.

The framework of this course is influenced by what I see as the political history of gender studies. The establishment of the category of sex and gender in the official canon of the profession of sociology is the outcome of a renewed wave of feminist activism that swept society, and therefore the academy. In the 1960s and 1970s, massive social movements for Black civil rights, women’s rights, ending the war in Vietnam, lesbian and gay rights, and environmentalism in the United States and internationally shook the economic and social status quo.  Today we are witnessing another wave of social movements across the globe, from the revolutions in Tunisia and Egypt to Occupy Wall Street, and from Turkey to Brazil.

The passion and breadth of social movements can become ossified and de-politicized, as the ideas and issues are translated into formal academic inquiry.  I hope therefore in this course to convey the connections to politics and activism behind these topics, so as to keep the links between academic research and social change fresh and vibrant. Students are encouraged to pursue their own interests in the class, and to develop their own frameworks for research and activism.

Soc. 85800: Race and Ethnicity

Prof. Philip Kasinitz- Pkasinitz@GC.CUNY.EDU
Tuesday, 4:15-6:15

Race and ethnicity are constantly changing and evolving, yet they remain among the most persistent and pernicious forms of structured social inequality. Focusing on the United States, but with reference to other multi-ethnic and multi-racial societies, we will examine the evolution of the concept of “race” and its relationship to racism; the heritage of slavery and segregation and their impacts contemporary life; the origins of modern racism and anti-Semitism, “scientific racism, ” why and how the salience of ethnic identity increases and decreases at particular historical moments, the relationship of race and ethnicity to migration, colonialism and class and the growth of the  Latino and Asian American populations and  what  that  means for American notions of race. In addition we will take an in depth look at how racial boundaries change, competition and cooperation between ethnic groups in contemporary America and how “racialized” minorities are (and are not) incorporated into different societies. Readings will include works by W.E.B. Dubois; Jean Paul Sartre, George Fredrickson; William Julius Wilson, Michele Alexander, Ibram Kendi, Richard Alba, Alejandro Portes, Douglas Massey and Mary Waters.

Soc. 83100: Social Construction of Health and Illness

Prof. Barbara Katz Rothman – bkatzrothman@gc.cuny.edu
Wednesdays, 2:00-4:00pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

This course offers an introduction to the field classically known as medical sociology, with an emphasis on newer qualitative, critical and theoretical work.

Key themes in Medical Sociology have included the social construction of illness and its ongoing expansion into more areas of life; the medical gaze and the processes of medicalization; how the medicalized body is framed; representations of the body in medicine; cultural images, ethnographies and narratives of disease and illness; and cultural understandings of medical subjects.

When we take seriously the call to do a truly global sociology, we can see Biomedicine operating at a level and in a way in which national boundaries are but minor obstacles in organizing access – access of providers of services to their customers or to their research material, and access of customers to services.  In that sense, the ‘social construction’ idea is too passive, and too limited in boundaries.  Illnesses are being constructed not only ‘socially,’ in each society according to its own ideas about the body, but in the pursuit of industrial profit.  While Foucault spoke of the state uses of  bio power,  we will also consider how biopower, as it is institutionalized in the Biomedical Empire, uses states.

Soc. 84600: Within-National Inequalities: From Pareto to Piketty

Prof. Branko Milanovic – bmilanovic@gc.cuny.edu
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

The objective of the course is be to review, analyze, and allow students to develop a much better understanding of the theories and empirics of personal income distribution within a single policy-making unit (that is, normally within a nation-state). The first such theory was developed by Vilfredo Pareto more than 100 years ago. Pareto believes that income distribution does not change regardless of a social system and level of development. Simon Kuznets, in the 1950s, posited, on the contrary, a theory where income inequality evolves as societies get richer. Jan Tinbergen, in the 1970s, argued that the level of inequality is determined by the two opposing forces of education (increasing the supply of highly skilled workers) and technological change (increasing the demand for them). Most recently, Thomas Piketty argues that low growth combined with high returns to capital predisposes advanced economies to high levels of inequality. These theories will be considered on the real-world examples of movements of inequality in Brazil, China, “transition countries” and the United States and other advanced economies.  We shall focus especially on the recent evolution of income and wealth inequality in the United States and Piketty’s analytical contributions. The class will be fairly empirical but does not require any prior specific knowledge of the issues nor techniques. It is recommended for students of economics, political science, and sociology.

Soc. 81500: Deportation & Ethnographic Immigration

Prof. David Brotherton – davebro54@icloud.com
Tuesdays, 6:30-8:30pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

This course is an overview of the fields of sociology and criminology that link deportation to processes of migration, social control, state formation, global political economy and social processes of inclusion and exclusion. The deportation of non-citizens has become a major issue in the United States as well as internationally. Literally millions of legal and "illegal" non-citizens have been removed from the U.S. during the past two decades in what is the largest and most enduring process of human expulsion from a Western country since the holocaust. A dramatic hardening of the U.S. immigration laws was enacted in 1996 and since then policies governing citizenship and residency have become increasingly punitive, tied to the moral crusades on drugs, terrorism, gangs and the immigrant and the economic paradigms of neo-liberalism. The erection of borders, both internal and external, symbolic and substantive, has been a key characteristic of these processes. Paradoxically, the United States has been "traditionally" viewed as a nation of immigrants, albeit a colonial settler one in which the indigenous populations were violently and systematically expelled from their ancestral lands only to be subsequently reincorporated and 'assimilated" as "minority" subpopulations. In this course we take a critical-ethnographic lens to the dynamics, practices and sociological contexts of the deportation regimes in the U.S. and beyond, focusing on both epistemological and methodological issues that are highlighted in the research literature. Students are also encouraged to experience the terrain of deportation first-hand with guidance from the instructor.

Soc. 85700: Migration Policy

Prof. Jamie Longazel– jlongazel@jjay.cuny.edu
Thursdays, 4:15-6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

This class will study key issues surrounding migration policy from a critical, interdisciplinary perspective. While our primary focus will be on theoretical issues concerning contemporary policy patterns in the United States, we’ll also make it a point to consider practical issues, historical policy patterns, and international trends. We will explore the social forces that shape migration policy (e.g., race, political economy), the policy tools states use to control migrants (e.g., detention, deportation, devolution), and the ways in which migrants respond to and are affected by such policies.

Soc. 81900 Spatial Demography

Prof. Deborah Balk - deborah_balk@baruch.cuny.edu
Wednesdays, 4:15 p.m.- 6:15 p.m. 3 credits     

This course provides an overview of spatial themes and techniques in demography. Examples will be drawn from many substantive areas (e.g., mortality, fertility, urbanization, migration, poverty and others in allied disciplines). Students will learn about the spatial construction of place, basic mapping skills and spatial data creation as well as statistical methods to explore and model spatially-referenced data to answer demographic (and allied) questions. In the most advanced topics, students examine the special difficulties that spatial data may create for standard regression approaches, and learn models and approaches for undertaking multivariate regression analysis in the presence of spatial heterogeneity and/or spatial dependence. Emphasis in the course is evenly split between learning how to make maps and spatial analysis. Pre-requisite: Introductory statistics including multiple linear regression, or permission of instructor.

Soc. 81200. Ethnography, Related Methods and Research Design

Prof. Rob Smith – robertsmith@baruch.cuny.edu 
Thursdays, 6:30-8:30pm, Room TBA, 3 credits 

This course offers and overview of ethnography and related methods, analysis, and research design. First, the course offers students the chance to learn about ethnographic research, including combining techniques such as ethnographic observation, various types of interviews, and case triangulation. Second, the course reviews how to design and do ethnographic, case-oriented, research that is fundable, publishable, and usable in several applied contexts. Third, the course offers students a chance to do their own pilot ethnographic studies and discuss them in class. 

Soc. 80201. Social Consequences of Digitalization

Prof. John Tropey – jtorpey@gc.cuny.edu
Tuesdays, 2:00- 4:00pm. Room TBA, 3 credits

This course examines the social consequences of the digitalization of modern life.  We will explore the nature and extent to which digitalization constitutes a social transformation and the character of that transformation.  Areas to be addressed include changes in the nature of social ties, the political consequences of social media, bias in artificial intelligence, the future of work, universal basic income, changes in warfare, the remaking of philanthropy, utopian possibilities and dystopian nightmares of new technologies, and the like.  Readings will be drawn from such authors as Blauner, Castells, Fischer, Berlin, Asaro, Scharre, Turkle, Vaidyanathan, Markoff, Zuboff, Ghiridharadas, Webb, Reich, et al.

Soc. 70100. Development of Sociological Theory

Prof. Jack Hammond- jhammond@hunter.cuny.edu 
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30pm, Room TBA, 3 credits 

The classical sociological theorists -Marx, Weber, and Durkheim -offer the foundations for sociological thinking in the twentieth century and into the present. This course will consist of a close reading of their major works, emphasizing their analyses of the nineteenth-century historical changes, which gave rise to the discipline of sociology.

Soc. 82201. Immigrant New York

Prof. Van Tran - vtran@gc.cuny.edu
Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

Over the course of the twentieth century, New York City has witnessed two major waves of immigration. How has immigration transformed New York City, both in the past and in the present? What are the major ethnic groups in the city? How are immigrants and their U.S.-born children incorporated into the city’s schools, workplaces and neighborhoods? How will their integration reshape patterns of ethnic and racial inequality in the city? This course answers these questions by focusing on New York City as a case study to highlight how immigration has transformed the city’s demographic, political, socioeconomic and spatial landscape. On the one hand, the influx of immigrants has brought about economic revitalization of many neighborhoods from Jackson Heights to Washington Heights, lowering the crime rate and stimulating business growth. On the other hand, immigration and diversity have raised concerns about social cohesion and national security. How can we balance these concerns? One unique feature of this course is the opportunity for students to directly observe and study New York City’s diverse neighborhoods, immigrant communities and immigrant organizations. The course welcomes students from a range of disciplinary background, including sociology, urban studies, social anthropology, political science, and history.   

Soc. 85800. Research/Writing/Publication on Race, Ethnicity, and Migration

Prof. Stephen Steinberg - ssteinberg1@gc.cuny.edu 
Tuesdays, 6:30 – 8:30 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

This seminar on Research/ Writing/ Publication is targeted for students whose scholarship is centered on race, ethnicity, and migration. 

We will explore a series of related genres that go “beyond the dissertation.”

  1. The book review.
  2. The conference paper.
  3. Converting the conference paper for submission to a journal for publication.
  4. Anticipating the eventual transition from dissertation to book. 
  5. The book proposal, beginning with the cover letter to an acquisition editor.
  6. The book proposal itself.
  7. The grant proposal.
  8. Publication in a non-academic venue: for example, an op-ed in a newspaper; an article in the Chronicle of Higher Education; a post on a blog, such as Racism Review: scholarship and action toward racial justice.

Soc. 81100 - Social Demography and Geographies of the Disadvantaged

Prof. Jeremy Porter – jporter@brooklyn.cuny.edu 
Wednesdays, 11:45 am-1:45 pm., Room TBA 3 credits 

In this course we will examine the role of “place” as social geographies which relates to containers of populations.  In particular, we are interested in the social geographies of disadvantage.  We will explore theoretical treatments and popular sources of data in the analysis of disadvantaged populations. We will also be introduced to ways that public policies, institutional practices and spatial perceptions become institutionalized and influence local contexts to maintain disadvantage.  Students in the course will work with data from the US Census Bureau, Centers for Disease Control, and other administrative population level data sources.  In addition, students will be introduced to a series of open source software packages commonly used in the application of methods associated with the examination of disadvantaged populations/individuals in localized contexts.  Methodological applications include Multilevel modeling (could be listed as HLM), Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR), Spatial Regression, and an introduction to Spatio-Temporal Analyses. Pre-requisite: Introductory statistics including multiple linear regression.

Soc.73200: Gender and Globalization

Prof. Hester Eisenstein - hester1@prodigy.net 
Mondays, 2:00-4:00 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

In this course we will examine the relationship between “globalization,” and the changes in gender relations that have taken place since the 1960s.Since the end of the “long boom” (starting after World War II and lasting through the mid-1970s), academic and mainstream feminism have enjoyed enormous success, during a period of economic, social, and political restructuring that has created an intensified polarization between rich and poor, and an ever-growing mass of desperately impoverished people around the globe. This course will examine this paradox. 

We will define globalization, starting from the premise that this is a stage in the development of the international capitalist system, under the economic and military domination of the world’s only remaining superpower. Poor countries have been forced to open their borders to the free flow of capital from the rich countries.”Globalization” involves the intensive use of female labor, from maquiladoras to electronics to textiles. It has also produced an acceleration of “informal” work for women. 

While educated women can now walk through many doors previously closed to them, in the worlds of business, sports, academe and politics, the majority of women in the world are increasingly impoverished, overworked and exploited, and subjected to a wide variety of forms of sexual, military, and economic violence. The majority of the world’s migrants and refugees are now women and children. 

Where does the ideology of globalization come from? How has globalization affected the conditions of women and children in the developed and the developing world? How has contemporary feminism been shaped by the workforce participation of women? What is the role of class and race in the women’s movement, domestically and internationally? Why are issues of gender, sexuality, and race so central to the culture wars being waged at home and abroad by religious fundamentalist leaders? How does the association of “liberated women” with modernity affect the process of globalization? In the revived social movement that has placed the World Trade Organization, the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank and other international financial institutions at the center of an intensified campaign for social justice, what is the place for organized women’s activism? 

Readings in the course are selected from theoretical writings as well as case studies, and students will be encouraged to develop their own research and activist agendas.

Soc. 82301: Computer Mapping for LA & NY, and Global Cities GIS with Mapinfo: Basic and Advanced Techniques

Prof. David Halle – dhalle10@gmail.com     
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30, Room TBA, 3 credits 

An introduction to computer mapping (Geographic Information  Systems), using the software Mapinfo.  We will learn the techniques of computer mapping to analyze the latest developments in New York and Los Angeles, both the cities and regions, and other global cities. We will analyze the most recently available census data, and the decennial census data for 2010, 2000, 1990, 1980 and 1970 for New York and Los Angeles. We will map such topics as  the distribution of income, occupations, racial and ethnic groups, and foreign-born. We will also map crime at the level of the police precinct, political data including Presidential, mayoral and congressional elections, city and county boundaries, world cities, environmental data, transportation, housing, schools and education data, and zoning matters including historic districts.  We will map, and discuss, such key topics as the decline of the classic “ghetto” and the Latinization of inner city neighborhoods, the movement of ethnic groups to the suburbs, gentrification, the 2007- financial crisis including the housing bubble, the affordable housing crisis, the ecology and “green” movement, flooding including Hurricane Sandy,  attempts to reform the school systems, arts and cultural institutions, and de Blasio’s impact and policies.  Students are encouraged to bring to class, and develop during the semester, any ongoing research they are doing.

Soc. 81900: Quantitative Research Methods 

Prof. Jeremy Porter- jporter@brooklyn.cuny.edu
Mondays, 6:30-8:30pm, Room TBA, 3 credits   

This course will cover issues pertaining to the applied research process in the collection, management, and analysis of quantitative data. Methods covered are intended to give students experience with a broad array of specific quantitative methods and a directed focus on the perspectives that underlie the application of such methods. The explicit goal of the course is to give students the foundational tools necessary to do high quality quantitative research in applied and academic settings. A sample of topics covered include; the science of science, the politics and ethics of research, developing novel research ideas, item measurement, instrumentation, sampling, understanding statistical inference, and a wide variety of topics associated with the collection, management, and analysis of quantitative data.

Soc. 85700: Social Welfare Policy

Prof. Janet Gornick- jgornick@gc.cuny.edu
Tuesdays, 4:15- 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits 

This course will examine social welfare policy in the United States, in historical and cross‐national perspective.  We will begin with an overview of the development of social welfare policy in the U.S. We will focus on crucial historical periods – including the Civil War years, the Progressive Era, the New Deal, the Great Society, and the “welfare reform” of the 1990s and early 2000s.  Second, we will assess “the big picture” of the American welfare state, through the lens of its underlying institutional framework.  Third, we will analyze a set of contemporary challenges in the U.S. that call for active policy responses, such as inequality, health insurance, low‐wage work, and care.  Finally, we will survey selected social policy lessons from other high‐income countries, especially in Europe, where social provisions are typically more extensive than they are in the U.S.

Soc. 84600: Introduction to Social Movements

Prof. James M. Jasper – jjasper@gc.cuny.edu
Wednesdays, 4:15- 6:15 pm, , Room TBA, 3 credits

This course will review the history and current directions of research and theory about social movements. I hope to show some pitfalls of research guided by grand metaphors, theories of history, or normative agendas, compared to research guided by modest micro-level mechanisms. We begin with theories of revolutions, which show some of the perils of macro-level comparative research. We will pay special attention to how both arenas and players change across time, confounding many theories of action.

Soc. 82907: Black America 

Prof. Juan Battle - jbattle@gc.cuny.edu
Mondays, 4:15- 6:15 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

“One ever feels his two-ness – an American, a Negro; two souls, two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings; two warring ideals in one dark body.” So wrote WEB Du Bois in 1897. Black history, Du Bois maintained, was the history of this double-consciousness. Black people have always been part of the American nation that they helped to build. But they have also been a nation unto themselves, with their own experiences, culture, and aspirations. Black-American history cannot be understood except in the broader context of American history. Likewise, American history cannot be understood without Black-American history.
--- excerpt from Hines, et al.’s (2014) preface

This course will serve as a broad, historical survey of the Black experience (mainly) within the United States. Because students will be exposed to (and contribute from) a wide variety of perspectives on the subject, this course is appropriate for students in the traditional social sciences (e.g. sociology, anthropology, psychology, urban education, and history) as well as more contemporary ones (e.g. women’s studies, race studies, American studies, cultural studies, lesbian and gay studies).

Soc. 82800: Urban Studies Core Seminar II

Prof. Marta Gutman/John Mollenkof  mgutman@ccny.cuny.edu / jmollenkopf@gc.cuny.edu 
Wednesdays, 4:15- 6:15 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

The second semester of the Core Seminar in Urban Studies will continue to build on the work of the first semester, which was designed to equip doctoral students in the humanities, social sciences, and urban-oriented sciences with the theoretical perspectives that will help them situate and conceptualize their research questions and also apply them to a case study neighborhood. The second semester will focus on the research methods that students can use to begin to answer their research questions and the ways in which they can inform policy-making. They will apply these methods both to their own long-term research projects and to the Queens waterfront case study, investigating the question of “What is the future of LIC after Amazon?” This site exemplifies the challenges of redeveloping post-industrial urban landscapes, particularly on shorelines. Students will learn how to use field work, in depth interviewing, archival research, visual and auditory inventories, survey research, administrative data analysis, GIS and other methods to explore policy questions about land use, zoning, gentrification, climate change, the development industrial ecologies, neighborhood cohesion, and other pressing topics. We will continue to treat this neighborhood as an ecology of work, consumption, recreation, and residence and ask now these elements both frame and are shaped by politics and policy-making.

Soc. 81500: Doing Visual Research

Prof. Wendy Luttrell - wluttrell@gc.cuny.edu
Tuesdays, 4:15- 6:15pm, Room TBA,  3 credits

In the past two decades, there has been an explosion of participatory visual research projects. This course aims to situate these projects within overlapping disciplinary traditions (education, sociology, anthropology, cultural studies, and psychology) and to consider what makes this research “critical” (i.e. feminist, de-colonial, reflexive, transformative). The course affords students the opportunity to read and review exemplary projects; and to work directly with visual data utilizing different analytic/interpretive strategies. Students will have access to an audio-visual archive of data I have collected based on a longitudinal visual research project with children 10-18 or can utilize an archive of their own interest. We will consider issues of power and ethics in participatory visual research; how working with visual data can (but not necessarily) challenge traditional notions of knowledge production; the role of new technologies in disseminating and reaching new audiences; and how we align our work with the expectations and politics within the communities within which we work.

Soc. 84505: Mothers In Law

Profs. Julie Suk and Sara McDougall - ​jsuk@gc.cuny.edu,  smcdougall@jjay.cuny.edu
Mondays, 11:45- 1:45pm, Room TBA,  3 credits

This course will introduce students to central issues in the history and sociology of law through the study of motherhood. The lens of motherhood will open up broader themes in the study of law and society, including categories such as gender, constitutionalism, and criminal justice. Studying the socio-legal history of motherhood will enable students to learn the skills of legal reasoning, utilize methods of legal-historical research, and pursue experiential learning through field studies, panel discussions open to the public, and the authoring of publicly available teaching materials on select topics. First, we will explore how ideas of women as mothers have been enshrined in law, from the legal definition of the mother in civil law, to the legal treatment of pregnancy. Second, this course will study women as lawmakers, as “founding mothers” of twentieth-century constitutions, and laws more generally. We will explore biographies of women lawyers and lawmakers. Third, we will consider mothers as law-breakers, by engaging the history of mothers in prison, and the current legal issues arising from incarceration of mothers. This component of the course may include field trips to engage the criminal justice system.

Soc. 82800: International Migration

Profs. Richard Alba and Nancy Foner - ​ralba@gc.cuny.edu,  nfoner@hunter.cuny.edu
Thursdays, 4:15- 6:15pm, Room TBA,  3 credits

This course offers a comprehensive overview of key current topics and issues in the field of international migration. While the course will aspire to incorporate the experiences of major immigrant receiving countries around the world, the main focus will be on Europe and North America, where the major theories and key concepts are most fully developed. The emphasis is on exploring both the theoretical debates in the field and the empirical data and case studies that address and, in some cases, have stimulated the debates.  Among the issues in migration studies that will be explored:  theories about the causes of international migration;  theories of assimilation;  the construction of ethnic and racial identities and group boundaries; the nature and impact of transnational ties; and comparative integration of immigrants and their children in Europe and North America. As the field of international migration is inherently interdisciplinary and methodologically eclectic we will be looking at a wide variety of studies, including those that use various kinds of quantitative data and qualitative techniques as well as some that draw on historical analyses.

Soc. 81900: Methods of Demographic Analysis

Prof. Frank Heiland – Frank.Heiland@baruch.cuny.edu
Tuesdays, 4:15 - 6:15 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

This course gives students an overview of some of the major demographic methods used in the study of population, and includes the standard procedures for the measurement of fertility, mortality, natural increase, migration, and nuptiality. Students will learn how to construct demographic rates, life tables, and population projections, and how to carry out standardization, decomposition of differences, analysis of fertility and nuptiality patterns, analysis invoking model life tables and stable population theory, and analysis of nonstable populations.

Soc. 71500: Sociological Statistics I

Prof. Paul Attewell – pattewell@gc.cuny.edu 
Mondays, 4:15 - 6:15 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

This course is the first part of a two-course sequence in quantitative research methods, intended primarily for students enrolled in the QMSS degree program. This course assumes no previous background in statistics or data analysis, but will move at a fairly quick pace starting with the basics. The course’s emphasis is on developing “hands on” analysis skills, rather than on the underlying mathematics. Students will learn how to use Stata statistical software to manage and analyze real datasets, and to recognize which techniques are appropriate in which contexts, aware of their strengths and weaknesses. We will consider alternative analytical methods that are available for various tasks, and learn how to interpret and evaluate statistical output. The class’ format will combine lectures and demonstrations with in-class statistical exercises. The class will take place in a computer lab with PCs that have the appropriate software installed. Grades will be based on a student’s in-class exercises.

Topics will include:

  1. Levels of measurement and types of variables. Measures of central tendency, variation and dispersion.
  2. Data preparation and data cleaning. Recoding data. Strategies for dealing with missing data. Imputation.
  3. The Central limit theorem, standard errors, confidence intervals. 
  4. Survey design and sampling weights. 
  5. The null hypothesis & the logic of significance testing, including its limitations and misuse. Robust standard errors. Bootstrapping and Permutation tests for significance testing, recent advances including cross-validation.
  6. Comparing across groups: ANOVA, t-tests, cross-tabulation.
  7. Standardization, z-scores, binning. Dealing with non-linearity.
  8. Measures of association and correlation, and non-parametric tests.  Building scales.
  9. Causal inference, spurious correlation, selection bias, mediation and moderation.
  10. Multivariate regression. Dummy variables. Variable transformations. Interaction terms.
  11. Regression assumptions and regression diagnostics.
  12. The Linear Probability model and Logistic Regression. Marginal Effects.
  13. Extensions of regression: fractional regression, censored regression, count data.

Soc. 85000: Criminology and the Law

Prof. R. L’Heureux Lewis-McCoy – rlewismccoy@gmail.com
Thursdays, 6:30 - 8:30 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

Criminologists rely on various theoretical perspectives to understand and explain criminal behavior. Research has examined the criminal act as contingent on an individual person’s psychology, biological traits, traumatic experiences, immediate environment, wider geographical community, or a combination of these, while others focus on the criminal event itself or trends in aggregate crime rates.  A different but deeply connected inquiry concerns the type and degree of social control imposed on the individual once a crime is committed.  Legal structures grow from communal and political contexts partly informed by criminological knowledge but mostly built on wider social forces.  The interplay between criminological knowledge, social norms, and legal responses is explored in this course.

Soc. 80000: Reading Foucault on power, religion, and sexuality

Prof. Marnia Lazreg  mlazreg@hunter.cuny.edu
Mondays, 4:15 - 6:15 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

This intensive seminar focuses on a close reading of a small number of texts to understand what Foucault exactly wrote (and said) about power, its articulation with religion and sexuality, and its effects on the physical as well as social body. Did Foucault elaborate a coherent theory of power that incorporates politics, religion and sexual identity? What is the explanatory potential of such a theory when compared with existing sociological conceptions of power? 

To answer these questions, the seminar examines the nature, forms, technical methods and consequences of power in the various settings Foucault evoked, such as the state, the economy (capitalism), and revolutions. The interface between sexuality and religion is studied through a number of key concepts, including “political spirituality,” “political life,” “liberalism,” “biopolitics” and “biopower;” “governmentality,” “pastoral power,” “mysticism,” “rupture”
and “subjectification.”

The seminar further explores the relevance of Foucault’s thought to understanding some major contemporary issues, including the emergence of religion as a political force in developing countries; the state use of security as a tool of population control; the rise of neo-conservative leaders to power in Europe and the United States; and the backlash against feminism and gay rights.

Main texts:
Lectures at the Collège de France: “Society must be defended” (1976); “Security, Territory and Population,” (1977-78); Birth of biopolitics” (1978-79); “On the Government of the Living” (1979-80). 
History of Sexuality and selections from Discipline and Punish

Students will be expected to engage in a sustained commitment to the readings and write a term paper on one of the theoretical issues covered in the seminar with a view to assessing its applicability to a current event.

Open to all interested students.

Soc. 81200: Qualitative Methods/Ethnography

Prof. Richard Ocejo rocejo@jjay.cuny.edu
Mondays, 2:00 - 4:00, Room TBA, 3 credits

The ethnographic method has produced some of the most influential and memorable studies in sociology since the discipline’s founding. Both seminar and practicum, this course will introduce students to and help train them in ethnography as it is used in sociology. To quote Robert Park’s famous line, a key goal of the course will be for students to “get the seat of [their] pants dirty with real research,” with guidance and reflection. In addition to readings and discussions on the method and examples of research, students will be required to select a site and group for their own semester-long fieldwork. This research will entail regular site visits, note taking, interviewing, and preliminary analysis and conceptual framing. It may be the start of a new project, or part of an ongoing one. We will cover such methodological topics as the epistemology of qualitative research, the role of theory in ethnographic work, and reflexivity. And through reading examples of a variety of types of ethnographic work, we will cover such topics on “doing ethnography” as roles in the field, ethics, relationships with participants, and positionality. Along with learning the method’s basics and enhancing research, critical thinking and writing skills, the course will also give students the chance to develop a potentially long-term research project.

Soc. 82800: The Origins of Capitalism: Comparative-Historical Sociology

Prof. Charles Post cpost@bmcc.cuny.edu
Mondays, 6:30 - 8:30 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

This course will serve as an introduction to one of the central themes of comparative-historical sociology, the origins of capitalism. We will begin with the classical sociological and historical discussions of the origins of capitalism (Smith, Marx, Weber, Polanyi), before moving to examining the ongoing debates on the ‘first transition’ in seventeenth century England. The course will proceed with a discussion of the ‘later transitions’ in the United States, Canada, France and Japan, before concluding with an overview of discussions of the problems of capitalist development (and non-development) in the global South. Among the themes addressed will be the respective role of markets, social conflict and states in the origins of capitalism. Readings will be substantial, varied in perspectives and range widely over time and place.

Soc. 72500: Neighborhood Ghettos & Enclaves

Prof Gregory Smithsimon gsmithsimon@brooklyn.cuny.edu
Wednesdays, 6:30 - 8:30 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

This class will examine the role neighborhoods and other forms of spatial community play in contemporary urban life. We will look at both the micro level interactions that create communities in the city, as well as larger structural forces such as racial segregation, migration and public policy in assessing what urban communities do, how they are created and change and how they are sometimes destroyed, as well as examining the role that spatial communities have in the lives of their residents and others in the City. Specific topics will include the development of the modern neighborhood, “ghettos” past and present, immigrant enclaves, the role of race, public space, ethnic enclaves, and gentrification.

Soc. 83300: Sociology of Family

Prof. Jessica Hardie jh1389@hunter.cuny.edu
Tuesdays 11:45 am – 1:45 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

Families are universally important social institutions, both for the individual and society. They are the keepers of culture and tradition and have acted as primary drivers of social inequality throughout history. This seminar will introduce students to the major theoretical perspectives and scholarship on families within sociology, improving their ability to critically analyze work in this field and inspiring students' own family-related research. The course will focus primarily on the United States, but will incorporate literature from other regions. Throughout the semester, we will seek to explain the role of family in individuals’ lives, the precursors and consequences of family change, and how the family intersects with other social institutions. The course materials draw on a variety of theoretical, historical, cultural, and methodological perspectives to examine topics such as union formation and dissolution, family relationships, childbearing, parenthood, work and family issues, and intergenerational exchanges. editor from public facing publication, and academic with high profile success engaging publics.

Soc. 85700: Reading and Speaking Race

Prof. Juan Battle jbattle@gc.cuny.edu
Mondays 4:15 – 6:15 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

This course will provide students with a deeper understanding of contemporary academic and public discourses surrounding race and ethnicity. Grounded in a sociological approach, students will read key social scientific texts on the meaning of race from both historical and contemporary perspectives. This class is different than a traditional race and ethnicity graduate course because it asks students to not only understand academic discussions of race and ethnicity but also work to make these complex arguments accessible to wider audiences. With journalists and publics becoming increasingly interested in nuanced discourse about the influence of race in the Post-Obama era, the class presents a unique opportunity to help emergent scholars hone their voices and analysis.

The contemporary political environment necessitates a language and nuance that helps articulate an increasingly diverse yet still unequal world. Weekly discussions will be facilitated by rotating members of the class. Students in the course will be expected to develop two written products: 1) an op-ed targeted at a major news publication such at the New York Times or a national news publication; and 2) a book review for an academic publication. The course will draw primarily (though not entirely) from two main texts. Further, the course will incorporate guest speakers who specialize in public facing work including a journalist, an editor from public facing publication, and academic with high profile success engaging publics.

Soc. 82901: Black Freedom Struggles and White Resistance

Prof. Chris Bonastia profbonastia@gmail.com
Wednesdays 2:00 – 4:00 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

In the last two decades, research on Black Freedom Struggles has expanded in several intriguing directions. Central to this expansion is the claim that the conventional narrative of the civil rights movement is reductionist and historically inaccurate. At its core, this conventional narrative is a regional morality tale that goes something like this: In the South, peaceful Blacks defeated the violent white enforcers of Jim Crow; when the movement traveled North (around 1965), unreasonable Black demands and violent outbursts led to white backlash and the collapse of the movement. Among other shortcomings, this North/South binary ignores the common roots of American racism that fueled Black activism and white resistance throughout the nation.

In response to the limits of the conventional narrative, some scholars have produced detailed case studies of local battles outside the Deep South. Some have argued that, in a number of locales, Black nationalist movements did not supplant integrationist movements, but co-existed alongside them for extended periods. Others have turned greater attention to grassroots activists and foot soldiers, many of them women, rather than focusing primarily on iconic figures and mainstream national civil rights organizations such as the NAACP and Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Still others have accorded closer scrutiny to the various manifestations of white resistance to social change, or the dynamics between Black and Latinx organizations fighting for racial justice.

Relatively few sociologists have joined this conversation. In this course, we will critically analyze research on Black Freedom Struggles and white resistance by scholars inside and outside of sociology. In addition to our attempts to gain a broader and deeper, historical and sociological understanding of our topic, we will spend some time thinking about how the conventions of various disciplines shape the way that authors understand and narrate history. What does sociology do well? Where does it fall short? What might sociologists contribute to this area of study? What might sociologists learn from scholars in other fields?

Please note that this course is not a survey of sociological theories of race and ethnicity. Some of these readings—mostly the ones by sociologists—are explicitly theoretical, while others are not. Throughout the semester, we will consider how theory can clarify or obscure our historical understandings of Black Freedom Struggles and white resistance.

Soc. 70200: Contemporary Sociological Theory

Prof. Thomas DeGloma tdegloma@hunter.cuny.edu
Tuesdays, 6:30 - 8:30 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

This course is designed to serve multiple purposes simultaneously.  The first aim is to provide you with a thorough survey of important theorists in the development of both European and American social theory, as well as a sense of how classical theory influenced contemporary thinking and how current theorists have influenced one another.  The second goal is to provide comprehensive exposure to theorists whose work will hopefully inspire you and help you shape your research agenda and refine you scholarship.  The third main objective, related to the second, is to help you learn to creatively apply contemporary theory to specific social issues and problems of your interest. Given these objectives, the course is not simply an abstract exercise but hopefully one that brings theory alive and shapes your sociological vision.

Soc. 83300 (PSC 83502/WSP 81000): Women, Work and Public Policy

Prof. Janet Gornick JGornick@gc.cuny.edu
Tuesdays 4:15 – 6:15 pm, Room TBA, 4 credits

This course will provide an overview of key issues affecting women in the contemporary workplace in the United States and other high-income countries. We will begin with an overview of women’s position in the labor market. Here we will take a multidimensional approach to capturing gender inequality at work, covering gender gaps in employment rates, in working time, in occupation, and in earnings; one section of the course will focus on paid care workers. We will assess growing class inequalities among women, which have led to polarization in the labor market, especially between women with more and less education; we will consider divisions by race, ethnicity, nativity, and sexuality. We will analyze the ways in which public policies have addressed these concerns, and evaluate their impacts.

The course also examines the effects on women workers persistent inequalities in divisions of labor within households. Despite the enormous increase in women’s employment rates during the past half century, women continue to carry out the bulk of unpaid work in their homes. Altering these inequalities has proven even more challenging than transforming the structures that shape paid work. We will consider recent research on the effects of “work-family reconciliation policies”– that is, public policies aimed at supporting women (and men) as they balance the responsibilities of paid work and family care. The key question now under consideration is whether some of these policies – e.g., paid family leave, rights to part-time work, and flexible scheduling – create new forms of gender inequality.

Students will complete weekly reaction papers and a semester-long research project.

Soc. 82800: Core Seminar in Urban Studies

John Mollenkopf jmollenkopf@gc.cuny.edu
Mondays, 4:15 - 6:15 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

This two-semester, interdisciplinary seminar provides a common core for urban studies across the disciplines at the Graduate School.  It will combine the close reading and analysis of key theoretical texts from the social sciences and humanities with an application to specific case study examples that will illustrate the different approaches that the humanities and social sciences take to understanding cities and urban life.  The seminar will familiarize students interested in engaging in urban studies with many of the necessary research methods, whether historical and textual and visual analysis to participant observation and in-depth interviewing to quantitative data gathering and analysis techniques, including mapping, Census data, administrative data, and open data sources.  Key Graduate Center professors from many disciplines will also present their perspectives on how to conduct cutting edge research.  The seminar seeks both to be a focal point for a new urban studies initiative at the Graduate Center and to prepare students to conceptualize and launch their own urban research project.

Soc.819000: Geospatial Humanities

Prof Jeremy Porter jporter@brooklyn.cuny.edu
Thursdays, 6:30 - 8:30 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

This course aims to familiarize students with GIS and spatial analysis tools and techniques used in the visualization, management, analysis, and presentation of geo-spatial data.  The course will be a hand's on applied course in which students will learn to work with publicly available geo-spatial data in open-source software packages, including but not limited to: R, Python, QGIS, and CartoDB.  Topics covered include, Data Acquisition, Geo-Processing, Data Visualization, Cartography, Spatial Statistics, and Web-Mapping.

Soc. 85000: Sociology of Violence

Prof. John Torpey jtorpey@gc.cuny.edu
Tuesdays 2:00 – 4:00 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

This course explores sociological explanations for and analyses of violence in human life.  We will examine interpersonal violence as well as that inflicted by violent groups and military organizations.  Readings will include classical theories about violence as well as contemporary empirical studies and interpretations.

Prof. Juan Battle  jbattle@gc.cuny.edu
Soc 74400 - Social Inequality
Mondays, 4:15 - 6:15 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

 

American society is highly unequal in terms of income and wealth, education, and health.  Individuals face very different opportunities for obtaining an education, for developing important social, psychological, and cognitive skills and competencies during childhood and youth, and for finding satisfactory employment as adults. Levels of consumption and material comfort are highly unequal. Moreover, some individuals live in highly precarious situations, and are buffeted by economic and other setbacks, while others are better protected against risks, can feel secure and plan ahead. Over the life course, substantial gaps in health and longevity emerge between different groups within our population, such that some ‘age’ and die faster than others.

When inequalities in life chances follow the boundaries of social groups – socioeconomic classes, racial or ethnic groups, genders, or age cohorts – we envision society as a hierarchy of groups, and call this pattern ‘social stratification.’  Sociologists ask why stratification exists, how it changes over time, and whether inequality is unavoidable or is a matter of political policy and popular will. We also debate normative issues: whether or when social inequality is just and productive, and when it is unjust and undesirable. 

The sociology of inequality and stratification is a huge area so this course will only be able to provide an introduction or overview suitable for doctoral students. The principal focus of the course will be theoretical, discussing the conceptual basis of our understandings of stratification. Many of the core concepts of sociology are intended to describe or explain aspects of social inequality: social class and SES; upward and downward social mobility; discrimination in labor markets and firms; “winner take all” and “big fish in small pond” concepts; ideas of social exclusion & notions of an underclass; theories of prejudice, discrimination, and group conflict; ideas about the intersectionality of race, class and gender. Debates rage around many of these ideas, and in large part this course will provide an introduction to these concepts and controversies.

Because students will be exposed to (and contribute from) a wide variety of perspectives on the subject, this course is appropriate for students in the traditional social sciences (e.g. sociology, anthropology, psychology, urban education, and history) as well as more contemporary ones (e.g. women’s studies, race studies, American studies, cultural studies, lesbian and gay studies).


Prof. Roslyn Bologh roslyn.bologh@csi.cuny.edu
Soc 74600 - Political Economy & Social Change
Mondays, 6:30 - 8:30 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits


How do the dynamics and relations of political economy affect social life, and how can they be changed?  From interpersonal relations to international relations, from rankings of happiness among countries and among migrants within countries to rates of suicide, from race and ethnic relations and inequalities to gender relations, from interpersonal violence to international violence, from militarization of policing to privatization of prisons and mass incarceration, from types of education to urban and suburban life, from Manhattan rents and real estate prices to segregation, political economy is shaping social life.
Part of the appeal of Thomas Piketty’s acclaimed book on inequality, Capital in the Twenty First Century, lies in his emphatic rejection of the narrow economistic approach of economics and his espousal of the more comprehensive, sociological, cultural and historical perspective of political economy  – employing sources as unorthodox as Jane Austen’s novels. We will examine theorists from Marx to the critical theorists of today in order to understand the dynamics and direction of our changing world.  Students (even beginning graduate students) will be encouraged to develop a draft of a publishable article.



Prof. David Halle dhalle10@gmail.com
Soc 82301 - Computer Mapping for LA & NY, and Global Cities
Wednesdays, 6:30 - 8:30 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

 
An introduction to computer mapping (Geographic Information  Systems), using the software Mapinfo.  We will learn the techniques of computer mapping using the most recent census, and other data, to analyze the latest developments in New York and Los Angeles, both the cities and regions, as well as other global cities. We will analyze the most recently available census data, and the decennial census data for 2010, 2000, 1990, 1980 and 1970 for New York and Los Angeles, and other global cities,. We will map such topics as  the distribution of income, occupations, racial and ethnic groups, and foreign-born.  We will also map crime at the level of the police precinct, political data including mayoral and congressional elections, and city and county boundaries. We will map, and discuss, such key topics as the decline of the classic “ghetto” and the Latinization of inner city neighborhoods, the movement of ethnic groups to the suburbs, gentrification, the 2007- financial crisis including the housing bubble, the affordable housing crisis, the ecology and “green” movement, attempts to reform the school systems,  flooding including Hurricane Sandy, arts and cultural institutions, and de Blasio’s impact and policies.  Students are encouraged to bring to class, and develop during the semester, any ongoing research they are doing.



Prof. Michael Jacobson Michael.Jacobson@islg.cuny.edu
Soc 84700 - Public and Social Policy Development, Analysis, and Evaluation
Tuesdays, 4:15 - 6:15 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

 

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of public policy development, implementation, and evaluation in real-world settings, using local and national examples from the work of the Institute for State and Local Governance (ISLG), a research and policy organization within the City University of New York (CUNY). The Institute currently has 40 full time staff and has projects in over 40 cities nationally.  ISLG works with government, nonprofit, private, and philanthropic organizations to reform and improve the structure, financing, delivery, measurement, and evaluation of vital public services in areas that include criminal justice, health care, child welfare and governmental budgeting. Specifically, the Institute provides state and local governments a range of  technical assistance, research and analytical expertise, including project development and management, performance measurement and evaluation, cost-benefit analysis, and fiscal planning. 

During the course, students will develop a foundational knowledge of the formal and informal policy making process with particular attention to how reforms can be proposed and implemented in what have become deeply politicized and resource constrained environments. Specific areas of focus will include the translation of research into policy and practice, the importance of relationship building, and the role of fiscal constraints in state and local decision-making.

Students will complete a semester-long capstone project that addresses the learning objectives in the context of the work of the CUNY Institute for State and Local Governance.  Students will complete readings and assignments related to social and public policy development, analysis, and evaluation to supplement their capstone work.


Prof. James Jasper jjasper@gc.cuny.edu
Soc 86800 - Cultural Sociology
Thursdays, 2:00 - 4:00 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

 

This course will examine the construction of meaning across many social institutions, taking culture as an aspect of all social life; it is not a course about the production of art and literature. We will read mostly theory, but many of the arenas we examine will be political. The “argument” of the course will be that we cannot understand meaning without understanding emotions.


Profs. John Mollenkopf jmollenkopf@gc.cuny.edu Robert Smith Robert.smith@baruch.cuny.edu
Soc 82800 - The Ethnography of Public Policy
Wednesdays, 4:15 - 6:15 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits


Most approaches to the study of public policy either use statistical analysis to address questions of efficiency and effectiveness or institutional analysis to understand how actors form (or block) coalitions to advance their policy agenda within a particular political opportunity structure. This course investigates a third approach: using the tools of ethnography and qualitative analysis (participant observation, in-depth interviewing) to investigate how the participants inside a given policy domain interact to formulate, adopt, and most importantly carry out programs. This approach focuses on the “front line workers” who actually do the work of delivering public policies by interacting with clients on an every-day basis.  We are particularly interested not only in the details of how such interactions ‘socially construct’ clients, but how clients react to the ways in which public and nonprofit programs process them, but also in how front line workers interact with the managers and policy-makers who try to reshape the co-production of public services from time to time.  In other words, we will examine the operating context for “street level bureaucrats,” including not only their interactions with clients and managers, but also with elected officials, the press, advocacy organizations, consultants, policy scholars, and the concerned public.  The course introduces approaches these issues through a close reading of Michael Lipsky’s classic Street Level Bureaucracy, then moves takes up a series of policy ethnography case studies, which will be chosen to reflect the interests of the seminar members and instructors.



Prof. Jayne Mooney jmooney@jjay.cuny.edu
Soc 83300 - Gender and Crime
Thursdays, 6:30 - 8:30 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits


This course explores the relationship between gender, crime and the criminal justice system. It focuses on feminist historical, sociological and socio-legal scholarship to examine the ways in which gender affects patterns of offending, victimization, and imprisonment. It critically engages with the intersections between gender, race, class and sexuality and analyzes how these impact on the treatment of women, as victims, survivors and offenders.  It provides an overview of the historical neglect of women’s contributions to sociological and criminological theory.  Cultural representations of masculinity and femininity are considered throughout. It explores debates on the construction of masculinit(ies) in contemporary society, and recent work on transfeminism and non-binary gender identities.  Specific topics to be covered include: violence against women, fear of crime, sex work, war, gangs, serial killing, imprisonment, immigration and feminist research methods. 



Prof. Frank Heiland Frank.Heiland@baruch.cuny.edu
Soc 81900 - Methods of Demographic Analysis
Wednesdays, 9:30 - 11:30 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits


This course gives students an overview of some of the major demographic methods used in the study of population, and includes the standard procedures for the measurement of fertility, mortality, natural increase, migration, and nuptiality. Students will learn how to construct demographic rates, life tables, and population projections, and how to carry out standardization, decomposition of differences, analysis of fertility and nuptiality patterns, analysis invoking model life tables and stable population theory, and analysis of nonstable populations.


Profs. Philip Kasinitz pkasinitz@gc.cuny.edu  and Mehdi Bozorgmehr mbozorgmehr@gc.cuny.edu
Soc 82800 - International Migration
Thursdays, 4:15 - 6:15 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits


This course offers a comprehensive overview of the key current topics and issues in the burgeoning field of international migration. While the course will aspire to incorporate the experiences of major immigrant receiving countries around the world, the main comparative focus will be on Europe and North America, where the major theories and key concepts are most fully developed. The emphasis is on exploring both the theoretical debates in the field and the empirical data and case studies on which these debates hinge. Attention will be paid to detailed discussions of “classic” issues of immigration, such as theories and mechanisms of international migration, diaspora and transnationalism, models of assimilation, ethnic identities and group boundaries, ethnic entrepreneurship, and comparative immigration in Europe and America. Throughout, the course will consider the way in which global cities, as contexts of reception, affect the immigrant experience, and how, in turn, these cities transformed by immigrants. As the field of international migration is inherently interdisciplinary and methodologically eclectic we will be looking at a wide variety of material including those that use quantitative data, ethnography, oral histories of migrants and policy analysis.


Prof. Leslie Paik  Lpaik@ccny.cuny.edu
Soc.84505 - Law & Society
Tuesdays, 4:15 - 6:15 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits


This seminar examines the relationship between law and society, considering how the law shapes social life and how social change affects law and legal institutions. The seminar takes a “law in action” approach to studying law that focuses on the social, political, economic, and cultural contexts of law. We will discuss readings about classic sociological theories of law, the limits and power to “rights” discourses to lead to social change, peoples’ perceptions and experiences of the law (e.g., legal consciousness) and the everyday workings of law. We then will apply those concepts to consider how the law has defined and evolved from our experiences and understandings of race, family and immigration in the US. This seminar will provide a broad socio-legal foundation for students working on those substantive topics, as well as for those interested in social control, social movements and social change.


Prof. Jeremy Porter  jporter@brooklyn.cuny.edu
Soc.81900 - Quantitative Research Methods
Tuesdays, 6:30 - 8:30 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits


This course will cover issues pertaining to the applied research process in the collection, management, and analysis of quantitative data. Methods covered are intended to give students experience with a broad array of specific quantitative methods and a directed focus on the perspectives that underlie the application of such methods.  The explicit goal of the course is to give students the foundational tools necessary to do high quality quantitative research in applied and academic settings.  A sample of topics covered include; the science of science, the politics and ethics of research, developing novel research ideas, item measurement, instrumentation, sampling, understanding statistical inference, and a wide variety of topics associated with the collection, management, and analysis of quantitative data.


Prof. Julia Wrigley – jwrigley@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 70100 – Development of Sociological Theory  
Tuesdays, 4:15 to 6:15, Room TBA, 3 credits


In this course we will read and discuss the works of the classical theorists, including, particularly, Marx, Durkheim, Weber, DuBois, and Wollstonecraft to discern their theoretical insights and also to understand how and why they became shapers of our field, with their work still influencing contemporary sociologists generations later. We will explore their distinctive ideas about power, unity, and division within societies and how societies change and will also consider the intellectual and historical context in which they developed their work. We will read some contemporary works that draw upon their ideas.
We will proceed through reading and discussion. To foster lively and informed discussion, each week you will be asked to prepare a question about the readings. The questions will be distributed before the class to stimulate thought in advance.


Prof. Paul Attewell – PAttewell@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 81900 – Data Mining
Tuesdays, 4:15 to 6:15, Room TBA, 3 credits


Data mining (DM) is the name given to a variety of new analytical and statistical techniques that are already widely used in business, and are starting to spread into social science research. Other closely-related terms are ‘machine learning’ 'pattern recognition' and ‘predictive analytics.’  Data mining methods can be applied to visual and to textual data, but the focus of this class is on the application of DM to quantitative or numerical data. In this area, DM offers interesting alternatives to conventional statistical modeling methods such as regression and its offshoots.
This class is taught jointly by a professor of computer science and a professor of sociology and typically enrolls a mix of computer science and social science doctoral students. It aims to provide an introduction to data mining methods and their application to data analysis. The course reviews the main DM techniques and explains the logic of each. It emphasizes contrasts between conventional statistical analyses and DM approaches. Students work with each technique using JMP Pro software, in a computer classroom. Each student will undertake a DM analysis project as a final paper, typically analyzing a dataset chosen by the student.


Prof. Mary Clare Lennon –  mlennon@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 70000 – Proseminar
Thursdays, 4:15 to 6:15, Room TBA, 3 credits


This course introduces students to some of the major elements involved in the training of scholars in the field of sociology.  We will explore the norms that govern the profession, the aims of sociological research, the process of grant-seeking and grant-writing, the qualities of a good dissertation, expectations about publication, the process of approval for research on human subjects, and other aspects of professional socialization.  In an effort to familiarize you with the kinds of scholarly work and teaching that are done by faculty at CUNY, we will also have a number of presentations by members of the CUNY Sociology faculty. 


Prof. William Helmreich - helmreichw@gmail.com
Soc. 82301 – The People of New York City
Thursdays, 2:00 to 4:00, Room TBA, 3 credits


This course looks at the different neighborhoods/communities that make up this great and fascinating city. Its focus is on the different ethnic, religious, and racial groups in the city and their social and cultural life-----Hispanics, Jews, Arabs, Asians, African Americans, Greeks, Italians, and people of differing socioeconomic and gender groups. In addition, we will be looking at the neighborhoods themselves, their  architectural and spatial characteristics, how  and why they grew, and how they function as communities. 
An integral part of the course will be field work---visiting and studying the areas-----Bensonhurst, Carroll Gardens, Gerritsen Beach, the South Bronx, Chelsea, Glendale, Maspeth, Harlem, etc., etc. Readings will reflect the above topics.


Prof. Hester Eisenstein - heisenstein@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 73200 – Global Feminism 
Mondays, 2:00 to 4:00, Room TBA, 3 credits


In this course we will take a look at what has come to be known as global feminism.  Feminism usually refers to the movement by women for full citizenship, in the wake of the strict gender rules inherited from the Victorian era in western countries.  In the United States, the “first wave” from 1848 to the 1880s and 1890s eventually produced the right to vote in 1920; labor feminism in the 1930s and 1940s expanded work roles for women and developed concepts such as sexual harassment and maternity leave; and the “second wave” expanded the agenda for women’s rights to include reproductive self-determination, sexual choice, access to all areas of paid work, and a common sense notion that the similarities between women and men vastly outweigh the differences attributable to biology.  In the wake of the globalization of the world economy since the 1970s, a highly visible form of feminism has emerged in the form of state or official feminism: “femocrats” emerged from Australia and entered governments throughout the world, and a fairly standard ideology of women’s rights has been developed which preaches equality for women, access to capitalist work and markets, and a critique of patriarchal cultures.  But is this global feminism what women all over the world really want and need?  We will take a look at this series of debates, reading texts by Chandra Talpade Mohanty, Valentine Moghadam, Sara Farris, Tithi Battacharya, among others.


Prof. John Torpey - jtorpey@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 80200 – Sociology of Knowledge and Science
Tuesdays, 2:00 to 4:00, Room TBA, 3 credits


This course examines the development of the sociology of knowledge and science from its nineteenth-century origins to the present day.  It seeks to convey a) an understanding of the ways in which knowledge has been grasped in sociological terms and b) the ways in which science and knowledge have affected social life in the past two centuries or so.

Prof. Pyong Gap Min - pyonggap.min@qc.cuny.edu
Soc. 82800 – New Immigrants and Their Religions
Tuesdays, 11:45 to 1:45, Room TBA, 3 credits
The vast majority of post-1965 immigrants have originated from Latin America, Asia, the Middle East, and the Caribbean Islands.  Asian and Middle Eastern immigrants have transplanted Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, and other “Oriental” religions to the United States.  Latino, Caribbean, and some Asian immigrant groups have brought with them Third World versions of Catholicism that put more stress on syncretic family and small-group rituals combining Catholic beliefs and local folk culture than on worship in a congregation.  Many Caribbean and Asian immigrants have also transplanted new versions of Protestantism.  After more than 50 years of enforcement of the Immigration Act of 1965, many second-generation Americans of post-1965 immigrants have grown up, participating in the labor market and establishing their own families.  
This course takes an overview of a growing body of the social science literature on the religious experiences of the new immigrant groups and their children. It will examine not only immigrants’ and children’s participation in religious institutions but also their practices of religious rituals at home.  As a sociology course, it will pay special attention to the relationships between immigrants’ religious practices and ethnicity, gender, race, class, intergenerational transition, globalization, and transnationalism. It will also look at the intergeneration transmission of religion to their 1.5- and second-generation adults and the transmission of ethnicity through religion.  

Prof. John Hammond - jhammond@hunter.cuny.edu
Soc. 84600 – Social Movements
Wednesdays, 6:30 to 8:30, Room TBA, 3 credits
This course will examine social and political movements, primarily in the industrial world, emphasizing systematic, theoretically based research and theoretical frameworks for the study of social movements: collective behavior, resource mobilization, identity-baaed movements, and electronically networked movements. Underlying causes in the economy and in culture. Effectiveness and decline of movements. 
Application of these theories to religious, labor, communal, political reform, and environmental movements.
Movements of the twenty-first century: populist movements of left and right; movements of millennials (Occupy, #Blacklivesmatter, living wage, dreamers, gun control); media (legacy and social); movements of occupation; the postindustrial movement complex.
    Requirements:
    1. Regular attendance and participation in discussion
    2. A weekly short essay based on that week's required reading, posted to Blackboard. 
    3. Research paper presented orally in the last two weeks of class and then in writing.

Prof. Juan Battle – jbattle@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 83300 – Sexuality
Mondays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits


Missing! Marginal! Misrepresented!  This course draws on various bodies of scholarship – across the humanities and social sciences – to interrogate the complex subject of sexuality. Because students will be exposed to (and contribute from) a wide variety of perspectives on the subject, this course is appropriate for students in the traditional social sciences (e.g. sociology, anthropology, psychology, urban education, and history) as well as more contemporary ones (e.g. women’s studies, race studies, American studies, cultural studies, lesbian and gay studies).


Prof. Mucahit Bilici – mbilici@jjay.cuny.edu
Soc. 82800 - American Islam: Islamophobia and Muslim Civility
Thursdays, 2 – 4pm, Room TBA, 3 credits


This course is an introduction to Islam in America in its contemporary moment. It revolves around the citizenship of Muslims in America in an age of intensified Islamophobia. After an overview of the history of Islam in the U.S. and overall familiarization with the diversity of American Muslim cultures, the course will focus on certain aspects of 21st-century American Islam. What are the various forms by which immigrant Muslims incorporate themselves into the mainstream culture and the later generations perform their citizenship  as Americans? Among the topics to be covered in the course are Islam and the Founding Fathers, Muslims and the American Constitution, Muslim patriotism in America, and Second Amendment Muslims..


Prof. Dave Brotherton– dbrotherton@jjay.cuny.edu
Soc. 85000 -  Studies of Youth, Marginalization and Subcultures of Resistance
Thursdays, 6:30 – 8:30pm, Room TBA, 3 credits


Youth resistance movements and subcultures are an historically continuing feature of the wide-ranging societal responses to social and economic repression on a global scale. Rebellions, riots, occupations, cultural innovations and new collective identities are some of the manifestations on global display as youth engage in an endless range of symbolic and substantive responses to their felt conditions of marginality and alienation. In this seminar, we will excavate this dynamic social field through theoretical and empirical studies that help explain the continuity and discontinuity of youth social and cultural resistances over time. Questions of race/ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality and age will be addressed as we trace the meanings and representations of youth reactions to industrial and post-industrial societies within and across their overt and covert political and cultural locations. Students will be expected to carry out small research projects that in some way reflect the transgressive practices, rituals and possibilities of youth in the late modern metropolis.  

The seminar has two major goals: (i) to explore the range of sociological theories that explain youth social and cultural resistance, and (ii) to critically interpret the different forms that this resistance takes in the context of an evolving and highly contradictory transnationalist capitalist order. We will focus in particular on the origins of youth subcultures as they emerge during both modernity and late modernity and their construction within changing notions of criminal and non-criminal deviance.


Profs. Lynn Chancer, Thomas DeGloma – lchancer@hunter.cuny.edu; tdegloma@hunter.cuny.edu
Soc. 70200 – Contemporary Theory
Mondays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits


This course is designed to serve multiple purposes simultaneously. The first aim is intellectual: to provide you with a thorough survey of important theorists in the development of both European and American social theory, as well as a sense of how classical theory influenced contemporary thinking and how current theorists have influenced one another. Our second goal is more pragmatic: we hope to provide comprehensive exposure to theorists whose work will both inspire you and help you with your future written work and independent research in the GC Sociology program. Third, and last, we aim to help you learn to creatively apply contemporary theory to specific social issues and problems of your interest; in this sense, the course is not simply an abstract exercise but hopefully one that brings theory alive and shapes your sociological vision.


Prof. Margaret M. Chin – mmchin@hunter.cuny.edu
Soc. 82800 - Migrant and Immigrant New York City
Tuesdays, 2- 4pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

 
Over the course of the twentieth century, New York City has witnessed two major waves of immigration: from the Irish, Italian and Jewish immigrants who arrived at the turn of the twentieth century to the Chinese, Jamaican and Mexican immigrants who now constitute the majority of the city’s immigrant population. New York City has also been on the receiving end of the great migration of African Americans. Together, these successive waves of newcomers and their children have changed the socioeconomic, political and cultural landscape of the city. We will examine migration across a diverse spectrum; distinguishing between forced and voluntary migration, “classic” issues of immigration, immigrant adaptation - assimilation and incorporation/integration; social mobility- the labor market, race and ethnic relations, gender and the family, transnationalism and the second generation. Throughout the course, we will use NYC experiences to highlight how these immigration and migration streams have transformed the city in the past and the present.


Prof. Erica Chito Childs – echitoch@hunter.cuny.edu
Soc. 83300 Critical Mixed Race Studies
Thursdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits


This course will cover the burgeoning interdisciplinary field of critical mixed race studies, exploring the historical, contemporary, and ideological constructions of mixed race.  Drawing from literary texts, historical documents, legal briefs, media productions and interdisciplinary research studies, we will interrogate notions of mixing and mixed, paying particular attention to the changing identities, discourses and representations.  Critical mixed race studies will serve as a lens to explore the intersections of race/sexuality and larger context of racism and "othering," moving beyond the black-white dichotomy Furthermore, we will explore different methods with a goal of completing a research project within mixed race studies for publication


Prof. Susan Dumais - susan.dumais@lehman.cuny.edu
Soc. 84503 – Sociology of Education
Mondays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, Room TBA, 3 credits


In this seminar, we will examine research and theory in the sociology of education, focusing specifically on issues of inequality. Our focus on inequality will include differences in access to, experiences in, and outcomes from schooling for categories such as social class, race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, age, ability, and/or nationality, among others.  Consideration will be given to various theoretical approaches to understanding the production, reproduction, and eradication of inequalities in schooling.


Prof. Mauricio Font  -  mfont@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 85600 – 
Gloalization, Social Transformation and Development
Tuesdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits


This seminar examines approaches to social transformations. First, it reviews “classical” and recent perspectives on modernization, development, transitions, globalization, and social change. After examining the evolving debate about the roles of markets and states, we compare shifts between state-centered and liberalizing experiments in Asia (China), Latin America (Brazil), and Central & Eastern Europe. The extended discussion considers the impact on social organization -- demographic transformations (urbanization, demographic transitions, migration; inequality); democracy and institutional strength; social, economic, and sustainable development, globalization. While interconnected, modern societies remain diversified by levels of wellbeing and social organization. Differences between and within countries and regions are of central concern to this course. Main readings and discussions draw from foundational works in the social sciences and selective works on emergent, developing, and transitional societies across the globe.
 
This seminar provides students with tools for exploring social transformations in the context of globalization/anti-globalization. Student projects face key issues about how to assess development and wellbeing; frame inquiries in historical and theoretical context; and negotiate confrontations between alternative doctrines, assumptions, interests, historical contexts and global trends. A starting question to ponder is the extent to which and why, after decades of development, economic and social life improved for some people while others remain mired in poverty. After various development states, transitions and the collapse of seemingly stable communist systems, the adoption of market reforms, the advance of globalization, and recent crises, what do development and social change actually mean? Send inquiries and request updates to mfont@gc.cuny.edu.


Prof. Lior Gideon – lgideon@jjay.cuny.edu  
Soc. 81100 Survey Methodology
Thursdays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, Room TBA, 3 credits


The course is aims to educate students on the essentials of survey methodology, and the importance of design, construct, execute and analyze survey data. During the course students will learn about the various methodological pitfalls of survey methodology and how to avoid them. The plan is to help student design their own survey to be used in their dissertation. In that regard, the course will be divided into theoretical and practical sections. In the theoretical section, students will be introduced to survey methodology concepts, theories and approaches, and in the practical section, students will be expected to develop their own survey too while implementing knowledge acquired during the course.


Prof. Jessica Halliday Hardie – jh1389@hunter.cuny.edu
Soc. 71600 – Sociological Statistics II
Tuesdays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, Room TBA, 3 credits


In this course we will move from the building blocks of social statistics to using statistical tools to test hypotheses and draw conclusions. We will focus on two widely used statistical models: multiple linear regression and logistic regression. Within these larger frameworks, we will cover the underlying assumptions of each model and circumstances in which these assumptions are violated. Specific topics also include non-linearity, mediation, and moderation.


Prof. Barbara Katz Rothman– bkatzrothman@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 82800 Food, Culture, and Society
Wednesdays, 6:30 – 8:30pm, Room TBA, 3 credits


This course explores major issues in foodways—food habits from production through consumption—through readings and discussions as well as through primary research in food and society.  The scholarly study of food invokes issues of gender, class, labor, and cultural identities and demands an interdisciplinary approach.  Theoretical frameworks include the food voice (Hauck-Lawson), cultural studies, political economy, and symbolic interactionism.
The key focus in the course is going to be the application of theory and methods from the disciplines represented by students, faculty and invited guests in the course, to Food Studies.
Rather than a standard paper, each student will, in consultation with the professor and the other students, develop a project that best fits in with her/his own work –for example,  a food-focused dissertation chapter, an internship, a series of published book reviews, or a paper presentation at a professional conference in the student’s home discipline.


Prof. Mary Clare Lennon– mlennon@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 83300 The Sociology of Childhood
Wednesdays, 2- 4pm, Room TBA, 3 credits


In this seminar, we examine changing concepts of childhood and adolescence.  Focusing mostly on the United States, we consider how notions of childhood have changed throughout time, across place, and within social contexts.  In considering contemporary childhood, we will examine how gender, race, social class, and immigration status shape the experience of children and the social construction of childhood.  While many readings are interdisciplinary and include historical, sociological, psychological and social policy perspectives, particular attention is given to sociological approaches, including what has been termed ”the new sociology of childhood.”.  In contrast with earlier sociological accounts that view children as passive recipients of socialization processes, current approaches consider children as active participants in shaping their own lives.  Most of the course will focus on young children who have been the focus of much contemporary research and policy consideration in recent years.  


Prof. R. L’Heureux Lewis-McCoy – rlewismccoy@gmail.com
Soc. 85700 - Race, Schools and Policy
Wednesdays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, Room TBA, 3 credits


This course is designed to introduce and deepen students' understanding of the ways that race has been a factor in the institution of schools in the United States. The course intends to enhance students’ understanding of theoretical perspectives, policy issues, and social scientific evidences’ role in the policy process. We will examine varying issues facing the institution of schools with a focus on African-Americans and other populations of color. Using sociological analysis we will interrogate past and present policy levers that affect(ed) schooling for all children. From this class, students will gain a richer knowledge base for understanding current policy debates and conduct better analysis of problems facing schools in the contemporary United States.


Prof. Leslie McCall – lmccall@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 84600 – Politics of Inequality, Opportunity, and Redistribution: Theory, Empirics, Methods, and Analysis
Wednesdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

 
This course will cover both substantive developments and measurement issues and analytic approaches across the social sciences.  It focuses on both the substantive and analytical/methodological aspects of the relationship between politics and economic inequality. Specifically, the objectives are to become familiar with (1) the different levels of analysis involved in the study of the politics of inequality, opportunity, and redistribution, namely, the role of political institutions (i.e., parties, electoral systems, policy regimes, etc.) on the one hand, and behavioral dynamics (e.g., individual beliefs, policy preferences, and voting choices) on the other hand, in shaping political and economic outcomes, and (2) the strengths and weaknesses of various methodological approaches to analyzing institutional and behavioral processes, such as political economy, public opinion and survey research, experimental research, ethnography, and discourse/textual analysis. To accomplish these objectives, readings will be interdisciplinary and include theoretical texts at the start of the course and empirically-based, substantive and methodological studies employing quantitative (including experimental) and qualitative data and methods throughout the rest of the semester (though the balance will be toward quantitative studies). Students will therefore learn both theoretical and methodological skills, and their interdependence, in the study of the politics of inequality, opportunity, and redistribution. We will also integrate the research on class inequality with ongoing research on other dimensions of inequality, such as gender and racial/ethnic inequality.
 

Prof. Branko Millanovic– bmillanovic@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 84600 Income Inequality in History: From Pareto to the Kuznets waves
Wednesdays, 6:30 – 8:30pm, Room TBA, 3 credits


The objective of the course is be to preesent methdoloy that is suitabnle for the study of income inequality historically (in pre-modern societies), discuss the data sources and review the evidence. Standard inequality “appartatus: neds to be augmented in historical studies by including the Inequality Possibility Frontier and using short-cut measuresd of inequality atht focus on the didfferemnces in average incomes between classes. The class will review t6he evidence on income distribution in ancient societies, pre-modern Europe (Byzantium, Italian cities,  Flanders, Spain) and in the 19th and early 20th century “industrializers” (UK, United States, the Nethelands etc).


Prof. Richard E. Ocejo – rocejo@jjay.cuny.edu
Soc. 84600 - Work in the New Economy
Mondays, 2- 4pm, Room TBA, 3 credits


Many scholars have been using the simple word “new” to describe today’s economy. It refers to a variety of economic realities and work arrangements that distinguish today’s industries and jobs from “old” ones. These include industries that are knowledge-, technology-, and service-based rather than manufacturing-based, jobs that require human, social, and cultural capital, work arrangements that are precarious and flexible rather than stable and fixed, and increasing global connectivity, investment, and immigration. Through our readings and discussions we will cover these and other shifts and conditions occurring in the world of work. We will discuss such topics as just what is so new about the “new” economy; the implications of today’s technologies and work arrangements for inequality, identity, and personal well-being; the rise of work as a vocation rather than a necessity; and the intersections of gender, race, and ethnicity in many of today’s industries and jobs. The course will cover a broad range of industries and jobs (IT, service, culture, manufacturing) and macro- and micro-level phenomena. Students will be required to examine an industry, workplace, or occupation of their choice around a theme from the literature by conducting fieldwork, interviews, and/or textual analysis. The end result will be a presentation and a research paper.


Prof. Charles Post– cpost@bmcc.cuny.edu
Soc. 82901 - The “New Capitalism”?
Mondays, 6:30 – 8:30pm, Room TBA, 3 credits


Over the past forty years, capitalist societies in the global North have experienced profound changes. In what is often referred to as the era of neo-liberalism, many analysts have argued that the most profound structural and institutional features of capitalism have been permanently altered. These attempts to analyze the “new capitalism” focus on three transformations: 1) “de-industrialization”—the decline of manufacturing employment in the global North; 2) “precarity”—the growth of part-time, temporary and unstable employment; and 3) “financialization”—the financial sectors’ displacement of industry as the driving force of the modern economy. This course will seek to critically interrogate these three trends, both conceptually and empirically. Has manufacturing actually disappeared in the global North? How do we account for the declining percentage of manufacturing workers in the total labor forces? What is the actual extent of “precarious” employment? Does the distribution of stable and precarious employment vary from sector to sector? To what extent has financial profitability become independent of profitability in the ‘real economy’? What is the relationship between the growth of finance and the radical reorganization of productive activity over the past forty years? Readings will be substantial, varied and historical in perspective.


Prof. Barbara Katz Rothman– bkatzrothman@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 86800 - Sociology of Disability
Tuesdays, 6:30 – 8:30pm, Room TBA, 3 credits


This course offers an introduction to the field of Disability Studies, through a sociological lens.  As more and more of our lives are drawn into biomedical discourse, the construction of disability grows broader; and as Disability activism develops as a social movement, the discussion becomes more politically complex. From the initial conceptualization of the field by Irving Kenneth Zola, to contemporary analyses of ‘queer, crip,’ race and gender intersectionality, the Sociology of Disability offers us a lens for understanding medical sociology, the body, social movements, gender and more.  The class will begin with an introduction to the theoretical and framing work; and expand into topics to be chosen in consultation with seminar members.


Prof. Jessie Daniels– jdaniels@hunter.cuny.edu
Soc. 85700 - Global Perspectives: Race and Racism of Interior Worlds
Wednesdays, 6:30 – 8:30pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
This proposed 3-credit graduate seminar is meant to offer a space for a critical interrogation of our understanding about the ways that race and racism shape our interior worlds. In this course, we begin from two premises. First, that ‘race’ is a social construct rather than a meaningful biological category, but one that is nevertheless real in its consequences; and, second, that racism is systemic, both structural and material. The questions explored here are meant to extend and deepen that structural analysis to ask what are the emotional, affective, and psychological ways that we experience race and racism in everyday life. To do this, we will read primarily personal essays and memoirs written by people exploring their racial identity and experience.
 

Profs. Ruth Milkman, Katherine Chen –  rmilkman@gc.cuny.edu; kchen@ccny.cuny.edu
Soc. 85600 – Change and Crisis in Universities:  Research, Education, and Equity in Uncertain Times
Tuesdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
This course examines recent trends affecting higher education, with special attention to how those trends exacerbate class, race/ethnicity, and gender inequalities.  With the rising hegemony of a market logic, colleges and universities have been transformed into entrepreneurial institutions.  Inequality has widened between elite private universities with vast resources and public institutions where students and faculty must “do more with less,” and austerity has fostered skyrocketing tuition and student debt.  Tenure-track faculty lines have eroded as contingent academic employment balloons.  The rise of on-line “learning” and expanding class sizes have raised concerns about the quality of higher education, student retention rates, and faculty workloads.  Despite higher education’s professed commitment to diversity, disadvantaged racial and ethnic groups remain underrepresented, especially among faculty.  Amid growing concerns about the impact of microaggressions, harassment, and even violence on college campuses, liberal academic traditions are under attack from the right.  Drawing on social science research on inequality, organizations, occupations, and labor, this course will explore such developments, as well as recent efforts by students and faculty to reclaim higher education institutions.

Prof. Carla Shedd – cshedd@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 85800 – Race, Place, and Inequality
Mondays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

Amidst increasing racial and ethnic diversity in the United States, there is growing concern that
racial and ethnic minorities in American cities will face even greater inequalities with respect to
access to housing, resources, educational/employment opportunities, etc. This seminar critically
examines how racial/ethnic inequality is generated and maintained in contemporary American
society.  The readings will cover major theoretical approaches and (quantitative and qualitative)
empirical investigations of racial and ethnic stratification in several urban cities, notably
Philadelphia, Chicago, and New York City.  This course will also explore the merits and
limitations of various paradigms that aim to explain racial inequalities and the concomitant social
policies that have been implemented and/or proposed to address the same.


Prof. Greg Smithsimon– GSmithsimon@brooklyn.cuny.edu
Soc. 72500 – Urban Sociology
Wednesdays, 6:30 – 8:30pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

Urban areas are at the heart of issues like climate change, racial inequality, capital
accumulation, and contests over the politics and use public space. This course will examine
sociological work focused on US cities. We will consider the modern and postmodern city,
the spatial turn in Marxist interpretations of the city, the central role of race and ethnicity in
US cities, and the role of neighborhoods and enclaves for both the working-class and elites.
We will read classic and contemporary urban ethnographies. The course will look at cities
and the effects of disasters, the impact of globalization, and the growing research on suburbs.

Prof. Amy Adamczyk - adamczykamy@gmail.com
Soc. 83000 – Religion, Morality, and Crime in Global Perspective
Tuesdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

In this seminar students will examine the theoretical and empirical literature on the relationship between religion and attitudes and behaviors that may be seen as deviant, moral, or illegal. Books by Cavanaugh (2009), Hinnells and King (2007), and Stark and Bainbridge (1996) will help provide the theoretical foundation for this course.  Empirical studies will lay the ground work for discussions of how the relationship is typically understood and assessed. The course will not only focus on the role of religion in shaping attitudes and behaviors, but also how engagement in criminal and deviant behaviors may shape religious beliefs in settings such as prisons and rehabilitation programs. we will examine a variety of different regions and religions to understand how and when there is likely to be a relationship between religion, morality, and crime, when the relationship may be the result of other processes, and how the influence of religion on some behaviors (e.g., terrorism, stealing) or attitudes (e.g., homosexuality, premarital sex) may differ across religions and regions of the world. The development of this seminar is being supported with a grant from the Global Religion Research Initiative.

Prof. Richard Alba – ralba@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 81900 – Quantitative reasoning in the Study
of Ethnicity, Race, & Migration
Wednesdays, 2 - 4pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

 
This course will focus on the practices and logics of contemporary quantitative analysis in the study of immigration and ethnicity/race.  We will study some of the major quantitative techniques (e.g., logistic regression, event-history analysis) and examine their applications in recent published research.  Exercises in applying the techniques also will be a regular feature of the course.  One emphasis will be on a critical examination of the logics behind contemporary quantitative practices and the substantive inferences to which they lead.  The goal of the course will be a sophisticated understanding of quantitative analysis, useful whether one is a consumer of quantitative research or producer of it.​

Prof. Juan Battle -  jbattle@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 83300 - Family
Mondays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

 
This course will examine the history of (U.S.) families from the 19th century to today. Particular attention will focus on: (a) the influence of marriage and changes in family organization over time; (b) family experiences; and (c) diversity in contemporary families. Sociological theories and methods used to study and understand families, including theories of gender and sexualities, will also be discussed. 

Prof. Marnia Lazreg -  marniaster@gmail.com
Soc. 80000 Foucault, Bourdieu and Baudrillard:  Power, Culture and Social Change
Mondays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits


Like Michel Foucault, Pierre Bourdieu as well as Jean Baudrillard addressed issues pertaining to the transformations of French-qua-Western culture.  Yet they also sought, directly or indirectly, to distinguish their sociology from Foucault's social philosophy.  In 1977 Jean Baudrillard wrote that Foucault's conception of power is a "mythic discourse" rather than a discourse that purportedly reveals the truth about the nature of power relations.  In 1968, Bourdieu, a one-time former student of Foucault, turned Foucault’s question "What is an Author?" into "How to read an Author." However, Baudrillard also shared with Foucault a rejection of the core concepts of Cartesian rationalism and a "poststructuralist" orientation, while Bourdieu intended to stake out a sociological perspective that incorporated a number of Foucault's critical theoretical insights.  What historical, philosophical, political and biographical factors account for these French sociologists' mixture of reticent admiration for, and skepticism about Foucault's ideas and political engagements?  Did they resolve the ambiguities and antinomies present in Foucault's theoretical orientation and methodology? To what extent sociology transforms or is transformed by Foucault’s social philosophy?

Using methods borrowed from the history of ideas as well as the sociology of knowledge, this course examines Bourdieu and Baudrillard's efforts to build a critical sociology with practical applications for social change as they grapple with Foucault's conceptual innovations. Special attention will be given to the meanings and articulations of key concepts and issues, including structure and event/history; language, rules and discourse; power and subjectivation; body, sex/sexuality and gender; biopolitics and liberalism; revolution and political spirituality; security/war and self-defense.  The course will further examine the concrete socio-political activities in which each author engaged as a result of his theoretical commitment.  

Although students are encouraged to read each author’s seminal works, special attention will be given to Foucault's Lectures at the College de France in addition to the Order of Things, and Madness and Civilization; Bourdieu's Pascalian MeditationsPractical Reason, Acts of Resistance, and Masculine Domination; Baudrillard's SeductionSimulacra and SimulationSymbolic Exchange and Death.

Students are expected to immerse themselves in the works of these authors, and write a paper focusing on three critical issues with which one of them grappled. Selecting current socio-political events or issues as testing ground for the three theorists' ideas is also encouraged. The paper will be elaborated in stages to be discussed in class until its completion.

Prof Katherine K. Chen – kchen@ccny.cuny.edu
Soc. 84700 – Organizations, Markets, and the State
Mondays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

Organizations are one of the main "building blocks" of contemporary society.  Despite their central role in shaping our experiences from education to the workplace to governance, these actors and their form of collective action are often overlooked or taken-for-granted among researchers and laypersons.  In this course, participants will learn why organizations form, how they develop, and how they can exacerbate inequality or improve people's life chances.  Participants will also discuss how organizations intertwine with the state and the market, and how these relations affect possibilities for action.  The course content will cover a variety of organizations, from conventional bureaucracies to alternative, democratic organizations.  Theories studied will include classics, as well as cutting edge synthetic work like Strategic Action Fields (SAFs). 

This course supports extending substantive knowledge, including preparing for comprehensives, widening cross-over expertise in a substantive area (i.e. social movements, urban sociology, stratification, etc.), designing and carrying out research, and promoting professional development.  One of the course's aims includes developing a community of supportive scholars for emerging research.

Course Objectives

This course is an introduction to the study of organizations and the larger environment in which they are embedded.  This course has two main objectives.  First, this course examines the literature on formal organizations.  Second, this course prepares students to undertake research and critical analyses of organizations.  To accomplish these objectives, course readings include both an overview of major theoretical perspectives, as well as excerpts of primary research.  In addition, the class will discuss strategies for conducting organizational research.  Depending on students' prior level of preparation and interest, students will draft a research proposal and/or conduct a research project. 

 
We will cover a variety of issues: Why do people create organizations instead of relying upon markets (i.e., contracts) or informal arrangements?  How are decisions made, and who makes these decisions?  Who holds power within and between organizations?  How can we make organizations more “effective”?  Who benefits from organizations?  How does participation in an organization affect the goals of the individual members?  How do environments influence organizations?  How do relations with the state constrain or support organizations?  To help answer these questions, we will apply various perspectives and examine past and contemporary studies.

Prof. Roslyn Bologh - Roslyn.Bologh@csi.cuny.edu
Soc. 74600 – Political Economy & Social Change
Tuesdays, 6:30 – 8:30pm, Room TBA, 3 credits


Political economy causes social changes that have major consequences for social life – including education, urban life, family life, immigration, ethnic and race relations, and gender relations as well as international relations.  The enormous success of Thomas Piketty's book on income inequality, Capital in the Twenty First Century, and the cross-disciplinary, international, academic and lay interest and acclaim it has garnered, speak to the significance of political economy.  Part of the appeal of Piketty's book lies in his emphatic rejection of the narrow economistic approach to questions of political economy that he encountered in the U.S. and his espousal, in its stead, of a more comprehensive, sociological, cultural and historical perspective – employing sources as unorthodox as Jane Austen's novels! What are the changes that have occurred in political economy since the 1970s? How should we analyze these changes (sometimes conceived as globalization, financial capitalism, monopoly capitalism, neo-liberalism or post-industrial high tech and service economy) and their consequences for social life and politics today and in the coming years?  We will examine different analytic perspectives from Marx to contemporary critical theorists to see which one(s) seem most compelling. An aim of this course is for students (even beginning graduate students) to be able to develop a draft of a publishable article, research proposal or book prospectus.

Prof. Janet Gornick – jgornick@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 84700 - Women, Work, and Public Policy
Tuesday, 4:15pm-6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits


This course will provide an overview of key issues affecting women in the contemporary workplace in the United States and other high-income countries. We will begin with an overview of women's position in the labor market; here we will take a multidimensional approach to capturing gender inequality at work, covering gender gaps in employment rates, in working time, in occupation, and in earnings. We will assess growing class inequalities among women, which have led to polarization in the labor market, especially between women with more and less education. We will consider divisions by race, ethnicity, and nativity, and examine the recent rise of the "precariat" – a segment of the labor force characterized by little or no employment security and few legal protections. We will analyze the ways in which public policies have addressed these issues, and evaluate their impact.
 
The course also examines the effects on women workers – of all classes, races, and ethnic groups, and on immigrants as well as natives – of persistent inequalities in divisions of labor within households. Despite the enormous increase in women's employment rates during the past half century, women continue to carry out the bulk of unpaid work in their homes. Altering these inequalities has proven even more challenging than transforming the structures that shape paid work. We will consider recent research on the effects of "work-family reconciliation policies"– that is, public policies aimed at supporting women (and men) as they balance the responsibilities of paid work and family care. The key question now under consideration is whether some of these policies – e.g., paid family leave, rights to part-time work and flexible scheduling – create new forms of gender inequality. Students will complete weekly reaction papers and a semester-long research project.

Prof. David Halle - dhalle10@gmail.com
Soc. 86800 – Sociology of Culture
Mondays, 6:30 - 8:30pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

 
This course approaches the study of culture via innovative case studies and theoretical thinking. We examine empirically interesting case studies of different aspects of culture, and consider which cultural theories best help us understand each case study and whether, for each case study, new theories are appropriate.  "Culture" is defined here both in the narrow sense as "the arts"—music, literature, journalism, film, television, art (painting, sculpture, etc.), architecture, dance, and so on—and more broadly to include political beliefs, social attitudes, and religious beliefs, and the Internet and social media. 

Prof. Jack Hammond – jhammond@hunter.cuny.edu
Soc. 85909 – Social Inequality in Latin America
Wednesdays, 6:30 – 8:30pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

 
Latin America, historically the world region with the greatest degree of inequality, showed signs of a reversal at the beginning of the twenty-first century, and many economists argued that the trend had finally been broken.  In the last few years, however, the decline in inequality has halted or even reversed in some countries, as the "pink tide" of governments adopting redistributive policies has receded. The optimistic predictions have been called into question.

This course will examine the causes, manifestations, and consequences of inequality in the economic, social, and political spheres.  We will begin with the colonial heritage and examine the developmental phases Latin American countries have traversed (with variations): primary product export; import substitution industrialization; authoritarianism; neoliberalism and globalization. We will look at the consequences of each of these for social inequality.  The political impact of inequality. Popular responses to inequality: reform and resistance. We will evaluate the relative contributions that economic growth, politically progressive governments, targeted redistribution policies, and policies regarding the distribution of opportunities and human capital made to the decline in inequality and consider how changes in these factors may be contributing to the recent turnaround.
 
Course requirements:
1. Regular attendance and participation in discussion
 2. Each week, post on Blackboard a short essay based on that week's required reading, concluding with an analytical question which will be presented to the class for discussion. 
 3. Research paper: Each student's research will be presented orally in the last two weeks of class and then in writing.

Strongly recommended advance reading: Moore, Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy (if you are registered for the course you can access the full text on the Blackboard page)

Prof. William Helmreich – helmreichw@gmail.com
Soc. 823010 - The Sociology of New York City
Thursdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits


This course is about the sociology of the Big Apple---all five boroughs. The purpose is to understand the pulse and rhythm of this great city On the trips we will tour the city and walk its streets focusing on the unknown, as in my book, (Princeton U. Press) Meals and transportation are included. Issues focused on include community, immigration, gentrification, spaces, social life, and ethnicity. Selected readings and a paper are the requirements.

Prof. Shiro Hirouchi – shirouchi@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 81900 - Advanced Methods of Demographic Analysis
Thursdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
In this course we study advanced methods of demographic analysis.  They are widely used in research on mortality, fertility, nuptiality, migration, population composition, and other demographic processes, but many of them can also be applied to a broad range of topics in other areas of the social sciences and biomedical sciences.  Those methods include event history analysis (nonparametric, semi-parametric and parametric versions; continuous and discrete time versions; fixed and time-dependent covariate versions), life table techniques (single-decrement, multiple-decrement and multi-state), decomposition analysis, age-period-cohort models, methods for analyzing multiple time trends (e.g., Lee-Carter model), Lexis map analysis, smoothing and non-parametric regression techniques, and mathematical models of population dynamics.  Computer exercises are included.

Prerequisites:  Introductory statistics including multiple linear regression; DCP 70200 or permission of the instructor.  No background in calculus or matrix algebra is required.

 

Prof. Jim Jasper – jjasper@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 84600 – Social Movements
Tuesdays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, Room TBA, 3 credits


A survey of social movement theory since the 1960s, with special emphasis on recent micro-level research on strategic choice, cultural meanings, emotions, and the construction of players and arenas. We will pay some attention to the gendered nature of each paradigm and its favored exemplar movements.

Prof. Phil Kasinitz – pkasinitz@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 85800 – Race and Ethnicity
Thursdays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
Race and ethnicity are constantly changing and evolving, yet they remain among the most persistent forms of structured social inequality. Focusing on the United States, but with reference to other multi-ethnic societies, we will examine the evolution of the concept of "race" and its relationship to racism; the heritage of slavery and segregation and their impacts contemporary life; the origins of modern racism and anti-Semitism, "scientific racism," why and how the salience of ethnic identity increases and decreases at particular historical moments, the relationship of race and ethnicity to migration, nationalism, colonialism and class, the growth of the  Latino and Asian American populations and  what  that  means for American notions  of race, etc.  In addition we will take an in depth look at how racial boundaries change, competition and cooperation between ethnic groups in contemporary America and how "racialized" minorities are (or are not) incorporated into different societies. Readings will include works by W.E.B. Dubois; Jean Paul Sartre, George Fredrickson; William Julius Wilson, David Roediger, John Iceland, Richard  Alba, Tariq Madood, Alejandro Portes, Stephen Steinberg and Mary Waters.

Prof. Branko Milanovic – bmilanovic@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 84600 – Historical Income Inequality: From Rome to Global Inequality
Wednesdays, 6:30 – 8:30pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
The objective of the course is to present methodology that is suitable for the study of income inequality historically (in pre-modern and ancient societies), discuss the data sources used, and review the evidence. The standard "apparatus" for the study of inequality needs to be augmented in historical studies by including the Inequality Possibility Frontier, dynamic social tables and using short-cut measures that focus on the differences in average incomes between classes. The course will review the evidence on income distribution in ancient societies, pre-modern Europe (Byzantium, Italian cities,  Flanders, Spain) and in the 19th and early 20th century "industrializers" (UK, United States, the Netherlands etc.) and the “less developed” countries (Chile, Brazil, Russia).  Using recent books  by Milanovic ("Global inequality: A new approach for the age of globalization"),  Scheidel ("The great leveler") and Bowles and Fochesato ("Technology, institutions and wealth inequality over 11 millennia") it will discuss forces that historically influenced inequality (wars, civil strife, epidemics, colonialism, population density etc.). The course will end with a historical overview of global inequality, including a brief discussion of global inequality today.

Prof. Jeremy Porter - jporter@brooklyn.cuny.edu
Soc. 81900 – Spatial Analysis of Social Data
Mondays, 6:30 - 9:00 pm, Room Bklyn college, 3 credits

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and the spatial analysis of social data have emerged as an essential tool for social science researchers and practitioners. The Spatial Data Analysis course will offer students an opportunity to gain skills in using GIS software to apply spatial analysis techniques to sociologically relevant research questions. The laboratory section of the course will give students the opportunity for hands-on learning in how to use GIS systems to analyze data and produce maps and reports. These laboratory exercises will be designed to increasingly challenge the students to incorporate the analytic skills and techniques they have learned in other courses with the geospatial and spatial statistics techniques commonly used in the analysis of data appropriate for spatial analysis. 

Prof. Mary Clare Lennon – mlennon@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 70000 - Proseminar
Tuesdays, 2-4pm, Room TBA, 3Credits   
 
This course introduces students to some of the major elements involved in the training of scholars in the field of sociology.  We will explore the norms that govern the profession, the aims of sociological research, the process of grant-seeking and grant-writing, the qualities of a good dissertation, expectations about publication, the process of approval for research on human subjects, and other aspects of professional socialization.  In an effort to familiarize you with the kinds of scholarly work and teaching that are done by faculty at CUNY, we will also have a number of presentations by members of the CUNY Sociology faculty. 

Prof. John Torpey – jtorpey@gc.cuny.edu 
Soc. 83101 – Populism, Authoritarianism, and Dictatorship
Tuesdays, 2- 4pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

This course explores the nature and characteristics of populism, authoritarianism, and dictatorship from a comparative and historical perspective.  In an effort to gain clarity about our own situation, the course will set contemporary developments against the background of 20th-century European history as well as the history of populist and authoritarian movements in the Americas.

Prof. Julia Wrigley – jwrigley@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 70100 – Development of Sociological Theory  
Thursdays, 2 - 4pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
In this course we will read and discuss the works of the classical theorists, including, particularly, Marx, Durkheim, and Weber, to discern their theoretical insights and also to understand how and why they became the great shapers of our field, with their work still influencing contemporary sociologists generations later. We will explore their distinctive ideas about power, unity, and division within societies and how societies change and will also consider the intellectual and historical context in which they developed their work.
 
We will proceed through reading and discussion. To foster lively and informed discussion, each week you will be asked to prepare a question about the readings. The questions will be distributed before the class to stimulate thought in advance.

Prof. Robert Smith – robert.smith@baruch.cuny.edu
Soc. 81200 – Ethnography & Mehtods
Wednesdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

 
This class will cover ethnography, related methods (e.g interviewing), and case based analysis.  This combination of topics seeks to equip students to be able to generate good research questions and analytical frameworks, design a study that will capture the needed data, and make the case for your project persuasively in a proposal, dissertation or article. We will have sections on how to do, and how to weigh the pros and cons, of various approaches to case based research, including: ethnography, interviews of different types, coding techniques, and others.  We will also discuss the epistemic, methodological and practical implications of  using net-effects versus case based approaches within mainstream sociology.

Prof. Pyong Gap Min - PyongGap.Min@qc.cuny.edu
Soc. 82800– Asian Americans
Thursday, 6:30– 8:30 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

  1. This course has two main objectives.  First, it intends to help students conduct research on Asian Americans effectively by providing information about Asian American experiences and research methods. Second, it will help students to prepare to teach social science courses on Asian American experiences.
  2. To achieve the intended objectives, it will provide an overview of Asian-American experiences by covering Asian Americans both as a whole with regard to particular topics and major Asian ethnic groups separately.
  3. Major Asian American groups to be covered separately are Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, South Asian, Korean, and Indo-Chinese (Vietnamese, Cambodians and Laotians). 
  4. General topics to be covered are immigration (history and contemporary trends), settlement patterns, socio-economic adjustment, prejudice and discrimination experienced, family and gender issues, community organization, ethnicity (ethnic attachment, ethnic identity, and ethnic solidarity), religious background, and intergenerational transition. 
  5. Specific topics and theories to be covered include the following: the model minority thesis, ethnic and pan-Asian ethnic identities, Asian Americans’ marital patterns, multiracial Asian Americans, Asian Americans' positioning in U.S. race relations, the effects of globalization on Asian immigration patterns, Asian Americans' transnational ties, Asian Americans' political development.
  6. The instructor will devote a significant amount of time in every class to teaching relevant research methods for Asian American experiences.
  7. Students will look at fresh data on Asian American experiences derived from the 2000 and 2010 Censuses and recent American Community Surveys and recent research findings. 
  8. Students will discuss major issues related to Asian American experiences and review a comprehensive literature on Asian American experiences. These components of the course will help doctoral students to decide dissertation topics related to Asian American experiences.

 Prof. Deborah Balk - dbalk@baruch.cuny.edu
Soc. 72200 Population Dynamics and Climate Change
Mondays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
           
This course will examine two hallmark characteristics of the 21st century: demographic change and climate change. We will examine demographic behavior and population dynamics (urbanization, migration, fertility, mortality, age and aging, and household size and formation) in the context of climate change. Further, we will explore the role that population dynamics play in climate models and scenarios, as well as in climate adaptation and mitigation strategies. We will consider policies and programs that address these issues. The course will be global in nature, although many examples will be drawn from a developing-country context as well as from the United States. Students will learn to examine theory and evidence (data and methods) at the local, national, and international levels to understand populations at risk in the short and long run, internal and international migration flows, city growth and urban dynamism, and fertility and mortality responses tin the context of short- and long-term climate change and related hazards (e.g., increased storms and associated flooding, sea-level rise, drought, and changes in disease vectors). Prerequisites: None.

Prof. Shiro Horiuchi – shoriouchi@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 81900 - Advanced Methods of Demographic Analysis
Thursdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

In this course we study advanced methods of demographic analysis. They are widely used in research on mortality, fertility, nuptiality, migration, population composition, and other demographic processes, but many of them can also be applied to a broad range of topics in other areas of the social sciences and biomedical sciences. Those methods include life table techniques (multiple-decrement and multi-state), decomposition analysis, age-period-cohort models, Lee-Carter model, Lexis map analysis, smoothing and non-parametric regression techniques, event history analysis (with demographic emphasis), and mathematical models of population dynamics. Computer exercises using R are included. Prerequisites: (1) Introductory statistics including multiple linear regression; (2) DCP 70200 or permission of the instructor. No background in calculus or matrix algebra, or no previous experience in R is required.

Prof. Ann Kirschner/ Gilda Barabino
Soc. 84503 – Rethinking Higher Education for the Knowledge Economy
Wednesdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

What does it take to prepare students for success in the 21st century? This graduate seminar will explore innovations in higher education, with a special focus on technology and new pathways that lead to lifelong learning.
The course will be interdisciplinary in its approach, and will look at the web of assumptions about democracy and social mobility that underlie the American system of higher education. It is appropriate for future faculty members, administrators, or anyone who plans a career in education or public policy, or is interested in innovation, technology, and entrepreneurship in education.
Leaving aside the philosophical question of what constitutes “success,” we start with a set of observations:

  • For the foreseeable future, the majority of good paying jobs will require some kind of
    postsecondary education.
  • America’s faith in the importance of a college degree is, however, declining among prospective students and their families. About half of today’s graduates question the value of their diploma.
  • The undergraduate student body has changed dramatically: what was once the “nontraditional” student—older, working, diverse, more likely to be first generation to graduate from college, more likely to transfer at least once—is now the mainstream of America’s 20 million college students.
  • Liberal arts majors are less and less popular, as students grapple with the challenge of debt, pragmatic concerns about employability, and outmoded pedagogy and curricula.
  • University curriculum and pedagogy in technology-related majors cannot keep up with the velocity of change in the private sector, a misalignment that will only increase in the future. Moreover, as computer science enrollments grow, universities struggle to maintain adequate instructional capacity.

And a set of questions, intended to be broad and provocative:

  • Is higher education set up to serve today’s students?
  • Is the college diploma the future “coin of the realm” for students? For employers?
  • Is the six year graduation rate the right standard of success? What are possible new pathways to success? Should college be shorter? Longer? In residence? Online?
  • Is “vocational” vs. “academic” an anachronistic construct? In an era when the majority of students say they go to college to get a job, how should we think about balancing career-consciousness vs. intellectual aspiration?
  • Should every student study coding? Shakespeare? How will student confidence in their diploma be affected by the need to pursue high tuition “boot camp” programs to gain employment in competitive new economy jobs?
  • Most employers use a college degree as a proxy for skills attainment; that confidence is perhaps the most important asset of higher education. If we lose this confidence either through outmoded curriculum or more reliable or more precise forms of skills assessment, what happens to the value of higher education?
  • What is the role of experiential learning: internships, study abroad, undergraduate research?
  • What pedagogies or newfangled approaches to the disciplines produce the kind of critical thinking that employers say they want? What is critical thinking, anyway?

Imagine a child of six today, graduating from high school in 2028. What do we think college will look like and how do we get ready for that student?
The course will be conducted in a seminar format, emphasizing class presentations and participation. There will be visitors drawn from leaders in higher education and technology. Students will interview students and leaders at other universities, as well as corporate leaders. Each seminar meeting will include a weekly lightning round, where each student will present an article/new study. Some may elect to be embedded with companies for group strategy projects.
As a final assignment, students will choose an area of innovation and present a case for CUNY adoption.

Profs. Richard Alba, Nancy Foner– ralba@gc.cuny.edu;nfoner@hunter.cuny.edu  
Soc. 85902 - Comparative Perspectives on Immigration

Tuesdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 A comparative perspective can yield fresh insights into the nature and impact of immigration and integration.  The focus in this course will be on comparisons that explore how Western European
countries, the United States, and Canada, have been dealing with the incorporation of millions of immigrants and their descendants in the past few decades.  We will seek to identify – and explain -- the contrasts as well as parallels in Western Europe and North America, a process that can deepen our insight into the underlying causes of inclusion and exclusion of immigrants and their children as well as how they are remaking the societies where they now live. We will be examining, among others,  issues pertaining to religion, race, educational achievement among the second generation, political and labor market incorporation, residential segregation, intermarriage and identities, and the rise of xenophobic movements. Students will critically discuss and prepare comments on relevant works on each of the topics discussed and write a final research paper.

 
Profs. Paul Attewell and Mary Clare Lennon - pattewell@gc.cuny.edumlennon@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 81900 - TOPICS IN MULTIVARIATE METHODS
Wednesdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
Social science methods have made a lot of progress over the last 25 years; simple regression is no longer state-of-the-art. This course is an introduction to these more recent methods, emphasizing when they are used and how to use them, and minimizing the underlying math. It is taught in a computer lab, and is suitable for anyone who has statistics up to regression and takes a practical approach. The course begins with a review of multiple regression and its limitations, which highlights the rationale for the new techniques. It then introduces several methods whose purpose is to focus on estimating the causal influence of one particular variable of interest on some outcome. These methods: regression discontinuity analyses, propensity score matching, difference-in-difference models and others are particularly useful for evaluating the effects of policy changes or of social/clinical interventions. Another set of methods we will cover has a different goal: uncovering unexpected relations in data. These are the central tools of ‘data mining’ and they identify interactions, non-linear relationships and heterogeneity in datasets. By the end of the course, students should know which techniques to use in what contexts and feel confident that they know how to run each program and interpret its output. Each student will be graded based a term paper that presents an analysis of quantitative data of their choosing using two of these techniques. We hope this will serve as the core of a publishable paper.


Prof. Mehdi Bozorgmehr – mbozorgmehr@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 85800 - Muslim Integration in Europe and North America
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
This new course explores some of the key integration dilemmas faced by rapidly growing Muslim populations in the West. It will draw upon case studies of Muslim minority groups in major settler societies in Western Europe and North America (i.e., Germany, France, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, the United States and Canada). The emphasis throughout the course is on empirical and theoretical works and controversial policy debates concerning the integration of Muslims across the two continents. Muslims in Europe are very well-researched, due to their numerical and substantive significance, but Muslims in America are one of the least studied of all minority groups, despite their disproportionate media coverage. Moreover, the Muslim-American experience is conspicuously absent from courses on immigration, ethnic and racial studies, and even religious studies in the social sciences and the humanities.
 
Specifically, this course will take into account the way in which global immigrant cities such as New York, Toronto, Paris, London, Berlin, and Amsterdam have an effect on the immigrant Muslim experience, and in turn, are transformed by these immigrants and their descendants. Furthermore, the course will comparatively address patterns of accommodation, or lack thereof, of secular and democratic national contexts vis-a-vis Muslim minorities. These can range from outright exclusion to Islamophobia, to reactive solidarity and ethnic/religious mobilization, and ultimately integration. Other pressing issues of the post-9/11 era include youth radicalization (or so-called “homegrown terrorism”), the European refugee crisis, and subsequent right-wing anti-Muslim parties and policies. These will be addressed in this course as well. 
 
The following topics will be covered, as related to Muslim integration:
· Theories of assimilation, integration, and incorporation
· Contrasting demographic and socioeconomic characteristics
· Comparing national and local contexts of reception
· Ethnic and religious group boundaries
· The new second generation
· Radicalization and terrorism
· European refugee crisis
· Ethnic and religious mobilization
· Immigration and integration policies

Prof. Erica Chito Childs – echitoch@hunter.cuny.edu
Soc. 75600 - Race & Multiculturalism in a Global Context 
Mondays, 2-40pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
Studying race and multiculturalism in a global perspective is an increasingly important phenomenon.  The global economy, growing rates of immigration, and rapidly advancing information and media technologies have brought diverse groups in closer contact in more areas of the globe, even those previously regarded as racially and ethnically homogenous.  This course will cover a myriad of issues under the rubric of race and multiculturalism, encompassing a large multidisciplinary body of research and beginning with a review of the very concepts of race, ethnicity, and multiculturalism. Throughout the course, we will explore what interracial intimacies, multicultural policies, multiracial families, and cross-racial coalitions show us about contemporary race relations, and the intersections of race, gender, religion, and class. Subjects covered include interracial/mixed marriage, transracial adoption, race/multiculturalism in law and politics, multicultural education, and multiracialism in the media and popular culture. We will focus on these issues in contemporary America, as well as globally covering varied countries and regions. A variety of theoretical frameworks including critical race theory, cultural studies, and post-colonial writings, as well qualitative and quantitative methodologies for studying these issues will be addressed to engage in comparative intercultural and interdisciplinary dialogue.

Profs. Lynn Chancer, Thomas DeGloma – lchancer@hunter.cuny.edu;tdegloma@hunter.cuny.edu
Soc. 70200 – Contemporary Theory
Mondays, 6:30-8:30pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
This course is designed to serve multiple purposes simultaneously. The first aim is intellectual: to provide you with a thorough survey of important theorists in the development of both European and American social theory, as well as a sense of how classical theory influenced contemporary thinking and how current theorists have influenced one another. Our second goal is more pragmatic: we hope to provide comprehensive exposure to theorists whose work will both inspire you and help you with your future written work and independent research in the GC Sociology program. Third, and last, we aim to help you learn to creatively apply contemporary theory to specific social issues and problems of your interest; in this sense, the course is not simply an abstract exercise but hopefully one that brings theory alive and shapes your sociological vision.
 
Prof. Hector Cordero-Guzmam – hcordero@aol.com  
Soc. 84700 - Community Based Organization & Public Policy

Tuesdays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
This course reviews the academic literature and current theoretical and empirical debates focusing on Community Based Groups, Organizations and Service providers and their connections to public policy debates and processes. The class explores who these organizations are; how they set and achieve their mission and related goals; what activities they tend to engage in; how they connect to their communities and other stakeholders; how they manage and find material, monetary and other resources to support their work; and how they connect to public policy institutions and policy debates. The course will focus on presenting, discussing, and analyzing materials and cases from a range of social service, labor and workforce based, advocacy, and community action oriented non-profit organizations and will explore how their experience informs contemporary debates and understandings about the role of civil society organizations in the lives and outcomes of communities and community residents.   
 
Prof. Kenneth Gould – kgould@brooklyn.cuny.edu  
Soc. 82303 – Environmental Sociology/Environment Political-Economy

Tuesdays, 6:30 – 9pm, Brooklyn College, Room TBA, 3 credits
This course explores the complex, dynamic interactions between social systems and ecosystems. Environmental political economy challenges social science’s human exemptionnalist paradigm by incorporating the natural environment as a variable. The course will examine the social origins of the major environmental stresses facing contemporary social systems, the social conflicts that these stresses have produced, and a range of approaches to resolving social system-ecosystem disjuncture at local, regional, national, and transnational levels. Major theoretical frameworks and debates in environmental political economy will be addressed. Special attention will be paid to the roles of science and technology in generating and responding to socio-environmental disorganization, the role of socio-economic inequality in environmental conflicts, the emergence of environmental social movement coalitions, the fusion of the politics of place, production, and identity in ecological resistance movements, and linkages between transnational economic processes and efforts to achieve ecologically and socially sustainable development trajectories. 

Prof. Samuel Heilman – scheilman@gmail.com  
Soc. 84509 - The Ethnography of the Hasidic Community: Brooklyn and Beyond

Wednesdays, 2-4pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
The course will offer a an ethnographic consideration of contemporary hasidic life, history,  social structure, education, gender, issues of succession and the role of religion in ultra-orthodoxy.  It will include field visits to various communities in and around New York.   Students will be expected to prepare an ethnography of some aspect of hasidic life.
 
Prof. Michael Jacobson – Michael.Jacobson@islg.cuny.edu
Soc. 84700 - Public and Social Policy Development, Analysis, and Evaluation
Tuesdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
This course is designed to provide students with an overview of public policy development, implementation, and evaluation in real-world settings, using local and national examples from the work of the Institute for State and Local Governance (ISLG), a research and policy organization within the City University of New York (CUNY). The Institute currently has 40 full time staff and has projects in over 40 cities nationally.  ISLG works with government, nonprofit, private, and philanthropic organizations to reform and improve the structure, financing, delivery, measurement, and evaluation of vital public services in areas that include criminal justice, health care, child welfare and governmental budgeting. Specifically, the Institute provides state and local governments a range of  technical assistance, research and analytical expertise, including project development and management, performance measurement and evaluation, cost-benefit analysis, and fiscal planning. 
 
During the course, students will develop a foundational knowledge of the formal and informal policy making process with particular attention to how reforms can be proposed and implemented in what have become deeply politicized and resource constrained environments. Specific areas of focus will include the translation of research into policy and practice, the importance of relationship building, and the role of fiscal constraints in state and local decision-making.
 
Students will complete a semester-long capstone project that addresses the learning objectives in the context of the work of the CUNY Institute for State and Local Governance.  Students will complete readings and assignments related to social and public policy development, analysis, and evaluation to supplement their capstone work.

Prof. Juan Battle – jbattle@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 83300 – Sexuality
Mondays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
Missing! Marginal! Misrepresented!  This course draws on various bodies of scholarship – across the humanities and social sciences – to interrogate the complex subject of sexuality. Because students will be exposed to (and contribute from) a wide variety of perspectives on the subject, this course is appropriate for students in the traditional social sciences (e.g. sociology, anthropology, psychology, urban education, and history) as well as more contemporary ones (e.g. women’s studies, race studies, American studies, cultural studies, lesbian and gay studies).
 
Prerequisite – None.

Prof. Barbara Katz Rothman – bkatzrothman@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 83100 - Sociology of Health, Illness and Biomedical Imperialism
Mondays, 6:30-8:30pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
This course offers an introduction to the field classically known as medical sociology, with an emphasis on newer qualitative, critical and theoretical work.

Key themes in Medical Sociology have included the social construction of illness and its ongoing expansion into more areas of life; the medical gaze and the processes of medicalization; how the medicalized body is framed; representations of the body in medicine; cultural images, ethnographies and narratives of disease and illness; and cultural understandings of medical subjects. 
 
When we take seriously the call to do a truly global sociology, we can see Biomedicine operating at a level and in a way in which national boundaries are but minor obstacles in organizing access – access of providers of services to their customers or to their research material, and access of customers to services.  In that sense, the ‘social construction’ idea is too passive, and too limited in boundaries.  Illnesses are being constructed not only ‘socially,’ in each society according to its own ideas about the body, but in the pursuit of industrial profit.  While Foucault spoke of the state uses of  biopower,  we will also consider how biopower, as it is institutionalized in the Biomedical Empire, uses states.

Prof. Branko Milanovic – bmilanovic@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 84600 – Within-National Inequalities: From Pareto to Piketty
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
The objective of the course is to review, analyze, and allow students to develop a much better understanding of the theories and empirics of personal income distribution within a single policy-making unit (that is, normally within a nation-state). The first such theory was developed by Vilfredo Pareto more than 100 years ago. Pareto believes that income distribution does not change regardless of a social system and level of development. Simon Kuznets, in the 1950s, posited, on the contrary, a theory where income inequality evolves as societies get richer. Jan Tinbergen, in the 1970s, argued that the level of inequality is determined by the two opposing forces of education (increasing the supply of highly skilled workers) and technological change (increasing the demand for them). Most recently, Thomas Piketty argues that low growth combined with high returns to capital predisposes advanced economies to high levels of inequality. These theories will be considered on the real-world examples of movements of inequality in Brazil, China, “transition countries” and the United States and other advanced economies.  We shall focus especially on the recent evolution of income and wealth inequality in the United States and Piketty’s analytical contributions. The class will be fairly empirical but does not require any prior specific knowledge of the issues nor techniques. It is recommended for students of economics, political science, and sociology.

Prof. Ruth Milkman – rmilkman@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 84600 - Labor and Inequality:  Gender, Race, Class, Immigration and the New Precarity

Tuesdays, 6:30-8:30pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
This course will explore the causes and consequences of growing precarity and polarization in the U.S. labor market, and the accompanying growth of class inequality.  We will consider parallels to earlier historical periods as well as the implications for the labor movement. The impact of recent labor market transformations on groups that were historically marginalized — especially women, African Americans, and immigrants — and the widening class inequalities within each of those groups will also be examined.
 
This is a reading course with a seminar format.  Students will be expected to carefully read the assigned texts and write brief weekly papers about them, as well as actively participating in class discussions.  In addition, each student will be required to write a research paper on a topic related to the course content and approved in advance by the instructor.

Profs. John Mollenkopf and Leslie McCall - jmollenkopf@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 84700 - Working Class Politics
Wednesdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
This seminar addresses a variety of theoretical perspectives and empirical studies on 1) what we mean by “class” and the “working class,” 2) what forces have been reshaping the working class in the U.S. and beyond, such as technological innovation, globalization, the rising share of income going to the top one percent, changing gender and family roles and work-family relations, and the changing gender, racial, ethnic, and nativity composition of the workforce (including how the “white male working class” may be distinctive), and 3) how class membership and more general socio-economic position relate to the adoption of distinctive political values and identities, forms of political mobilization and participation, and policy preferences.  The seminar will then use the case of the contemporary working class in metropolitan New York to investigate how its different segments are actually thinking and acting politically, situating them in the national context.  (Seminar participants will select a working class segment and explore it through a variety of data sets and sources.)  We will ask whether labor unions are still relevant to working class politics, despite their decline in membership, and also ask what other institutions or movements shape their political mobilization, including social movements, community organizations, political parties, civic and religious and fraternal organizations.  The course concludes by looking at the role that class played in the 2016 presidential election and the ensuing political dynamics of the city and nation.


Prof. Tamara Mose – tbrown@brooklyn.cuny.edu 
Soc. 81200 – Ethnography

Thursdays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
This course will explore various ethnographic approaches to the study of communities, neighborhoods, and other social phenomena.  Emphasis will be on conducting field work through participant observation and interviews. We will focus on technical training in developing observational and interview guidelines, data collection, coding, and transcript analysis. There will be a strong emphasis on quality writing, analysis of ethnographic research in book and article format and attention to recent developments in ethnography, especially reflexivity.

Professor Jayne Mooney      jmooney@jjay.cuny.edu
Soc. 85000 – Theorizing Violence
Wednesday, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
This is course focuses on why violence is both an anathema and, at the same time, a common part of everyday life and a core cultural concern for movies through to videogames and the daily news. That is, it is concerned with the prevalence of violence and the fascination of violence. We will discuss the gamut of violence from homicide and domestic violence, through to spree and serial killings to terrorism and the violence of the state, to the harsh realities of war and genocide.  The gendered nature of violence and the structural violence of race and class will be considered throughout, as well as, the theories that have arisen in an attempt to provide an explanation. We will focus on why ‘normal’ persons commit extreme violence and why violence is such a ‘normal’ part of the institutions of late modern society. Finally we will turn to how we can tackle the dehumanization and othering which constitute the narratives and psychological mechanisms that make such violence possible.
 

Prof. Jessica Halliday Hardie – jh1389@hunter.cuny.edu   
Soc. 71600 – Statistics II

Thursdays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
In this course we will move from the building blocks of social statistics to using statistical tools to test hypotheses and draw conclusions. We will focus on two widely used statistical models: multiple linear regression and logistic regression. Within these larger frameworks, we will cover the underlying assumptions of each model and circumstances in which these assumptions are violated. Specific topics also include non-linearity, mediation, and moderation.
 
Prof. John Torpey – jtorpey@gc.cuny.edu 
Soc. 80000 – Comparative Historical Sociology

Tuesdays, 2-4pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
One of the most striking tendencies in the historical social sciences is the bold return of grand narratives and of global perspectives on human life.  This course introduces students to the field of comparative-historical sociology and to world history.  We will focus on approaches to making sense of major social change in the areas of state formation and democratization, the uses of physical violence, revolution, religion, and the economy, and on how approaches to these issues have changed over time.  As befits a course with these aims, readings will be substantial and will range widely across time and place.  We will emphasize especially major turning points and transformations in human history

Prof. Sharon Zukin – zukin@brooklyn.cuny.edu  
Soc. 86800 - Consumer Society and Social Media

Wednesdays, 2-4 p.m, Room TBA, 3 credits
During the past century and a half, consumption has joined production as a major source of identity, a surrogate for citizenship, and an important driver of global, national, and local economies.  Both praised and damned, it is the source and site of an ever wider and more sophisticated demand for goods and services and a major category of existential choice.  Does consumer culture offer a better or a bogus form of citizenship?  Does it promote a freer choice of identity or chain humans to an illusory sense of equality?  Through branding strategies and digital devices, these questions form an inescapable, universal dilemma that we will explore in this course.

We will study consumer society as an institutional field where different kinds of social actors try to exercise agency, on the one hand, and exert power, on the other.  Through readings, discussions, and small-group research, leading to both a course paper and perhaps the first stage of a future journal publication, we will examine such broad issues as the historical construction of global empires of consumption, the role of consumption in social theory, branding as identity and loyalty, and labor and regulation at each stage of the commodity chain.  We will also focus on specific technologies of power such as Yelp reviews and on the social construction of the “sharing economy,” as well as specific areas of consumption such as food and fashion.  All in one semester!
 
Prof. David Halle – dhalle@ucla.edu
Soc. 82800 – Global Cities
Monday, 6:30-8:30pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
Office Hours: Mon  5:30 – 6:15 in GC cafeteria (8th floor).
Prerequisites:   None
Global Cities seeks to understand the politics, economics, social, and cultural  life of  today’s urban-mega centers.  We will study innovation and job creation, neighborhood life including integration and segregation, housing including the “affordable housing” and “homeless” crises; the rise and decline of  urban “ghettos”,  the waxing and waning of the suburbs, education, political incorporation, crime and police-community relations, architecture and “starchitects”, ethnic and racial relations, immigration including Europe’s current refugee crisis, religious diversity, inequality, finance and banking, cultural institutions such as museums and art galleries, environmental issues including threats such as global warming and flooding as well as opportunities to make cities “greener”, urban riots, and terrorism.  We will focus especially on New York, Los Angeles, and London, but draw examples from many other global cities. The course complements International Migration (MALS 77400) by seeking to understand the global urban context to which so many international migrants are drawn.

Prof. Stanley Aronowitz – saronowitz@gc.cuny.edu  
Soc. 82800 - The Dynamics of Urban Policy & Society
Thursdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

The urban landscape is rapidly changing. Major manufacturing centers are either depleted or have disappeared. For example, New York, which at one point had 1.1 million factory workers, now has less than 100,000. This course explores both historically and conceptually the economic, social, and cultural dimensions of the city and suburbs focusing on the dynamics of power. The course will focus on the work of Lewis Mumford and Henri Lefebvre, and will include articles and books by others.


Profs. Paul Attewell & Susan Dumais – pattewell@gc.cuny.edu; susam.dumais@lehman.cuny.edu 
Soc. 84503 - Sociology of Education
Thursdays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

This course focuses on education and its relationship to social inequality (class, race and gender), taking a life-course perspective that looks at the sequence of educational experiences from pre-school, to elementary and high school, through college. The emphasis will be on structures and processes that tend to create and/or diminish inequalities in learning, educational attainments, and life outcomes such as earnings. The course will follow a seminar format in which students are expected to share their understandings, raise questions and debate issues in class.

Requirements for the course consist of (1) reading the assigned materials each week and discussing them in class; (2) completing a short (at least 1 page) paper to be submitted each week (via email before the class meetings) which includes your response to the week’s readings and which may also include your assessment of strengths and/or weaknesses of the argument or the evidence, and any questions in response to the readings;  (3) a term paper on any topic within the sociology of education due by the last week of classes.


Prof. Sophia Catsambis – scatsambis@rcn.com  
Soc. 74400 - Stratification & Sorting Processes in Education
Mondays, 6:30 – 8:30pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

Education is considered to be the “great equalizer” in American society, providing opportunities for social mobility and ameliorating social inequalities.  Yet, despite the widespread consensus of their egalitarian role, educational institutions produce social inequalities by numerous sorting mechanisms employed to address variation in students’ character and skills. This course examines scholarly debates over the role key organizational features of school play in sorting students and producing social inequality.  
The course begins with an overview of classic sociological theories considering education as building human capital or reproducing social inequalities.  It continues by  examining mechanisms that schools use at different organizational levels to organize students for instruction and debates over their role in reproducing existing stratification by social characteristics such as class, race/ethnicity, gender, etc.  The organizational features examined refer to sorting and grouping between schools, such as, school segregation and school choice (e.g. vouchers and charter schools), within schools and classrooms in elementary and secondary education  (e.g. ability grouping and curricular tracking), in higher education  (e.g. access to college and college selectivity) and the socioeconomic returns of educational credentials.  
The class follows a seminar format with students participating regularly in class discussions and introducing assigned readings.  Students are expected to submit weekly responses to the assigned readings and to complete an article-length paper on a topic relevant to the course that will be developed in consultation with the instructor. 


Prof. Patricia Clough– pclough@gc.cuny.edu 
Soc. 80000 – The Psyche and the Social
Tuesdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm,  Room TBA, 3 credits

Focusing on contemporary psychoanalytic writings as well as looking back to classical works of Freud, Klein, Lacan, Winnicott, the course will stage an encounter between psychoanalysis and contemporary philosophical turns to affect, objects, ecologies and technologies in order to rethink the psyche and the social today.   We will then evaluate the potential of social psychoanalytic thinking for addressing contemporary cultural and political issues, especially the implication of races, genders, sexualities in biopolitics, contemporary global capitalism, neocolonialism and terrorism. 


Prof. Thomas DeGloma – tdegloma@gc.cuny.edu 
Soc. 86800 – Culture and Cognition
Tuesdays, 2-4pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

This course will provide a comprehensive overview of cognitive sociology. In general, the purpose of this course is to help you build an understanding of the relationship between culture and the mind. In other words, you will learn how the communities to which we belong shape our mental processes. More particularly, you will be introduced to various sociological studies and theories that illuminate the ways people perceive and understand the world around them, attribute meaning to events and experiences, comprehend their identities and the identities of others, draw boundaries and separate the world into categories, experience time, and remember or envision the past. While our mental processes are seemingly personal, they are actually products of culture. The studies and theories we will cover in this course are relevant to a huge range of topics, issues, and areas of sociological study: from mental health to war, from political power relations to sexual attraction, from the social logic of fear and taboo to the politics of memory, from the cultural dynamics of identity (with regard to the wide diversity of identity categories and reference groups) to the ways individuals tell stories about growth and transformation in their lives, and much more. 

Over the course of the semester, we will focus on applying the tools and methods of cultural and cognitive sociology to several social issues, topics, and situations in order to better understand them. The primary purpose of this course is to provide you with a set of intellectual tools that you can use to explore the ways culture and community shape the mind as you pursue your own research and develop your written work. The course is separated into five sections: (1) Introduction: Key Themes and Foundational Approaches in Cultural and Cognitive Sociology, (2) Meaning, Perception, and Experience, (3) Social Identity, (4) Classification and Cultural Codes, and (5) Culture and Memory.   

Prof. Hester Eisenstien    hester1@prodigy.net
Soc. 83300 - Global Feminisms
Mondays, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Room TBA, 3 credits

This course will explore key global debates in contemporary international feminism.  Many if not most of the issues focused on by modern (second wave) Western feminism have run up against cultural, political and/or economic obstacles in the form of cultural barriers, opposing standpoints regarding colonialism and its aftermath, and other differences of philosophy and perspective.  Are women’s rights a universal claim or a Western-inflected tool of cultural and political domination?  How do feminists around the world view issues of religious fundamentalism, reproductive freedom, female genital cutting, sexual objectification of women, political participation for women, lesbian and gay rights, trafficking in women and girls, veiling for women and girls, and violence against women?  We will examine these issues in an international frame, asking questions about universalism and economic globalization, and looking at the possibilities for, but also the barriers to, international feminist solidarity. 


Prof. Janet Gornick – jgornick@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 85902 - Social Welfare Policy
Wednesdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

This course will examine social welfare policy in the United States, in both historical and cross-national perspective. We will begin with an overview of the development of social welfare policy in the U.S. We will focus on crucial historical periods – including the Civil War years, the Progressive Era, the New Deal, the Great Society, and the “welfare reform” of the 1990s and early 2000s. Second, we will assess “the big picture” of the American welfare state, through the lens of its underlying institutional framework. Third, we will analyze contemporary challenges in the U.S. that call for active policy responses, such as inequality, health insurance, low-wage work, and care. Finally, we will survey selected social policy lessons from other high-income countries, especially in Europe, where social provisions are typically more extensive than they are in the U.S.               


Prof. David Halle – dhalle10@gmail.com 
Soc. 86800  - Sociology of Culture 
Mondays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

The course examines empirically interesting case studies of different aspects of culture, and considers which cultural theories best help us understand each case study and whether, for each case study, new theories are appropriate.  The course also looks at the history of theories and studies of culture.  “Culture” is defined here both in the narrow sense as “the arts”—film, music, architecture, literature, journalism, film, television, art, dance, and so on—and more broadly to include  political beliefs and social attitudes, sports, religious beliefs, and the Internet and social media.


Prof. Jack Hammond – jhammond.hunter.cuny.edu
Soc. 85600 - . Social Movements in Latin America
Wednesdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

This course will examine social movements in Latin America since World War II.  The period can be (roughly) divided into four parts with a set of social movements corresponding to each: 1) Populism/import substitution industrialization: worker, peasant, and urban housing movements 2) armed struggle, dictatorship, and
democratization: revolutionary movements, resistance to dictatorship, human rights movements, transition movements 3) neoliberalism:
identity-based movements, opposition to neoliberalism, globalization, transnational movements 4) post-neoliberalism: Pink Tide and after; horizontalism, resistance movements, digital organizing.  In studying these movements we will examine the applicability of North-based theories of social movements and the alternatives which have been proposed or may be needed.

Course requirements:
     1. Regular attendance and participation in discussion
     2. Each week, post on Blackboard a short essay based on that week's required reading, concluding with an analytical question which will be presented to the class for discussion.
     3. Research paper: Each student's research must be presented orally in the last two weeks of class and then in writing.

Prof. Shiro Horiuchi – shoriouchi@gc.cuny.edu 
Soc. 81900 - Advanced Methods of Demographic Analysis 
Tuesdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

In this course we study advanced methods of demographic analysis.  They are widely used in research on mortality, fertility, nuptiality, migration, population composition, and other demographic processes, but many of them can also be applied to a broad range of topics in other areas of the social sciences and biomedical sciences.  Those methods include event history analysis (nonparametric, semi-parametric and parametric versions; continuous and discrete time versions; fixed and time-dependent covariate versions), life table techniques (single-decrement, multiple-decrement and multi-state), decomposition analysis, age-period-cohort models, methods for analyzing multiple time trends (e.g., Lee-Carter model), Lexis map analysis, smoothing and non-parametric regression techniques, and mathematical models of population dynamics.  Computer exercises are included.
Prerequisites:  Introductory statistics including multiple linear regression; DCP 70200 or permission of the instructor.  No background in calculus or matrix algebra is required. 


Profs. Philip Kasinitz & Greggory Smithsimon – pkasinitz@gc.cuny.edu; gsmithsimon@brooklyn.cuny.edu
Soc. 85800 - Neighborhoods, Ghettos and Enclaves
Wednesdays, 11:45 – 1:45, Room TBA, 3 credits

This class will examine the role neighborhoods and other forms of  spatial community play in contemporary urban life. We will look at both the micro level interactions that create communities in the city, as well as larger structural forces such as racial segregation, migration and public policy in assessing what urban communities do, how they are created and change and how they are sometimes destroyed, as well as examining the role that spatial communities have in the lives of their residents and others in the City. Specific topics will include the development of the modern neighborhood, “ghettos”—past and present, immigrant enclaves, the idea of the “urban village,” the role of race, relations in public, public housing and urban public policy, planned communities, gentrification, “bohemian” and Gay and Lesbian communities, the commercial life in the city and the “new urbanism.” Students will be expected to complete two critical essays and one original research paper.

Prof. R. L’Heureux Lewis-McCoy– RLEWISMCCOY@CCNY.CUNY.EDU 
Soc. 82301 – Black Intellectual Thought
Tuesdays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

This course explores the development and evolution of the Black intellectual tradition in the United States in the 20th and 21st centuries. In particular, the course explores two distinct areas: 1) conceptualizing and interrogating the diversity of scholarly approaches to the African-American condition and 2) what role(s) can/should intellectuals play in the Black freedom struggle. The course surveys ideological traditions that include, but are not limited to, Black nationalism, Black conservatism, Black feminism, Black Marxism, etc. These traditions are presented to raise greater consideration of the influence of ideology, diversity within the tradition, and the weight of ontological claims on programs of racial uplift and social change. Through an exploration of critical voices from inside and outside of academia, the course seeks to locate sites for potential intellectual intervention, pragmatic struggle, and redefinitions of the boundaries of Blackness. Readings from authors such as WEB Du Bois, Harold Cruse, Audre Lorde, Jared Sexton, Joy James, and Patricia Hill Collins are designed to survey existing approaches to social and intellectual problems facing Black peoples. Requirements for the class include: 1) thorough reading and discussion of the assigned course materials, 2) weekly response papers submitted digitally to the instructor, and 3) an in-depth term research paper on Black Intellectual Tradition.


Prof. Branko Milanovic – bmilanovic@gc.cuny.edu 
Soc. 84600 - Global Inequality: Measurement, Analysis and Political Implications 
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

The focus of the class is on global inequality which is defined as inequality between citizens of the world (as if they were members of a same nation). We will review the evolution of global inequality from the Industrial Revolution until today, and see how the changing composition and magnitude of global inequality affects politics, economics, and migration. Two types of inequalities, within-national (inequality among individuals within a single nation) and cross-national (inequality in mean incomes across nations) combine to determine global inequality. We shall thus also review the changes in within- and between-national inequalities. The class ends with an overview of positions of various political philosophers (e.g., Rawls, Pogge, Sen, Nagel) regarding global inequality and migration. 

The course will be fairly empirical but does not require any prior specific knowledge of the issues nor techniques. It is recommended for students of economics, political science, and sociology. This class is a follow-up of the one on “The theories of income distribution: from Pareto to Piketty” but can be taken independently. 


Prof. Pyong Gap Min        pyonggap.min@qc.cuny.edu
Soc. 82800 - International Migration
Wednesdays 6:30 – 8:30pm, room TBA, 3 credits

We have ushered into the global migration period since the early 1990s.  Not only traditionally immigrant-accepting countries, including the U.S. and three former British colonies in the “New World” (Canada, Australia and New Zealand), but also Western European countries and Asian countries have annually received large numbers of formal immigrants or migrant workers/brides over the last two decades. In particular, the U.S. has received the largest number of immigrants annually since the late 1960s The influx of immigrants to the U.S. over the last 50 years has changed the face of the U.S., impacting neighborhoods, the economy, the school systems, cuisines, politics, healthcare, and sports.  

This course, focusing on international migration, has three main objectives.  First, it will provide an overview information about immigration patterns in three areas for students: (1) the U.S., (2) Canada, Australia and New Zealand, and (3) Europe.  Immigration patterns include immigration policies, the annual number of immigrants, their national and regional origins, and their racial, religious, and socioeconomic backgrounds.  Second, it will compare two mass migration periods in the U.S. (the classical and contemporary periods) in immigration patterns and immigrants’ adaptations. Third, it will help students to learn about U.S. immigrants’ and their children’s adaptations (settlement patterns, socioeconomic adaptations and racialization) and theories of adaptations, especially regarding second-generation immigrants’ adaptations. To summarize the main objectives, this course aims to provide general information about global migration patterns, but focuses on the U.S. context in examining immigrants’ and their children’s adaptations with special attention to the differences between turn-of-the twenty-century white immigrant and contemporary immigrant groups. 


Prof. Jermey Porter – jporter@brooklyn.cuny.edu
Soc. 71500 – Sociological Statistic 1
Mondays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

The broad focus of this course will be on the application of introductory statistics within the realm of sociological research.  Topics covered include measures of central tendency, measures of variability, probability and the normal curve, samples and populations, hypothesis testing, ANOVA, correlation, and an introduction to linear regression analysis.


Prof. Charles Post –  cpost@bmcc.cuny.edu 
Soc. 82901 - Capitalism, Race and Class
Thursdays, 6:30 – 8:30pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

The dominant “common sense” in the United States holds that this country, unique among all industrialized capitalist countries, has no fixed and permanent social classes and affords equal opportunity for social advancement to all its citizens. However, the reality is quite different. Social class divisions and racial inequality have marked US society from its birth in the 17th century, and these divisions grow sharper today. The problem of the relationship between these two fundamental forms of social inequality and power in the US has long been the subject of theoretical and historical controversy. In this seminar, we will assess some of the extensive literature on race and class in the US. Among the questions we will grapple with over the course of the year will be: What is the theoretical status of “race”? How do different sociologists understand social class? How were the racial categories “black” and “white” socially constructed alongside plantation slavery during the 17th and 18th centuries? How were these racial categories preserved and transformed as slavery was abolished, new immigrants arrived in the US and new forms of class inequality evolved over the course of the 19th century? How have racial categories been transformed as African-Americans have become an overwhelmingly urban people who compete as legal equals for jobs, education and housing with European-Americans? What is the current relationship of race and class in the US? Readings will be substantial, varied and historical in perspective.


Prof. Mary Clare Lennon    mlennon@gc.cuny.edu 
Soc. 70000 - Proseminar 
Wednesdays, 2-4pm, Room TBA, 3Credits    

This course introduces students to some of the major elements involved in the training of scholars in the field of sociology.  We will explore the norms that govern the profession, the aims of sociological research, the process of grant-seeking and grant-writing, the qualities of a good dissertation, expectations about publication, the process of approval for research on human subjects, and other aspects of professional socialization.  In an effort to familiarize you with the kinds of scholarly work and teaching that are done by faculty at CUNY, we will also have a number of presentations by members of the CUNY Sociology faculty.  


Prof. John Torpey– jtorpeyr@gc.cuny.edu 
Soc. 70100 – Classical Social Theory
Tuesdays, 2-4pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

This course introduces students to some of the foundational works in the sociological tradition.  The emphasis here is not on textual exegesis (though we will inevitably do some of that), nor on intellectual history (though that is equally unavoidable), but on the ways in which these writers speak directly to our contemporary circumstances, if in fact they do.  Our principal task in this course is to explore the intellectual orientations of these seminal thinkers.  We will concentrate on issues such as the following: What (if anything) is society?  What is the relationship between the individual and society?  What makes for a stable society, and what destabilizes society?  In what ways has social life varied according to time and place?  How have societies changed over time?  What (if anything) distinguishes “modern” society – in order to explain which the discipline of sociology came into being – from its predecessors?


Prof. Bryan Turner– bturner@gc.cuny.edu 
Soc. 84600 – Citizenship & Human Rights
Tuesdays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

The course is divided in two sections, starting with social citizenship and its critics, and then moving on to human rights and its critics. We finish with some consideration as to whether these two different systems of rights could be combined. Citizenship as a principle of inclusion is criticized because it cannot cope adequately with globalization (including migration, refugees, asylum seekers and so forth). Some sociologists believe we can modify citizenship to develop new forms:  flexible citizenship or semi-citizenship or post-national citizenship. Human rights are seen to be more relevant to a global world, but critics note that they are enforced by states, and require the resources made available by states. The course examines the apparent decline of welfare states, citizenship and growing inequality in income and wealth within neo-liberal economics and neo-conservative politics. We also consider differences between the American tradition of civil liberties and European welfare states. Other topics include aboriginal or first nation rights, migration, documentation and citizenship, ageing and health rights. We look at different forms of citizenship in Latin America, Asia and the Middle East. The course concludes by considering the contemporary limitations of both citizenship and human rights traditions with respect to authoritarianism, genocide, and new wars.


Prof. Julia Wrigley – jwrigley@gc.cuny.edu  
Soc. 82800 - The Sociology of Accidents and Disasters
Thursdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

Societies are subject to many types of breakdowns and disasters, including wars and economic depressions, but this class will look at other types of negative events, those that are less extreme in their impact but are generally perceived as indicating organizational or technical failures, either in precipitating events or in producing inadequate responses to natural events. These include, for example, accidents and disasters in the nuclear, chemical, and oil industries; in medicine and aviation; and in preparing for and responding to natural disasters (Katrina). We will consider theories of how such failures occur and also the steps that have been taken (such as risk management) to reduce their frequency or limit their impact. The focus throughout will be on what the experience and analysis of accidents and disasters reveals about organizations and technology within society, how negative events are perceived and explained (as in official reports analyzing them), and how they can produce both social solidarity and conflict. The class will be run as a seminar, with a focus on discussion of the readings.

Prof. Jim Jasper – jjasper@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 80500 - Analytical Sociology {32557}
Tuesdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

This course tries to break down the complacent macro-level concepts that sociologists so often use, including elites, the state, social movements, and organizations, to get at the micro-level mechanisms that make them work. In particular we will ask what role individuals play in social explanation. We will also try to develop a cultural version of analytical sociology to replace the usual version based on rational-choice assumptions about human nature.

Profs. Richard Alba & Nancy Foner ralba@gc.cuny.edu; nfoner@huner.cuny.edu
Soc. 82800 – Immigration in an Era of Globalization
Thursdays, 2-4pm, 3 credits, Room TBA

This course will provide an overview of the literature on contemporary
immigration.  The focus will be on the U.S., but the larger context of
South-North immigration will be brought into view.  Attention will be
divided between theories and empirical research, as the course considers
accounts of who immigrates and why and how immigrants insert themselves into
the receiving society and its economy.  The final part of the course will
consider the impact of immigration on, among other things, future ethno-racial
divisions and intermarriage and family relations.
 
 
Prof. Stanley Aronowitz                    saronowitz@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 80000– Marx's Grundrisse
Thursdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, 3 credits, Room TBA
 
A decade before the publication of Capital, Marx completed a draft of the study. The draft went well beyond the final version which was almost entirely a critique of the categories of political economy. The Grundrisse(rough draft) has important sections that anticipate the later work, including the second and third volumes of Capital.  The Grundrisse, however, which was first translated into English in 1973 covers more ground: an elaborate chapter on money; considerations in the history of human societies that depart from the three stages model enunciated in the German Ideology; significant contributions to the theory of work and labor; a remarkable fragment on the effects of automation on work; a major critique of contemporary theories of surplus value and profit; reflections on poverty and much more.
 The entire course will be devoted to this single book and its reception. We will read major sections closely, and consider some of the commentaries on it by Negri, Rosdolsky and Stiegler. Prior familiarity with The German Ideology and the Economic and Philosophical Notebooks of 1844 by Marx and Engels is helpful but not required.
 
Profs. Paul Attewell & Mary Clare Lennon pattewell@gc.cuny.edumlennon@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 81900 – Topics in Multivariate Methods
Wednesdays 2-4pm, 3 credits, Room TBA
Social science methods have made a lot of progress over the last 25 years; simple regression is no longer state-of-the-art. This course is an introduction to these more recent methods, emphasizing when they are used and how to use them, and minimizing the underlying math. It is taught in a computer lab, and is suitable for anyone who has statistics up to regression and takes a practical approach.
The course begins with a review of multiple regression and its limitations, which highlights the rationale for the new techniques. It then introduces several methods whose purpose is to focus on estimating the causal influence of one particular variable of interest on some outcome. These methods: regression discontinuity analyses, propensity score matching, difference-in-difference models and others are particularly useful for evaluating the effects of policy changes or of social/clinical interventions. Another set of methods we will cover has a different goal: uncovering unexpected relations in data. These are the central tools of ‘data mining’ and they identify interactions, non-linear relationships and heterogeneity in datasets.
By the end of the course, students should know which techniques to use in what contexts and feel confident that they know how to run each program and interpret its output. Each student will be graded based a term paper that presents an analysis of quantitative data of their choosing using one or more of these techniques. We hope this will serve as the core of a publishable paper.
 
Professor David C. Brotherton    dbrotherton@jjay.cuny.edu
Soc. 85000 Studies of Youth, Marginalization and Subcultures of Resistance
Mondays, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Room TBA
In the current period a plethora of youth resistance actions, movements and subcultures have developed in response to socio-economic dislocations on a global scale. From rebellious students, youth riots in England to graffiti writers in Rio de Janeiro to politicized gangs in Quito and New York and the globalized Occupied Wall Street movement an endless range of symbolic and substantive responses by youth to their felt conditions of marginality can be observed and studied. In this seminar we will excavate this dynamic and fluid social field through focusing on theories and empirical studies that help to explain the continuity and discontinuity of youth social and cultural resistances over time. Questions of race/ethnicity, class, gender and age will be addressed as we trace the meanings and representations of youth reactions to industrial and post-industrial societies within and across their highly ambiguous political and cultural locations. Students will be expected to carry out small research projects that in some way reflect the transgressive practices, rituals and possibilities of youth in the late modern metropolis. 
The seminar has two major goals: (i) to explore the range of sociological theories that explain youth social and cultural resistance, and (ii) to critically interpret the different forms that this resistance takes in the context of an evolving and highly contradictory transnationalist capitalist order. We will focus in particular on the origins of youth subcultures as they emerge during both modernity and late modernity and their construction within changing notions of criminal and non-criminal deviance.
 
Prof. Erica Chito Childs                      echitoch@hunter.cuny.edu
Soc. 76900– Media and Popular Culture Analysis
Mondays, 2-4pm, 3 credits, Room TBA
 This course will explore the myriad of theoretical approaches and methods used to analyze the content, structure, and contexts of media and popular culture in society.  In particular we will explore how cultural meanings convey specific ideologies of gender, race, class, sexuality, nation, and other ideological dimensions.  We will focus on three inter-related dimensions of cultural analysis including the production and political economy of culture, the reading of cultural texts (film, TV, video games, news coverage music, social media, etc.), and the audience reception of those texts (including social media responses).   Students will produce an original research paper employing one of the theoretical frameworks and methodologies of cultural analysis for publication.
 
Prof. Hester Eisenstein                       hester1@prodigy.net
Soc. 80000– Feminist Texts and Theories
Mondays, 2-4pm, 3 credits, Room TBA
In this course students will consider significant classic and modern texts in the feminist tradition.  The course will cover a series of feminist theories from the 19th to the 21st centuries, including Marxist, radical and liberal perspectives, and ranging from Black, Third World, lesbian and ecofeminist formulations to postmodern/poststructuralist views that question the existence of woman as a category. We will look at issues of race, class, sexuality, and disability in relation to feminist and womanist positions. The class will include readings by Clara Zetkin, Simone de Beauvoir, bell hooks, Chandra Mohanty, and Judith Butler, among others. Students will be expected to be prepared to discuss the readings each week, and to write a weekly short zap or response paper.  The final project for the class will be a 20-25 page research paper, but can also be a film, a video, or a political statement and analysis.   
 
Prof. Kenneth Gould      kgould@brooklyn.cuny.edu
Soc 84510 Environmental Sociology
Thursdays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, 3 credits, Room TBA
This course explores the complex, dynamic interactions between social systems and ecosystems. The sub-field of environmental sociology challenges sociology's human exemptionalist paradigm by incorporating the natural environment as a variable. The course will examine the social origins of the major environmental stresses facing contemporary social systems, the social conflicts that these stresses have produced, and a range of approaches to resolving social system-ecosystem disjuncture at local, regional, national, and transnational levels. Major theoretical frameworks and debates in the sub-discipline will be addressed. Special attention will be paid to the roles of science and technology in generating and responding to socio-environmental disorganization, the role of socio-economic inequality in environmental conflicts, the emergence of environmental social movement coalitions, the fusion of the politics of place, production, and identity in ecological resistance movements, and linkages between transnational economic processes and efforts to achieve ecologically and socially sustainable development trajectories. 
 
Prof. David Halle       dhalle10@gmail.com
Soc. 82800 Global Cities
Mondays, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Room TBA
Global Cities seeks to understand the politics, economics, social, and cultural  life of  today’s urban-mega centers.  We will study innovation and job creation, neighborhood life including integration and segregation, housing including the “affordable housing” and “homeless” crises; the rise and decline of  urban “ghettos”,  the waxing and waning of the suburbs, education, political incorporation, crime and police-community relations, architecture and “starchitects”, ethnic and racial relations, immigration including Europe’s current refugee crisis, religious diversity, inequality, finance and banking, cultural institutions such as museums and art galleries, environmental issues including threats such as global warming and flooding as well as opportunities to make cities “greener”, urban riots, and terrorism.  We will focus especially on New York, Los Angeles, and London, but draw examples from many other global cities. The course complements International Migration (MALS 77400) by seeking to understand the global urban context to which so many international migrants are drawn.

 
Prof. Samuel Heilman      scheilman@gmail.com
Soc. 84509– Sociology of Hasidism
Wednesdays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, 3 credits, Room TBA
This course will explore the current Hasidic world looking at it sociologically. We will detail its history, structure, personalities, and conflicts. We put it in the context of fundamentalism. Special attention to issues of succession and continuity. 
 
Prof. Philip Kasinitz                              pkasinitz@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 72500– Urban Sociology 
Wednesdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, 3 credits, Room TBA
This course will survey sociological work on the city as both a spatial location and a social institution. We will discuss the relationship of urbanism and modernity, debates over the role of “community” in urban life, the “Chicago School” and political economy approaches, ghettos, neighborhoods, neighborhood chance, ethnic enclaves, the sociology of the built environment, the role of public space in urban life, the importance of culture and consumption in shaping the urban experience and the impact of migration, gentrification and globalization on contemporary cities.

 Prof. Barbara Katz Rothman                          
Soc. 82800– Maternal, Child, sexual and reproductive health
Wednesdays, 6:30 – 8:30pm, 3 credits, Room TBA

This course will offer an introduction and critical overview of public health issues, approaches and concerns with a particular focus on the area generally known as Maternal and Child Health. The focus will be on the United States, but global issues will be under consideration as well. Specific topics will include the medicalization of maternity care and infancy/childhood; the consequences of 'risk' as a dominant ideology for maternal and child health care; issues in reproductive justice, with particular attention to race and class, and the historic and contemporary influence of eugenics in public health; the history of midwifery and global trends in midwifery care; the role of public health interventions in infant care, including breast feeding and co-sleeping; and selected other topics as decided by the class.


Prof. Leslie Paik                    Lpaik@ccny.cuny.edu
Soc. 84505– Law and Society
Mondays 11:45-1:45 pm, 3 credits, Room TBA
This seminar examines the relationship between law and society, considering how the law shapes social life and how social change affects law and legal institutions. The seminar takes a “law in action” approach to studying law that focuses on the social, political, economic, and cultural contexts of law. We begin by the classical and contemporary theories of the sociology of law and then proceed to various topics of law and society research, including legal consciousness, legal pluralism, the legal profession, legal mobilization, and the globalization of law. To highlight those topics, substantive readings will focus on how the law shapes our views of race, gender, family and immigration in the US. This seminar will provide a broad socio-legal foundation for students working on those substantive topics, as well as for those interested in social control and social change.
 
Prof. Robert Smith                              robert.smith@baruch.cuny.edu   
Soc. 81200– Ethnography, Related Methods and Case Based Analysis. 
Tuesdays, 6:30-8:30pm, 3 credits, Room TBA
This course will review ethnography and related methods, and have students conduct their own ethnographic research.   The course has several goals: First, it seeks to familiarize students with different schools of ethnographic research.  Second, it seeks to develop the ability of students to do ethnographic research and writing, and make them self conscious and confident about the epistemic and scientific bases of ethnographic research, enabling students to better engage with mainstream sociology.   Two key tasks here are to develop students ability to identify what their case/s is/are case/s of, and then make the case for that case.  Third, the course will examine theories about all the various tools in the ethnographic toolkit:  participant observation, interviews of various kinds, biographical and comparative case analysis, narrative and documentary analysis, and particular issues, such as negotiating the IRB (Institutional Review Board).  As part of the class, students will engage in their own ethnographic research, and present both notes and some analysis in class. 
 
Prof. John Torpey                                jtorpey@gc.cuny.edu  
Soc. 82800– Social Change: In Search of Progress
Tuesdays, 2-4pm, 3 credits, Room TBA
This course examines the idea of “social change” generally, and the idea of “progress” more specifically.  We will explore ways of thinking about how societies change, different approaches to understanding historical time, and specific domains in which “progress” might be said to have been made in recent decades and centuries – economic, political, gender, racial, military, and the like.  Readings will be drawn from interdisciplinary sources across the social sciences and philosophy.
 

Prof. Elena Vesselinov      elena.vesselinov@gmail.com
Soc. 82100– Studying Urban Inequality 
Thursdays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, 3 credits, Room TBA 

The course aims to engage graduate students in discussions about the main axes of urban inequality: economic, racial/ethnic, spatial, educational and environmental. We will discuss these five aspects of inequality, as well as how each of them is studied, using specific research methods. We will debate when and how scholars use in-depth interviews, surveys, Census data, GIS, various indexes, or social media to address specific research questions. Thus the course will focus on urban inequality in substantive and methodological way. It is organized in five sections.
The first section, Economic Inequality in the Study of Cities, begins with some theoretical evidence about the political economy of place.  The readings in this section examine the origins and sources of economic inequality in contemporary world cities. The section continues with evidence about the widening income and wealth gap between urban residents.
The second and third sections then focus on urban inequities related to racial/ethnic origin, immigration status and residential location. These sections are closely related and we will discuss some latest work about indices of residential segregation, particularly the work of Sean Reardon, Van Tran and others, as they improve the methodology of studying social and neighborhood differentiation.
The readings in the fourth section are still intertwined with the previous sections, because educational inequality is also linked to residential location. We will compare the educational outcomes of children alongside class and racial/ethnic background.
The last section is about environmental inequality and justice. While the previous three sections are focused more on the U.S., in this section we will explore inequities in cities around the world, because the environment is an area that probably shows us the most of humanity’s interdependence.
The class will operate as a seminar in which students will introduce some of the readings. There will be two take home essays assigned during the semester, corresponding to major sections of the course. In addition, each student will prepare a final project: a research proposal. The final grade will be calculated as follows: class discussion - 20 percent; essays - 25 percent each; research proposal - 30 percent.

Professor Angie Y. Chung       aychung@albany.edu
Soc. 82800 – Immigrant Communities
Tuesdays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, 3 credits, Room TBA
The course will cover the evolution, structure, and dynamics of immigrant communities in the United States with particular attention to the ethnic economy and community politics of contemporary Asian and Latino enclaves. We will cover a wide range of ethnic communities from socially isolated, self-sufficient ethnic enclaves to transnationally-embedded global economies to multiracial suburbs on the metropolitan outskirts. Among other things, we will discuss different scholarly perspectives on what constitutes an ethnic enclave, why some thrive while others decline, how they may empower and exploit, how they are culturally consumed, and how they are integrated into the urban political economy. Students will have the opportunity to develop an instructor-approved community project relevant to the course.

Professor Bryan S. Turner          bturner@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 83000 – Comparative Sociology of Religion
Tuesdays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, 3 credits, Room TBA
The course attempts to do three things. The first is to provide you with a critical overview of the development of the sociology of religion and to explore key authors and works. This aspect of the course considers how ‘religion’ and the ‘sacred’ raise issues that are generic to sociology (explanation, understanding, interpretation, rational action, body, practice and so forth). The second is to consider the current debate about secularization and post-secularism, and its antecedents in such notions as civil religion, religious nationalism, popular religion and public religions. Finally while in much of western society mainline churches are declining, in global terms religion is dominant in social and political conflicts: in the Middle East conflict, in Africa between Muslims and Christians, and in Asia between Buddhists and Muslims. Therefore the course looks at a range of problems concerning state-religion relations in multicultural, multi-faith, culturally hybrid and ethnically divided societies. These issues will require us to consider such developments as ‘public religions’, fundamentalism, Pentecostalism, revivalism, religious radicalism, piety, conversion and so forth. Where possible, these considerations are pursued within a comparative and historical framework. Click for detailed course descriptions.

Prof. Roslyn Wallach Bologh                       rbologh@csi.cuny.edu
Soc. 74600– Political Economy and Social Life
Tuesdays, 6:30 – 8:30pm, 3 credits, Room TBA
What kinds of changes have been occurring and what kinds of changes are likely to occur in social life over the next five or ten years? Political economy has major consequences for social life -- including inequality, education, urban life, family life, the environment, immigration, ethnic and race relations, labor relations, and gender relations as well as international relations – also for suicide rates, marriage and divorce rates, single parent rates, rates of morbidity and mortality (including longevity) – also for what is called personality structure, character and culture. Thomas Piketty’s book, Capital In the Twenty-First Century, harkens back to Capital written in the nineteenth century by Karl Marx. Piketty argues that twenty-first century capitalism is going to look a lot like nineteenth century capitalism in terms of class inequality. Faculty and students at Harvard have created an interdisciplinary Program in the Study of Capitalism. How can we, as social scientists, analyze political economy and its consequences for social life today and in the coming years? We will compare different analytic perspectives to see which one(s) seem most compelling. We will examine important changes in political economy and explore how these changes were reflected in and changed life in a particular locale, such as New York City. How do researchers and writers link their analyses and descriptions of social life to a larger historical, political economic context, and what difference does that make? 
One objective of the course: first draft of a publishable paper on any aspect of social life, but with a political economic framework, context or theoretical analysis, or first draft of a publishable paper that directly engages some issue of political economy. 

Prof. Jeremy Porter
Soc. 81100 / DCP. 80300 - Social Demography and Geographies of the Disadvantaged
Wednesday, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., 3 credits,
 Room TBA
In this course we will examine the role of “place” as social geographies which relates to containers of populations.  In particular, we are interested in the social geographies of disadvantage.  We will explore theoretical treatments and popular sources of data in the analysis of disadvantaged populations. We will also be introduced to ways that public policies, institutional practices and spatial perceptions become institutionalized and influence local contexts to maintain disadvantage.  Students in the course will work with data from the US Census Bureau, Centers for Disease Control, and other administrative population level data sources.  In addition, students will be introduced to a series of open source software packages commonly used in the application of methods associated with the examination of disadvantaged populations/individuals in localized contexts.  Methodological applications include Multilevel modeling (could be listed as HLM), Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR), Spatial Regression, and an introduction to Spatio-Temporal Analyses. Pre-requisite: Introductory statistics including multiple linear regression.

Prof. Frank Heiland
DCP. 70200/SOC. 81900 Methods of Demographic Analysis
GC:  Thursday, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., 3 credits, Room TBA

This course gives students an overview of some of the major demographic methods used in the study of population, and includes the standard procedures for the measurement of fertility, mortality, natural increase, migration, and nuptiality. Students will learn how to construct demographic rates, life tables, and population projections, and how to carry out standardization, decomposition of differences, analysis of fertility and nuptiality patterns, analysis invoking model life tables and stable population theory, and analysis of nonstable populations.

Soc. 84600 – Prof. Branko Milanovic          bmilanovic@gc.cuny.edu
 THEORIES OF INCOME DISTRIBUTION : FROM PARETO TO PIKETTY
 Wednesday, 6:30 – 8:30, 3 credits, room TBA
 
The objective of the course is be to review, analyze, and allow students to develop a much better understanding of the theories and empirics of personal income distribution within a single policy-making unit (that is, normally within a nation-state). The first such theory was developed by Vilfredo Pareto more than 100 years ago. Pareto believes that income distribution does not change regardless of a social system and level of development. Simon Kuznets, in the 1950s, posited, on the contrary, a theory where income inequality evolves as societies get richer. Jan Tinbergen, in the 1970s, argued that the level of inequality is determined by the two opposing forces of education (increasing the supply of highly skilled workers) and technological change (increasing the demand for them). Most recently, Thomas Piketty argues that low growth combined with high returns to capital predisposes advanced economies to high levels of inequality. These theories will be considered on the real-world examples of movements of inequality in Brazil, China, “transition countries” and the United States and other advanced economies.  We shall focus especially on the recent evolution of income and wealth inequality in the United States and Piketty’s analytical contributions. The class will be fairly empirical but does not require any prior specific knowledge of the issues nor techniques. It is recommended for students of economics, political science, and sociology.

Prof. Richard Alba.  ralba@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 81900 - Quantitative reasoning in the study of immigration {28882}
Wednesdays, 2:00 – 4:00, Room TBA, 3 Credits
 
The goal of this course is a sophisticated understanding of the application of some of the advanced techniques of multivariate analysis.  We will not concern ourselves very much with the statistical theory behind the techniques;  rather, our concern will be with their implementation in real-world research—the situations where they are appropriate, the decisions that go into using them, pitfalls in their application, and the interpretation of the results they produce.  The examples will be drawn throughout from contemporary research in the study of race, ethnicity, and immigration.


Prof. Stanley Aronowitz – saronowitz@gc.cuny.edu 
Soc. 82303 - Global Climate Crisis: Social and Political Aspects {29270}
Thursdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

There is widespread agreement that the world is on a disastrous course with respect to climate change. The frequency of hurricanes, damaging storms and unexpected droughts and floods has already devastated towns and parts of major cities worldwide.  The food supply in many parts of the globe is either endangered or has been seriously damaged so that many areas face starvation and mass rural unemployment. But agreement has not yet yielded concrete proposals for stemming the deterioration of our environment.
This course will focus on four areas: the scientific theories and evidence; the political economy of climate change; medical and social consequences of pollution and other features of the crisis; and the history of the environmental movement, political subjectivity and the crisis of governmental responses.
In each of these areas, there are significant disagreements concerning both analysis and remedies. These will be explored. The works of Bill McKibben, Naomi Klein, James O’Connor, Joel Kovel as well as papers by leading environmental scientists will be considered. Also several histories of the environmental movement.


Profs. Paul Attewell/Susan Dumais   pattewell@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 84503 – Sociology of Education {28892}
Thursdays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, Room TBA, 3 credits


This course focuses on education and its relationship to social inequality, taking a life-course perspective that looks at the sequence of educational experiences from pre-school, elementary and high school, through college. The emphasis will be on events that tend to create and/or diminish inequalities in learning, educational attainments, and life outcomes such as earnings and other material results. The class will follow a seminar format in which students are expected to share their understandings, raise questions and debate issues.
Requirements for the course consist of (1) reading the assigned materials each week and discussing them in class; (2) completing a short (at least 1 page) paper to be submitted each week (via email before the class meetings) which includes your response to the week’s readings and which may also include your assessment of strengths and/or weaknesses of the argument or evidence and any questions in response to the readings;  and (3) a term paper on any topic within the sociology of education.
 

 

Prof. Chris Bonastia profbonastia@gmail.com 
Soc. 82901  - Black Freedom Struggles and White Resistance {28890}
Tuesdays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

In the last two decades, research on Black Freedom Struggles has expanded in several intriguing directions. Central to this expansion is the claim that the conventional narrative of the civil rights movement is reductionist and historically inaccurate. At its core, this conventional narrative is a regional morality tale that goes something like this: In the South, peaceful Blacks defeated the violent white enforcers of Jim Crow; when the movement traveled North (around 1965), unreasonable Black demands and violent outbursts led to white backlash and the collapse of the movement. Among other shortcomings, this North/South binary ignores the common roots of American racism that fueled Black activism and white resistance throughout the nation. In response to the limits of the conventional narrative, scholars have attempted to broaden and deepen our thinking about Black Freedom Struggles in various ways.  
Some have produced detailed case studies of local battles outside the Deep South. Some have argued that, in a number of locales, Black nationalist movements did not supplant integrationist movements, but co-existed alongside them for extended periods. Others have turned greater attention to grassroots activists and foot soldiers, many of them women, rather than focusing primarily on iconic figures and mainstream national civil rights organizations (such as the NAACP and SCLC). Still others have accorded closer scrutiny to the various manifestations of white resistance to social change.
Relatively few sociologists have joined this conversation. In this course, we will critically analyze research on Black Freedom Struggles and white resistance by scholars inside and outside of sociology. In addition to our attempts to gain a broader and deeper, historical and sociological understanding of our topic, we will spend some time thinking about how the conventions of various disciplines shape the way that authors understand and narrate history. What does sociology do well? Where does it fall short? What might sociologists contribute to this area of study?
Click here to see a preliminary list of readings.

Prof. Patricia Clough – pclough@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 80000 - The Non-Human Environment {28879}
Tuesdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

The course brings together a number of strands of criticism, theory and philosophy that address the non-human, such as: affect theory, actor-network theory, new materialisms, animal studies, cognitive sciences, new media theory, speculative realism, new media studies, accelerationism, and post-cybernetic studies.  Across the social sciences, the humanities and the arts, the non-human turn differs from post-humanism in that the former focuses more on the relationship that always has existed between the human and non-human objects, things, other species and environments such that the human is identified precisely by this indistinction from the nonhuman. Studying noted authors such as Wendy Chun, Steven Shaviro, Mark B.N. Hansen, A.N.Whitehead, Bruno Latour, Luciana Parisi, Brian Massumi and Timothy Morton, the focus will be on the implications for understanding the social, the political, the psychic, and what we have thought in terms of identity, race, class, gender and sexuality


Profs. Kandice Chuh/  Sujatha Fernandes - sujathaf@yahoo.com
Soc. 84501  - Encountering Cuba {29273}
Tuesdays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

Cuba has long loomed large in the U.S. imagination, whether by virtue of its refusal to embrace capitalism, the richness of its literary and musical traditions, the persistence of Fidel Castro's leadership, its proximity to the US coastal state of Florida and the migrants, exiles, and refugees who crossed the Florida Straits, and, now, because of the changing relations between the two countries. This team-taught, interdisciplinary course offers the opportunity to consider how ideas of Cuba and "Cubanness" take shape through literary and other aesthetic modes of expression, and to examine the ways in which such ideas are grounded in or depart from the everyday lives and political and cultural practices characterizing life in Cuba. What understandings of Cuba emerge by understanding it as a key site in the long histories of capital-driven migrations? How might racial formation be theorized through this space characterized by multiple forms of racialization, colonial histories, and ex-colonial nationalism? In what ways does Cuba exemplify and generate Caribbean and Latin American epistemologies, and what remains distinctive "about" Cuba and Cubanness? We will address such questions by studying the literature, film, history, sociology, and political theory, that help us encounter Cuba from multiple points of entry.
Students should expect to contribute regularly to this discussion-based seminar, and to submit several writing assignments as the formal requirements of the course. 

Professor Jessie Daniels                               jdaniels@gc.cuny.edu 
Soc. 80000– Digital Sociology {28878}
Wednesdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 Credits
 
Digital technologies now underpin academic work at all levels -- from theorization and conceptual work, to research methods and data collection, to the professionalization of disciplines. Yet, as Deborah Lupton (Digital Sociology, Routledge, 2014) notes, the field of sociology has only just begun to take account of the broader implications that the digital has raised about the “practice of sociology and social research itself.” And, as Daniels and Feagin (“The (Coming) Digital Revolution in the Academy,” Fast Capitalism, 2011) observed, digital technologies have offered both challenges and exciting possibilities for the ways in which sociologists do their work. Similarly, Clough and colleagues (“The Datalogical Turn,” in Nonrepresentational Methodologies: Re-Envisioning Research, ed. 2014) suggest that the “datalogical turn” underway in the social sciences poses not only serious challenges to sociological methodologies, but also requires more robust theorizing of the social itself. Digital sociology as a field is gaining traction in Australia, Canada and the UK, and finally in the US.
Students in this graduate seminar will read and discuss foundational texts in this field with the goal of understanding the theoretical underpinnings of social life in a networked society. Students will also read and discuss a variety of methodological case studies in order to gain a basic understanding of digital methods for conducting and analyzing sociological research. Students will examine both the theoretical and methodological implications of “big data”. And, students will explore some of what it means to be a public sociologist in a digital era.
Assignments for this course will include weekly readings and short (500-750 words) weekly writing assignments on a course blog. Some portion of the assignments will involve writing peer-reviews of digital sociology writing. At least once during the semester, each student will be responsible for making a presentation to the rest of the class on the weekly readings.

Prof. Sujatha Fernandes - sujathaf@yahoo.com
Soc. 81006  - Qualitative Methods {28884}
Mondays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
This course will give students an introduction to qualitative and interpretive methods in the social sciences. We will cover ethnographic fieldwork, participant observation, focus groups, open-ended interviewing, semiotics, ordinary language analysis, and life history research. Through regular, practical exercises, students will learn to analyze texts, images, and narratives. We will discuss ethics in the field and collaborative ethnography. The course will also explore contemporary theoretical debates over interpretation, representation, social construction, and the sociology of knowledge production


Prof. Robert Garot – rgarot@jjay.cuny.edu
Soc. 85000 - Migration and Crime {28887}
Mondays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
Immigration and crime have a long tradition of being connected, not only in the public mind, but also among policymakers. Though the question whether there is a nexus between immigration and crime is discussed widely, a clear answer has yet to be found. Whether speaking of an immigration and crime nexus means that immigrants are thought to be more criminal before they migrate (i.e., criminal members of the sending society tend to migrate more often than non criminal members), turn to a criminal lifestyle after settling in the new country (i.e., due to social, political, and/or economical exclusion), or become criminal through the process of immigration itself (hence, immigration causes immigrants or non immigrants or even both to engage in crime) seems unclear. The fact is that members of some disadvantaged minority groups in every Western country are disproportionately likely to be arrested, convicted, and imprisoned for violent, property, and drug crimes. However, not all disadvantaged immigrant groups have higher crime rates than the native born. In fact, most have lower crime rates and recent research findings show that immigration may even contribute to a decrease of the overall crime rate.
Though specifics vary from country to country, Western societies in particular repeatedly state concerns about immigration and crime. Public opinion has frequently linked trends in immigration to social problems in the country, and has been especially concerned about a possible relationship between rising numbers of immigrants and levels of crime and violence. In the public mind, the post 9/11 period has illuminated immigration and religionin the context of terrorism. As a result, many countries have begun to control immigration in the name of safeguarding their nations against terrorism. At the same time, religious profiling and discrimination – especially against Muslim immigrants – seem to be increasing. This course will explore whether the public perception that immigration increases crime (and terrorism) is actually true. We will analyze the links between immigration and crime by looking at and comparing the experiences of North America and Europe. The course will not only explore if and why immigrants commit more or less crime, but will also look at how criminal law and criminality have become increasingly affected by notions of citizenship in a period of globalization and mass mobility. The course will look at undocumented migrants (illegal immigration) and the control of borders as well as trends in punishment of foreigners (particularly in Europe) and their deportation. Finally, we also consider immigrants as victims of crime in various countries.
 
Prof. Janet Gornick – jgornick@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 85700 - Introduction to Policy Process {29272}
Tuesdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

This course will provide an introduction to theories of the policy-making process, with a focus on the United States.  The first section of the course will offer an overview of major theories, concepts, and models of public policy-making.  The second section of the course will address problem definition and agenda-setting, and will situate policy-making in the political landscape. The third section will focus on the impact of social movements on the policy process. The final section of the course will assess the implementation process, with a focus on “street-level bureaucracy”.
Readings will include works by leaders in the field, including David Rochefort and Roger Cobb, Paul Sabatier, Deborah Stone, Anne Schneider and Helen Ingram, Frank Baumgartner and Bryan Jones, John Kingdon, Jeffrey Pressman and Aaron Wildavsky, and Michael Lipsky.
 
Prof. David Halle – dhalle10@gmail.com
Soc. 86800  - Sociology of Culture {28888}
Mondays, 2-4pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
The course examines empirically interesting case studies of different aspects of culture, and considers which cultural theories best help us understand each case study and whether, for each case study, new theories are appropriate.  The course also looks at the history of theories and studies of culture.  “Culture” is defined here both in the narrow sense as “the arts”—film, music, architecture, literature, journalism, film, television, art, dance, and so on—and more broadly to include  political beliefs and social attitudes, sports, religious beliefs, and the Internet and social media.

Professor William Helmreich    helmreichw@gmail.com  
Soc. 82301– The Peoples of New York City {28885}
Wednesdays, 2 - 4 p.m. Room TBA, 3 Credits
 
This course looks at the different neighborhoods/communities that make up this great and fascinating city. Its focus is on the different ethnic, religious, and racial groups in the city and their social and cultural life-----Hispanics, Jews, Arabs, Asians, African Americans, Greeks, Italians, and people of differing socioeconomic and gender groups. In addition, we will be looking at the neighborhoods themselves, their  architectural and spatial characteristics, how  and why they grew, and how they function as communities.
An integral part of the course will be field work---visiting and studying the areas-----Bensonhurst, Carroll Gardens, Gerritsen Beach, the South Bronx, Chelsea, Glendale, Maspeth, Harlem, etc., etc. Readings will reflect the above topics.

Prof. Hester Eisenstein        hester1@prodigy.net
Soc. 73200 – Sociology of Gender {28893}
Tuesdays, 2-4pm, Room TBA, 3Credits    
 
In this course we look a range of issues in the sociology of gender.  To define this field briefly, the sociology of gender looks at the beliefs, interests and structures that tend to preserve the traditional relations between the sexes, and those which contest them.  Among other areas, the field considers the process of socialization into masculine and feminine roles in childhood, through education, and into the public worlds of work and politics.
In recent years sociological inquiry has moved beyond the original concept of “sex roles” to look at gendered structures in institutions, the significance of gender in politics, economics, and social movements, nationally and internationally, and the complex relationships among gender, race, and class.  What was seen as a “natural” and biologically based dichotomy of male/female has been questioned through the study of gender as performance, and the critical challenge to traditional femininity and masculinity from “queer” and transgendered folk.
My own research has focused on what we can term the political economy of gender, in relation to the changes within capitalism with the rise of neoliberalism over the past few decades. The topics covered in this course are a selection reflecting my interests, and should by no means be considered comprehensive. Therefore I include a list of alternative topics in this syllabus that students can pursue on their own, for their final research papers, and for future study.
The framework of this course is influenced by what I see as the political history of gender studies. The establishment of the category of sex and gender in the official canon of the profession of sociology is the outcome of a renewed wave of feminist activism that swept society, and therefore the academy. In the 1960s and 1970s, massive social movements for Black civil rights, women’s rights, ending the war in Vietnam, lesbian and gay rights, and environmentalism in the United States and internationally shook the economic and social status quo. Today we are witnessing another wave of social movements across the globe, from the revolutions in Tunisia and Egypt to Occupy Wall Street, and from Turkey to Brazil.
The passion and breadth of social movements can become ossified and de-politicized, as the ideas and issues are translated into formal academic inquiry.  I hope therefore in this course to convey the connections to politics and activism behind these topics, so as to keep the links between academic research and social change fresh and vibrant. Students are encouraged to pursue their own interests in the class, and to develop their own frameworks for research and activism.
 
Prof. Shiro Hirouchi – shirouchi@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 81900 - Advanced Methods of Demographic Analysis {28883}
Tuesdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
In this course we study advanced methods of demographic analysis.  They are widely used in research on mortality, fertility, nuptiality, migration, population composition, and other demographic processes, but many of them can also be applied to a broad range of topics in other areas of the social sciences and biomedical sciences.  Those methods include event history analysis (nonparametric, semi-parametric and parametric versions; continuous and discrete time versions; fixed and time-dependent covariate versions), life table techniques (single-decrement, multiple-decrement and multi-state), decomposition analysis, age-period-cohort models, methods for analyzing multiple time trends (e.g., Lee-Carter model), Lexis map analysis, smoothing and non-parametric regression techniques, and mathematical models of population dynamics.  Computer exercises are included.
Prerequisites:  Introductory statistics including multiple linear regression; DCP 70200 or permission of the instructor.  No background in calculus or matrix algebra is required.
 
Profs. James M. Jasper and Ruth Milkman      jjasper@gc.cuny.edurmilkman@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 84600 - Social Movements and Labor Movements {28894}
Tuesdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
The study of unions and labor movements, at one time integral to the sociological study of social movements, has become increasingly marginal to that field in recent decades, as “new” social movements, especially those involving “identity” politics, have moved to center stage. Yet in this same period, sociological research on labor and labor movements has burgeoned, emerging as a subfield of the discipline in its own right.  This course explores both the reason for the historical divergence of these two areas of study and the potential synergies between them. 
This is a reading course, in which participants will closely study and discuss influential pieces of scholarship from these two subfields. Course requirements include weekly response papers on the required readings, active participation in class discussion, as well as a longer piece of written work, developed in consultation with the instructors, on a specific topic related to the course.

Prof. Philip Kasinitz   pkasinitz@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 85800 - Race and Ethnicity{29012}
Wednesdays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
Race and ethnicity are constantly changing and evolving, yet they remain among the most persistent forms of structured social inequality. Focusing on the United States, but with reference to other multi-ethnic societies, we will examine the evolution of the concept of “race” and its relationship to racism; the heritage of slavery and segregation and their impacts contemporary life; the origins of modern racism and anti-Semitism, “scientific racism, ” why and how the salience of ethnic identity increases and decreases at particular historical moments, the relationship of race and ethnicity to migration, nationalism, colonialism and class, the growth of the  Latino and Asian American populations and  what  that  means for American notions  of race, etc.  In addition we will take an in depth look at how racial boundaries change, competition and cooperation between ethnic groups in contemporary America and how “racialized” minorities are (or are not) incorporated into different societies. Readings will include works by W.E.B. Dubois; Jean Paul Sartre, George Fredrickson; William Julius Wilson, David Roediger, John Iceland, Richard  Alba, Tariq Madood, Alejandro Portes, Stephen Steinberg and Mary Waters.

Prof. Marnia Lazreg - marniaster@gmail.com
Soc. 80000 - Foucault and the paradox of culture:  theory and practice {28880}
Mondays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
Thirty four years after his death, Michel Foucault's work continues to be explored and applied to ever increasing domains across the social sciences and the humanities.  Yet remarkable as the expansion of Foucault's ideas has been, one issue central to his epistemology has been neglected:  his conception of cultural difference, and the role it played in his approach to the uniqueness of Western culture.  This course intends to open up a space in which productive critical analysis of Foucault's struggles with how to situate non-Western cultures, especially the "Orient," in relation to Western rationality can be thoroughly examined.  Importantly, it asks whether Foucault's critique of Immanuel Kant's cosmopolitan anthropology enabled him to develop an alternative anthropology/ sociology, or paradoxically reasserted the need for a humanistic conception of culture.  To answer this question, the course requires a close reading of a number of foundational texts, interviews and archival materials with a view to tracing the itinerary of Foucault's approach to culture as well as elucidating key concepts such as "philosophical originary," "limit-experience," or "the  death of man." Additionally, Foucault's cultural conundrum will be explored through his experiential journeys in non-western cultures, specifically Japan, Iran and Tunisia.
This is a demanding course that  will be conducted as an advanced seminar in which texts will be read attentively and examined from the perspectives  of the history of ideas, the sociology of knowledge, as well as historical sociology.  The overarching goal is to move forward debates on post-modernist/"anti-humanist" theory as they bear upon understanding culture and cultural difference. 
Students will be expected to seriously engage the course materials, and feel free to formulate new ways of reading the texts. Required is an extensive research paper to be shared with the class before submission.  Drafts of the paper will follow a schedule aimed at assessing progress in thinking through issues related to the course objectives.

Prof. Branko Milanovic – bmilanovic@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 84600 - Global Inequality: Measurement, Analysis and Political Implications {29271}
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

The focus of the class is on global inequality which is defined as inequality between citizens of the world (as if they were members of a same nation). We will review the evolution of global inequality from the Industrial Revolution until today, and see how the changing composition and magnitude of global inequality affects politics, economics, and migration. Two types of inequalities, within-national (inequality among individuals within a single nation) and cross-national (inequality in mean incomes across nations) combine to determine global inequality. We shall thus also review the changes in within- and between-national inequalities. The class ends with an overview of positions of various political philosophers (e.g., Rawls, Pogge, Sen, Nagel) regarding global inequality and migration.
The course will be fairly empirical but does not require any prior specific knowledge of the issues nor techniques. It is recommended for students of economics, political science, and sociology. This class is a follow-up of the one on “The theories of income distribution: from Pareto to Piketty” but can be taken independently.

Prof. Pyong Gap Min – pyonggap.min@qc.cuny.edu
Soc. 82800  -International Migration {29010}
Thursdays, 6:30 – 8:30pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
We have ushered into the global migration period since the early 1990s.  Not only traditionally immigrant-accepting countries, including the U.S. and three former British colonies in the “New World” (Canada, Australia and New Zealand), but also Western European countries and Asian countries have annually received large numbers of formal immigrants or migrant workers/brides over the last two decades. In particular, the U.S. has received the largest number of immigrants annually since the late 1960s, more immigrants than all European countries have received. The influx of immigrants to the U.S. over the last 50 years has changed the face of the U.S., impacting neighborhoods, the economy, the school systems, cuisines, politics, healthcare, and sports. 
This course, focusing on international migration, has three main objectives.  First, it will provide an overview information about immigration patterns in three areas for students: (1) the U.S., (2) Canada, Australia and New Zealand, and (3) Europe.  Immigration patterns include immigration policies, the annual number of immigrants, their national and regional origins, and religious and socioeconomic background.  Second, it will compare two mass migration periods in the U.S. (the classical and contemporary periods) in immigration patterns and immigrants’ adaptations. Third, it will help students to learn about U.S. immigrants’ and their children’s adaptations (settlement patterns, socioeconomic adaptations and racialization) and theories of adaptations, especially regarding second-generation immigrants’ adaptations. To summarize the main objectives, this course aims to provide general information about global migration patterns, but focuses on the U.S. context in examining immigrants’ and their children’s adaptations with special attention the differences between turn-of-the-century white immigrant and contemporary immigrant groups.
Click here to find a detailed course descriptions

Profs. William Kornblum, John Mollenkopf         wkornblum@gc.cuny.edu;jmollenkopf@gc.cuny.edu   
Soc. 82800– Theories of Neighborhood and Community Change {28886}
Wednesdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 Credits
 
Neighborhoods are the basic units of community formation in urban settings. People are sustained the attachments they form with their neighbors and neighborhoods – and they in turn play important roles in identity-formation, family-formation, child-rearing, primary education, friendship networks, sociability, shopping, dining, recreation and entertainment, worship, access to work, civic engagement, political representation, and so on.  The clustering of similar people in neighborhoods is thought to generate both positive and negative feedbacks.  In the ideal case, these building blocks of urban community are resilient in the face of change, or at least achieve new equilibria when circumstance require them.  (In the worst case, people abandon their neighborhoods.)  At the same time, neighborhoods constantly evolve, as people come and go, while those who stay age through the life cycle. Larger trends in politics and government, the housing and job markets, and society and culture operate on them, if unevenly.  We have surprisingly little systematic theory about how patterns of neighborhood change result from the interplay of individual and family choices about where to live nested in the larger framework of housing markets, political institutions and regulations, and social change.  This course begins by reviewing some classic theoretical orientations, such as the Chicago School, urban political economy, and the gentrification debates. It will then interrogate a series of case studies in New York City.  While the specific cases will depend on the research interests of seminar participants, whom we expect to join in elaborating the case studies, they may include East Williamsburg/Bushwick/Ridgewood, the neighborhoods around Jamaica Bay, and the New York City working waterfront.  We will use these case studies to assess the strengths and weaknesses of the theoretical perspectives and consider how to improve them.

Prof. Jeremy Porter – jporter@brooklyn.cuny.edu 
Soc. 71500  - Statistic I {28881}
Wednesdays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
The broad focus of this course will be on the application of introductory statistics within the realm of sociological research.  Topics covered include measures of central tendency, measures of variability, probability and the normal curve, samples and populations, hypothesis testing, ANOVA, correlation, and an introduction to linear regression analysis.

Prof. Mary Clare Lennon  mlennon@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 70000 - Proseminar {28846}  
Mondays, 2-4pm, Room TBA, 3Credits    
 
This course introduces students to some of the major elements involved in the training of scholars in the field of sociology.  We will explore the norms that govern the profession, the aims of sociological research, the process of grant-seeking and grant-writing, the qualities of a good dissertation, expectations about publication, the process of approval for research on human subjects, and other aspects of professional socialization.  In an effort to familiarize you with the kinds of scholarly work and teaching that are done by faculty at CUNY, we will also have a number of presentations by members of the CUNY Sociology faculty. 

Prof. John Torpey     jtorpey@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 70100 – Theory I {28879}
Tuesdays, 2-4pm, Room TBA, 3Credits    
 
This course introduces students to some of the foundational works in the sociological tradition.  The emphasis here is not on textual exegesis (though we will inevitably do some of that), nor on intellectual history (though that is equally unavoidable), but on the ways in which these writers speak directly to our contemporary circumstances, if in fact they do.  Our principal task in this course is to explore the intellectual orientations of these seminal thinkers.  We will concentrate on issues such as the following: What (if anything) is society?  What is the relationship between the individual and society?  What makes for a stable society, and what destabilizes society?  In what ways has social life varied according to time and place?  How have societies changed over time?  What (if anything) distinguishes “modern” society – in order to explain which the discipline of sociology came into being – from its predecessors?

Prof. Bryan Turner         bturner@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 84600 – Citizenship and Human Rights {28889}
Tuesdays, 11:45 – 1:45 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
The course is divided in two sections, starting with social citizenship and its critics, and then moving on to human rights and its critics. We finish with some consideration as to whether these two different systems of rights could be combined. Citizenship as a principle of inclusion is criticised because it cannot cope adequately with globalization (including migration, refugees, asylum seekers and so forth). Some sociologists believe we can modify citizenship to develop new forms:  flexible citizenship or semi-citizenship or post-national citizenship. Human rights are seen to be more relevant to a global world, but critics note that they are enforced by states, and require the resources made available by states. The course examines the apparent decline of welfare states, citizenship and growing inequality in income and wealth within neo-liberal economics and neo-conservative politics. We also consider differences between the American tradition of civil liberties and European welfare states. Other topics include aboriginal or first nation rights, migration, documentation and citizenship, ageing and health rights. We look at different forms of citizenship in Latin America, Asia and the Middle East. The course concludes by considering the contemporary limitations of both citizenship and human rights traditions with respect to authoritarianism, genocide, and new wars.
Click here to find a detailed course descriptions
 
Prof. Vilna Treitler      vilna.treitler@baruch.cuny.edu
Soc. 82800 – Writing for Publication  {29011}
Tuesdays, 2-4pm, Room TBA, 3Credits
 
This course will have two components: one is a scholarly sociological study of publishing itself: an examination of the worlds and institutions of knowledge-production and dissemination.  We will consider book publishing, following and more recent changes in the world of book publishing.  Similarly, we will explore the contemporary issues in journal publication, including issues of copyright and new technologies,  current debates and concerns about journal costs and distribution, and ongoing discussions of ethical concerns in academic publishing in an increasingly commercialized world.
The second component is more pragmatic, in which students take their own work through the appropriate and necessary steps for publication in a variety of media.  Topics we will cover include how to do book reviews, how to prepare a paper for presentation and then for publication, how to participate in anthology writing, how to prepare a book proposal, and how to construct a book out of a dissertation.  Each student will (at minimum) and with the support of the instructor and class, write and publish two book reviews; submit papers to three academic meetings; prepare one journal article for submission; prepare and submit one article to a non-academic publication such as an op-ed article; and prepare a (draft) book proposal based on dissertation work.
Registration will be in the fall semester; with the clear and absolute understanding that students are committing to meeting every other week for the entire academic year.  Because of the exigencies of publication timetables and the work involved, a single semester is not adequate.
Course is limited to 12 students, with permission of the instructor.

Prof. Richard Alba.  ralba@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 81900 - Quantitative reasoning in the study of immigration {28882}
Wednesdays, 2:00 – 4:00, Room TBA, 3 Credits
 
The goal of this course is a sophisticated understanding of the application of some of the advanced techniques of multivariate analysis.  We will not concern ourselves very much with the statistical theory behind the techniques;  rather, our concern will be with their implementation in real-world research—the situations where they are appropriate, the decisions that go into using them, pitfalls in their application, and the interpretation of the results they produce.  The examples will be drawn throughout from contemporary research in the study of race, ethnicity, and immigration.


Prof. Stanley Aronowitz – saronowitz@gc.cuny.edu 
Soc. 82303 - Global Climate Crisis: Social and Political Aspects {29270}
Thursdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

There is widespread agreement that the world is on a disastrous course with respect to climate change. The frequency of hurricanes, damaging storms and unexpected droughts and floods has already devastated towns and parts of major cities worldwide.  The food supply in many parts of the globe is either endangered or has been seriously damaged so that many areas face starvation and mass rural unemployment. But agreement has not yet yielded concrete proposals for stemming the deterioration of our environment.
This course will focus on four areas: the scientific theories and evidence; the political economy of climate change; medical and social consequences of pollution and other features of the crisis; and the history of the environmental movement, political subjectivity and the crisis of governmental responses.
In each of these areas, there are significant disagreements concerning both analysis and remedies. These will be explored. The works of Bill McKibben, Naomi Klein, James O’Connor, Joel Kovel as well as papers by leading environmental scientists will be considered. Also several histories of the environmental movement.


Profs. Paul Attewell/Susan Dumais   pattewell@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 84503 – Sociology of Education {28892}
Thursdays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, Room TBA, 3 credits


This course focuses on education and its relationship to social inequality, taking a life-course perspective that looks at the sequence of educational experiences from pre-school, elementary and high school, through college. The emphasis will be on events that tend to create and/or diminish inequalities in learning, educational attainments, and life outcomes such as earnings and other material results. The class will follow a seminar format in which students are expected to share their understandings, raise questions and debate issues.
Requirements for the course consist of (1) reading the assigned materials each week and discussing them in class; (2) completing a short (at least 1 page) paper to be submitted each week (via email before the class meetings) which includes your response to the week’s readings and which may also include your assessment of strengths and/or weaknesses of the argument or evidence and any questions in response to the readings;  and (3) a term paper on any topic within the sociology of education.
 

 

Prof. Chris Bonastia profbonastia@gmail.com 
Soc. 82901  - Black Freedom Struggles and White Resistance {28890}
Tuesdays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

In the last two decades, research on Black Freedom Struggles has expanded in several intriguing directions. Central to this expansion is the claim that the conventional narrative of the civil rights movement is reductionist and historically inaccurate. At its core, this conventional narrative is a regional morality tale that goes something like this: In the South, peaceful Blacks defeated the violent white enforcers of Jim Crow; when the movement traveled North (around 1965), unreasonable Black demands and violent outbursts led to white backlash and the collapse of the movement. Among other shortcomings, this North/South binary ignores the common roots of American racism that fueled Black activism and white resistance throughout the nation. In response to the limits of the conventional narrative, scholars have attempted to broaden and deepen our thinking about Black Freedom Struggles in various ways.  
Some have produced detailed case studies of local battles outside the Deep South. Some have argued that, in a number of locales, Black nationalist movements did not supplant integrationist movements, but co-existed alongside them for extended periods. Others have turned greater attention to grassroots activists and foot soldiers, many of them women, rather than focusing primarily on iconic figures and mainstream national civil rights organizations (such as the NAACP and SCLC). Still others have accorded closer scrutiny to the various manifestations of white resistance to social change.
Relatively few sociologists have joined this conversation. In this course, we will critically analyze research on Black Freedom Struggles and white resistance by scholars inside and outside of sociology. In addition to our attempts to gain a broader and deeper, historical and sociological understanding of our topic, we will spend some time thinking about how the conventions of various disciplines shape the way that authors understand and narrate history. What does sociology do well? Where does it fall short? What might sociologists contribute to this area of study?
Click here to see a preliminary list of readings.

Prof. Patricia Clough – pclough@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 80000 - The Non-Human Environment {28879}
Tuesdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

The course brings together a number of strands of criticism, theory and philosophy that address the non-human, such as: affect theory, actor-network theory, new materialisms, animal studies, cognitive sciences, new media theory, speculative realism, new media studies, accelerationism, and post-cybernetic studies.  Across the social sciences, the humanities and the arts, the non-human turn differs from post-humanism in that the former focuses more on the relationship that always has existed between the human and non-human objects, things, other species and environments such that the human is identified precisely by this indistinction from the nonhuman. Studying noted authors such as Wendy Chun, Steven Shaviro, Mark B.N. Hansen, A.N.Whitehead, Bruno Latour, Luciana Parisi, Brian Massumi and Timothy Morton, the focus will be on the implications for understanding the social, the political, the psychic, and what we have thought in terms of identity, race, class, gender and sexuality


Profs. Kandice Chuh/  Sujatha Fernandes - sujathaf@yahoo.com
Soc. 84501  - Encountering Cuba {29273}
Tuesdays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

Cuba has long loomed large in the U.S. imagination, whether by virtue of its refusal to embrace capitalism, the richness of its literary and musical traditions, the persistence of Fidel Castro's leadership, its proximity to the US coastal state of Florida and the migrants, exiles, and refugees who crossed the Florida Straits, and, now, because of the changing relations between the two countries. This team-taught, interdisciplinary course offers the opportunity to consider how ideas of Cuba and "Cubanness" take shape through literary and other aesthetic modes of expression, and to examine the ways in which such ideas are grounded in or depart from the everyday lives and political and cultural practices characterizing life in Cuba. What understandings of Cuba emerge by understanding it as a key site in the long histories of capital-driven migrations? How might racial formation be theorized through this space characterized by multiple forms of racialization, colonial histories, and ex-colonial nationalism? In what ways does Cuba exemplify and generate Caribbean and Latin American epistemologies, and what remains distinctive "about" Cuba and Cubanness? We will address such questions by studying the literature, film, history, sociology, and political theory, that help us encounter Cuba from multiple points of entry.
Students should expect to contribute regularly to this discussion-based seminar, and to submit several writing assignments as the formal requirements of the course. 

Professor Jessie Daniels                               jdaniels@gc.cuny.edu 
Soc. 80000– Digital Sociology {28878}
Wednesdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 Credits
 
Digital technologies now underpin academic work at all levels -- from theorization and conceptual work, to research methods and data collection, to the professionalization of disciplines. Yet, as Deborah Lupton (Digital Sociology, Routledge, 2014) notes, the field of sociology has only just begun to take account of the broader implications that the digital has raised about the “practice of sociology and social research itself.” And, as Daniels and Feagin (“The (Coming) Digital Revolution in the Academy,” Fast Capitalism, 2011) observed, digital technologies have offered both challenges and exciting possibilities for the ways in which sociologists do their work. Similarly, Clough and colleagues (“The Datalogical Turn,” in Nonrepresentational Methodologies: Re-Envisioning Research, ed. 2014) suggest that the “datalogical turn” underway in the social sciences poses not only serious challenges to sociological methodologies, but also requires more robust theorizing of the social itself. Digital sociology as a field is gaining traction in Australia, Canada and the UK, and finally in the US.
Students in this graduate seminar will read and discuss foundational texts in this field with the goal of understanding the theoretical underpinnings of social life in a networked society. Students will also read and discuss a variety of methodological case studies in order to gain a basic understanding of digital methods for conducting and analyzing sociological research. Students will examine both the theoretical and methodological implications of “big data”. And, students will explore some of what it means to be a public sociologist in a digital era.
Assignments for this course will include weekly readings and short (500-750 words) weekly writing assignments on a course blog. Some portion of the assignments will involve writing peer-reviews of digital sociology writing. At least once during the semester, each student will be responsible for making a presentation to the rest of the class on the weekly readings.

Prof. Sujatha Fernandes - sujathaf@yahoo.com
Soc. 81006  - Qualitative Methods {28884}
Mondays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
This course will give students an introduction to qualitative and interpretive methods in the social sciences. We will cover ethnographic fieldwork, participant observation, focus groups, open-ended interviewing, semiotics, ordinary language analysis, and life history research. Through regular, practical exercises, students will learn to analyze texts, images, and narratives. We will discuss ethics in the field and collaborative ethnography. The course will also explore contemporary theoretical debates over interpretation, representation, social construction, and the sociology of knowledge production


Prof. Robert Garot – rgarot@jjay.cuny.edu
Soc. 85000 - Migration and Crime {28887}
Mondays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
Immigration and crime have a long tradition of being connected, not only in the public mind, but also among policymakers. Though the question whether there is a nexus between immigration and crime is discussed widely, a clear answer has yet to be found. Whether speaking of an immigration and crime nexus means that immigrants are thought to be more criminal before they migrate (i.e., criminal members of the sending society tend to migrate more often than non criminal members), turn to a criminal lifestyle after settling in the new country (i.e., due to social, political, and/or economical exclusion), or become criminal through the process of immigration itself (hence, immigration causes immigrants or non immigrants or even both to engage in crime) seems unclear. The fact is that members of some disadvantaged minority groups in every Western country are disproportionately likely to be arrested, convicted, and imprisoned for violent, property, and drug crimes. However, not all disadvantaged immigrant groups have higher crime rates than the native born. In fact, most have lower crime rates and recent research findings show that immigration may even contribute to a decrease of the overall crime rate.
Though specifics vary from country to country, Western societies in particular repeatedly state concerns about immigration and crime. Public opinion has frequently linked trends in immigration to social problems in the country, and has been especially concerned about a possible relationship between rising numbers of immigrants and levels of crime and violence. In the public mind, the post 9/11 period has illuminated immigration and religionin the context of terrorism. As a result, many countries have begun to control immigration in the name of safeguarding their nations against terrorism. At the same time, religious profiling and discrimination – especially against Muslim immigrants – seem to be increasing. This course will explore whether the public perception that immigration increases crime (and terrorism) is actually true. We will analyze the links between immigration and crime by looking at and comparing the experiences of North America and Europe. The course will not only explore if and why immigrants commit more or less crime, but will also look at how criminal law and criminality have become increasingly affected by notions of citizenship in a period of globalization and mass mobility. The course will look at undocumented migrants (illegal immigration) and the control of borders as well as trends in punishment of foreigners (particularly in Europe) and their deportation. Finally, we also consider immigrants as victims of crime in various countries.
 
Prof. Janet Gornick – jgornick@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 85700 - Introduction to Policy Process {29272}
Tuesdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

This course will provide an introduction to theories of the policy-making process, with a focus on the United States.  The first section of the course will offer an overview of major theories, concepts, and models of public policy-making.  The second section of the course will address problem definition and agenda-setting, and will situate policy-making in the political landscape. The third section will focus on the impact of social movements on the policy process. The final section of the course will assess the implementation process, with a focus on “street-level bureaucracy”.
Readings will include works by leaders in the field, including David Rochefort and Roger Cobb, Paul Sabatier, Deborah Stone, Anne Schneider and Helen Ingram, Frank Baumgartner and Bryan Jones, John Kingdon, Jeffrey Pressman and Aaron Wildavsky, and Michael Lipsky.
 
Prof. David Halle – dhalle10@gmail.com
Soc. 86800  - Sociology of Culture {28888}
Mondays, 2-4pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
The course examines empirically interesting case studies of different aspects of culture, and considers which cultural theories best help us understand each case study and whether, for each case study, new theories are appropriate.  The course also looks at the history of theories and studies of culture.  “Culture” is defined here both in the narrow sense as “the arts”—film, music, architecture, literature, journalism, film, television, art, dance, and so on—and more broadly to include  political beliefs and social attitudes, sports, religious beliefs, and the Internet and social media.

Professor William Helmreich    helmreichw@gmail.com  
Soc. 82301– The Peoples of New York City {28885}
Wednesdays, 2 - 4 p.m. Room TBA, 3 Credits
 
This course looks at the different neighborhoods/communities that make up this great and fascinating city. Its focus is on the different ethnic, religious, and racial groups in the city and their social and cultural life-----Hispanics, Jews, Arabs, Asians, African Americans, Greeks, Italians, and people of differing socioeconomic and gender groups. In addition, we will be looking at the neighborhoods themselves, their  architectural and spatial characteristics, how  and why they grew, and how they function as communities.
An integral part of the course will be field work---visiting and studying the areas-----Bensonhurst, Carroll Gardens, Gerritsen Beach, the South Bronx, Chelsea, Glendale, Maspeth, Harlem, etc., etc. Readings will reflect the above topics.

Prof. Hester Eisenstein        hester1@prodigy.net
Soc. 73200 – Sociology of Gender {28893}
Tuesdays, 2-4pm, Room TBA, 3Credits    
 
In this course we look a range of issues in the sociology of gender.  To define this field briefly, the sociology of gender looks at the beliefs, interests and structures that tend to preserve the traditional relations between the sexes, and those which contest them.  Among other areas, the field considers the process of socialization into masculine and feminine roles in childhood, through education, and into the public worlds of work and politics.
In recent years sociological inquiry has moved beyond the original concept of “sex roles” to look at gendered structures in institutions, the significance of gender in politics, economics, and social movements, nationally and internationally, and the complex relationships among gender, race, and class.  What was seen as a “natural” and biologically based dichotomy of male/female has been questioned through the study of gender as performance, and the critical challenge to traditional femininity and masculinity from “queer” and transgendered folk.
My own research has focused on what we can term the political economy of gender, in relation to the changes within capitalism with the rise of neoliberalism over the past few decades. The topics covered in this course are a selection reflecting my interests, and should by no means be considered comprehensive. Therefore I include a list of alternative topics in this syllabus that students can pursue on their own, for their final research papers, and for future study.
The framework of this course is influenced by what I see as the political history of gender studies. The establishment of the category of sex and gender in the official canon of the profession of sociology is the outcome of a renewed wave of feminist activism that swept society, and therefore the academy. In the 1960s and 1970s, massive social movements for Black civil rights, women’s rights, ending the war in Vietnam, lesbian and gay rights, and environmentalism in the United States and internationally shook the economic and social status quo. Today we are witnessing another wave of social movements across the globe, from the revolutions in Tunisia and Egypt to Occupy Wall Street, and from Turkey to Brazil.
The passion and breadth of social movements can become ossified and de-politicized, as the ideas and issues are translated into formal academic inquiry.  I hope therefore in this course to convey the connections to politics and activism behind these topics, so as to keep the links between academic research and social change fresh and vibrant. Students are encouraged to pursue their own interests in the class, and to develop their own frameworks for research and activism.
 
Prof. Shiro Hirouchi – shirouchi@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 81900 - Advanced Methods of Demographic Analysis {28883}
Tuesdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
In this course we study advanced methods of demographic analysis.  They are widely used in research on mortality, fertility, nuptiality, migration, population composition, and other demographic processes, but many of them can also be applied to a broad range of topics in other areas of the social sciences and biomedical sciences.  Those methods include event history analysis (nonparametric, semi-parametric and parametric versions; continuous and discrete time versions; fixed and time-dependent covariate versions), life table techniques (single-decrement, multiple-decrement and multi-state), decomposition analysis, age-period-cohort models, methods for analyzing multiple time trends (e.g., Lee-Carter model), Lexis map analysis, smoothing and non-parametric regression techniques, and mathematical models of population dynamics.  Computer exercises are included.
Prerequisites:  Introductory statistics including multiple linear regression; DCP 70200 or permission of the instructor.  No background in calculus or matrix algebra is required.
 
Profs. James M. Jasper and Ruth Milkman      jjasper@gc.cuny.edurmilkman@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 84600 - Social Movements and Labor Movements {28894}
Tuesdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
The study of unions and labor movements, at one time integral to the sociological study of social movements, has become increasingly marginal to that field in recent decades, as “new” social movements, especially those involving “identity” politics, have moved to center stage. Yet in this same period, sociological research on labor and labor movements has burgeoned, emerging as a subfield of the discipline in its own right.  This course explores both the reason for the historical divergence of these two areas of study and the potential synergies between them. 
This is a reading course, in which participants will closely study and discuss influential pieces of scholarship from these two subfields. Course requirements include weekly response papers on the required readings, active participation in class discussion, as well as a longer piece of written work, developed in consultation with the instructors, on a specific topic related to the course.

Prof. Philip Kasinitz   pkasinitz@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 85800 - Race and Ethnicity{29012}
Wednesdays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
Race and ethnicity are constantly changing and evolving, yet they remain among the most persistent forms of structured social inequality. Focusing on the United States, but with reference to other multi-ethnic societies, we will examine the evolution of the concept of “race” and its relationship to racism; the heritage of slavery and segregation and their impacts contemporary life; the origins of modern racism and anti-Semitism, “scientific racism, ” why and how the salience of ethnic identity increases and decreases at particular historical moments, the relationship of race and ethnicity to migration, nationalism, colonialism and class, the growth of the  Latino and Asian American populations and  what  that  means for American notions  of race, etc.  In addition we will take an in depth look at how racial boundaries change, competition and cooperation between ethnic groups in contemporary America and how “racialized” minorities are (or are not) incorporated into different societies. Readings will include works by W.E.B. Dubois; Jean Paul Sartre, George Fredrickson; William Julius Wilson, David Roediger, John Iceland, Richard  Alba, Tariq Madood, Alejandro Portes, Stephen Steinberg and Mary Waters.

Prof. Marnia Lazreg - marniaster@gmail.com
Soc. 80000 - Foucault and the paradox of culture:  theory and practice {28880}
Mondays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
Thirty four years after his death, Michel Foucault's work continues to be explored and applied to ever increasing domains across the social sciences and the humanities.  Yet remarkable as the expansion of Foucault's ideas has been, one issue central to his epistemology has been neglected:  his conception of cultural difference, and the role it played in his approach to the uniqueness of Western culture.  This course intends to open up a space in which productive critical analysis of Foucault's struggles with how to situate non-Western cultures, especially the "Orient," in relation to Western rationality can be thoroughly examined.  Importantly, it asks whether Foucault's critique of Immanuel Kant's cosmopolitan anthropology enabled him to develop an alternative anthropology/ sociology, or paradoxically reasserted the need for a humanistic conception of culture.  To answer this question, the course requires a close reading of a number of foundational texts, interviews and archival materials with a view to tracing the itinerary of Foucault's approach to culture as well as elucidating key concepts such as "philosophical originary," "limit-experience," or "the  death of man." Additionally, Foucault's cultural conundrum will be explored through his experiential journeys in non-western cultures, specifically Japan, Iran and Tunisia.
This is a demanding course that  will be conducted as an advanced seminar in which texts will be read attentively and examined from the perspectives  of the history of ideas, the sociology of knowledge, as well as historical sociology.  The overarching goal is to move forward debates on post-modernist/"anti-humanist" theory as they bear upon understanding culture and cultural difference. 
Students will be expected to seriously engage the course materials, and feel free to formulate new ways of reading the texts. Required is an extensive research paper to be shared with the class before submission.  Drafts of the paper will follow a schedule aimed at assessing progress in thinking through issues related to the course objectives.

Prof. Branko Milanovic – bmilanovic@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 84600 - Global Inequality: Measurement, Analysis and Political Implications {29271}
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

The focus of the class is on global inequality which is defined as inequality between citizens of the world (as if they were members of a same nation). We will review the evolution of global inequality from the Industrial Revolution until today, and see how the changing composition and magnitude of global inequality affects politics, economics, and migration. Two types of inequalities, within-national (inequality among individuals within a single nation) and cross-national (inequality in mean incomes across nations) combine to determine global inequality. We shall thus also review the changes in within- and between-national inequalities. The class ends with an overview of positions of various political philosophers (e.g., Rawls, Pogge, Sen, Nagel) regarding global inequality and migration.
The course will be fairly empirical but does not require any prior specific knowledge of the issues nor techniques. It is recommended for students of economics, political science, and sociology. This class is a follow-up of the one on “The theories of income distribution: from Pareto to Piketty” but can be taken independently.

Prof. Pyong Gap Min – pyonggap.min@qc.cuny.edu
Soc. 82800  -International Migration {29010}
Thursdays, 6:30 – 8:30pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
We have ushered into the global migration period since the early 1990s.  Not only traditionally immigrant-accepting countries, including the U.S. and three former British colonies in the “New World” (Canada, Australia and New Zealand), but also Western European countries and Asian countries have annually received large numbers of formal immigrants or migrant workers/brides over the last two decades. In particular, the U.S. has received the largest number of immigrants annually since the late 1960s, more immigrants than all European countries have received. The influx of immigrants to the U.S. over the last 50 years has changed the face of the U.S., impacting neighborhoods, the economy, the school systems, cuisines, politics, healthcare, and sports. 
This course, focusing on international migration, has three main objectives.  First, it will provide an overview information about immigration patterns in three areas for students: (1) the U.S., (2) Canada, Australia and New Zealand, and (3) Europe.  Immigration patterns include immigration policies, the annual number of immigrants, their national and regional origins, and religious and socioeconomic background.  Second, it will compare two mass migration periods in the U.S. (the classical and contemporary periods) in immigration patterns and immigrants’ adaptations. Third, it will help students to learn about U.S. immigrants’ and their children’s adaptations (settlement patterns, socioeconomic adaptations and racialization) and theories of adaptations, especially regarding second-generation immigrants’ adaptations. To summarize the main objectives, this course aims to provide general information about global migration patterns, but focuses on the U.S. context in examining immigrants’ and their children’s adaptations with special attention the differences between turn-of-the-century white immigrant and contemporary immigrant groups.
Click here to find a detailed course descriptions

Profs. William Kornblum, John Mollenkopf         wkornblum@gc.cuny.edu;jmollenkopf@gc.cuny.edu   
Soc. 82800– Theories of Neighborhood and Community Change {28886}
Wednesdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 Credits
 
Neighborhoods are the basic units of community formation in urban settings. People are sustained the attachments they form with their neighbors and neighborhoods – and they in turn play important roles in identity-formation, family-formation, child-rearing, primary education, friendship networks, sociability, shopping, dining, recreation and entertainment, worship, access to work, civic engagement, political representation, and so on.  The clustering of similar people in neighborhoods is thought to generate both positive and negative feedbacks.  In the ideal case, these building blocks of urban community are resilient in the face of change, or at least achieve new equilibria when circumstance require them.  (In the worst case, people abandon their neighborhoods.)  At the same time, neighborhoods constantly evolve, as people come and go, while those who stay age through the life cycle. Larger trends in politics and government, the housing and job markets, and society and culture operate on them, if unevenly.  We have surprisingly little systematic theory about how patterns of neighborhood change result from the interplay of individual and family choices about where to live nested in the larger framework of housing markets, political institutions and regulations, and social change.  This course begins by reviewing some classic theoretical orientations, such as the Chicago School, urban political economy, and the gentrification debates. It will then interrogate a series of case studies in New York City.  While the specific cases will depend on the research interests of seminar participants, whom we expect to join in elaborating the case studies, they may include East Williamsburg/Bushwick/Ridgewood, the neighborhoods around Jamaica Bay, and the New York City working waterfront.  We will use these case studies to assess the strengths and weaknesses of the theoretical perspectives and consider how to improve them.

Prof. Jeremy Porter – jporter@brooklyn.cuny.edu 
Soc. 71500  - Statistic I {28881}
Wednesdays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
The broad focus of this course will be on the application of introductory statistics within the realm of sociological research.  Topics covered include measures of central tendency, measures of variability, probability and the normal curve, samples and populations, hypothesis testing, ANOVA, correlation, and an introduction to linear regression analysis.

Prof. Mary Clare Lennon  mlennon@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 70000 - Proseminar {28846}  
Mondays, 2-4pm, Room TBA, 3Credits    
 
This course introduces students to some of the major elements involved in the training of scholars in the field of sociology.  We will explore the norms that govern the profession, the aims of sociological research, the process of grant-seeking and grant-writing, the qualities of a good dissertation, expectations about publication, the process of approval for research on human subjects, and other aspects of professional socialization.  In an effort to familiarize you with the kinds of scholarly work and teaching that are done by faculty at CUNY, we will also have a number of presentations by members of the CUNY Sociology faculty. 

Prof. John Torpey     jtorpey@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 70100 – Theory I {28879}
Tuesdays, 2-4pm, Room TBA, 3Credits    
 
This course introduces students to some of the foundational works in the sociological tradition.  The emphasis here is not on textual exegesis (though we will inevitably do some of that), nor on intellectual history (though that is equally unavoidable), but on the ways in which these writers speak directly to our contemporary circumstances, if in fact they do.  Our principal task in this course is to explore the intellectual orientations of these seminal thinkers.  We will concentrate on issues such as the following: What (if anything) is society?  What is the relationship between the individual and society?  What makes for a stable society, and what destabilizes society?  In what ways has social life varied according to time and place?  How have societies changed over time?  What (if anything) distinguishes “modern” society – in order to explain which the discipline of sociology came into being – from its predecessors?

Prof. Bryan Turner         bturner@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 84600 – Citizenship and Human Rights {28889}
Tuesdays, 11:45 – 1:45 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
The course is divided in two sections, starting with social citizenship and its critics, and then moving on to human rights and its critics. We finish with some consideration as to whether these two different systems of rights could be combined. Citizenship as a principle of inclusion is criticised because it cannot cope adequately with globalization (including migration, refugees, asylum seekers and so forth). Some sociologists believe we can modify citizenship to develop new forms:  flexible citizenship or semi-citizenship or post-national citizenship. Human rights are seen to be more relevant to a global world, but critics note that they are enforced by states, and require the resources made available by states. The course examines the apparent decline of welfare states, citizenship and growing inequality in income and wealth within neo-liberal economics and neo-conservative politics. We also consider differences between the American tradition of civil liberties and European welfare states. Other topics include aboriginal or first nation rights, migration, documentation and citizenship, ageing and health rights. We look at different forms of citizenship in Latin America, Asia and the Middle East. The course concludes by considering the contemporary limitations of both citizenship and human rights traditions with respect to authoritarianism, genocide, and new wars.
Click here to find a detailed course descriptions
 
Prof. Vilna Treitler      vilna.treitler@baruch.cuny.edu
Soc. 82800 – Writing for Publication  {29011}
Tuesdays, 2-4pm, Room TBA, 3Credits
 
This course will have two components: one is a scholarly sociological study of publishing itself: an examination of the worlds and institutions of knowledge-production and dissemination.  We will consider book publishing, following and more recent changes in the world of book publishing.  Similarly, we will explore the contemporary issues in journal publication, including issues of copyright and new technologies,  current debates and concerns about journal costs and distribution, and ongoing discussions of ethical concerns in academic publishing in an increasingly commercialized world.
The second component is more pragmatic, in which students take their own work through the appropriate and necessary steps for publication in a variety of media.  Topics we will cover include how to do book reviews, how to prepare a paper for presentation and then for publication, how to participate in anthology writing, how to prepare a book proposal, and how to construct a book out of a dissertation.  Each student will (at minimum) and with the support of the instructor and class, write and publish two book reviews; submit papers to three academic meetings; prepare one journal article for submission; prepare and submit one article to a non-academic publication such as an op-ed article; and prepare a (draft) book proposal based on dissertation work.
Registration will be in the fall semester; with the clear and absolute understanding that students are committing to meeting every other week for the entire academic year.  Because of the exigencies of publication timetables and the work involved, a single semester is not adequate.
Course is limited to 12 students, with permission of the instructor.

Prof. Stanley Aronowitz                  saronowitz@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 84001 -  Race and Class in the History of the Americas {25344}
Thursdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, 3 credits, Room TBA
 
The relation of race and class has had a turbulent history in the Americas. Economic and political structures in the United States the Caribbean and Latin America were crucially formed by slavery. Slavery became a legacy of capital accumulation, in the emergence of the industrial working class and of course the civil war and reconstruction.  The 19th and 20th century labor movements developed, in part, along race lines; racial formation , especially the US, the Caribbean and Brazil. Among the readings are DubBois Black Reconstruction;  Omi and Winant: Racial Formation; Nicholson: Selections from Labor’ s Story in the United States; Williams: Capitalism and Slavery, Freeman: Working Class New York; Aronowitz: How Class Works; and selections from works by Roediger, Ignatin and other writing on whiteness as an ideological category. Class presentations will address the work of Patterson’s Slavery and Social Death, Genovese Roll, Jordan Roll, Gutman The Black Family; Frazier Black Bourgeoisie and others.

Profs. Paul Attewell/Juan Battle    pattewell@gc.cuny.edu;jbattle@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 75800 -  Sociology of Stratification & Inequality {25348}
Thursdays, 2-4pm, 3 credits, Room TBA
 
The sociology of inequality and stratification is a huge area. The principal focus of this course will be theoretical, discussing the conceptual basis of our understandings of stratification. It will provide an overview of competing perspectives and frameworks. Many of the core concepts of sociology are intended to describe or explain aspects of social inequality: social class and SES; upward and downward social mobility; discrimination in labor markets and firms; “winner take all” and “big fish in small pond” concepts; ideas of social exclusion & notions of an underclass; theories of prejudice, discrimination, and group conflict; ideas about the intersectionality of race, class and gender; theories of imperialism, underdevelopment and unequal exchange. Debates rage around many of these ideas, and in large part this course will provide an introduction to these concepts and controversies.
 
Prof. Mehdi Bozorgmehr     mbozorgmehr@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 82800 – International Migration {25920}
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 PM, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
This course offers an interdisciplinary overview of the key current topics and issues in the burgeoning field of international migration. The field is unique in its interdisciplinary nature, stretching from history, anthropology, demography and economics, through political science, geography and sociology. Methodologically, it is also very eclectic, ranging from the use of quantitative data to ethnography and oral history of migrants. While the course will aspire to incorporate the experiences of major immigrant receiving countries around the world, the main comparative focus will be on Europe and North America, where the major theories and key concepts are most fully developed. The emphasis is on exploring both the theoretical debates in the field and the empirical data and case studies on which these debates hinge. Attention will be paid to detailed discussions of “classic” issues of immigration, such as assimilation, incorporation/integration, the labor market, race and ethnic relations, gender and the family, transnationalism, the second generation, the undocumented, and citizenship. Throughout, the course will take into account the way in which global cities, as contexts of reception, affect the immigrant experience, and in turn, are transformed by immigrants.

 
Prof. Patricia Ticineto Clough             pclough@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 80000 - Bodies Media and Sociality {25327}                                                                                                       Tuesdays, 4:15-6 :15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
Among media scholars especially those who have been categorized as new media or digital media scholars, there has been a reluctance to accept the category of new media and instead to profoundly rethink media (as well as communication and information) and to move media criticism beyond the categories of good and bad. While such an undertaking involves a critical engagement with media that is both archeological and genealogical, it also raises the question of the social. What is sociality given a rethinking of media? Bodies are a thread in an exploration of sociality as bodies change--actually and conceptually-- in relationship to different media technologies. In this sense, media are not only or primarily an epistemological matter but rather operate to produce ontological effects, opening the study of media to discussions about matter/energy, information/communication, representation/performance. The course will explore bodies and sociality by taking up the genealogy/archeology of media (text, sound, film and TV) while focusing on debates around biosciences/neurosciences; digitality and the screen, the platform, and the program; social media, governance and the derivative economy; the relation of affective capacity to gender, sexuality, race and ethnicity; representation, big data, measure and method; subjectivity, objects, things and consciousness. As media has been defined in liberalism and neo-liberalism in terms of a certain configuration of state, economy and civil society—or what has been called the private and public spheres, rethinking media means rethinking this configuration and the effects of its various reconfigurations on sociality and the body.

Prof. Hester Eisenstein           hester1@prodigy.net
SOC.73200  Sociology of Gender {25367}
Tuesdays, 2-4 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

 
In this course we look a range of issues in the sociology of gender.  To define this field briefly, the sociology of gender looks at the beliefs, interests and structures that tend to preserve the traditional relations between the sexes, and those which contest them.  Among other areas, the field considers the process of socialization into masculine and feminine roles in childhood, through education, and into the public worlds of work and politics.
In recent years sociological inquiry has moved beyond the original concept of “sex roles” to look at gendered structures in institutions, the significance of gender in politics, economics, and social movements, nationally and internationally, and the complex relationships among gender, race, and class.  What was seen as a “natural” and biologically based dichotomy of male/female has been questioned through the study of gender as performance, and the critical challenge to traditional femininity and masculinity from “queer” and transgendered folk.
My own research has focused on what we can term the political economy of gender, in relation to the changes within capitalism with the rise of neoliberalism over the past few decades. The topics covered in this course are a selection reflecting my interests, and should by no means be considered comprehensive. Therefore I include a list of alternative topics in this syllabus that students can pursue on their own, for their final research papers, and for future study.
The framework of this course is influenced by what I see as the political history of gender studies. The establishment of the category of sex and gender in the official canon of the profession of sociology is the outcome of a renewed wave of feminist activism that swept society, and therefore the academy. In the 1960s and 1970s, massive social movements for Black civil rights, women’s rights, ending the war in Vietnam, lesbian and gay rights, and environmentalism in the United States and internationally shook the economic and social status quo.  Today we are witnessing another wave of social movements across the globe, from the revolutions in Tunisia and Egypt to Occupy Wall Street, and from Turkey to Brazil.
The passion and breadth of social movements can become ossified and de-politicized, as the ideas and issues are translated into formal academic inquiry.  I hope therefore in this course to convey the connections to politics and activism behind these topics, so as to keep the links between academic research and social change fresh and vibrant. Students are encouraged to pursue their own interests in the class, and to develop their own frameworks for research and activism.
 
Prof. Cynthia Fuchs Epstein                       cepstein@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 80000 - Cultural Sociology and Sociology of Culture
{253324}
Wednesdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
The theme of culture, and empirical work on culture, has grown in the last 20 years.
Although in the past Sociology of Culture has dealt with specific spheres such as art, film, fashion, music etc. more recent work focuses also on culture as embedded in social practices and technologies along with  symbolic and classificatory systems, repertoires of action, of contention, and webs of significance. Cultural structures are topics comprising the “cultural turn” in sociology.
 We shall read the work of scholars who have conceptualized these topics, sought research sites and methodologies for exploring them in such arenas as music, art, fashion, communications, celebrity culture, sexuality, gender  and politics. The work of such theorists and researchers as Jeffrey Alexander, Eviatar Zerubavel, Jerome Bruner, Clifford Geertz, Sherry Turkle, Ilana Gershon , Nina Eliasoph and Pierre Bourdieu will contribute to the analysis of substantive topics.Several guests will be invited to speak about their research and show videos and films.
Students are invited to explore areas of interest using sociological frameworks explored in the course such as computer games, You Tube presentations, Political rhetoric and other areas of interest.

Prof. Sujatha Fernandes                 sujathaf@yahoo.com   
Soc. 85600 – Rethinking Neoliberalism {25362}
Tuesdays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, Room TBA, 3credits
 
Neoliberalism is typically understood as a set of economic policies that attempt to privatize and deregulate the economy in order to promote free trade, foreign direct investment, and export oriented industrialization. This course seeks to explore the larger global trajectory of neoliberalism, situating it within evolving social and historical processes of late capitalism, and discussing the possibilities that it may make available for political action. We will also examine the transformations in governance, subjectivity, and power associated with neoliberalism. Drawing on sociological, anthropological, and historical approaches from diverse regional contexts including the United States , Latin America, Africa, and Asia , this course aims to provoke reflections about the multi-dimensional nature of neoliberalism.
 
The course will probe the ways in which citizenship, public space, and social movements have been reconfigured during the current neoliberal moment. What are the discourses and practices by which neoliberal rule is justified? How has neoliberalism altered the terrain in which social actors operate? What might a post-neoliberal world look like?
 
 
Prof. Janet Gornick              jgornick@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 85902 - Social Welfare Policy {25366}
Wednesdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
This course will examine social welfare policy in the United States, in both historical and cross-national perspective.
The course will begin with an overview of the development of social welfare policy in the U.S. We will focus on three important historical periods: the Progressive Era, the New Deal, and the War on Poverty. We will end the first section with a review of developments in the tumultuous 1990s.
Second, we will assess “the big picture” of the American welfare state, through the lens of its underlying institutional framework.
Third, we will survey selected areas of social policy provision, such as anti-poverty policy; health policy; employment-related social policy; social policy for the elderly; and/or work-family reconciliation policies. In each of these policy areas, we will assess current provisions and evaluate contemporary debates, integrating political, sociological, and economic perspectives.
In the final section of the course, we will assess selected social policy lessons from Europe, where provisions are typically much more extensive than they are in the U.S.  We will close by analyzing the question of "American exceptionalism" in social policy, and will assess a range of institutional, ideological, and demographic explanations.

Prof. David Halle      dhalle@gmail.com
Soc. 81900 – Geographic Information System with mapinfo {25334}
Mondays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
An introduction to computer mapping (Geographic Information Systems), using the software Mapinfo.  We will learn the techniques of computer mapping using 2010 census data (and more recent) to analyze the latest developments in New York and Los Angeles, both the cities and regions. We will also analyze  2000, 1990, 1980 and 1970 census data for New York and Los Angeles. We will map such topics as  the distribution of income, occupations, racial and ethnic groups, and foreign-born.  We will also map crime at the level of the police precinct, political data including mayoral and congressional elections, and  city and county boundaries. We will discuss such key topics as the decline of the classic “ghetto” and the Latinization of inner city neighborhoods, the movement of ethnic groups to the suburbs, gentrification, the 2007- financial crisis including the housing bubble, the ecology and “green” movement, attempts to reform the school systems,  flooding including Hurricane Sandy, and de Blasio’s impact and policies.  Students are encouraged to bring to class, and develop during the semester, any ongoing research they are doing.

Prof. Jack Hammond                        jhammond@hunter.cuny.edu
Sociology 85909-  Social Inequality in Latin America {25351} 
Wednesday 6:30-8:30, Room TBA, 3 credits


Historically, Latin American has been the world region with the greatest degree of inequality.  Remarkably, in the last decade the continent has made remarkable strides to reduce that inequality.  This course will examine the historical record of inequality and the recent apparent reversal.  We will begin with the colonial heritage and examine the developmental phases Latin American countries have traversed (with variations): primary product export; import substitution industrialization; authoritarianism; neoliberalism and globalization. We will look at the consequences of each of these for social inequality.  Then we will examine the recent changes and their causes, evaluating the relative contributions of economic growth, politically progressive governments, targeted redistribution policies, and policies to improve the distribution of opportunities and human capital.
Course requirements:
    1. Regular attendance and participation in discussion
    2. Each week, post on Blackboard a short essay based on that week's required reading, concluding with an analytical question which will be presented to the class for discussion.
    3. Research paper: Each student's research must be presented orally in the last two weeks of class and then in writing.
Strongly recommended advance reading: Moore, Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy

Prof.  Shiro Horiuchi                       shoriuch@hunter.cuny.edu
Soc. 81900 - Advanced Methods of Demographic Analysis {25337}.
Mondays, 4:15 pm – 6:15 pm, 3 credits, Room TBA
In this course we study advanced methods of demographic analysis. They are widely used in research on mortality, fertility, nuptiality, migration, population composition, and other demographic processes, but many of them can also be applied to a broad range of topics in other areas of social sciences and biomedical sciences. Those methods include event history analysis (nonparametric, semi-parametric and parametric versions; continuous and discrete time versions; fixed and time-dependent covariate versions), life table techniques (single-decrement, multiple-decrement and multi-state), decomposition analysis, age-period-cohort models, methods for analyzing multiple time trends (e.g., Lee-Carter model), Lexis map analysis, smoothing and non-parametric regression techniques, and mathematical models of population dynamics.  Computer exercises are included.
Prerequisites:  Introductory statistics including multiple linear regression; DCP 70200 desirable but not required.
 
Prof. James M. Jasper                       jjasper@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 84600 – Introduction to Social Movements {25360}
Tuesdays, 4.15-6.15, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
This course reviews the history and current directions of research and theory about social movements. I hope to show some pitfalls of research guided by grand metaphors, theories of history, or normative agendas, compared to research guided by modest micro-level mechanisms. One aim of the course is to enable students to begin their own research on protest and movements.
 
Prof. Philip Kasinitz                        pkasinitz@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 72500 - Race and Ethnicity{25340}
Wednesdays, 11:45 – 1:45pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
Race and ethnicity are constantly changing and evolving, yet they remain among the most persistent forms of structured social inequality. Focusing on the United States, but with reference to other multi-ethnic societies, we will examine the evolution of the concept of “race” and its relationship to racism; the heritage of slavery and segregation and their impacts contemporary life; the origins of modern racism and anti-Semitism, “scientific racism, ” why and how the salience of ethnic identity increases and decreases at particular historical moments, the relationship of race and ethnicity to migration, nationalism, colonialism and class, the growth of the  Latino and Asian American populations and  what  that  means for American notions  of race, etc.  In addition we will take an in depth look at how racial boundaries change, competition and cooperation between ethnic groups in contemporary America and how “racialized” minorities are (or are not) incorporated into different societies. Readings will include works by W.E.B. Dubois; Jean Paul Sartre, George Fredrickson; William Julius Wilson, David Roediger, John Iceland, Richard  Alba, Tariq Madood, Alejandro Portes, Stephen Steinberg and Mary Waters.

 
Prof. Barbara Katz Rothman                   bkatzrothman@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 85600 - Writing for Publication {25368}
Tuesdays 2 - 4pm.room TBA, 3 credits
 
This course will have two components: one is a scholarly sociological study of publishing itself: an examination of the worlds and institutions of knowledge-production and dissemination.  We will consider book publishing, following and more recent changes in the world of book publishing.  Similarly, we will explore the contemporary issues in journal publication, including issues of copyright and new technologies, current debates and concerns about journal costs and distribution, and ongoing discussions of ethical concerns in academic publishing in an increasingly commercialized world.
 
The second component is more pragmatic, in which students take their own work thru the appropriate and necessary steps for publication in a variety of media.  Topics we will cover include how to do book reviews, how to prepare a paper for presentation and then for publication, how to participate in anthology writing, how to prepare a book proposal, and how to construct a book out of a dissertation.  Each student will (at minimum) and with the support of the instructor and class, write and publish two book reviews; submit papers to three academic meetings; prepare one journal article for submission; prepare and submit one article to a non-academic publication such as an op-ed article; and prepare a (draft) book proposal based on dissertation work.
 
Registration will be in the fall semester; with the clear and absolute understanding that students are committing to meeting every other week for the entire academic year.  Because of the exigencies of publication timetables and the work involved, a single semester is not adequate.
 
Course is limited to 12 students, with permission of the instructor.
 
Prof. Mary Clare Lennon       mlennon@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 70000 - Proseminar {25320}
Mondays, 2-4pm, Room TBA, 3Credits   
 
This course introduces students to some of the major elements involved in the training of scholars in the field of sociology.  We will explore the norms that govern the profession, the aims of sociological research, the process of grant-seeking and grant-writing, the qualities of a good dissertation, expectations about publication, the process of approval for research on human subjects, and other aspects of professional socialization.  In an effort to familiarize you with the kinds of scholarly work and teaching that are done by faculty at CUNY, we will also have a number of presentations by members of the CUNY Sociology faculty. 
 
Prof. Wendy Luttrell                       wluttrell@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 83105 - Critical Childhood and Youth Studies{25369}
Tuesday 4:15-6:15pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
Critical Childhood Studies (sometimes called the “new sociology of childhood” understands youth as social actors who are “central informants of their own life worlds” (Christensen and James 2008). Not incomplete adults but human subjects who have insights, they contribute to as well as are shaped by social institutions.  This course will examine the basic tenants of critical childhood studies, including the ways in which it contests the traditional socialization model, which emphasizes children as passive recipients of a unidirectional socialization process.  A critical childhood studies approach understands child-adult relationships as existing within power relations-- therefore, Waksler’s (1996) argument that “children do not have the power to correct adults’ misunderstandings of them.” The new sociology of childhood critiques the “old” sociology of childhood that ignored the significant effects of adults always speaking for children, the ease of which “effectively silenced” children. Rejecting neither the idea that children develop nor that children are dependent on adults, the new sociology of childhood suggests, rather, that thinking of the relationship in terms of interdependence rather than deficiency, and acknowledging the lack of authority that children have in their relationships with adults, recognizes the differences in power relations and works toward understanding agency. As Lee (2001) asks, what does it mean to take children seriously? The dangers of romanticizing children’s voice will be considered as well.  How does the new sociology of childhood intersect with critical theory, disability studies, feminist theory and critical race theory? 
 
This class will examine the conceptual framework of the new sociology of childhood (and youth), and study its politics and implications for research.  It will imagine generational difference as a border, and look at research that enables us to understand children and youth relative to power relations, authority, culture, education and punishment.  It will also look at adults with whom children are in relationship, including parents, teachers, police, salespeople, and counselors, as well as the institutions, discourses and systems that shape how childhood is experienced.  We will ask methodological questions about how to study children from the standpoint of the new sociology of childhood.

Professor Branko Milanovic    bmilanovic@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 84600 – Income Inequality: From National to Global {25354}
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 PM, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
The objective of this course will be to analyze inequality from an inter-disciplinary perspective. The course will first review varied approaches that aim to explain the movement of within-national inequalities: from Pareto's "iron law" (which was anything but "iron"), Kuznets' inverted U-curve,  and Tinbergen's "race" between education and technology, to Piketty's "political theory of income concentration".  The second part of the course will assess the evolution of income differences across countries in the world, and in particular between developed and developing countries. In the third part, these two types of inequalities (i.e., within-national and cross-national) will be considered jointly as global inequality. We will review the evolution of global inequality from the Industrial Revolution until today, and see how the changing composition and magnitude of global inequality affects politics, economics, and  migration. The class will end with an overview of positions of various political philosophers  (e.g., Rawls, Pogge, Nagel) about  global inequality. The course will be fairly empirical but does not require any prior specific knowledge of the issues nor techniques. It is recommended for students of economics, political science, and sociology.


Prof.  John Mollenkopf                    jmollenkopf@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 82800 – Urban Policy {25729}
Mondays, 4:15 pm – 6:15 pm, 3 credits, Room TBA

Cities in general and New York in particular have always been characterized by substantial inequalities in terms of class, race, gender, and space or place. Urban inequality has waned at certain points only to wax once more in the current period. This seminar will use New York City as a case study to understand the forces driving the changing patterns of urban inequality, the political responses to these trends, and the policy initiatives being advanced to reduce inequalities and promote upward mobility. Particular emphasis will be given to the proposals under consideration by the new mayoral administration in New York City in 2014 and beyond. Students will review empirical analyses of these trends, consider alternative explanations for them, and examine and interrogate proposed policy responses. Each member of the class will pick one policy are to investigate. In addition to readings, discussion, and research, the seminar will draw on policy activists inside and outside the new administration.
 
Prof. Leslie Paik       
Lpaik@ccny.cuny.edu
Soc. 84505 - Law and Society
Wednesdays 2-4 pm, Room TBA, 3credits
 
This seminar examines the relationship between law and society, considering how the law shapes social life and how social change affects law and legal institutions. The seminar takes a “law in action” approach to studying law that focuses on the social, political, economic, and cultural contexts of law. We first will discuss readings about classic sociological theories of law; peoples’ perceptions and experiences of the law (e.g., legal consciousness, procedural justice) and the limits and power to “rights” discourses to lead to social change. We then will turn to consider how the law has defined and evolved from our experiences and understandings of race, immigration, gender and family in the US. This seminar will provide a broad socio-legal foundation for students working on those substantive topics, as well as for those interested in social control, social movements and social change.

Prof Porter
Soc.71500
- Sociological Statistic I  
Wednesdays 2-4 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits

The broad focus of this course will be on the application of introductory statistics within the realm of sociological research.  Topics covered include measures of central tendency, measures of variability, probability and the normal curve, samples and populations, hypothesis testing, ANOVA, correlation, and an introduction to linear regression analysis.

 
Prof. Charles Post                
cpost@bmcc.cuny.edu
Soc. 80101 - The Origins of Capitalism: Comparative-Historical Sociology{25635}
Mondays, 6:30 – 8:30pmp.m. Room TBA, 3credits
 
This course will serve as an introduction to one of the central themes of comparative-historical sociology, the origins of capitalism. We will begin with the classical sociological and historical discussions of the origins of capitalism (Smith, Marx, Weber, Polanyi), before moving to examining the ongoing debates on the ‘first transition’ in seventeenth century England. The course will proceed with a discussion of the ‘later transitions’ in the United States, Germany, Italy, France and Japan, before concluding with an overview of discussions of the problems of capitalist development (and non-development) in the global South. Among the themes addressed will be the respective role of markets, social conflict and states in the origins of capitalism. Readings will be substantial, varied in perspectives and range widely over time and place.
 
Prof. John Torpey                 jtorpey@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 70100 – Development of Sociological theory {25322}
Tuesdays, 2-4pm, Room TBA. 3 credits
 
This course introduces students to some of the foundational works in the sociological tradition.  The emphasis here is not on textual exegesis (though we will inevitably do some of that), nor on intellectual history (though that is equally unavoidable), but on the ways in which these writers speak directly to our contemporary predicament.  Our principal task in this course is to explore the intellectual orientations of these seminal thinkers.  We will concentrate on issues such as the following: What (if anything) is society?  What is the relationship between the individual and society?  What makes for a stable society, and what destabilizes society?  In what ways has social life varied according to time and place?  How have societies changed over time?  What (if anything) distinguishes “modern” society – in order to explain which the discipline of sociology came into being – from its predecessors?

Prof. Bryan Turner              bturner@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 84600 – Citizenship and Human Rights {25357}
Tuesdays, 11:45 – 1:45 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
The course is divided in two sections, starting with social citizenship and its critics, and then moving on to human rights and its critics. We finish with some consideration as to whether these two different systems of rights could be combined. Citizenship as a principle of inclusion is criticised because it cannot cope adequately with globalization (including migration, refugees, asylum seekers and so forth). Some sociologists believe we can modify citizenship to develop new forms:  flexible citizenship or semi-citizenship or post-national citizenship. Human rights are seen to be more relevant to a global world, but critics note that they are enforced by states, and require the resources made available by states. The course examines the apparent decline of welfare states, citizenship and growing inequality in income and wealth within neo-liberal economics and neo-conservative politics. We also consider differences between the American tradition of civil liberties and European welfare states. Other topics include aboriginal or first nation rights, migration, documentation and citizenship, ageing and health rights. We look at different forms of citizenship in Latin America, Asia and the Middle East. The course concludes by considering the contemporary limitations of both citizenship and human rights traditions with respect to authoritarianism, genocide, and new wars.
Assessment
Two book reviews each 800 words by mid-semester
Long essay end of semester 8000 words
Seminars
Section 1: social citizenship
Overview of differences between citizenship and human rights
T.H.Marshall’s theory of citizenship
Criticisms of Marshall – Michael Mann
New theories of citizenship – flexible, semi, post-national
Citizenship in the USA –work, race, and  inequality
Citizenship in the USA –borders, identity and migration debates
The end of social rights, the economic crisis and the financialization of capitalism?
Section 2: human rights
The origins of human rights: a sociology of human rights?
Comparative Rights Regimes: Middle East and North Africa
Comparative Rights Regimes: Asia
Comparative Rights Regimes: :Latin America
Human vulnerability: gender, technology, the life extension project, the post-body
Environmentalism, green citizenship, indigenous rights, animal rights
Conclusion: citizenship versus human rights?
Weekly Reading
I shall circulate papers and articles for the majority of seminars to overcome the shortage of works in libraries.
General Reference Works
David Brunsma et al (2013) Handbook of Sociology and Human Rights
Thomas Cushman (ed) (2012) Routledge Handbook of Human Rights
Engin Isin and Bryan S. Turner (eds) (2002) Handbook of Citizenship Studies
Engin Isin, Peter Nyers and Bryan Turner (eds) (2008) Citizenship between Past and Present
Geoffrey Robertson (1999) Crimes against Humanity
Dinah Shelton (ed) (2013) The Oxford Handbook of International Human Rights Law
Bryan S. Turner (ed) (1993) Citizenship and Social Theory

Professors Richard Alba/Mitchell Duneier
ralba@gc.cuny.edu; mduneier@princeton.edu  
Soc. 82800 – The Ghetto and the Enclave {23371}
Thursdays, 2:00 – 4:00 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
"The Ghetto and the Enclave."  The course will an historical and international survey of ghettoes and enclaves and address how they come about and what consequences they have for the lives of their residents.  It will cover the gamut of methods that are currently used to study these topics, from ethnography to geographic information systems. 

Professor Stanley Aronowitz: Soc. 80700    
Georg Lukacs & Frankfurt School {23363}
Thursdays 4:15-6:15pm, 3 credits
 
Georg Lukacs is undoubtedly a major influence in the emergence of critical social and cultural theory and a key inspiration for what has been termed Western Marxism. This course will explore  his contributions in both literary and social theory and his influence on the Frankfurt School, especially Herbert Marcuse Max Horkheimer and Theodor Adorno.  These were all trans-disciplinary writers who spanned the humanities and social studies. The term ‘critical’ connotes their rejection of positivism and other scientistic methodologies The pedagogic style will combine lectures, close textual readings and class presentations by students. 
Click For Reading List

Professors Paul Attewell/Robert Haralick
pattewell@gc.cuny.edu;
rharalick@gc.cuny.edu 
Soc. 81900 – Data Mining Methods  {23366}
Thursdays, 2:00 – 4:00 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
Data mining (DM) is the name given to a variety of new analytical and statistical techniques that are already widely used in business, and are starting to spread into social science research. Other closely-related terms are ‘machine learning’ 'pattern recognition' and ‘predictive analytics.’  Data mining methods can be applied to visual and to textual data, but the focus of this class is on the application of DM to quantitative or numerical data. In this area, DM offers interesting alternatives to conventional statistical modeling methods such as regression and its offshoots.
This class is taught jointly by a professor of computer science and a professor of sociology and typically enrolls a mix of computer science and social science doctoral students. It aims to provide an introduction to data mining methods and their application to data analysis. The course reviews the main DM techniques and explains the logic of each. It emphasizes contrasts between conventional statistical analyses and DM approaches. Students work with each technique using JMP Pro software, in a computer classroom. Each student will undertake a DM analysis project as a final paper, typically analyzing a dataset chosen by the student.

Professor Juan Battle           
jbattle@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 71600 – Sociological Statistics II {23365}
Mondays, 4:15 – 6:15 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
This course will instruct students in file management and the statistical techniques used for the analysis of survey data.  Students will further develop their skills in computer programming, file handling, data transformation, index creation, and multivariate statistics.  Each student will undertake an individual project and will work on every aspect of the research endeavor from identifying a topic for investigation to writing and presenting a final project.  The final project will employ hierarchical multiple regression analysis with interaction terms.  The goal of the individual project is for the student to use quantitative research methodologies to develop the core of a publishable paper.  For this course, each student will use Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS) to analyze a large dataset, provided by the instructor.

Professor David C. Brotherton
dbrotherton@jjay.cuny.edu
Soc. 85000 – Studies of Youth, Marginalization and Subcultures of Resistance
Tuesdays, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Room TBA
In the current period a plethora of youth resistance actions, movements and subcultures have developed in response to socio-economic dislocations on a global scale. From rebellious students, youth riots in England to graffiti writers in Rio de Janeiro to politicized gangs in Quito and New York and the globalized Occupied Wall Street movement an endless range of symbolic and substantive responses by youth to their felt conditions of marginality can be observed and studied. In this seminar we will excavate this dynamic and fluid social field through focusing on theories and empirical studies that help to explain the continuity and discontinuity of youth social and cultural resistances over time. Questions of race/ethnicity, class, gender and age will be addressed as we trace the meanings and representations of youth reactions to industrial and post-industrial societies within and across their highly ambiguous political and cultural locations. Students will be expected to carry out small research projects that in some way reflect the transgressive practices, rituals and possibilities of youth in the late modern metropolis. 
 
The seminar has two major goals: (i) to explore the range of sociological theories that explain youth social and cultural resistance, and (ii) to critically interpret the different forms that this resistance takes in the context of an evolving and highly contradictory transnationalist capitalist order. We will focus in particular on the origins of youth subcultures as they emerge during both modernity and late modernity and their construction within changing notions of criminal and non-criminal deviance.

Click for Syllabus


Prof. Katherine Chen         
kchen@ccny.cuny.edu
Soc. 84700 – Organizations and Collective Action {23984}
Mondays, 2:00 – 4:00 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
Organizations are one of the main "building blocks" of contemporary society.  Despite their central role in shaping our experiences from education to the workplace to governance, these actors and their form of collective action are often overlooked or taken-for-granted among sociologists and laypersons. Learn why organizations form, how they develop, and how they can exacerbate inequality or improve individuals' life chances.  The content will cover a variety of organizations, from conventional bureaucracies to alternative, democratic organizations.  Theories studied will include classics, as well as cutting edge synthetic work like Strategic Action Fields (SAFs). 
Participation in this course could be helpful for preparing for comprehensives, widening cross-over expertise in a substantive area (i.e., ideal for social movements, urban sociology, etc.), designing and carrying out research, and professional development.  One of the aims will be developing a community of supportive scholars for emerging research.
 


Prof. Hester Eisenstein       
hester1@prodigy.net
Soc. 83300 – GENDER and GLOBALIZATION {23377}
Tuesdays, 11:45 – 1:45 pm,  3 credits
 
In this course we will examine the relationship between the phenomenon now widely termed “globalization,” and the changes in gender relations that have taken place since the rise of the second wave of the women’s movement in the 1960s.
Since the end of the “long boom” (starting after World War II and lasting through the mid-1970s), academic and mainstream feminism have enjoyed enormous success, during a period of economic, social, and political restructuring that has created an intensified polarization between rich and poor, and an ever-growing mass of desperately impoverished people around the globe. This course will examine this paradox.
We will seek to define globalization, starting from the premise that this is a stage in the development of the international capitalist system, under the economic and military domination of the world’s only remaining superpower. More specifically, we will look at the “Washington consensus,” under which developing countries have been forced to open their borders to the free flow of capital from the rich countries. Among other changes, “globalization” involves the intensive use of female labor, from maquiladoras to electronics factories to textile factories.  It has also produced an acceleration of “informal” work for women. 
While educated women can now walk through many doors previously closed to them, in the worlds of business, sports, and politics, the majority of women in the world are increasingly impoverished, overworked and exploited, and subject to a wide variety of forms of violence, sexual, military, and economic.  The majority of the world’s refugees are now women and children.
We will address these issues by posing a number of questions. Where does the ideology of globalization come from? How has globalization affected the conditions of women and children in the developed and the developing world?  How has contemporary feminism been shaped by the workforce participation of women?  What is the role of class and race in the women’s movement, domestically and internationally? Why are issues of gender, sexuality, and race so central to the culture wars being waged at home and abroad by religious fundamentalist leaders?  How does the association of “liberated women” with modernity affect the process of globalization? In the revived social movement that has placed the World Trade Organization, the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank and other international financial institutions at the center of an intensified campaign for social justice, what is the place for organized women’s activism?

Click for Syllabus


Prof. Mauricio Font         
mfont@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 83000 - Social Change and Development: Theoretical, Historical and Global Contexts{23379}
Wednesdays, 4:15 – 6:15 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
Human society is increasingly interconnected, yet it remains characterized by great diversity in in levels of well-being between and within countries. This seminar examines major approaches and strategies seeking to explain or guide social change and transformation and thus address existing disparities and inequalities. It focuses on changing, developing, and transitional societies. After exploring the various meanings and historical attached to the concept of development, the course reviews main theoretical perspectives: modernization and dependency theory, new forms of political economy, institutionalism and economic sociology, market vs. state-based approaches, and yet others. The seminar pays particular attention to the on-going debates about the development state, market reforms, and alternative strategies. In particular, the course reviews contemporary debates on reforms toward and away from markets, statism, the “institutional turn,” and globalization. This social science course draws from mainstream and critical literature in sociology, development and transitions studies, geography, and economic anthropology. Though the instructor will draw heavily from contemporary Latin America & the Caribbean and East Asia (including China), student projects are welcome to other regions (e.g., Central and Eastern Europe, comparative historical works on the rise of modernity, Africa, the Middle East, and the rest of Asia).
As a major form of social change, development is not static. It has been and remains a contested terrain driven by the confrontation between different doctrines, assumptions, geopolitical interests, and social science trends. In this rich context, practitioners and analysts seek practical approaches that provide answers to key social, economic, and political issues. In the process, they refine the meaning of development.  How have ideas about development, its causes, and its objectives changed over time? Why, after decades of development, are so many people still suffering from poverty, economic decline, and major disparities? Where should we focus our development efforts in the future? What does development mean in the 21st century – after three decades of transitions and the collapse of seemingly stable communist systems, market reforms, globalization, a series of global economic crises, and the search for alternative models?
The seminar explores views of development and globalization as inter-related sets of historical processes and mechanisms that continue to revolutionize human society. It will explore complex contemporary consequences of development and globalization across a range of issues: culture, migration, gender relations, state building, contentious politics and social movements, urbanization, poverty and inequality, civil society, democracy and human rights, and the environment.
The course will provide students will a deep and broad interdisciplinary understanding of development and social change, appreciate the alternative concepts and measures of development, and think critically about the ways in which intellectuals assess and effect change. As it surveys approaches and places them in historical and theoretical context, the course will help students prepare their own research projects in this exciting field. Send inquiries and request updates to mfont@gc.cuny.edu.

Prof. David Goode  Cancelled          
goodedog1@hotmail.com  
Soc. 83000 - The Sociology of Total Institutions: The Case of Willowbrook State School, Staten Island, New York{23362}
Thursdays, 4:15 – 6:15 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
At one time the study of total institutions was central to sociology but more recently this topic has been overlooked. Given the increasing role of institutional control of daily life, and the continued existence of total institutions in society that house various devalued groups, this ignoring by the discipline is a notable sociological phenomenon. This course will examine the history of a particularly important New York City institution, Willowbrook State School (WSS). WSS is notable as a symbol for human abuse and neglect and, because of the expose by Geraldo Rivera and other factors, as a symbol of social victory over the governmental and political indifference and abuse. This course is based upon a book by the instructor and three other authors, two of whom worked at WSS. It examines the history of institutions for the care of persons with intellectual disability, the history of these institutions in the United States and New York State and City, the case of WSS, and the history of sociological studies of total institutions beginning in the 20th century. In their work for the course, students are encouraged to select topics related to any kind of total institution (see Goffman, 1961 for a list of types) or on the increasing control of institutions on daily life. Basic text: Goode, Hill, Reiss & Bronston, A History and Sociology of Willowbrook State School, 2013, Washington, D.C.: American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disability.

Professor Frank Heiland
Soc. 81900 – Methods of Demographic Analysis {23369}
Thursday, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., 3 credits
 
This course gives students an overview of some of the major demographic methods used in the study of population, and includes the standard procedures for the measurement of fertility, mortality, natural increase, migration, and nuptiality. Students will learn how to construct demographic rates, life tables, and population projections, and how to carry out standardization, decomposition of differences, analysis of fertility and nuptiality patterns, analysis invoking model life tables and stable population theory, and analysis of nonstable populations.

Professor Samuel Heilman: Cancelled
Soc. 83105 Sociology of Death & Dying {23710}
Wednesdays, 2:00-4:00pm, 3 credits

The course will explore such issues as  death and dying in history, the anthropology of death, death in cultural context, bereavement, mourning, the politics of the right to die debate, reversing death, death and war, and the the medicalization of death.

Prof. Nicole Marwell: Cancelled          
nicole.marwell@baruch.cuny.edu
Soc. 74500 – Public Organizations { 24044}
Wednesdays, 2:00 – 4:00 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
A critical examination of organization theory, blending classical and contemporary perspectives, with a focus on the application of theoretical principles to public organizations.  Organizational studies is a vast, interdisciplinary field encompassing micro- and macro-level research in cognitive psychology, social psychology, anthropology, sociology, political science, public administration, history, and economics.  This course focuses on concepts applicable to the study of individual organizations, populations of organizations, inter-organizational relations, and the structure of organizational systems.  It will cover key works by major theorists in these areas; the historical development of this field of inquiry in the U.S.; relations among public, private, and hybrid organizations; and issues of research design and methodology.  By the end of the course, students should be able to: explain the arguments of leading organizational theorists; trace a basic timeline of the key developments in the history of organizational theory; apply insights from general organizational theory to public organizations; productively compare private, public, and hybrid organizational forms and operations; and design a quality empirical research study on private, public, and/or hybrid organizations.


Professor Branko Milanovic   
bmilanovic@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 84600 – Income Inequality: from National to Global{23379}
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 PM, Room 3207, 3 credits
 
The objective of this course will be to analyze inequality from an inter-disciplinary perspective. The course will first review varied approaches that aim to explain the movement of within-national inequalities: from Pareto's "iron law" (which was anything but "iron"), Kuznets' inverted U-curve,  and Tinbergen's "race" between education and technology, to Piketty's "political theory of income concentration".  The second part of the course will assess the evolution of income differences across countries in the world, and in particular between developed and developing countries. In the third part, these two types of inequalities (i.e., within-national and cross-national) will be considered jointly as global inequality. We will review the evolution of global inequality from the Industrial Revolution until today, and see how the changing composition and magnitude of global inequality affects politics, economics, and  migration. The class will end with an overview of positions of various political philosophers  (e.g., Rawls, Pogge, Nagel) about  global inequality. The course will be fairly empirical but does not require any prior specific knowledge of the issues nor techniques. It is recommended for students of economics, political science, and sociology.

Professor Pyong Gap Min   
PyongGap.min@qc.cuny.edu  
Soc. 82800 – Changing American Families {23822}
Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 PM, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
Why Should Students Take This Course?
Families in the United States, as well as in other industrialized countries, have gone through radical changes over the past 50 years or so. The proportion of single-person households has increased greatly, with a much larger proportion of adults living outside of the family than before. The labor force participation of married women has increased radically, with government and social service agencies playing a far more important role in the care of children and the elderly. These days, despite the much greater public nature of families (affected by the intervention of governmental agencies, schools, and social-service organizations), contemporary families also put more emphasis on the more private and personal aspects of family life (including comfort, privacy, and intimacy) than before. This family course focuses on these changing aspects of family life in the twenty-first century.
Family studies have been considered a very important component of sociology. However, this specialty area has not been one of the strengths of our Ph.D. program. Thus, only a few of our sociology students may be interested in choosing marriage and the family as their primary or secondary specialty area. But I believe a background in family studies will be helpful in studying many other related specialty areas. For example, studying marriage and the family is useful to students specializing in gender and women’s studies, because gender inequality has much to do with child socialization and the gender role division in the family. Those students who specialize in education need to understand the class and racial differences in family resources for and values on children’s education, because the former have a significant effect on the latter. Studying marriage and the family is also useful in studying immigration and ethnicity, because family values and structure have a significant effect on second-generation children’s assimilation or ethnic retention. A background in family studies is also of great importance for students specializing in social work because social service agencies play an increasingly important role in the care of children, battered women, and the elderly.
I chose immigration and ethnicity as my primary specialty area for my Ph.D. program. I chose marriage and the family as my secondary specialty area to increase my chances of finding an academic position. For my family studies, I took only one family course and published an article in a journal, using a term paper written for the course. I taught a family course as a part-time instructor for one semester. However, this background in family studies has proven to have a very positive effect on my finding an academic position at the Queens College Department of Sociology. I was hired partly because the department needed a faculty member who could teach family-related courses. I taught two or three sections of the sociology of family course during my first several years at Queens College. 
Finally, a family course should be interesting and meaningful to all students because it deals with topics related to their personal lives. Whether they are married or not, all students are involved in family relations. Thus, information, interpretations, and explanations available in reading materials and class discussions will be helpful to their family and marital relations. This personal interest in the topics to be covered seems to be the main reason why undergraduate students take family courses.

Click for Syllabus

Prof. Barbara Katz Rothman         
Bkatzrothman@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 83100 – Social Construction of Illness {23378}
Tuesdays, 2:00 – 4:00 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
Illness writes the body: our sense of self, of health, of our physical being, takes meaning from the contrast with illness.  And the social world writes illness: what it is to be ill; what categories of illness are acknowledged; how illness is defined, treated, managed, and determined.  The study of illness places us at the intersection of agency and social control; body and society; the "natural" and the "technological"; the self and the social world. 
This course  is an introduction to some of the basic concepts of Medical Sociology, beginning with the theoretical perspective that grew out of Symbolic Interactionism and labeling theory to offer a sociological understanding of illness. In the years since, the process of medicalization (placing more and more arenas of life into a medical frame) has moved beyond being a program of professional domination, and become increasingly internalized as "patients" become self-diagnosing and self-medicating consumer/customers and as corporate dominance increases.   Starting with the specific management of birth and of death, we will move on to several case-studies of diseases including AIDS and SIDS.  With that base, we will more generally consider social epidemiology, the social causation of disease, or disease as written in race, sex, and class, including the historical uses of medicalization to label women as almost inherently pathologized; and moving to an understanding of illness as performance and as representation.


Professor Robert Smith      
Robert.smith@baruch.cuny.edu
Soc. 85800 – Second  plus Generations and American Immigrant Integration {23373}
Thursday, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., 3 credit, Room TBA
 
This course examines the ways that immigrants, and especially the second and subsequent generations are integrating into American society.  In particular, it asks how they engage with several American institutions: schools,  the political and voting systems,  socioeconomic and cultural institutions, and others.   It will look at schools as institutions for inclusion/exclusion;  will consider what political institutions and processes are working towards or against political incorporation of immigrants and later generations;   will review how assimilation is taking sometimes unexpected turns in various new immigration destinations in the northeast and southwestern US; and examine how other institutions, such as families and their internal dynamics, affect integration and mobility.   The course will give special consideration to the place of undocumented immigrants in American society.   Where appropriate, comparisons to European cases will be made. 

Prof. John Torpey    
jtorpey@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 80000 – Great Transformations: Comparative-Historical Sociology {23364}
Tuesdays, 2-4 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
This course introduces students to the field of comparative-historical sociology as well as to the increasingly prevalent idea of “world history.”  We will focus on approaches to making sense of major social change in the areas of religion, state formation and democratization, the uses of physical violence, revolution, and the economy.  As befits a course with these aims, readings will be substantial and will range widely across time and place.  We will emphasize especially major turning points and transformations in human history.

Professor Vilna Bashi Treitler      
vtreitler@gc.cuny.edu  
Soc. 85800 – Race Theory {23708}
Mondays, 6:30-8:30 PM, Room TBA, 3 credits
This is an advanced seminar for graduate students. This course is one that compares what I call "racial structures" across nations and time periods. (It focuses neither solely on the United States, nor on the contemporary moment.) In readings and classroom discussions we try to jointly discover and debate the meaning of race. To do so, we compare theoretical and empirical writings about race, racial categories, racial hierarchies, and racism as they are played out in political, cultural, and socioeconomic structures around the globe and in different historical periods. We will learn together in our attempt to answer these questions: What is race and how is it socially constructed? Given that definition of race, then what is racism? What is a racial structure? How do racial structures vary over time and across space? Given these newfound definitions of race, racism, and the structures in which race and racism are manifest, what insights do we have about doing research on race and racism? Students are required to complete a draft of a publishable paper that uses a social constructionist model of race (i.e., does not treat race as an essential 


Prof. Bryan S. Turner         
bturner@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 83300 – Sociology of Comparative Religion {23374}
Tuesdays, 11:45 – 1:45 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
The course attempts to do three things. The first is to provide you with a critical overview of the development of the sociology of religion and to explore key authors and works. This aspect of the course considers how ‘religion’ and the ‘sacred’ raise intellectual issues that are generic to sociology (explanation, understanding, interpretation, rational action, body, practice and so forth). The second is to consider the current debate about secularization and post-secularism, and its antecedents in such notions as civil religion, religious nationalism, popular religion and public religions. Finally the course looks at a range of problems concerning state-religion relations in multicultural, multi-faith, culturally hybrid societies. These issues will require us to consider such developments as fundamentalism, Pentecostalism, revivalism, religious radicalism, piety, conversion and so forth. Where possible, these considerations are pursued within a comparative and historical framework. However special attention is given to Islam and the issues in the West surrounding veiling, diet, and shari’a. 

Click for Reading List


Prof. Elena Vesselinov        
elena.vesselinov@gmail.com
Soc. 83000 – Comparative Urbanization {23370}
Wednesdays, 2:00 – 4:00 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
The course aims to introduce graduate students to the complexity of urbanization in historical and comparative contexts. From Rome to Jerusalem, from Manchester to Beirut, from Mecca to Berlin, from Paris to New York, the course is a survey of historical and contemporary religious, territorial, political, economic and spatial divisions. Thus, throughout this introduction to comparative urbanization, the course will focus on urban inequality in cities around the world and is organized in five sections.
The first section, Comparative-Historical Perspectives in the Study of Cities, focuses on historical and theoretical evidence of city formation. The readings in this section examine the origins of cities and the origins of inequality, particularly in Middle Eastern and European cities. The second section then focuses on Middle Eastern cities in the context of religion and the contemporary uprisings, termed “Arab Spring.”
The readings in the third section contemplate the contemporary causes and consequences of social and spatial inequality in Paris and Berlin. The fourth section will take the students to Asia, and specifically to Chinese cities, where issues of population and economic growth will be explored. The fifth section of the course will take us from the Asian financial crisis to the continuous Great Recession and its impact on global cities.
The class will operate as a seminar in which every reading is introduced by one student (responsible also for 1-2 pages of written summary to be distributed in class). There will be two take home essays assigned during the semester, corresponding to major sections of the course. In addition, each student will prepare a final paper on comparative urban research based on scholarly research published in top sociological journals (also books). The final grade will be calculated as follows: class discussion - 20 percent; essays - 25 percent each; paper - 30 percent.

Prof. Sharon Zukin     
szukin@gc.cuny.edu
Soc. 86800 – CONSUMER SOCIETY AND CULTURE {23372}
Thursdays, 2:00 – 4:00 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits
 
Consumption is one of the three basic arenas of the modern public sphere.  It poses challenges not only to us in our everyday lives, but also to us as social researchers who study the critical practices of everyday life.  Following Weber, Veblen, Bourdieu, and Baudrillard, we will develop an institutional framework for understanding modern consumer society and the cultures that it spawns.  How does “consumer society” develop around the world?  What is the state’s interest in creating consumer-citizens?  How do ideologies and interests compete at each stage of the global commodity chain?  How does technology shape the life-cycle of commodities?
 
Drawing on social theories and empirical analyses, we will explore consumption in the global political economy through creative responses to weekly reading assignments and an individual research paper on a significant empirical question.  Issues to look for:  consumption and inequality, the global food economy, shopping as the default mechanism of social choice.